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LO-MA CLASSES TO BEGIN

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF LOGAN, HARRISON COUNTY, IOWA

An open house will be held for kindergarten through grade 12 at LoganMagnolia from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Aug. 17. Also at 5:30 p.m., Aug. 17, seventh grade orientation will be held. Logan-Magnolia classes for the 2011-12 school year will begin Aug. 18 with a onehour early out that day. Preschool classes will begin Aug. 29.

THE LOGAN

Herald-Observer

VOLUME 127, ISSUE 33

SHORT TAKES ICE CREAM SOCIAL

from

The Logan Methodist Church will hold an ice cream social from 5 to 7 p.m., Aug. 21. Besides ice cream, the menu includes sandwiches, cookies, bars and beverages. Free will donation.

HOURS FOR POOL The Jim Wood Aquatic Center will be open after school on Aug. 18 and 19. Open Aug. 20 and 21 as normal and closed 2226th and open the 27th which will be the last day this season.

www.heraldobserver.com AUGUST 17, 2011

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Council hires contractor, approves extra police pay Mary Darling Editor The Logan City Council awarded Collins Construction, LLC the bid for hail damage repairs to city property at the Aug. 8 meeting. Collins Construction was the lowest responsible bidder for the project. The total bid amount for all repairs from the company

was $96,264.25. The council also approved the bid of $2,700 from Triple C Roofing for repairs for the foam roofing section. The council set 6:45 p.m., Sept. 12 for a public hearing regarding amending the budget to allow for payment of hail repairs in this fiscal year. The police committee met and discussed extra compensation for Police Chief Elmer Smith and

Sgt. Richard Hiatt for on call time while down an officer in the department. The committee recommended $500 for each two-week pay period for Smith and $375 for each two-week pay period for Hiatt, retroactive to June 20. The council approved the recommendation. Smith informed the council he had 18 applicants for the vacant officer position and would be

holding physical agility testing on the 20th. Steve Johnson met with the council regarding leasing the section of the alley directly behind his business, “Doc’s Roadhouse,” for an outdoor area for the business. The city attorney drew up a proposed lease. Johnson’s proposal to the council included paying a year’s lease in advance along with a $200 deposit. He would have all

BOWLING TEAMS FORMING Teams are now forming for the Missouri Valley bowling leagues. There are still openings for men’s, women’s and mixed leagues for teams or individuals. Men’s and women’s leagues are set to begin Aug. 25 and 26. Mixed leagues will begin shortly after Labor Day. For more information or to sign up, call the Tamarack at 712-6425990 or Randy Fetter at 644-3109.

LOGAN 6TH ANNUAL 5K The Logan Chamber of Commerce will hold its sixth annual 5K run/walk at 5 p.m., Sept. 17. The event will begin in front of the Harrison County Courthouse with the route being the same as in 2010. For registration forms and more information, log on to www.loganiowa.com or contact Steve Eby at 644-2160 or speby@loganet.net.

SEE COUNCIL Page 2

W E L C O M E T O L O - M A Celebrate Several news faces to greet students

BOOSTER CLUB GOLF EVENT The Lo-Ma Booster Club is sponsoring a four-person best-shot golf tourney Aug. 19 at the Logan-Missouri Valley Country Club. Supper for golfers and the public will begin at 5 p.m. and a shotgun start at 6 p.m. For more information contact Trent Buckner, Lo-Ma golf coach, at 712-6472204.

the responsibility of liability and would maintain the area. Johnson told the council it would basically just be used on weekends. “I’m in favor of working something out,” said council member Chris Hartwig. Johnson was requested to bring a rough drawing

When classes begin Aug. 18 at Logan-Magnolia for the 2011-2012 school year, there will be several new faculty members to greet students. Pictured in front, from the left are, Kendra Collins (high school social studies); Brielle Koch (elementary special education); Jessica Tentinger (high school math); Derek Sonderland (kindergarten through eighth grade physical education and head girls basketball coach); in back, Rose Willard (pre-school); Elizabeth Wood, (Spanish); Rob Hingstrum (ninth through twelfth grade science); Faith Riessen (ninth through 12th grade physical education) and Megan Christiansen (high school special education). An all-grade open house is scheduled for 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Aug. 17. Classes will be dismissed one hour early the first day. For more information you can reach the junior-senior high at 644-2250 or the elementary at 644-2168. Photo: Mary Darling

Harrison County Extension honors the late Beth Magill Harrison County candidate for 4-H Hall of Fame Beth Magill will posthumusly be onducted as the the 2011 Harrison County candidate into the Iowa 4-H Hall of Fame during ceremonies at the 4-H exhibit building at the Iowa State Fair, Aug. 21. Iowa counties have selected inductees for outstanding service and dedication to 4-H. Inductees or their surviving family members will be presented a certificate by the Iowa 4-H Foundation as they are introduced on stage. Magill’s family will be recognized on her behalf at 1:30 p.m. A reception will follow the presentations. Beth (Allen) Magill was a 10-year member of the Loveland Angels (Missouri Valley) 4-H Club in Harrison County. She loved participating in communications at the county fair and her skills usually

Beth Magill is pictured with her family, in front from from the left, Jennifer Magill, Jim Magill, Beth; in back, Dallas Magill and Brittany Magill. Submitted photo advanced her to the Iowa State Fair. Magill also enjoyed showing cats and presented county workshops on cats. She founded the Missouri Valley Clovers 4-H

Club when her first child was old enough to join 4-H. All her club members were required to do communications, which was quite a challenge for most of the youth. With her help, most

of her 4-H’ers qualified and participated at the Iowa State Fair. Magill was always there with words of SEE MAGILL Page 2

125th Old Settlers in Magnolia The 125 th Old Settlers Reunion is set for Friday and Saturday, Aug. 19 and 20 in Magnolia. The committee is marking the 125 th event with several special activities and an extra day added to the annual celebration. The schedule on Friday includes: •Little king and queen contest •Ladies hat contest •Beard contest •Hog roast and marshmallow roast •8 to 11 p.m., DJ Mark Zack •Come dressed in authentic Old Settlers era outfits Saturday events include: •Parade line up at 9:30 a.m. •Parade at 10:30 a.m. •Citizens 80 and over should call 6442313 to reserve a ride in the parade •Awards following the parade •Lunch stand in the park serving chicken, maidrites, hotdogs, nachos and chips all day •Games and inflatables for the children in the park •Log cabin open for tours •Bingo sponsored by the American Legion in the park •1:15 p.m., pedal tractor pull •2:00 p.m., horseshoe tournament is scheduled to begin •3:00 p.m., beanbag tournament - a new event this year •5:00 p.m., on stage Rick Powell and friends

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Logan Herald-Observer

2 August 17, 2011

From the Front

Council: Hail repairs; extra pay FROM PAGE 1 of the proposed outdoor area along with measurements to city hall by the end of the week. Mayor Randy Fetter signed the contract for the CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Grant. The grant provides $383,000 for the rehabilitation of approximately 10 homes in the area of East First Street to East Sixth Street and North Second Avenue to North Fifth Avenue for eligible residents. This is over a two year period with the city contributing $15,000 in matching funds. $24,999 is the maximum amount that can be spent per home. A housing committee will be set up to review applica-

tions. The council spent some time discussing personnel issues that occurred at the Jim Wood Aquatic Center this summer and steps that can be taken for next season. Marilyn Keizer, assistant city clerk, reached her sixth month anniversary date and, according to the employee handbook, is eligible to receive a 50-cent per hour raise effective Aug. 1. She also completed her first week of clerk school July 22 and according to policy, will receive a 25 cent an hour raise for that session. The Harrison County Landfill committee is requesting that cities in the county police the recycling bins daily and

go through them to make sure what is in there is all recyclables and not trash. They also want to charge the city $50 if trash is found and $50 if the bins are full and they have to come early to dump them. The council recommended Ron Holthe, the city’s representative to the landfill, vote no on the proposal. Building permits were approved for R.C. Androy, 318 N. Fourth Ave., replace screened porch; Bob Salter, 121 W. Sixth St., sidewalk; Herbert Clark, 321 W. Seventh St., concrete patio; Tammy Kirk, 121 N. Fourth Ave., concrete patio; Gene Beckner/Logan Auto, 117 The Logan Chamber of Commerce presented the ceremonial “first dollar” Aug. 12, to the N. Fourth Ave., concrete Logan Cafe and Mexican Food located on the corner of Sixth Street and Fourth Avenue. slab in alley. Pictured from the left are Steve Eby (treasurer), Ragene Darling (co-president), owners Chauncey Mora and Jose Mora and daughter Elena and chamber member Judson Frisk. Photo: Mary Darling

MAGILL: 4-H Hall of Fame FROM PAGE 1 encouragement for her 4H’ers. Magill was so proud of them and their accomplishments. After graduating from Missouri Valley High School, Magill attended Iowa Western Community College where she earned an associate degree. Her true calling was working with children with special needs. Magill operated a daycare for special-needs youth for many years until she became a para-professional at Rue Elementary School in Council Bluffs. While working full time, she made the decision to return to school. She was attending Buena Vista University and was in the last year of earning her degree in education. At the end of May 2010, Magill was diagnosed with cancer, but that didn’t stop her or her club. Chemotherapy sessions were scheduled around the 4-H events. She even made it to the county fair every day to watch her “kids.” Her dedication and talents led all the other club leaders and youth in the county to look up to her. In fact, as

her health declined, they all pooled together to make sure Magill’s club had everything it needed and helped in so many ways. In August, 2010, Magill even traveled to the Iowa State Fair to watch three of her club members participate in communication events. This last year, the Missouri Valley Clovers joined with the Missouri Valley Dazzlers, because Magill was not physically able to do all the things required of a leader. Magill was given her 10-year 4-H leader pin and told about her selection to the Iowa 4H Hall of Fame, while she was in the hospital. It meant the world to her. On May 5, 2011, the 4-H family lost Magill to cancer. She is now one of the angels that take care of Harrison County 4-H and watches over the Harrison County Fair – her second home. Dee Colwell, Harrison County Extension Youth Coordinator said, “Harrison County is very proud to have had Beth Magill as part of our 4-H family.” Counties select inductees for their exceptional work in contributing

CHAMBER SALUTE

to the lives of 4-H members and the overall 4-H program. Many inductees served as club leaders, youth mentors, fair superintendents or fair board members, Iowa State University Extension county council members, county youth council members, fair judges, financial supporters, chaperones or ISU Extension staff members. The inductees have demonstrated dedication, encouragement, commitment and guidance to Iowa’s 4-H’ers through the years. “This is a wonderful opportunity for the counties and state to recognize and celebrate 4-H volunteers and staff who have shown outstanding service and dedication to Iowa’s 4-H program,” said Chuck Morris, director of ISU Extension 4-H Youth Development. The Iowa 4-H Hall of Fame was initiated in 2002 to help commemorate the 100th anniversary of 4-H. A summary of all previous honorees will be on display at the 2011 Iowa State Fair in the 4-H Exhibits building.

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Harrison County needs your help On Aug. 4, President Obama denied Gov. Terry Branstad’s request for Individual Assistance for all six counties bordering the Missouri River. The Governor has stated he will appeal the decision. Harrison County Emergency Management Director, Larry Oliver is asking for your help. “If your home has sustained damage due to flooding (water in the

basement – including seepage water, water on the first floor or higher, mold, etc.) contact the Harrison County EMA office at 644-2353 or hcema@harrisoncountyia.org. If you are planning to repair damages to your home - record water lines or other damage with pictures, before doing repairs and keep all receipts.

Oliver said if a damage assessment team is assigned to Harrison County you may be contacted and requested to allow the team to inspect and document damages. “Without this information, the chance of receiving the disaster declaration is greatly reduced,” Oliver said. For more information contact Harrison County Emergency Management.

Grant application deadline Sept. 1st Susan Bonham, Chair of the Harrison County Community Foundation, a countywide community foundation, is reminding Harrison County nonprofit organizations the fall grant program is now beginning. The deadline to apply for funds through the online grant application process is Sept. 1. “We are pleased to announce we have $45,800 to distribute,” Bonham said. “That will make over $159,000 in grants and scholarships distributed by the Harrison County Community Foundation in 2011.” Only organizations providing services in Harrison County are eligible. They must be able to demonstrate broad

community/county support and supply a copy of their 501(c)(3) IRS determination letter. Requests for general operational funds will not be considered. The HCCF’s mission is to provide funds to those nonprofit and governmental agencies that are involved in community betterment through their organizations. Application procedures and grant guidelines may be obtained online at w w w. i o w a c o m m u n i t y foundations.org/harrisoncef. Click on the Grant Information tab or contact any board member for additional information. Detailed instructions are provided in a downloadable form, as well as a link to the online application. Only online applications

will be considered. Contact Dennis Nissen at 800-794-3458 or dennis@omahafoundation.org or Denise Cardos at denise@omahafoundation.org with grant application specific questions. All completed applications will be considered at the October board meeting with notification of results the end of October. Board members of the Harrison County Community Foundation are Bonham of Logan, 6442401, vice chair Alan Anderson, Logan, 6442485; secretary/treasurer, Cindy Pryor, Woodbine, 712-647-2724; Nancy Cohen, Persia, 712-4886185; Bill Cunard, Missouri Valley, 712-6422695; and Linda Lehan, Dunlap, 712-643-5442.

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Editorial

Logan Herald-Observer August 17, 2011

3

Down Home By Sandy Turner Sandy Turner writes a weekly column “Down Home” which is published in several newspapers in the Midwest. She puts a humorous spin on issues that revolve around families and every day life, drawing from her own experiences.

