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GOBLINS ON THE GREEN

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF LOGAN, HARRISON COUNTY, IOWA

4-7 p.m., Oct. 17 Logan City Park For children of all ages. For more information call 644-2863.

THE LOGAN

Herald-Observer www.heraldobserver.com OCTOBER 13, 2010

VOLUME 126, ISSUE 42

SHORT TAKES POLITICAL FORUM OCT. 21

The Logan HeraldObserver and Woodbine Twiner are giving Harrison County residents an opportunity to hear first hand from Harrison County candidates for treasurer and supervisor at a political forum at 7 p.m., Oct. 21 at the Logan Community Center. Candidates confirmed to attend are: Treasurer: Heather Hack Edney, Renee King, Sandy Royer. Supervisor: Russell Kurth, Robert Smith, Norma Coret and Walter Utman. Lorie Thompson, who is running unapposed as Harrison County Recorder will also be in attendance. To submit questions or for more information, call Nikki Davis at 712-647-2821 or Mary Darling at 644-2705. Questions may be emailed to nikki.davis@woodbinetwiner.com or mary.darling@heraldobserver.com.

$1.00

Possible application for design program discussed by city council ‘

Mary Darling Editor

The possible application for the community design program sponsored by the Iowa Architectural Foundation was discussed at length at the Oct. 4 Logan City Council meeting. A concern the council had was that if they applied, they would not be as far along as they need to be at this time. They will get additional information from Renea Anderson of

Harrison County Development Corporation, who initially spoke to the council about the program. City administrator Nedra Fliehe told the council that out of more than 200 letters sent out to residents to trim their trees, the city had to hire trimming services for only 20 residents that did not comply with the request to have them trimmed by Sept. 15 and Oct. 1. Top Notch Trimming and Rod Meeker Tree Service are doing the work for the city.

No one attended the public hearing that evening to approve the CDBG retention pond and ditch project. The council approved the project and stated the city was grateful to Southwest Iowa Planning Council for all its help. City attorney Joe Lauterbach was present when the council went into closed session to discuss a matter presently in litigation. When the council returned the open session, a motion was made to allow the city administrator to

consult with the city attorney on pending litigation. Fliehe was honored at the SWIPCO meeting Sept. 30 for 30 years of service as a city clerk/administrator. The city received a bid from Doug Johnsen Construction for work on three storm sewers on U.S. Highway 30. Fliehe was going to talk with the Iowa Department of Transportation and see if the sewers could be repaired one at a time instead of all at once. Fliehe said it would be financially

Public health oversees 24 programs

Jennette McGrew seven year Cancer Survivor

CAN COLLECTION SITE

Mary Darling Editor

As a fundraiser for postprom, the Lo-Ma junior class has a can collection bin available at the Logan Mini Mart parking lot.

KIWANIS PANCAKE DAY The Logan Kiwanis Club will hold its pancake day from 7 to 11 a.m., Oct. 16 at the Logan Community Center. On the menu, pancakes, sausage, biscuits and gravy, coffee, juice.

BLOOD MOBILE A blood donation opportunity will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Oct 14 at Logan-Magnolia High School. For more information call 644-2250.

Mary Darling Editor When Jennette McGrew felt a lump in her breast during a routine self-exam seven years ago, she didn’t anticipate it would lead to her life being turned upside down. A mammogram and an ultra sound completed on the same day showed what the doctor thought was just fluid. Two weeks later when she went back to have it aspirated, the doctor wasn’t able to. McGrew, then 46, went in for a biopsy two weeks later. “I thought I would wake up and SEE MCGREW Page 2

TOBACCO COALITION The Harrison County Tobacco Prevention Coalition will meet at noon, Oct. 19 at the Logan Library. Everyone is invited to attend. For more information contact Julie at 644-2220.

CRIMESTOPPERS MEETING The Harrison County Crimestoppers will be meeting at 7 p.m., Oct. 20 in the Logan Public Library meeting room. The meeting is open to the public.

YOUTH FOOTBALL LEAGUE The three Logan youth football teams will play on the Logan high school field Oct. 17. At noon the midgets will play; 2 p.m., junior midgets; and 4 p.m. the peewees. There is no admission charge.

Jennette McGrew, center holidng her granddaughter, is pictured with daughters Chanda, left and Ellen, near the finish line in the Race for Cure Oct. 3 in Omaha, Neb. Photo: Mary Darling

Persia Fire and Rescue marks 100 years Mike Brownlee For the Herald-Observer Not a bad 100th year. As Persia Fire and Rescue hits the century mark this year, the volunteer firefighters and emergency medical technicians have settled into a brand-new building shedding their old, worn and cramped digs for a facility that includes much more space. “It’s nice to have more room to walk around,”

impossible for the city to do all three this year. Two bids were received for winterization of the pool and the city is waiting for one more. They are also waiting on warranty repairs to be completed on the heater and a pump. Building permits were approved for Roger Seeley, 126 E. 10th St., fence and bathroom addition; Hartwig Investments, LLC, 123 E. Ninth St., footings and replace deck, pillars, ceiling and railing on front porch.

Persia Fire Chief Mark Carrigan said. “Everything was packed tight in the old hall.” The new fire hall was much needed for a crew that serves the small Harrison County town in a number of ways. In addition to putting out fires, rushing people to the hospital and rescuing cats from trees, members of Persia Fire and Rescue are also

Dealing with the 2009 H