You might fool others, but never your sister We choose who we want as friends and the person we want to share our life with but when it comes to family – there’s no option for do-overs or breakups. Regardless whether you talk every day or once a year, they’re still family. My sister and I are a perfect example of siblings, who, even though we don’t share many common interests or views, our relationship remains strong for the simple fact that we are family. Years ago she told me if we weren’t sisters, we probably wouldn’t be friends, and at the time it really hurt my feelings. Over the years, I’ve come to realize what she said is true and that’s the beauty of being family. As sisters, we don’t have to agree, look for approval or try to impress – as the bond is stronger than friendship, it’s forever. Even though she lives in town, her standard rule of thumb is to never read this column. She says I make her sound like the “mean” sister, and she doesn’t want any part of it. The fact of the matter is – she is the older sister and I make sure to remind her of our age difference every chance I get – as only little sisters can do. I’ve never intentionally tried to make her out as a “mean” sister, only that we are different. And besides, if I can’t make fun of her, who can? It’s hard to imagine what life would be like without siblings, as they are the only people in the world who know the good and bad things about you, yet will continue to be your confidante, support system and cheerleader. How many people do you know who will continue to talk to you once they find out you have skeletons lurking in your closet? That isn’t a concern with siblings, since they usually share those same secrets. We don’t always see eye-to-eye and more times than not, our opinions on most any topic are as different as night and day. Even so, there have only been a handful of times throughout our lives in which we have been so upset with each other we haven’t talked for longer than a week. This weekend we’re celebrating her birthday – and I feel it’s time to come clean about really happened with her favorite doll – Chatty Cathy. The bottom line is this. We are sisters and that bond is stronger than any friendship. A bond that can withstand any disagreement, criticism or, a 45-year-old “accidental” drop of doll down a clothes chute. I’ll know if she really does read this column when she doesn’t speak to me at her birthday breakfast. All I can say is thank goodness sisters are the kind of friend you can’t ever get rid of since, whatever you may say or do, they’ll still be there.

LETTERS POLICY

The Logan Herald-Observer will publish letters of up to 300 words in length. Letters must be signed and include a mailing address and daytime telephone number, intended to be used by us to verify authorship. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, accuracy and taste. Leading up to an election, an author may only write one letter every 30 days. Responses will be allowed up to the week before the election. Letters may be submitted to news@heraldobserver.com or directed by mail to P.O. Box 148, Logan, IA 51546.

TH E

LO GAN

Herald-Observer Editor MARY DARLING mary.darling@heraldobserver.com Sales Coordinator LOYAL FAIRMAN loyal.fairman@heraldobserver.com Advertising ads@heraldobserver.com Production Assistant MARY LOU NONEMAN marylou.noneman@woodbinetwiner.com 107 No. 4th Ave. P.O. Box 148 (mailing address) • Logan, IA 51546 Phone 712-644-2705 • Fax 712-644-2788 Published weekly in Logan, Iowa A Western Iowa Newspaper Group Publication of Midlands Newspaper, Inc. The Official Paper of the City of Logan and the Logan-Magnolia Community School District Periodical Class Postage Paid at Logan, IA 51546 USPS 317-740 Subscription Rates $33.00 per year for Senior Citizens (Age 62 years or older in county) $40.00 per year in Harrison County, Panama, Portsmouth and Moorhead $43.00 per year outside of Harrison County in Iowa and Nebraska $47.00 per year elsewhere in the United States $24.00 college/academic (9 month) The contents of this newspaper are protected by copyright. Other than non-commercial, personal use of a limited nature, no part of this publication may be copied and reproduced in any way without the prior written consent of the publisher.

Ice age fashions The popular conception of our distant ancestors is that they wore animal skins and lived in caves. They may have made exquisite cave paintings, but their lives were only a few steps above savagery. Until recently, scientists thought the first farmers developed weaving five to ten thousand years ago. However, Professor Olga Stoffer of the University of Illinois has studied 90 clay fragments that bear the impressions of woven fibers. If confirmed, her work could change our understanding of the socalled Ice-Age hunters of the Upper Paleolithic Stone Age. A number of sites in the Czech Republic provided the evidence. Some of the fibers may have been woven bags and baskets lined with clay to make them watertight. Stone artifacts assumed to be for ceremonial purposes may

actually have been parts of looms. If so, it would be the first known machine to be invented after the wheel. People may have been using looms as far back in the past as 28,000 years ago. A 25,000 year-old figurine was wearing what looked like a woven hat. Other paintings showed men wearing trousers and shirts or jackets. Several figurines showed women wearing string skirts similar to what teenaged girls wore for ceremonial purposes in Bronze Age Denmark. Men and women also wore leather shoes. Scientists have found bone needles over 25,000 years old. They are not strong enough to go through hide or leather, but they will still go through cloth. The standard explanation is that a hard object made holes for which needles were used to guide thread. However, if looms

Perley’s Bits & Pieces By Jim Perley Logan Herald-Observer Columnist jperley@iowatelecom.net

existed, it is possible the needles were used to make clothing from cloth. Some graves contain beads which remained after the clothing disintegrated. That also implies people were wearing clothing made from cloth and valued fashion enough to decorate their clothes. Professor Stoffer believes woven cloth may have been made from nettles the way cloth was made in medieval times. Weaving also implies nets. While the men hunted for big game, women

and children may have used nets to capture small animals like rabbits. Such food sources may have been enough to create a surplus that allowed a community to grow to the size of a village. Some communities lived in some sort of houses as early as 29,000 years ago. Professor Stoffer believes our Ice Age ancestors lived at about the same cultural level as pre-Columbian plains Indians and they may have had a sense of fashion.

News from the Extension Service

Of butter and more Day one of the Iowa State Fair and I splurged and sampled a deep fried butter on a stick! Yes, that is what I said – fried butter; the most recent strange foodstuff to grace the Fairgrounds. Here is a simple recipe: take a stick of butter, and dip it into a cinnamony batter and deep fry it. Slather it with goopy icing and then eat it hot. Although that will likely be my last sampling of this “treat,” I will say it was at least edible….but you really, REALLY have to like butter. Picture a small cinnamon roll with a quarter pound of butter, and you get the idea. But what the heck, the State Fair only comes once a year, and particularly in this, the centennial year of the butter cow, it only seemed right to do. I went to the State Fair to judge 4-H exhibits in agriculture and natural resources. Six of us took two days to evaluate nearly 400 exhibits from around Iowa. That whole experience continues to impress me with the creativity of some of Iowa’s youth, and Harrison County was well represented. Fair time also lets me touch base with old and new friends and to share experiences with them. State Fair also represents the peak of summer. That itself serves as a minor marker for a few

things. A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the Japanese beetles that were first reported from the County last year, and posed some questions this year. They will, no doubt, pose even more questions next year. I did get a couple agronomic (corn and wine grapes) questions about Japanese beetle feeding this past month. I mention this because in Iowa experience, there is one generation of beetles that damage plants and those adults die off about at the state of the State Fair. Because we are at the beginning of the Japanese beetle establishment, I can only share with you what has been noticed farther east. In about 2004, central Iowa saw their first beetles. The first two or three years’ infestations were pretty intense. Such an observation is likely twofold: there are few natural defenders and even plant responses to ward off the onslaught, and it is a new thing to observe, which makes it seem more intense. After an initial few years, the beetle barrage seems to become more manageable, and daresay maybe tolerable. State Fair time is also when farmers go to the field and start to assess grain set and begin preharvest planning. I have been in a few cornfields with obvious patchy poor pollination. Likewise, I

Logan City Council First and third Mondays, 7 p.m.

Lo-Ma Board of Education Second Wednesday, 6:30 p.m.

Rich Pope Harrison County Extension Program Coordinator

I O W A S TAT E

have been in other fields with really thorough pollination. The bad areas aren’t incredibly bad, just noticeable, and the good tend to be really good. My best bet is that any fields that were at the height of pollen shed and reception when the week-long oppressive heat struck (think entry day of the Harrison County Fair) may have suffered, but thankfully only a little. Soil moisture is a little dry now but OK throughout most of our area, and irrigation is obvious in the valley. Depending on the next

two weeks, most areas away from the Missouri River should be setting up in good shape for the fall harvest. On a final note this week, farmers can learn a bit about soybean leaf diseases that are pretty easy to find now. There is a new threefold publication we have in the office that is a great guide to the common foliar diseases of soybean. Best of all, they are free for now. For more information, contact the Harrison County Extension Office at 644-2105.

Harrison County Landfill Second Wednesday, 7 p.m.

Logan Public Library Board Second Monday, 4 p.m.


4

Logan Herald-Observer August 17, 2011

Neighbors

Jeremy Sukup Runoff control demo Angus on deployment Aug. 26 at Lewis site breeder Navy Ensign Jeremy Sukup, a 2005 graduate of Missouri Valley High School, and fellow crew members aboard the amphibious transport dock USS New Orleans, home ported in San Diego, Calif., recently departed Naval Base Point Loma after completing a six-day deperming evolution in preparation for the ship’s scheduled deployment. New Orleans is the first San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship to undergo the deperming process. Deperming a ship reduces the ship’s magnetic signature by erasing the permanent magnetism from

ships and submarines to camouflage them against magnetic detection vessels and enemy marine mines. This process is a key element in preparation for New Orleans’ future taskings. Her war fighting capabilities include a state-ofthe-art command and control suite, a large flight deck and advanced ship survivability features that enhance its ability to operate in the unforgiving littoral environment. Naval Base Point Loma is the only station on the West Coast with magnetic silencing support capability. Shawn Shouse, ISU Extension field agricultural engineer at the vegetated treatment area. Sukup joined the Navy Submitted photo in December 2009. Iowa State University the farm.” “Pumping effluent onto Extension and Outreach is Recent compliance cropland is not a common hosting a manure manage- enforcement from both practice in Iowa, but by ment and runoff control Department of Natural doing so we can reduce the demonstration from 1 to 3 Resources and potential for nutrients to p.m., Aug. 26 at the ISU Environmental Protection reach the stream and the Armstrong Research Farm Agency has put the focus on effluent can provide nutrinear Lewis. The purpose of runoff from small to medi- ents and water to a growing Murphy, this will be an this demonstration is to um size feedlots. Iowa State crop.” In addition to the manure extremely important meet- review low-cost options for has partnered with EPA, ing as a major item on the managing runoff water and DNR and the Iowa control options, the field day agenda will be prepara- manure from small to medi- Cattlemen’s Association to will also include information tions for the Harrison um size beef and dairy feed- look at feedlot control sys- on manure production and tems that will reduce runoff nutrient content of feedlot County Republican lot operations. “Small and medium size from feedlots and is more manure, how to sample Women Fundraiser Sept. open feedlots can potentially economically feasible to manure for nutrient analy1. For more information discharge significant install for smaller feedlots. sis, stockpiling regulations contact Murphy at amounts of nutrients to This demonstration will and an update on rules for sheilagop@msn.com or streams,” said Shawn look at a vegetated treatment medium size operations as 712-642-2849. Shouse, ISU Extension field area and pumping effluent well as review of other types agricultural engineer. “The into cropland as a possible of manure control practices. nutrients can cause water low-cost handling option for The ISU Armstrong quality problems in streams feedlot runoff. According to Research Farm is located at and present a loss of valu- Kris Kohl, ISU Extension 53020 Hitchcock Avenue, able fertilizer nutrients for field agricultural engineer, Lewis, Iowa.

Republicans to meet Aug. 18th The Harrison County Republican party will meet Aug. 18 at the Junction Café meeting room in Missouri Valley. Those wishing to eat dinner should arrive between 6 and 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be called to order at 7 p.m. According to Harrison County GOP Chair, Sheila

News from the Pisgah area By Joanne Shearer Pisgah Red Hat Wildflowers had breakfast at Dave’s Old Home Café July 20. Those attending were Sharon Young, Shirley Dunlap, Doris Woodward, Leanna Christensen, Cherry Hall, Kathy Woodward, Joyce Hall, Mary Grubb, Carolyn Waldemer, Barbara Riley Hunt, Rose Molitor, Fran Mitsch, Laura Hagerman, Bobbi Thompson, Bev Hutchinson, Anna Belle Lizer and Vicki Carson. The Community of Christ church ladies meeting was held July 21 with ten attending. The theme for worship was peace and faith given by Hazel Alton and Lizer. Hostesses were Sherry Sherer and Myrna Glennie. Tables were decorated with clowns. Seven get-well cards were sent. Bob Shearer of Audubon, Maine, was a visitor of his aunt “Jo” Shearer. He also visited other relatives. Over the Fourth of July weekend, Larry and Sarah Bryceson along with their daughter, Deborah Nelsen and son Ryan, made the trip to Macon, Mo., to visit their son, Mark. Joining the group were Jane Johnson and daughters Katlyn and

Lindsey of Lynn Creek, Mo. Mark and his friend, Amy, along with her family, treated all to a barbecue, games and fireworks. The group also attended a Fourth of July parade in Maceline, Mo. Making another trip to Missouri the last week in July, the Bryceson’s visited their daughter and family, the Bruce Johnson’s. They also delivered sweet corn to Johnsons and other friends in Osage Beach, Mo. The Brycesons and daughter Deborah Nelsen flew to Las Vegas and rented a car for their final destination, Lake Havasu, Ariz. They spent time cleaning and making arrangements to remodel their winter home. The average temperature while there was 107 to 110 degrees.

recognized O’Neill Angus Farm, Logan, owns three bulls listed in the 2011 Fall Sire Evaluation Report published by the American Angus Association in St. Joseph, Mo. The semi-annual analysis for the Sire Evaluation Report utilizes more than 20 million measures to generate nearly 59 million EPDs for the Angus breed.

Logan council to meet Aug. 22 The Logan City Council will meet at 7 p.m., Aug. 22. Items on the agenda include: Jeremy Middents of SWIPCO to discuss procedures for the CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Grant; approve resolution adopting policies, rules, regulations during grand program; approve CDBG owner occupied rehabilitation program administrative plan; Steve Johnson to discus leasing the alley behind his business; citizens questions/comments.

Leonard reunion The Leonard reunion will be held Sept. 4 at fellowship hall of the Logan Methodist Church. The potluck dinner will be at 12:30 p.m.

Pasture improvement walk set for Aug. 24 Cattle producers and others with interest in pasture management are invited to a pasture walk Aug. 24. The event will take place at the Merle and Greg Christiansen farm north and west of Beebeetown and will begin at 6 p.m. The pasture is located two miles north and two and a half miles west of Beebeetown on 315th Street. Topics to be covered include: The establishment and maintenance of grazing systems, including continuous, high-intensity and mob systems for cattle production; watering and fencing systems; dry weather supplementation and co-products to maintain profitability during weather-stressed times;

weed identification and management; extending Fall forage with alternative crops, including turnips, peas, rye, etc. The Harrison County Cattlemen will be grilling ribeye sandwiches for attendees to be served at the end of the evening. The pasture walk is jointly sponsored by Harrison County Soil and Water Conservation District and Iowa State University Extension, Harrison County and USDA-NRCS in Harrison County. For more information call the Extension office at 6442105.

Harrison County REC Woodbine, Iowa is offering a

Little Sioux Car Show

$1,000.00 Reward

August 27, 2011 Parade: 10 am Car Show: 10:30 am- 3 p.m. Registration begins 10:30am

Awards: 3:00 Early registration fee $10, Day of Show $15 Trophies For: 1st, 2nd, 3rd place Judge’s Choice People’s Choice *Dash Plaques for the first 50 entries. Ph: 712-644-3081 E-mail: jgswan@wctatel.net

NOTICE

For information leading to the arrest and conviction of any person or persons found tampering with, vandalizing or stealing copper wire or other materials from distribution utility poles and other facilities owned by the members of Harrison County Rural Electric Cooperative. Anyone found to be involved will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. If you notice unusual activity or apparent damage to utility structures in remote rural areas please notify our office at 712-647-2727 OR 1-800-822-5591 or contact the Sheriff’s office 1-712-644-2244. This may include dangling wires or other hardware hanging loosely from poles or suspicious activity along roadways late at night.

Introducing STEP IN TIME STUDIO Classes forming NOW! 5th St. • Woodbine, IA Penny • 647-2725 Danielle • 592-0750


Neighbors

Logan Herald-Observer August 17, 2011

5

Biggest tomato, Region 17 4-H table potato, zucchini setting championship contest Aug. 18 Aug. 18, the Welcome Center Farmer’s Market will host a “Biggest Tomato, Potato and Zucchini Contest.” Entries in each category will be judged by weight and will be accepted from 3:30 to 6 p.m. during regular market hours. Contestants will be able to keep their entries, as produce will be weighed and returned. Winners in each category will receive a $10 gift certificate to be used either at the Welcome Center gift shop or with the farmer’s market vendors. “With the Iowa State Fair currently showcasing some of the biggest

and best from throughout Iowa, we thought a local ‘biggest’ contest during the farmers market would be fun,” said coordinator Kathy Dirks. “Hopefully, many of our local gardeners will agree and stop by with their entries.” The Welcome Center Farmer’s Market is held from 3:30 to 6 p.m. every Thursday through Oct. 13. For additional information on the market and future market events such as the “Grilling with Vegetables and Herbs,” demonstration Sept. 1, call 712-642-2114 or check out the Harrison County Iowa Welcome Center Facebook page.

National Guard to hold reunion A gathering at the Little Sioux Park and Campground will be held Sept. 9-10 for all members of the Ida Grove, Mapleton and Denison Iowa National Guard units. “We invite all current and retired members with ties to these units to attend,” said Randy Archer, a retired member of the Mapleton National Guard. “Many of these soldiers are scattered throughout

Iowa and we are in hopes of reaching as many as we can.” A weekend campout, activities and noon potluck on Saturday are among the planned festivities. Soldiers who are interested in attending this year’s reunion are asked to contact Archer at 712-239-0879 or email mapleton133rd@yahoo. com for more information and a newsletter about the event.

Community Memorial Hospital 631 N. 8th St. Missouri Valley, IA

712-642-2784

AUGUST OUTPATIENT SPECIALTY CLINICS For Scheduling Appointments Call 712-642-9347

AUDIOLOGY Rhonda Ward, M.S., CCC-A....................,..August 1 & 15 CARDIAC Heart Consultants..........Every Wed. all day & Friday PM Heart & Vascular Services..Mon. & Wed. P.M. & Fri. A.M. CARDIAC/PULMONARY REHABILITATION Cindy Sproul, R.N.......Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday CARDIOVASCULAR NON-INVASIVE STUDIES..................................................Every Mon AM EAR, NOSE, THROAT Iris Moore, M.D.........................................August 1 & 15 GENERAL SURGERY Roalene J. Redland, M.D...........August 5, 12, 19 & 26 Andrew Y. Reynolds, M.D....Every Thurs. A.M. and Wed.

4-H’ers representing Harrison, East Pottawattamie, West Pottawattamie, Mills, Montgomery, Fremont and Page counties participated in the second annual Region 17 4-H Table Setting championship at the Carson Community Center. 4-H’ers competed in their home counties to earn a spot at the championship with members representing both formal and casual table settings in three age divisions: junior (fourth, fifth and sixth grades); intermediate (seventh and eighth grades) and senior (nine through 12 th grades). Formal, themed place settings could include candles, more than three pieces of flatware, china, tablecloth and/or mats and cloth napkins. Formal themes were for occasions for where you would dress up. Casual themed place settings could be planned for indoors, outdoors, use of any type of cover (tablecloth, blanket or paper) and any type of table service. Casual themed parties would include themed birthday parties, sports parties or other themed party where the guests might come for a fun meal. Participants in the Region 17 table setting program chose a theme for their formal or casual setting, a menu of what would be served, then

As the Missouri River flood waters ever so gradually recede, a growing number of grateful citizens feel it is time to express their gratitude for the protection provided by the historical and new levees in western Harrison County and northern Pottawattamie County.

Homemade

Ice Cream Social

Logan Methodist Church

Sun. Aug. 21, 2011 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Home Made Ice Cream Sandwiches Cookies and Bars Beverages

OB-GYN Sami Zeineddine M.D...............................August 2 & 16

UROLOGY Larry Siref, M.D...............................August 8, 22 & 29 MAMMOGRAPHY..............................Monday thru Friday EVENING HOURS NOW AVAILABLE......Mon., thru Friday MOBILE NUC MED....................................August 8 & 22 PT/OT......................................Mon.-Fri........642-2179 BEHAVIORAL HEALTH.............................642-2045 Judith Benson, Psych ARNP Nancy Cyr LISW, Cindy Duggin LISW Amy Jonas LISW Rod Black LISW

These levees, so far, have kept large portions of the local floodplain dry during this risky time. In an attempt to express thanks for the hard work and diligence to the effort performed by neighbors who had the vision and energy to take on the task, an appreciation picnic is being planned. Your help is needed. Assistance from citizens, businesses, churches, etc. in the planning and putting on of the picnic would be appreciated. This will be a local floodplain wide

Holcomb, West Pottawattamie County, reserve. Intermediate formal champion was Catherine Dublinski, Harrison County, was grand champion and in the junior formal division, Anna Hull, Page County, was grand champion with reserve going to Olivia Dobben, West Pottawattamie County. Receiving a purple award were Savanna ClarkMoffat with blue awards going to Alexis

Christians, Harrison County and Emily Welch. In the senior casual 4H table setting, Emily Dickinson, Harrison County was champion and Ashley Gilbert, Fremont County the reserve. In the intermediate casual division, blue awards went to Justin Thomas, Harrison County. In the junior casual division, reserve champion went to Shelby Oloff, Harrison County.

event with volunteers from Little Sioux, Mondamin, Modale, California Junction, Missouri Valley and rural areas all encouraged to participate. The first planning meeting for the appreciation picnic is scheduled for 7 p.m. Aug. 17 in the Modale United Methodist Church Community Center. If unable to attend the first meeting and are willing to help in the future, please provide your name and contact information to AppPicnic@gmail.com. If you know of individuals,

agencies, businesses, etc. who should be recognized, please let committee members know at the meeting, or send an e-mail with names and a brief description of their contribution. “Remember, we planned for the worst and prayed for the best,” appreciation dinner organizers said. “Thanks to the hard work of a handful of our neighbors, for the most part we have been fortunate. Come help in making this appreciation picnic event a success – just one way of expressing our thanks.”

Boyer River Arts presents melodrama Aug. 26, 27, 28 “Medium Rare,” a melodrama by Steve Hogue, Pioneer Drama Service, has been selected by Boyer River Arts for its initial production. It is the story of

90 degrees in the shade

ONCOLOGY Heartland Oncology & Hematology..Aug. 4, 11, 18 & 25

ORTHOPEDICS Thomas Atteberry, M.D...............1st, 3rd, 5th Thurs A.M, 2nd & 4th Thurs. all day PODIATRY John Weremy, DPM................................August 11 & 25 Indergit Panesar, M.D................................August 4 & 16

Emily Dickinson of Harrison County, was the senior winner in the casual category at the table setting championship. Submitted photo

Appreciation dinner plans in works for levee volunteers

Freewill Donation

OPHTHALMOLOGY Michael Feilmeier, M.D..................................August 16

arranged a full single table setting with flatware, glasses, plates and bowls as needed to serve that meal to guests at their dinner or party. They also chose a centerpiece for the table that could be constructed or chosen by them to fit the theme. All of this would be set up on a card table or for informal table settings such as for a picnic could be arranged on a blanket on the floor. All of the contestants also wore clothing that went along with the theme to strengthen their presentation on the table setting. The purpose of the program is to provide youth the opportunity to plan a meal around a theme learning the skills of planning, developing a theme, selecting or making matching centerpieces and clothing to go along with that theme, planning a nutritious and fun meal and developing hospitality skills through communicating their planning process and table setting with a judge through conference judging. Awards were presented to the 4-H’ers at the end of the evening contest hosted by East Pottawattamie County Extension staff and Region 17 4-H Specialists. In the senior formal 4-H table setting division, Jessica Lowthorp, Fremont County, was champion and Victoria

C O N T E S T

C O N T E S T

TOTAL DAYS JULY 20-28

7 Days 90 Degrees or Above

Harry and Bunny Polk, first-time homeowners, whose new purchase, surprisingly, comes with an inhouse grandma, Nina Smeltenmelter (played by Fonda Allen). “Medium Rare,” is slated for the stage at 7 p.m., Aug. 26 and 27 in the Woodbine City Park. A 2 p.m., matinee will be held Aug. 28. Playing Harry Polk is Tim Gaugird, from Chapel Hill, N.C., now a Woodbine resident. Polk is new to drama but has extensive experience in the music world as composer and lead musician, “The Life of Oranges,” and guitarist, “Jesus Christ Superstar.” Misty Bush, as Bunny Polk, was seen on the Woodbine stage in 2009, in

the melodrama, “Curse You Otis Crummy.” Later, she performed in “The Boardinghouse.” As Bunny, she works to pacify and calm Harry and assure grandma she won’t be thrown out. Directing “Medium Rare” is Lou Waite. Other members of the cast include, Virgil Lary, Sue Lary, Kevin Polson, Sabrina Christiansen, Norma Coret, Michelle Brunow, Misty Nelson, Alana Smith and Catherine Dublinski. “Bring lawn chairs and blankets and be prepared for a most entertaining comedy,” said director Lou Waite. Tickets may be purchased at the gate. Children 12 and under with parents are free.

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Courthouse

Logan Herald-Observer August 17, 2011

6

1301 Normal St • Woodbine, IA • 712-647-2627

Harrison County Sheriff Report By Sheriff Pat Sears Aug. 5 •Sheriff Sears and Deputy Killpack assisted the state patrol with a vehicle pursuit south of Little Sioux. The pursuit ended after the vehicle drove through a farm field and rolled over. A female and male were arrested and charged by the state. Aug.6 •Deputy Klutts took a harassment complaint from a subject on Monroe Avenue. •Deputy Doiel and Deputy Sieck responded to a residential alarm in Melody Oaks. All was found to be secure. Aug. 7 •Deputy Cohrs responded to the Boyer River Bridge south of Missouri Valley for suspicious activity. Three young men were located and told to move on. Aug. 8 •Deputy Klutts found an ATV parked on the side of the road of Austin Avenue in the early morning. No key was in the switch and there was damage done to the gauges. No one was around so the ATV was towed for safe keeping and

further investigation. •Deputy Cohrs is investigating an attempted burglary of a residence on Lima Trail. •Deputy Knickman assisted Dunlap Police with a traffic stop in Dunlap. The driver was arrested and charged with OWI by Dunlap Police. •Deputy Knickman is investigating the theft of wire from a bin site off 315th Street. •Deputy Knickman and Deputy Klutts responded to an attempted burglary on 270th Street. The house is vacant at this time. The property was secured by the owner. Aug. 9 •Deputy Killpack responded to Pisgah for a reported stolen vehicle. The report was taken and Deputy Killpack checked the area. The reported stolen vehicle was found parked in town. The vehicle was stolen and may have run out of gas. •Deputy Cohrs was called to Willow Lake to take a theft report. Items were taken from a car that was parked in the parking lot.

To report littering 1-888-665-4887 Crimestopper Line 1-800-247-0592 Sheriff Office - 644-2244

Courthouse Fines & Fees MARRIAGES Rebecca Kay Dugdale, Missouri Valley and Adam Daniel Vokt, Logan

Aug.10 •Deputy Heffernan is investigating criminal mischief that occurred south of Magnolia. Aug.11 •Deputy Clemens responded to reported suspicious activity around Overton Avenue. The area will be patrolled. •Deputy Cohrs charged two juveniles from Missouri Valley with burglary. The juveniles were interviewed then charged with burglary to a residence. •Deputy Clemens is investigating the theft of copper wire from a bin site off Niles Trail. Any criminal charge is merely an accusation and the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

SMALL CLAIMS Gemini Capital Group LLC vs Kent Clodfelder, Logan Razor Capital LLC vs Louann Finken, Logan TFRG LLC vs Kimberly Knudsen ABA Recovery Services, Inc. vs Stacy Coberly, Woodbine General Service Bureau, Inc. vs Tammy M. Wendt, Missouri Valley General Service Bureau, Inc. vs Darrel Conrad, Woodbine Asset Acceptance LLC vs Mary Birdsall, Missouri Valley SEAT BELT VIOLATIONS Sean Hall, Logan Paige Thurman, Missouri Valley Matt Staley, Logan Kristen Collier, Missouri Valley Gary Shearer, Modale Heather Freihage, Pisgah Larry Collins, Honey

Creek Jason Logan

111. N. 2nd Ave. Logan, Iowa 51546 712-644-2665

Winchester,

SPEEDING Jay Clark, Onawa Scott Ford, Missouri Valley Elena Thomas, Missouri Valley Cherri Shannon, Missouri Valley Jenise Bryan, Crescent Patricia Reyes, Missouri Valley Michael Staben, Woodbine Roy Pepple, Moorhead VIOLATIONS Randal Moore, Modale, financial liability Jason Winchester, Logan, financial liability Randal Moore, Modale, use of light restricting device Brian Green, Dunlap, possess/purchase alcohol by person under 21 Shasta Smith, Moorhead, fail to carry registration card; financial liability Jordan Bresette, Logan, fail to maintain control Audrey Jensen, Logan, financial liability

Anthony Peterson, Missouri Valley, no valid driver’s license Kati Groll, Dunlap, fail to have valid license Melanie Cox, Logan, no proof of insurance DISTRICT COURT State of Iowa vs Melissa Marie Dunn, OWI first. Deferred judgment for one year. Placed on unsupervised probation for one year. $1,250 civil penalty plus costs. State of Iowa vs Joseph R. Smith, OWI, first. Ninety days in jail with all but seven suspended. Fined $1,250 plus costs. Unsupervised probation for one year. Ordered to obtain alcohol/drug evaluation and complete drinking driver’s school.

Farm Bureau presents proposed resolutions to Iowa Farm Bureau Federation for consideration The county policy development committee, chaired by Lynn Stamp of Persia, with members Randy Olsen, Travis Shearer, Leonard and Jan Johnson, formed proposed resolutions based on the tabulated results of members’ returned opinionnaires. These proposed resolutions were presented to members attending the meeting. After much discussion, the following resolutions were adopted. These adopted resolutions were sent to the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation in West Des Moines where consideration will be given to them becoming state policy. The adopted resolutions include: Animal Production & Health & Ag Biosecurity: 1.We believe that an individual that provides onfarm custom slaughter and meat processing should be State regulated. 2. We believe that livestock should be included with small scale poultry regulations. 3. We believe Iowa should participate with USDA oversight and allow interstate shipment of meat products from state inspected facilities.

Conservation & Natural Resources: 4. We believe that regulation should be based on targeted locations and practices. 5. For conservation program funds, we believe funds should be p r i o r i tized based on environmental benefit. Energy: 6. We believe the current ethanol tax credit system should be left alone. Environmental & Other Regulations: 7. We support taking voluntary steps to reduce air emissions. 8. We support voluntarily managing fertilizer applications to reduce ammonia emissions and we support shutting off engines instead of idling. Waters of the State Definition-(State): 9. We believe Iowa should only regulate rivers, streams, public lakes and aquifers. Federal Agency Access to Private Property(National): 10. We believe a Federal agency inspector should only be allowed to enter private property with the consent of the owner. Confidentiality (State & National): 11a. We believe that no information should be publicly available. 11b. We believe

no information should be made available to the public. 12. We do not believe a person should be allowed to file an anonymous complaint with the DNR, EPC, or IDALS. Risk Management & Farm Programs: 13. We believe that, if the Federal budget is reduced, all farm programs should be cut equally. Farm ProgramPayment Limitations(National): 14. We believe that farm eligibility should not be restricted by income or net worth. Program-Pay Farm Limit for ACRE(National): 15. We believe that ACRE payments should not be limited when the next farm bill is written. Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)(National): 16. We believe that enrollment in CRP should be maintained and encouraged on highly erodible land. 17. We believe that CRP enrollment rates are appropriate. 18. We believe that CRP rental rates should reflect local land rental rates. Conser vation Compliance-(National): 19. We believe that

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Go online to register or call us today 306 E Erie Street Missouri Valley, IA 51555 Phone: 712-642-3082 Tuesday 9:00 am to 4:00 pm

1005 Iowa Ave Onawa, IA 51040 Phone: 712-423-2289 Mon 8:00 am to 3:00 pm

Federal crop insurance premium subsidies should not be added to the list of farm program benefits that are subject to conservation compliance. 20. We believe crop insurance eligibility should not be tied to conservation compliance. Beginning Farmers(State and National): 21. We support lower operating loan interest rates for beginning farmers. Crop Reports(National): 22. We believe the current USDA crop reporting system should stay the same. Condemnation of Land for Lake Development-(State): 23. We do not believe there should be a change in how the size of a drinking water lake is determined. Nuisance Lawsuits(State): 24. We believe a plaintiff who loses a nuisance lawsuit involving a farm should pay the defendant’s costs, such as court costs, attorney fees,

and expenses. 25. We believe the damage of a nuisance lawsuit should be limited. 26. We believe the time allowed to file a nuisance lawsuit should be limited. Corps Of Engineers:

27. We believe that the corps’ Manual for operations of the Missouri River basin should be rewritten to its original intent with the highest priority being flood control.

Remarriage May Require Refocus on Financial Goals If you’re planning to get remarried, you have plenty of company: More than 40% of all U.S. weddings are second marriages for at least one of the participants, according to an estimate by the National Stepfamily Resource Center. Naturally, a second marriage will bring many changes to your life — not the least of which may be changes in your financial strategy and goals. In fact, your remarriage should cause you to take a close look at these areas: • Past financial obligations — Before even discussing your investments, you and your new spouse should decide how to handle past financial obligations such as child support, alimony and debts. Consider temporarily managing three accounts – his, hers and ours – to keep track of these various payments. • Retirement accounts — You and your new spouse may want to examine your respective retirement accounts — such as your 401(k)s and Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) — to determine if there are areas of duplication that you may wish to avoid. If you both have the same types of investments, you may be more susceptible to downturns that primarily affect one

industry or economic sector. By diversifying your holdings, you can reduce the effects of volatility on your portfolios. Keep in mind, though, that diversification cannot guarantee a profit or protect against loss. • Insurance — Evaluate your medical insurance plans to decide which policy is more economical and comprehensive for you, your spouse and any dependents. You may also want to review disability insurance to ensure appropriate coverage is in place. Also, review life insurance policies and update beneficiaries and coverage. • Income taxes — When you consult with your tax professional to discuss the tax implications related to your marriage, be sure to adjust your tax withholding on Form W 4 to reflect your marital status. You may also want to discuss whether your Social Security benefits will be impacted if you remarry and are under age 60. • Estate considerations — Remarriage almost certainly will require you to work with a legal advisor to make changes to the following: will, living will, durable power of attorney, health care power of attorney and trust. If

Scott Thompson 115 N. Ave., Suite 200 Logan, IA 51546 (712) 644-3692 www.edwardjones.com Toll Free: 866-644-3692 Member SIPC

you have children, this step is critical toward ensuring your wishes will be carried out. You can also speak with your legal advisor if you are considering a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement. And perhaps above all else, you need to communicate effectively with your new spouse about your respective ideas on managing finances and investments. To develop a joint investment strategy that addresses your goals and your individual differences, you may want to consult with a financial professional. Your remarriage can be a joyous occasion. And by making sure you and your new spouse are “on the same page” with regard to your financial situation and goals, you can make a positive contribution to your new life together. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.


Church

Logan Herald-Observer

7 August 17, 2011

Pipeline leak reported in STATE FAIR EXHIBIT Farm leasing Missouri Valley Flood meeting Plain in Monona County Aug. 19 A pipeline carrying natural gasoline developed a leak over the weekend with the potential to lose about 140,000 gallons of gasoline in the Missouri River floodplain southwest of Onawa. Enterprise Products of Houston, Texas, reported a drop in pipeline pressure to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources at 4:30 a.m., Aug. 13. The pressure drop occurred at 2:30 a.m. in a section of eightinch pipe that runs under the Missouri River from Decatur, Neb., east to Interstate 29 just west of Onawa. Company officials were able to shut the pipeline down on both sides of the river, estimating the maximum amount of gasoline in the pipe to be 140,742 gallons. They had teams searching for the leak by 4:30 a.m. The company tried to verify and locate

the break on the ground, from a plane and from a boat. By 4 p.m., they suspected the break was on the Iowa side of the river in the flood plain, but still did not have a specific location. The company pumped the gasoline that remained in the pipeline into trucks. Natural gasoline is not natural gas. It is an unrefined light-weight liquid, clear to light amber in color. It smells of petroleum and floats on the water. It is heavier than air. The product has likely floated on down the river, Department of Natural Resource representatives said. Even if the gasoline is found, it would be dan- Michael Stevens, 17, of Mondamin, presents his 4-H Working Exhibit at the Iowa State Fair gerous and difficult to Aug. 13. Photo: Iowa State Fair/Steve Pope Photography recover in the turbulent flood conditions. Water supplies downstream were notified by the DNR. No enforcement action is expected.

Third Living Loess tour set for Aug. 20 The third Living Loess tour is planning for Aug. 20. Sawmill Hollow Aronia Berry Farm, Honey Creek Creamery, the Loess Hills Lavender Farm, Hitchcock Nature Center, Gallagher Designs, Harvest Studio, Loess Hills Woodworks, Garden Drove Deli and the Harrison County Welcome Center make up the journey through the Loess Hills. Each establishment will be open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with those taking the tour able to start at any location. A “passport” may be picked up at each spot,

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Modale and Missouri Valley Pastor Kim Crummer 642-3168 or 642-2464 Modale Worship, 9:30 a.m. Missouri Valley Sunday School during church services Missouri Valley Worship, 10:30 a.m. CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS Logan Branch Pres. - Wayne Kennedy Sunday Sacrament, 10 a.m. Sunday School, 11:20 a.m. Primary 11:20 a.m. Priesthood and Relief Society, 12:10 p.m. Seminary and MIA, 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays Mutual/Scouts, Wed. 7 p.m. LITTLE SIOUX CHURCH OF CHRIST 403 Mulberry Little Sioux, Iowa 51545 (712) 646-2644 Wayne Bahr, pastor Youth Pastor, Joey Norton Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m.

and those who visit all nine locations during the season will be entered in a drawing for goods from the group valued at $500. The Living Loess tour is held every third Saturday of the month and runs through October. For more information go to livingloess.com.

Pastor Kirk Parsons Youth Leaders Kirk and Pam Parsons Sunday School 9:30 Worship Service 10:30 First Sunday of every month, 9:30 worship followed by fellowship LIFELINE ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH Pastor Ray Sorenson Assoc. Pastor Hank Gruver 1207 Harrison St., Dunlap, Iowa - 6435475 Sun.: 9:30 a.m., Sunday School; 10:30 a.m., Morning Worship; Thurs.: 7 p.m., Intercessory Prayer. PERSIA TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH Vacancy Pastor: Rev. Merlene Ostebee Sunday worship at 8:30 a.m. Communion the 2nd and 4th Sundays of the month GRACE COMMUNITY FELLOWSHIP of the

COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Persia

Merrymakers bring smiles to Logan seniors Merrymakers is celebrating 25 years of brightening the lives of seniors and elderly through music and laughter. In 1986 a local entertainer met with a group of Omaha businessmen to form Merrymakers’ mission of improving the quality of life for seniors by encouraging active participation, increasing social interaction and sparking memories through professional entertainment. That year, eight nursing homes were given a total of 10 performances. Slowly this dream began to grow. Each year, more and more seniors receive the benefit of Merrymakers’ free professional musical

Nursery and children’s church provided during worship - infants through 3rd grade. Wed., 7 p.m.,men’s and women’s fellowship study and prayer MONDAMIN BAPTIST CHURCH Pastor Harley Johnsen Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday - Youth Group “Magnolia Fire Escape” 7:30 p.m. at Magnolia Fire Hall Wednesday Family NIghts 6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m. (during school year) LOGAN CHRISTIAN CHURCH Minister Ron Riley Youth Minister Nate Powell, 644-2642 www.loganchristianchurch.org Saturday Service - 7 p.m. Sunday Worship, 8:15 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. 6th - High School Youth, 6-8 p.m.

CHRISTIAN and MISSIONARY ALLIANCE

Missouri Valley Pastor Brad Westercamp 9:00 a.m. Sunday School for all ages. Nursery through adults. 10:30 a.m. Worship -

COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Mondamin Co-Pastors Tomm Bothwell and John Carritt Sunday

712-644-2710

School, 9:15 a.m. Worship, 10 a.m PERSIA METHODIST CHURCH Rev. Orris Drake Sunday Worship, 8:45 a.m. ST. ANNE’S Logan Rev. Michael Berner, Pastor 644-2535 • 644-2092 Saturday Mass, 4:00 p.m. Sunday Mass, 8:00 a.m. ST. PATRICK’S Dunlap Saturday Mass, 5:45 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. SACRED HEART Woodbine Sunday 9:30 a.m. HOLY FAMILY Mondamin 645-2683 Saturday Mass, 4 p.m. Sunday Mass, 8 a.m. ST. PATRICK’S Missouri Valley Rev. Michael Berner, Pastor Saturday Mass, 5 p.m. Sunday Mass, 9:30 a.m. UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pisgah

215 N. 4th Ave. Logan 644-2929 Randall D. Scott ~ Funeral Director

LOGAN SuperFoods ‘Proudly offering Best Choice brands’ 644-2260 Logan, IA

644-2705

Lay Pastor Pam Schwertley Sunday Service, 10 a.m. Sunday School, 11 a.m. United Methodist Women, 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays MONDAMIN CHURCH OF CHRIST (Christian) 207 Noyes Mondamin, Iowa 51557 (712) 646-2644 Wayne Bahr, pastor Jeff Bierbrodt, Youth Pastor Worship – 9:00 a.m. Sunday School – 10:15 a.m. ST. JOHN LUTHERAN CHURCH Honey Creek 545-3022 Pastor David Kuhnle Bible Study, 9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Adult Bible Class - 9 a.m. Children’s Church in 10 a.m. service ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH Magnolia -Sunday Worship at Immanuel Lutheran Church Logan

217 East Seventh St. Logan, IA 712-644-2234 Serving Western Iowa since 1988

PERSIA ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH Rev. Dale Jenson Sunday Worship, 8:30 a.m. Communion, Every 1st Sunday PISGAH COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Pastor Terry McHugh Co-Pastor Ralph Hussing Sunday School, 9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Mondamin Lay Pastor Pam Schwertley Sunday School, 10:30a.m. Sunday Worship, 9:45 a.m. THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Little Sioux Lay Pastor Pam Schwertley Sunday Worship, 8:45 a.m. Fellowship Hour, 9:30 United Methodist Women, 3rd Wednesday Every Month LANDMARK BAPTIST CHURCH Logan Sunday School, 9:45

Piecemakers quilt guild meeting set The Piecemakers Quilt Guild meets at 7 p.m., the third Tuesday of every month at the United Methodist Church, 223 E. Superior St. in Missouri Valley. All are welcome. Meetings include guest speakers, show and tell and a business meeting. For more information contact Phyllis at 712642-3194.

a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m. and Sunday night 6:30 p.m. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Missouri Valley 642-2538 Rev. Barbara Todd firstpresbymvmsn.com Adult Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:00 a.m. Sunday School, 11:15 a.m. IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH Logan Pastor Jerald Firby 644-2384 • 642-2842 Sunday Worship, 9:00 a.m. Fellowship: 10:00 10:15 a.m. Sun. School, 10:15 11:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study: 10:15 0 11:00 a.m. LOGAN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pastor Jack D. Hofmockel Worship, 9:30 a.m. Contemp. Sun. School, 9:30 NEW LIFE CHURCH Logan Comm. Center Pastor Stan Udd 642-9363 Kids/Adult Classes 9:30 a.m. Worship: 10:30 a.m.

Eby Drug Store 3 Generations of Pharmacists 644-2160 Logan

Missouri Valley/Mondamin Helping You Reach Your Dreams

Member FDIC

Equal Housing Lender

Warner Insurance Agency, Inc.

“A life of possibilities for people with intellectual disabilities” Your Hometown Newspaper

to this facility and provided a performance by Hillbilly Hal Cottrell at 2 p.m., Aug. 15. Financial support is needed from the community. All funds raised go directly to support the programming in Logan. Donations can be made online or mailed to Merrymakers, 11213 Davenport St., Ste. 201, Omaha, NE 68154.

Church Services

Logan Memorial Chapel Strong Insurance Agency

entertainment, serving more than 40,000 today. In 2011, more than 100 facilities will receive musical programming thanks to generous donors who believe in the mission. Merrymakers partners with skilled care centers, assisted living facilities, subsidized senior housing, memory care facilities and senior centers, each receiving a monthly visit at no cost. This year, the seniors at Westmont Care Center have been enjoying the merriment through the support of generous donations and foundations. Merrymakers is committed to continuing their service

Harrison County Extension will be sponsoring a Farm Leasing Arrangement meeting from 10 to 11:30 a.m., Aug. 19 at the ISU Extension office in Logan, 304 E. Seventh St. Tim Eggers, ISU Extension Field Agricultural Economist, will be the presenter. Eggers will be explaining land value trends, cash rental rate trends, how to calculate a fair cash rental rate and how property taxes on ag land are determined. The Farm Leasing Arrangements meeting cost $15 per person, which includes the 100page Farm Leasing Arrangement booklet. Pre-registration is required by Aug. 17. To pre-register call the Extension Office at 6442105 or toll free at 888644-2105.

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712-644-2456

644-3298 219 E. 7th

Please send your church service changes and/or notices to The Logan Herald-Observer, P.O. Box 148, Logan, IA 51546, or e-mail them tomary.darling@heraldobserver.com.


8

Logan Herald-Observer August 17, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Southwest 8 senior services is holding a public hearing on Monday, September 12, 2011 at 10:30 a.m., at the Southwest 8 main office at 300 W. Broadway, Suite 240, Council Bluffs (2nd floor of the Omni Center). Within the current budget constraints the agency is looking to add the following services in FY2012: Elder Abuse Intervention and Options Counseling. This hearing will provide the public an opportunity to comment on the addition of these services. Questions? Kelly Butts at 712-328-2540 ext. 13. 33-1

PUBLIC NOTICE HARRISON COUNTY SUPERVISORS CLAIMS GENERAL BASIC FUND Betty Abrams, emp. mil. ...$65.28 Agriland FS ...................1,195.49 Alamar Uniforms, wearing Apparel & uniform ..........746.91 Alegent Health OHS/EAP, Utilities payments ..........200.00 Alegent Health Clinic, cont. Education .......................183.00 AT&T...................................34.91 Auditor of State, acct., audit Service ...........................625.00 Kathy Baer, emp. mil. .......174.06 James Baxa, deputies Salaries ..........................200.00 Connie Betts, meeting reg..50.00 Bill’s Water Cond. .............421.35 Elizabeth Block, emp. Mileage...........................120.05 Bomgaars ...........................99.98 Bonsall TV & App., ..........825.00 Patty Booher, emp. mil. ......12.29 Breezy Hills Winery, sales Items ..............................701.40 Nichole Briggs, emp. mil.....93.58 C&H Hauling ....................361.00 Care Facts Info. Sys., service Contracts........................793.50 Carpenter Paper Co., custodial Supplies .....................1,113.86 Casey’s General Stores .....76.04 Cheetah Tech. Integration, Office & data proc. .........115.00 Cheryl Smith Cleaning Service, Other personnel .............540.00 City of Dunlap................1,247.73 City of Little Sioux ............115.96 City of Logan ....................318.95 Clark Pest & Termite Control ...........................40.00 Control Services, equip., Repair & maint. ..............765.00 Ladeena Coolman, utilities Payments ........................64.80 Susan Corrin, emp. mil.....167.68 Dr. Herbert Coulter ...........136.00 Counsel Office & Document, Service contracts ..........953.24 Creighton Medical Labs. ..287.00 Dr. Robert Cunard ..............70.00 Sandra Dickman, emp. Mileage .........................157.79 Dollar General ....................68.25 Doug Johnsen Const.....4,765.50 Dunlap Senior Citizens, Congregate meals.......1,500.00 Eby Drug ............................87.70 ECOLAB, laundry exp. .....435.32 Emergency Services, office Equip. & furn. ................977.00 Farm Plan, parts...............120.95 Farner Bocken Co., food & Provisions....................2,224.01 Fazzi Associates, Inc., service Contracts.......................911.00 Julie Florian, emp. mil. .......39.27 Fourth Ave. Building Corp., Service contracts ...........120.00 Dixie Frisk.........................473.00 Judson Frisk .....................600.00 The Globe Pequot Press, sales Items .............................371.30 Reanna Gochenour, emp. Mileage .........................131.22 Graham Tire Co., ..........1,067.88 Amanda Hall, emp. mil. ......17.85 Lois Hall, service Contracts.......................600.00 Linnea Handbury, emp. Mileage .........................159.32 Harr. Co. Auditor, bldg. Maintenance .................200.00 Harr. Co. Dev. ..............10,902.12 Harr. Co. Landfill .................22.00 Harr. Co. Law Enforcement, Service contracts ............14.00 Harr. Co. Public Health, Juvenile programs......2,010.00 Harr. Co. REC................1,884.96 Harr. Co. Secondary Road, Fuel & oil ........................483.80 Patricia Hazen, cont. ed. ....65.00 HERC Publishing, office Supplies ........................114.55 Home Town Hdw. .............520.20 Hy-Vee................................40.41 IKON Financial Services, Office equip. & furn. .......455.21 Independent Pub. Group, Sales items ...................141.54 IA Counties Pub. Health, Dues & memberships .....75.00 IA Dept. of Natural Resources, Abandon well exp. & Water.............................300.00 IA Dept. of Veteran’s Affairs, Misc............................2,854.59 IA Law Enforcement Academy, Cont. ed..........................460.00 IA state medical Examiner ....................1,372.50 Jeanette Jensen, emp. Mileage ...........................18.10 JM Auto Body ................2,427.75 Kohl’s Pharmacy & HC.......73.04 Lerner Pub. Group, sales Items ...............................80.45 Little Sioux Senior Citizens, Congregate meals.........500.00 Dr. Mary Lob.....................105.00 Logan Auto Supply ...........180.05 Logan Do It Best Hdw. .....667.39 Logan Meal Site, congregate Meals .........................1,500.00 Logan Mini Mart ...............782.30 Logan Postmaster ............720.00 Logan Super Foods.......2,225.75 Logan Woodbine Newspaper, Legal notice...................457.65 Loganet ..............................25.00 Mail Services, DOT renewal Notices ..........................555.26 Maintenance Eng., electrical Supp. & par. ..................148.61 Matt Parrott, office supp. ..439.94 Teresa McCandless, emp. Mileage ...........................27.72 Dean McIntosh, mileage ..167.66 Diane Meeker, emp. mil........5.88 Rod Meeker, bldg. Maint. .900.00 Gay Melby, emp. mileage ...24.63 Tabitha Melby, emp. mil. .....48.96 Menards, ..........................450.36 MidAmerican First Call, Autopsy & coroner exp.....75.00 MidAmerican Energy.....3,629.80 Galen Mikels, cont. ed........65.00 Miller Fuel & Oil, fuel

And oil ........................2,612.88 John Mock, dues & Memberships....................30.00 Mondamin F&F Senior Citizens, cong. Meals ....500.00 Carrie Montanez, emp. Mileage .........................102.81 Moore Medical, health supplies And equip. .....................413.52 MPS Accounts Receivable, Sales items ....................402.64 Mumm Law Firm ...........3,881.96 Mundt Franck & Schum....620.70 Myrtue Medical Center.....160.00 Scott Nelson, postage ........20.65 Nifty Lawns.......................420.00 Norms’ Tires .......................10.00 Kim Nunez, mileage .........264.26 Office Stop, office equip. & Furniture......................1,206.09 On Trac, service contracts..92.45 Onawa Democrat, magazines Periodicals.......................32.00 William Ouren, autopsy & Coroner exp....................150.00 Parents as Teachers National, Dues & memberships.......75.00 Kristina Pauley, emp. mil. .279.48 Pat Perry, mileage ............340.64 Pisgah Senior Citizens, Congregate meals..........500.00 Pitney Bowes, office supp.261.90 Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Care of soldiers graves1,930.00 Qwest .................................84.08 Recognition Works, office Supplies ...........................13.10 Reserve Account, Postage .....................2,300.00 Alan Ronk, custodial Services ...........................75.00 Marty Rose, extra help Salaries ..........................237.50 Rush Family Care Service, Funeral service ..........2,500.00 Stacy Salter, emp. mil.......364.22 Brenton Saron, emp. mil.....15.30 Scheels..........................1,497.00 Rhonda Sears, emp. mil. ..155.29 Seeley Service ...................72.50 Seiler Instrument & Mfg., Off. & data proc. .............206.00 Senior Citizens of Western Har., congregate meals1,500.00 Shaw Screenprinting ........252.00 Shelby Co. Auditor, bldgs. Rent.............................1,162.50 Shelby co. Environment Heal., Safety & prot. Supp. ......100.00 Shirley Sigler, emp. mil.......12.24 Sirchie Finger Print Lab, Off. Supp. .........................57.82 Dewey Sloan, utilities Pmts. ...........................1,162.70 SW IA Housing Trust, contrib.. Other-gov. ..................3,000.00 SW IA Plan. Co., contrib.. other Gov. ...........................10,191.00 Stephens-Peck Incorp., office Supplies ..........................70.00 Cindy Stessman, deputies Salaries .........................600.00 Linda Stueve, emp. mil. ....137.09 SWI Juvenile Emergency Serv., Juvenile deten. Costs14,323.60 T of C Comm. Laundry.........7.40 Telrite Corp. ......................293.80 Lorie Thompson, emp. mil. .20.40 Tribune Newspapers, adv. 155.00 Ultra No Touch....................52.00 US Bank ........................6,672.88 UTC Spectrum Services, radio And communication ........60.00 Walter Utman, emp. mil. ...252.96 Valley Times News, board Proceedings ...................607.66 Verizon Wireless...............460.90 Dwayne Walker, mileage ..105.04 Wall Lake Popcorn, sales Items ................................65.10 Tim Ward, rent pmts.........150.00 Sherrill Webb, emp. mil.....243.84 West Group, magazines Periodicals.....................543.75 West Monona Comm. School, Juvenile programs......2,000.00 Western IA Tourism, misc.500.00 Williams & Co. PC, acct., Audit service ..............1,800.00 Windstream ...................1,638.01 Sherry Wohlers, cont. ed. .103.00 Woodbine Golden Age Center, Congregate meals......1,500.00 Woodhouse Auto Fam.17,000.00 Yellow Book, mag. Period...67.50 SHERIFF GUN PERMIT Brownells, office supp. .....405.90 City of Logan ......................80.00 Claritus, off. Supp. ............209.96 GENERAL SUPPLEMENTAL FUND Julie Florian, emp. grp. Ins.166.66 Amanda Hall, emp. grp.ins.166.66 Brian Heffernan, emp. grp. Ins. ................................166.66 Rene Hiller, emp. grp. Ins. 166.66 Christina Holcombe, emp. Grp. Ins. ........................166.66 IMWCA, workmen’s comp Ins. ...........................15,741.00 IA Comm. Pool Admin., Real property ins.....229,633.42 Elizabeth Lenz, emp. grp. Ins. ................................166.66 Tabitha Melby, emp. grp. Ins. .................................166.66 Richard Ohl Sr., emp. grp. Ins. ................................166.66 Floyd Pitt, emp. grp. Ins....166.66 Pott. Co. Sheriff, sheltered Care .................................64.00 Quakerdale, sheltered Care ...........................1,399.50 SilverSTone Group, emp. Grp. Ins. .....................7,000.00 Lorie Thompson, emp. grp. Ins. ................................166.66 Walter Utman, emp. grp. Ins. .................................166.66 RURAL SERVICES BASIC FUND Ed Eberlein, motor veh.....150.00 Harr. Co. Landfill dues & Memberships.............13,433.00 Woodhouse Chev.-BuickPont..........................46,326.00 JAIL G&M Refrig. & App.............74.49 Leg. Serv. Ag., personal Items & clothing .............200.00 Loftus Htg. & AC...............133.87 US Bank ...........................729.86 MH-DD SERVICES FUND Alegent Hth. The Mercy Center, outpatient.............76.00 Cass Inc., work act. Services .....................3,066.63 Concerned, work act. Services .....................7,830.85 Country Care Center Corp., RCF............................8,618.54 County Rate Info Sys., tech. Assistance...................1,210.00 Crossroads of Western IA, Work act. Services ....29,746.79 Elec. Trans. Clearin., tech. Assistance..................4,728.00 Harr. Comm. Mental Hth., Outpatient....................8,333.33 Harr. Co. Homemakers, supp. Comm.. living ................696.40 Heartland Family Service, Outpatient.......................428.00 Home Care Services, Other .............................585.75 Horizons Unlimited Palo Alto, Work activity services ....954.96

Legals Ida Services, work activity Services .....................1,600.62 Narmi Joseph, legal rep. ..240.00 Morse Ent., RCF ...........4,510.98 Nishna Prod., work act. Services ......................1,626.30 Partnership for Progress, RCF............................2,336.99 Pott. Co. Comm. Svs., sheriff Transportation ...............370.38 Pott. Co. Sheriff, sheriff Transportation .................35.00 The Pride Group, RCF ..2,951.18 Seasons Center, outpat......70.55 SW IA Plann. Co., other 1,909.09 Treas. State of IA, inpatient/ Hospital ......................3,422.64 Vocational Dev. Ctr., sheltered Workshop ....................1,266.14 Wesco Ind., supp. Comm.. Living.............................945.51 SECONDARY ROAD FUND AA Wheel & Truck Supply, Lubricants .......................62.95 Agriland FS .................50,602.51 Aramark Uniform Services, Elec. light & power ..........56.35 Atco International, lub. .....350.00 Barco, minor MV pts. & Accessories....................101.70 Baum Hydraulics, minor MV pts. And access. ..................251.59 Bedrock Gravel, cover aggregate And sand ...................15,286.61 Ronald Bell, meals & Lodging ............................41.00 Bi-State Motor Parts, minor MV Parts & access. ..............143.54 Bill’s Water Cond. ...............23.25 Bonsall TV & App. ..............47.85 Certified Appliance ...........424.38 Cheryl Smith Cleaning Serv., Building maint. ..............220.00 City of Logan ....................145.41 City of Missouri Valley ........16.25 Diamond Mowers Inc., minor MV pts. & access. .........309.16 Electronic Eng., office Supplies .........................129.00 Hallett Materials, flood & Erosion const. St. ..........250.65 Harr. Co. REC...................880.01 ICEOO, meeting reg.........150.00 IA Prison Ind., traffic & st. Sign material ..............2,053.60 Jensen’s Ace Hardware .....19.52 Loess Hills Co. Corner .....223.65 Logan Auto Supply ...........514.92 Logan Do It Best Hdw. .....353.15 Matheson Trigas Inc., minor Equip. & hand tools .......247.20 MidAmerican Energy.....1,456.00 Mo. Valley NAPA ...............128.53 New Sioux City Iron, safety Items ................................32.56 Northern Safety Co., safety Items .............................221.17 Nuts & Bolts, minor equip. & hand tools ..................216.36 Powerplan, minor MV parts & Access........................4,324.89 Qwest .................................52.67 Regional Water...................43.00 Reliable Office Supplies, Office supplies ..............166.42 Ri-Tec, lubricants...........1,194.00 Rubber Inc., tires & tubes 146.45 Sam’s Club .......................185.36 JT Stoner, meals & lodg.....56.00 Thermo King Christensen, minor MV pts & access. ............27.35 Ultra No Touch....................58.00 US Bank ...........................649.47 Verizon Wireless...............208.08 Wick’s Sterling Trucks, minor MV pts & access. ...........425.73 Windstream ......................654.58 Wise-Mack Inc., minor MV Pts & access. .............1,574.90 Wright Express Fleet Serv., Fuel & oil ....................3,011.51 Ziegler Inc., minor MV pts. And access. ..................383.58 FLOOD AND EROSION Shearer Contractors Co., Flood & erosion Const.8,912.50 Sundquist Eng., flood & erosion Const. St. ...................1,270.50 E911 SERVICE COMMISSION AT&T..............................3,476.00 Bill’s Water Cond. ...............46.50 Bonsall TV & App. ............304.95 D&D Comm., radio & related Equip. ............................493.00 Harr. Co. REC.....................46.81 IA Dept. of Pub. Safety, Misc.............................5,220.00 Mainstay Sys. Inc., misc. ..237.00 MidAmerican Eng...............15.47 Qwest ...............................477.91 Tip Top Comm., radio and Related equip. ...............100.00 Windstream ...................2,659.27 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT City of Logan ......................74.82 Counsel Office & Document, Off. & data proc. .............115.62 Loftus Htg. & AC.................57.37 Logan Do It Best ..................6.99 MidAmerican Energy........736.32 Larry Oliver, meals & Lodging ............................73.81 Sam’s Club .......................214.33 Ultra No Touch....................21.00 US Bank ...........................363.91 Verizon Wireless.................59.62 CONSERVATION LAND ACQUISITION TRUST FUND Logan Do It Best Hdw. .....117.87 Next Phase Env., park land Dev. ..........................41,309.84 Alan Ronk, park land dev. 193.50 Treas. State of IA, tax and fee Disbursement ................487.00 US Bank ...........................132.00 ASSESSOR Bonsall TV & App. ............175.00 Counsel Office & Document, Office supplies .................13.44 Office Stop .......................444.99 Solutions, office & data Processing ..................3,100.00 Verizon Wireless.................37.91 Windstream ........................25.13 JULY 2011 WITHHOLDING GENERAL FUND FICA ............................18,071.10 IPERS..........................20,877.55 SHERIFF GUN PERMIT FICA ...................................23.56 IPERS.................................34.82 GENERAL SUPPLMENT FICA ............................24,820.81 IPERS..........................28,694.26 AFFINITY CARE ..............168.30 LINCOLN FINANCIAL ......387.30 BC/BS..........................53,460.31 FIRST HORIZON ..........4,224.29 RURAL SERVICES FICA ...................................38.63 IPERS.................................39.07 SECONDARY ROAD FUND FICA ............................22,902.29 IPERS..........................24,171.82 AFFINITY CARE ................91.80 LINCOLN FINANCIAL ......211.80 BC/BS..........................35,777.10 FIRST HORIZON ..........2,056.11 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FICA ..............................4,912.16 IPERS............................5,169.76 AFFINITY CARE ................20.40 LINCOLN FINANCIAL ........48.00 BC/BS............................6,335.43 FIRST HORIZON .............295.66 ASSESSOR FUND

FICA ..............................1,910.98 IPERS............................2,038.32 AFFINITY CARE ..................7.65 LINCOLN FINANCIAL ........18.00 BC/BS............................3,027.04 JULY SALARIES Margie Heffernan ..........1,177.45 F. Irene Churchill...............592.75 Janet Wilderdyke ..............495.87 Shirley Sigler ....................120.91 Nichole Briggs ...............1,088.81 Ruth Heim ........................348.50 Juanita Johnsen ...............534.66 Susan Gilfillan ....................75.00 Gay Melby .....................3,862.44 Patty Booher.....................564.21 Pearl Pinkham ...............1,886.94 Dedra Hatcher ...............3,185.15 Kandice Wallis ..................189.00 Diane Meeker ...................326.12 Carrie Montanez...............700.20 Elizabeth Block..............1,280.70 Deanna Neil ..................1,623.28 Corrine AesophMangiaruca ................1,739.76 Sara Bonham ...................510.75 Donald Rodasky .................36.10 Craig Kelley ......................125.00 John Burbridge.................100.00 Royla Roden.....................100.00 Clifford Raper ...................656.32 Richard McIntosh ...............50.00 Eugene Jacobsen...............31.66 Gail Witt..............................75.00 Kenneth McIntosh ..............75.00 Michael Hack......................75.00 Thomas Schafer ...............280.50 Gary Wenninghoff .........1,989.84 Ron Greenwood ...............290.43 Kyle Lindberg ...................113.36 Lyle Gilfillan ........................75.00 Carter Oliver..................1,939.50 Thomas Maaske............2,106.00 33-1

PUBLIC NOTICE THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT PROBATE NO. ESPRO14295 NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL, OF APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTOR, AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF REGINA M. JONES, Deceased ..To All Persons interested in the estate of Regina M. Jones, Deceased, who died on or about June 23, 2011: You are hereby notified that on the 19th day of July, 2011, the last will and testament of Regina M. Jones, deceased, bearing date of the 18th day of June, 2001, was admitted to probate in the above named court and that Kenneth W. Jones was appointed executor of the estate. Any action to set aside the will must be brought in the district court of said county within the later to occur of four months from the date of the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice to all heirs of the decedent and devisees under the will whose identities are reasonably ascertainable, or thereafter be forever barred. Notice is further given that all persons indebted to the estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned, and creditors having claims against the estate shall file them with the clerk of the district court, as provided by law, duly authenticated, for allowance, and unless so filed by the later to occur of four months from the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid) a claim is thereafter forever barred. Dated this 25th day of July, 2011. Kenneth W. Jones Executor of the Estate 2450 Mulligan Trail Logan, IA 51546 James D. Lohman, ICIS PIN. No: AT0004705 Attorney for Executor Reimer, Lohman & Reitz 25 S. Main St., P.O. Box 248 Denison, IA 51442 Date of second publication 17 day of August, 2011. 33-2

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR HARRISON COUNTY CASE NO. EQCV029115 ORIGINAL NOTICE DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., ASSETBACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-C, Plaintiff, Vs. ESTATE OF MARGARET D. KOUGIAS, SPOSE OF MARGARET D. KOUGIAS, THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF MISSOURI VALLEY, STATE OF IOWA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AND PARTIES IN POSSESSION AND All Unknown claimants and all Persons Unknown Claiming any Right, Title or Interest in and to the following described real estate situated in Harrison County, Iowa, to wit: The following described real estate situated in Harrison County, Iowa, to-wit: South One-half (1/2) of Lot One (1), Block Three (3), Addis Addition to Missouri Valley, Iowa AND ALL KNOWN AND UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS AND ALL PERSONS KNOWN OR UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST AND ALL OF THEIR HEIRS, SPOUSES, ASSIGNS, GRANTEES, LEGATEES, DEVISEES AND ALL OF THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby notified that there is now on file in the Office of the Clerk of the above Court, a Petition, in the above-entitled action which prays for judgment in rem in the principal amount of $29,435.31 plus interest to 5/11/2011 in the amount of $1,016.65 and thereafter at the rate of 7.75% per annum, such amount equaling $6.25 per day, the costs of the action including report of title costs $250.00, late charges of $113.84, recoverable balance of $9.60, and reasonable attorney fees and that said sums be declared a lien upon the following described premises at 587 N. 1st

St., Missouri Valley, Harrison County, Iowa to-wit: South One-half (1/2) of Lot One (1), Block Three (3), Addis Addition to Missouri Valley, Iowa; That the mortgage on the abovedescribed real estate for foreclosed; that a special execution issue for the sale of as much of the mortgaged premises as is necessary to satisfy the judgment; and for other relief as the Court may deem just and equitable. The attorney for the Plaintiff is Brian G. Sayer, whose address is 531 Commercial Street, Suite 250; P.O. Box 2363, Waterloo, IA 50704-2363, telephone (319) 232-3304, facsimile (319) 2323639. NOTICE THE PLAINTIFF HAS ELECTED FORECLOSURE WITHOUT REDEMPTION. THIS MEANS THAT THE SALE OF THE MORTGAGED PROEPRTY WILL OCCUR PROMPTLY AFTER ENTRY OF JUDGMENT UNLESS YOU FILE WITH THE COURT A WRITTEN DEMAND TO DELAY THE SALE. IF YOU FILE A WRITTEN DEMAND, THE SALE WILL BE DELAYED UNTIL SIX MONTHS FROM ENTRY OF JUDGMENT IF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY IS YOUR RESIDENCE AND IS A ONE-FAMILY OR TWO-FAMILY DWELLING OR UNTIL TWO MONTHS FROM ENTRY OF JUDGMENT IF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY IS NOT YOUR RESIDENCE OR IS YOUR RESIDENCE BUT NOT A ONE-FAMILY OR TWO-FAMILY DWELLING. YOU WILL HAVE NO RIGHT OF REDEMPTION AFTER THE SALE. THE PURCHASER AT THE SALE WILL BE ENTITLED TO IMMEDIATE POSSESSION OF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY. YOU MAY PURCHASE AT THE SALE. IF YOU DO NOT FILE A WRITTEN DEMAND TO DELAY THE SALE AND IF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY IS YOUR RESIDENCE AND IS A ONE-FAMILY OR TWOFAMILY DWELLING, THEN A DEFICIENCY JUDGMENT WILL NOT BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU. IF YOU DO FILE A WRITTEN DEMAND TO DELAY THE SALE, THEN A DEFICIENCY JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU IF THE PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY ARE INSUFFICIENT TO SATISFY THE AMOUNT OF THE MORTGAGED DEBT AND COSTS. IF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY IS NOT YOUR RESIDENCE OR IS NOT A ONE-FAMILY OR TWO-FAMILY DWELLING, THEN A DEFICIENCY JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU WHETHER OR NOT YOU FILE A WRITTEN DEMAND TO DELAY THE SALE. You are further notified that unless you serve and, within a reasonable time thereafter, file a motion or answer on or before September 6, 2012 in the Iowa District Court for Harrison County, Iowa, at the Courthouse in Logan, Iowa, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. If you require the assistance of auxiliary aids or services to participate in court because of a disability, immediately call your district ADA coordinator at 712-328-4797. (If you are hearing impaired call Relay Iowa TTY (800) 735-2942.) VickI Krohn Clerk of Court Harrison County Courthouse Logan, Iowa IMPORTANT; YOU ARE ADVISED TO SEEK LEGAL ADVICE AT ONCE TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS. 31-3

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF EXPIRATION OF RIGHT OF REDEMPTION TO: Dave L. Steinbach and Mary S. Steinbach; Citifinancial, Inc.; John Doe and Jane Doe, real names unknown; and all persons/entities who have or claim some lien upon, right to, interest in, or title to the real estate described below. In accordance with Iowa Code Section 447.9 you are hereby notified that: 1. The property described in paragraph 2 of this Notice was sold at the regular tax sale on or about the day of June 15, 2009, Tax Certificate Number 2009-00136. The purchaser at tax sale was Ken Knosp. 2. The legal description of the property sold is: STR 001-079-043 LOT 2 SE SW PT LOT 1 SW SW MAGNOLIA-LM. ...............Harrison County Parcel #150001150200000. a.k.a. 2625 230th St., Logan, IA 51546 in the County of Harrison and State of Iowa. 3. That your right of redemption as set forth in the Iowa Code will expire unless redemption of the property is made within 90 days from the date of completed service of this Notice. 4. If the right of redemption is allowed to expire, a tax deed will be issued by the Treasurer of Harrison County, Iowa. By: Ken Knosp 32-2

PUBLIC NOTICE LOGAN CITY COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS August 8, 2011 At 7:00 p.m. Mayor Fetter called the meeting to order. Those present were council members Clark, Johnson, Hartwig, Moss and Crum. Mayor Fetter asked if there were any additions or deletions to the agenda. There were none. Motion was made by Clark and seconded by Crum to approve the agenda. 5 ayes. Motion was made by Moss and seconded by Hartwig to approve the consent agenda which consisted of: approval of the 7-18-11 minutes and the 7-22-11 special meeting minutes, set date of 8-22-11 as the next regular council meeting, approve claims register, treasurer’s report, department reports and building permits for: R.C. Androy, 318 N. 4th Ave., replace screened porch; Bob Salter, 121 W. 6th St., sidewalk; Herbert Clark, 321 W. 7th St., con-

crete patio; Tammy Kirk, 121 N. 4th Ave., concrete patio; Gene Beckner/Logan Auto, 117 N. 4th Ave., concrete slab in alley. 5 ayes. .Agenda item 6 was to decide on sending the request by Wes Greve to vacate Kole Dr. and Jacob Ave. on Kerry Lane to Planning and Zoning for review. Motion was made by Johnson and seconded by Clark to send the request to Wes Greve to vacate Kole Dr. and Jacob Ave. on Kerry Lane to Planning and Zoning for review. 5 ayes. Agenda item 7 was to award the bid for hail damage to the city buildings. Motion was made by Moss and seconded by Hartwig to accept the bid from Collins Construction, LLC for $96,264.25 to repair the hail damage to the city buildings. 5 ayes. Motion was made by Johnson and seconded by Clark to award the bid for foam roofing on the lower storage building to Triple C Roofing for $2,700.00. 5 ayes. Next on the agenda was a discussion for a budget amendment to allow for the payment of hail repair work to city buildings and possibly set a date for a public hearing on the proposed amendment. The expense for the hail damage repair was put into last year’s budget when the budget amendment was done in May. Motion was made by Johnson and seconded by Clark to schedule a public hearing for a budget amendment on September 12, 2011 at 6:45 p.m. 5 ayes. Next on the agenda was a discussion with Steve Johnson about leasing the portion of the alley behind Doc’s Roadhouse from the city. The city attorney has drawn up a lease for Doc’s Roadhouse for $50.00 a month. Johnson expressed concern over having to pay $50 per month. He stated that he would be willing to pay as much as $300 per year. The council discussed charging Johnson only for the months that the beer garden would be in use. Johnson will make a drawing of his plans and bring it to City Hall by the end of the week. The next item on the agenda was the police committee making the recommendation for extra pay for on call time to Chief Smith and Officer Hiatt while they are down an officer. Motion was made by Johnson and seconded by Crum to pay Chief Smith an extra $500.00 every pay period and to pay Officer Hiatt an extra $375.00 every pay period until a third officer is hired. 5 ayes. Citizens questions and comments: Tim Rife attended the meeting to ask the council if there is any place in the alley that he could lease for parking for his tenant at 108 N. 3rd Avenue since there is no overnight parking on this street. The council suggested that there would be parking behind the Masonic Lodge or possibly behind some of the 4th Avenue businesses. Chamber update: Hartwig reported the Chamber considered the 4th of July celebration a success this year. CLAIMS 3 E Elec. Engineering, pool elec. parts ...................$104.84 ACCO, sodium bicarb.......974.75 Agriland FS, chemicals & Fuel .............................2,417.56 Bluffs Electric Inc., traffic signal Equip. ............................281.15 Electric Pump Inc., service Agreement.....................958.85 Farm Service Co., diesel....28.77 First Natl. Bank, payroll Taxes ..........................6,408.00 G&M Refrigeration, pool Repair...............................67.50 Lois Hall, contract serv. ....459.74 Harr. Co. Clerk of Court, court Fees ..............................205.00 Harr. Co. E911 Board, Iowa Sytem ............................350.00 Harr. Co. Landfill, assmt., Tipping fees................3,233.00 Heller Implement Inc., Kubota parts...................573.59 Richard Hiatt, mileage........58.28 Hygienic Laboratory, tests ..11.00 Iowa DNR, permit.............210.00 IA League of Cities, clerk Conference....................185.00 IPERS, Ipers..................3,464.99 John Shafer, deposit Refund ............................39.79 Loftus Heating, A/C rep....363.97 Logan Auto Supply, parts .104.57 Logan Car Care, repair 98 Int. dump ........................567.45 Logan Do It Best Hdw., UPS/ Office/supplies................409.52 Logan Pub. Lib., reimb...4,725.00 Logan Super foods, pool Supplies ........................689.21 Logan Water Dept., apply Deposits ........................310.21 Marilyn Keizer, meals/ Mileage .........................219.57 MidAmerican Energy, Utilities.........................7,238.38 Norm’s Tires, tire repair......10.70 Oloff, Jeremy, repair 98 Int. dump. .......................155.00 Papillion Sanitation, trash Removal ........................115.00 Principal Life, life & disability Ins. ................................129.43 Rhonda Sears, pool pass Refund..............................60.00 Sam’s Club, concessions, Supplies ........................620.90 Shelby Co. Enviornmental, 2011 Pool inspection..............486.00 Sioux City Journal, police Officer ad ......................421.74 Elmer Smith, mileage .......111.00 Solution One, copier...........43.72 T&S Electric, pool pump Repair...............................75.00 The Office Stop, printed Envelopes .....................117.50 Treas., State of Iowa, payroll Taxes ...........................1069.00 Treas. State of Iowa, sales Tax..............................2,613.00 Ultra No Touch, city vehicle Wash ...............................20.00 Upper Boyer Drainage District, Drainage tax.....................57.94 Verizon Wireless cell Phones ...........................181.90 Warner Ins. Agency, WC Audit ............................2,238.00 Windstream, telephone ....224.52 Winnelson Co., aerator.......79.76 Angela Winther, mileage ....22.20 TOTAL .........................43,512.00 PAYROLL THRU 7/25/11 .....................14,052.43 PAYROLL THRU 8/8/11 .......................13,863.92 TOTAL PAYROLL.........27,916.35 PAID TOTAL.................71,428.35 Motion was made by Clark and seconded by Crum to adjourn. 5 ayes. Randy Fetter, Mayor Angela Winther, City Clerk/Administrator 33-1


Classifieds WANTED WANTED: Paying for unwanted, old motorcycles - running or not. Prefer titled, but not a deal breaker without. Please call Jeff, 712-310-6503.

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED: Full-time Sports Reporter/Photograp her needed at the Lexington ClipperHerald. Duties include: Covering 5 local high school sports teams, photography, other local stories of interest, experience in J o u r n a l i s m writing/QuarkPhotos hop helpful, competit i v e wage/401K/Insuranc e benefits. Send resume to David Penner, Editor, Lexington ClipperHerald, P O Box 599, Lexington, NE 68850. MCAN HELP WANTED: The Federal Public Defender for Districts of South Dakota & North Dakota is accepting application for an: Assistant Federal Public Defender in the Bismarck, North Dakota office. This is a full time attorney position dedicated exclusively to criminal defense work for indigent defendants before the U. S. District court and the U. S. Court of Court of Appeals. Travel & work in branch offices may be required. Job qualifications include

excellent oral advocacy and writing skills, along w/recent, substantial trial experience. Salary’s negotiable based on qualifications and experience and compensation includes federal gov’t benefits. Also accepting applications for an: Administrative Offficer. This position oversees all operational aspects of the organization and reports directly to the Federal Public Defender. A full description of duties and qualifications is available at http://sd.fd.org/. Qualified applicants should send a resume and 3 references by Aug. 26, 2011 to: Neil Fulton, Federal Public Defender. P. O. Box 1258, Pierre, SD 57501 or via e-mail to: neilfulton@fd.org. Subject to a Preemployment background check. Equal O p p o r t u n i t y Employer. MCAN

background check and drug screen. We invite you to apply at www.bbgh.org to download application or contact. Nebraska W o r k f o r c e Development 302 Box Butte, Alliance, NE 69301. EOE. Phone 308-7632935 - Fax 308-7632 9 3 6 Jill.Langemeier@ne braska.gov. MCAN HELP WANTED: The Panhandle Humane Society is actively seeking an Executive Director. This person is responsible for all activities of the shelter including animal welfare, personnel, and fundraising. Phone Calls or inperson communications will not be accepted. For job description, application and submission requirements please visit our website www.panhandlehum a n e s o c i e t y. o r g under our Links seciton. HELP WANTED: Looking for hard working, honest, individual to work on a dairy farm in Lingle, Wyo. Looking for a full-time worker. Based on experience $20,000-$40,000 yearly with paid vacation. Ask for Tim 307-534-5119 MCAN

HELP WANTED: Box Butte General Hospital in Alliance, Nebraska is seeking Labor and Delivery Full-time Nights RN. Desiring a full range of learning and professional experiences. We offer a competitive salary and a full range of benefits including paid continued education certifications. Ask about our sign on incentives. All offers of employment are subject to a

HELP WANTED: Work for Dept. of Health & Human Services. View current job openings at w w w. d h h s. n e. g ov MCAN

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The City of Pisgah will be holding a public hearing to review an application for a State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan and to make available to the public the contents of an environmental information document and the City’s Facility Plan. These documents include design and environmental information related to the proposed improvements to the City’s

wastewater treatment system. The proposed project involves addition of a third lagoon cell. The purpose of this public hearing is to inform area residents of the community of Pisgah of this proposed action, discuss the actual cost and user fees associated with this project, and to address citizen’s concerns if any, with the plan. The public hearing location and time are as follows:

September 21, 2011, 7 p.m., Pisgah City Hall, 106 E. Main St., Pisgah, Iowa 51564. All interested persons are encouraged to attend this hearing. Written comments on this proposal may be submitted prior to the hearing. Questions regarding this hearing or the availability of documentation may be directed to the City Clerk’s office at 7 1 2 - 4 5 6 - 2 3 0 1 . 33-1

421 E. Erie, Missouri Valley, IA For information on all area listings go to: www.npdodge.com

REDUCED!

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

No Picture Available

REDUCED

416 N. Tower Rd.,

135 E. Michigan St.

2941 Ottawa Lane -4 bed, 3

3 Acres ml, 3 bdrms, 1.75 bath, 36x44’ shop/gar

5 bedr, 1.5 baths, 2, 494 sf, 2 car garage

Logan $145,000

Mo. Valley $125,000

NEW LISTING!

REDUCED!

bth, 2 car attached 4,016 sa. ft. , blt 2005, 10 acres, 30x54’ outbldg Red. $46,000

Mo. Valley

$299,000

NEW LISTING!

HELP WANTED: OTR Drivers for flatbed operation. Must have CDL and a minimum 5 years, exp. Newer equipment 308-432-2843, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. MCAN

ple, Community Room Woodland Apartments, 1105 Park, Saturday, Aug. 20, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

FOR RENT

GARAGE SALE: Aug. 20, 27 108 C o l o n i a l , Shenandoah, IA. Vintage cameras, enamelware, tools, books, china, dinnerware, linens, Dekalb collectibles, MidCentury Modern dining set, furniture, housewares. OWL

FOR RENT: House, 608 Lincoln Way Woodbine! 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1260 sq. ft., 1 car detached garage, all appliance included, New Carpet! $650 per month, utilities not included $500 Deposit and Reference Required, NO inside pets or smoking. Call Mindy @ 712-592-1127 for application and showing. FOR RENT: 6 Weare St., Woodbine. $500/month. Deposit required. HUD approved. Stove, refrigerator included. Available Setp. 1. If interested call 402871-4385. FOR RENT: Apartments for rent in Odd Fellows Building located on Woodbine Main Street Contact Now! 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apartment, with all appliances i n c l u d i n g washer/dryer, $550 a month. Wood floors with 12 ft. ceilings. Attached garage space available. Contact Mindy at 712-592-1127.

FOR SALE FOR SALE: La-ZBoy recliner, blue, good condition $75. Call 712-644-2108 MISCELLANEOUS SALE: Several peo-

GARAGE SALES

LOST LOST - 2 year old male lab, last seen Aug. 10 near Melody Oaks. Reward. Call 402-350-9338. STATE WIDE ADS ADOPTION ADOPTION = LOVE. A secure, happy, loving home awaits your baby. Exp. paid. Susan & Frank, 1866-664-1213 www.wewishtoadopt.net (INCN) PREGNANT? Considering Adoption? Call us First! Living expenses, housing, medical and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. Adopt Connect. 1-866-7439212 (INCN) HELP WANTEDTRUCK DRIVER Drivers - Midwest regional or OTR. $5000 Sign On Bonus for new lease ops & $2500 for company. Good pay & benefits. 888-5146005 www.drivehml.com (INCN) J O H N S R U D

Now Accepting Applications For: 1 bedroom apartment at Boyer View Apts., Logan, IA. Quiet complex, stove & refrigerator furnished. Rent based on income. 62 years or older or persons with disabilities of any age. Call 1-712-647-2113 or 1-800-762-7209. Boyer View is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

129 N. 9th St. 3 bd,, 1 bth, 2 car garage corner lot, 1,098 sf

Mo. Valley

121 & 123 N. 6th St.

303 N. 6th St.

2161 Westridge Dr.

Commercial property former church

3+ bdrm, 3 ba, 2 kitchens, 1 car gar., corner lot

4 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2 car, 2770 sq. ft., 1.18 acres, 20’x40’ ingd pool

Mo. Valley $65,000

Mo. Valley $79,000

Mo. Valley $95,000

Mo. Valley $184,900

D r i v e r s - N o Experience-No Problem. 100% Paid CDL Training. Immediate Benefits. 20/10 program. Trainers Earn up to $.49 per mile! CRST VAN EXPEDITED 800-326-2278 www.JoinCRST.com (INCN) INSTRUCTION, SCHOOLS ALLIED HEALTH career trainingAttend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-4819 4 0 9 www.CenturaOnline. com (INCN) MISCELLANEOUS Place a 25 word classified ad in over 250 newspapers in Iowa for only $300. Find out more by calling 800-227-7636 or this newspaper. w w w. c n a a d s . c o m (INCN) Social Security Disability Claim Denied? We specialize in appeals and hearings. FREE C O N S U LTAT I O N . Benefit Team Services, Inc. Toll Free 1-888-8364052. (INCN)

ADOPTION PREGNANT? Consider ing Adoption? Call us First! Living expenses, housing, medical and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. Adopt Connect. 1-866-7439212 (INCN) ANNOUNCEMENTS Become Dietary Manager (average annual salary $40,374) in eight months in online program offered by T e n n e s s e e Technology Center at Elizabethton. Details www.ttcelizabethton.edu, 1-888986-2368 or email patricia.roark@ttceli zabethton.edu. (INCN) HELP WANTED MISCELLANEOUS Swine Wean-Finish Site Manager. Site manager for family owned Farrow-Finish operation. Excellent compensation package. Extensive production experience required. Contact 319-330-3579 (INCN) HELP WANTEDMISCELLANEOUS ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.workservices9.com (INCN)

PUBLIC AUCTION WEDNESDAY NIGHT AUGUST 24

6:30 P.M.

Metal building on corner of Windom and Huron St.

TOOLS AND SOME ANTIQUES Platform Scale, cream seperator, band saw, drill press, radial saw Go to www.gochenourauctioneering.com for full listing

402-238-8744 712-216-2024

402-639-6106 • www.chucksmallwood.com

hT ank You

to all those involved with making the 2nd Annual Amanda Jean Pape Memorial Golf Tournament a huge success. We are deeply appreciative to all those who donated time, money, prizes, golf carts and other support; and to those who participated in the golf tournament. The turnout was overwhelming and we are once again comforted and proud to know that Amanda meant so much to so many. It truly keeps us going to see that her spirit and fun loving ways live on and are not forgotten.

• Schenkelberg Implement • Heine-Richards Irrigation Electric Justin Richards • Logan Car Wash • Adam Bradfield • Colton & Kylie Henschen • Marcy Olson • Patty NiedermeyerTupperware • Sharon Neill • Marilyn BousteadBoustead RE • Annette KnottTastefully Simple • John & Joleen Larson • United Life Insurance Mike Sears • Harrison County REC • Mike & Lori Williams

“You got the drive, We have the Direction” OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass Pets/passenger policy. Newer equipment. 100% NO touch. 1-800528-7825 (INCN)

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal,*Compute rs, *Criminal Justice. Job placement a s s i s t a n c e . Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-2203 9 6 0 www.CenturaOnline. com (INCN)

Local Resident 317 S. 3rd Ave., Logan

Chuck & Ravae Smallwood

• Papa Joe’s • Hoffman Agency • Midstates Bank • Farmer’s Trust & Savings Bank • Quaker Steak & Lube • Dunlap Livestock • Moorhead Feed & Supply • Horizon Implement • Bank of the West • Bonsall’s TV & Appliance • Gary’s Ag Supply • Jiffy Mart • State Farm Insurance • Adam DickinsonChannel Seeds • Gary DickinsonAgriland FS • Rick & Leigh Meeker • Casey’s General Store • Al & Jodi Swand

TRANSPORT, Food Grade Liquid Carrier, Seeking Class-A CDL drivers. Home flexible weekends. 5 years experience required. Will train for tank. Great Pay/Benefits 1-888200-5067 (INCN)

OROZCO ROOFING & SIDING Tear Off - Free Estimates

REDUCED

3 bdrm, 2 bath, corner lot

• Peeka and Papa • Grandma and Grandpa Pape • Scott and Brenda Pape Leaders’ Salvage • Frances Barnett • Mike’s Garage (Mike Beers) • Progressive Ins. • Berne Coop • Gurney’s • Hall Body Shop (Bob Hall) • Twisted Tail • Hall Welding (Wes Hall) • Austad’s Golf • N&N Construction (Lee & Tony Nuzum) • Pendelton WhiskeyKurt Boustead • Mark’s Home Improvement (Mark Flint)

August 17, 2011

9

$59,500

3002 Westview Circle

The Family of Amanda Pape would like to say

Logan Herald-Observer

• Greg Wonder Trucking • Cory Jackson Family • Washington County Bank • Travis Shearer Family • Fatboyz • E. Drew Howard • Heather & Troy Hall • Ryan & Gina Henschen • Todd & Lori Cohrs • Aaron Herman • Dustin Henschen • Angele Boehm • Sue Shreve • Twin Valley Veterinary

PUBLIC AUCTION WEDNESDAY NIGHT Tommy Gate Co. a leading manufacturer of lift gates has an opening for an Engineering Technician at the Woodbine plant. Engineering Technician is needed to assist in building prototypes, drawing prints, writing manuals, writing CAM programs and other non-design functions. Successful candidates will need to have the following: • High School diploma, Associates Degree a plus. • Knowledge of CAD, CAM and Solid Works programs. • Skilled in problem solving. • Proficient in computer (i.e. Microsoft Office suite) and pertinent equipment skills. • Have excellent interpersonal, teamwork and communication skill. • Ability to self pace and meet deadlines. • Motivated and self starter. Tommy Gate offers an excellent wage and benefit package. Candidate must be able to pass skills test and drug screening. If you meet the above requirements, please e-mail, fax or mail your resume to: Marian Bosak, HR Manager 83 Bus Brown Drive, Woodbine, IA 51579 mbosak@tommygate,com FAX: 712-647-2572

AUGUST 17

6:30 P.M.

Metal building on corner of Windom and Huron Street Household Items and Furniture Owner: Eleanor Harvey Go to www.gochenourauctioneering.com to see full listing The Harrison County Homemaker Agency needs a Part-Time Home Care Aide. Qualifications include a current CNA certificate, must be able to work independently, valid driver’s license., dependable auto. Requires flexibility in work times and the ability to work independently, Competitive Wages.

Please contact: Kathy Baer RN Program Director 712-644-3437 Harrison County Homemaker Agency 111 N. 2nd Ave., Court House Logan, IA 51546


10

Logan Herald-Observer August 17, 2011

Sports

Gochenour girls excel in USA Track and Field

Iowa Girls Coaches Assn. All-State team

KELSEY FRISK THIRD TEAM PITCHER

Katelyn Gochenour Katelyn and Kennedy Gochenour, both students at Logan-Magnolia, completed an impressive USA Track and Field season with the Cornhusker flyers. The girls throw shot put, discus and javelin. Together they won 30 of 53 events and medaled in nine of the 11 events they competed in this season. Katelyn moved up to the youth division (age 13/14) and to the 600gram adult javelin in 2011. She quickly erased the previous Nebraska Association record, finally pushing the new record

to 124-feet 9-inches. Her season highlight was a national championship in the discus in Myrtle Beach at the National Youth Outdoor Championships, with a throw of 113-3 inches. She also finished second in the javelin with a throw of 116-3-i” and second in the shot put with a throw of 42-4 at Myrtle Beach. At the National Junior Olympic Championship in Wichita, Kan., Katelyn finished fourth in the javelin with a throw of 121-4 and fifth in the dis-

COURTNEY OVIATT HONORABLE MENTION

Kennedy Gochenour cus with a throw of 115. She missed a medal in the shot put by 8 centimeters, finishing ninth. It was an outstanding finish to her first year in the youth division. Kennedy competed in the midget division (age 11/12). She claimed the national championship in the mini-javelin, a title that her sister held the previous year at the National Youth Outdoor Championships with a throw of 87-2. She also finished third in the discus with a throw of 67-6 and seventh in the shot

put with a throw of 2411.25 at Myrtle Beach. Despite an injury hampering her chances before the National Junior Olympics, Kennedy regained her form and earned an eighth place medal in the mini-javelin with a throw of 95-10. She also competed in the discus in Wichita. Both girls ended the season as All-Americans with their medal-winning performances at the Junior Olympics. They are the daughters of Kelly and Lisa Gochenour of Logan.

Take part in Iowa Games

HALEIGH RIFE HONORABLE MENTION

PANTHER POST SEASON HONORS CONTINUE

UPCOMING SPORTS SCHEDULES VOLLEYBALL August 25 At Tri-Center August 30 At Missouri Valley

CROSS COUNTRY August 30 Boys and Girls at Lo-Ma September 6 5 p.m. Treynor Invitational

Lo-Ma 14U boys soccer team participated in the select division of the 25th Iowa Games July 15-17 in Ames. The tournament began with two games on Friday followed in the evening with supper, courtesy of the Iowa Food and Family Project. Team members were able to meet and get autographs that evening from Shawn Johnson, Iowa’s Olympic gymnastics gold medalist. They also participated in the opening ceremonies grand march led by Johnson at Jack Trice Stadium followed by the torch run and lighting of the cauldron kicking off the official games. On Saturday, they played their final two games and were awarded fourth place medals. Team members included, in front from the left, Christian Jensen, Chance McGrew, Jason Yost, Dillon Bonham, Brady Charbonneau, Kaleb Reynek; in back, coach Trent Lally, Drake Cohrs, Colton Fisher, Gabe Holben, Rusty meeker, Tyler Clark, Brett Rosengren, Tyler Coffin and assistant coach Dom Snyder. Submitted photo

FOOTBALL August 26 Missouri Valley at Logan September 2 At Clarinda

Flood damaged crops, insurance payments and lease contracts By Iowa State University Extension Some Iowa corn and soybean producers are facing substantial if not complete crop losses due to flooding. In particular, many acres of crops in the Missouri River Valley have been under water for a month or more this year. Fortunately, nearly 90 percent of Iowa’s corn and soybean acres are protected by multiple peril crop insurance. Crop Insurance Most Iowa producers purchase crop insurance policies with a 75 percent or 80 percent level of coverage. This means that if crops are a total loss, the producer must stand the first 20 percent to 25 percent of the loss. However, in 2011 nearly 90 percent of the crop acres insured in Iowa were covered under the Revenue Protection policies, which offer an increasing guarantee if prices increase between February and October. So far, this has added over a dollar per bushel to corn guarantees and about $.25

per bushel to soybean guarantees. Moreover, since Revenue Protection policies are settled at the average nearby future price during the month of October, rather than local cash prices, farmers will receive a bonus equal to the fall grain basis in their area. Producers with crops that have been totally destroyed by flooding will not have to incur the variable costs of harvesting. This could save around $20 per acre for soybeans and perhaps $70 per acre for corn, depending on potential yields and drying costs. Nevertheless, even producers who carried insurance at an 80 percent coverage level could be looking at net revenues of at least $100 per acre that obtained from normal yields this year. Potential Losses For example, assume an insured tract has an expected corn yield of 160 bushels per acre and an insurance proven yield of 150 bushels per acre. A normal crop marketed at

$6.50 per bushel would bring $1,040 per acre. The insurance indemnity payment for an 80 percent RP guarantee, zero yield, and an October futures price of $7.00 would equal 150 bu. X $7.00 x 80 percent = $840. Saving $70 in harvest costs would given an equivalent of $910 per acre, or $130 below the value of a normal crop. For soybeans, assume both the expected yield and the proven yield are 50 bushels per acre, and the crop could be marketed at $13 per bushel. Gross income for a normal crop would be $650 per acre. The insurance payment for a complete crop failure and a $13.75 October futures price would be 50 bu. X $13.75 x 80 percent = $550. Savings of $20 in harvesting costs brings the equivalent of $570 per acre, or $80 below the value of a normal crop. In many cases, of course, flooded acres will make up only a portion of the insured unit, so pro-

duction from non-flooded acres will be averaged in with the zero yields from the flooded acres. The real question is how much will it cost to clean up fields and bring them back into production next year? Iowa farmers have not had prior experience with fields being under water for extended periods of time, so effects are difficult to estimate. Problems with range from physically removing debris to leveling eroded areas to restoring fertility. Rental Contracts What do these questions imply for rental contracts? A great deal of uncertainty, for one thing. Lease agreements in Iowa continue in effect for another year under the same terms if they are not terminated on or before September 1. Either an owner or a tenant can terminate a lease. Operators who rented flood covered land this year may want to think seriously about whether they want to rent those acres next year, espe-

cially at the same level of cash rent. Leases can be terminated by delivering a notice in person to the other party, sending it by certified mail, or (rarely) publishing it. Landowners will have to bear the burden of mitigating flood damages – that goes with owning property. But, a better solution may be for renters and owners to work together to repair the damage and bring the land back into production. Farm operators may have access to machinery that can help accomplish the job that owners do not. In return, tenants should be compensated for their efforts, either directly, through a significant discount on the 2012 rent, or with a long-term lease. Next Year In some cases there may be doubt as to whether land flooded this year can even be planted next year. Fortunately, such acres are still eligible for multiple peril crop insurance coverage in 2012, including prevented planting payments.

Operators have the opportunity to increase the prevented planting coverage from 60 percent of their initial guarantee to 65 percent or 70 percent when they purchase their policies. They should also consider insuring flood damaged land as a separate unit to the extent possible. Finally, operators can request that their 2011 yield histories reflect a value equal to 60 percent of the county “T-yield” rather than a zero or very low yield. Close communication and cooperation between owners and renters can be a “win-win” strategy in the long run, but recovery will likely take several years. For more information about managing flood damaged cropland go to the Iowa State University website at www.extension.iastate.edu /topic/recovering-disasters. In addition, this will be a farm leasing meeting at 10 a.m., Aug. 19 at the Harrison County Extension office in Logan.


Logan Herald-Observer 8-17-11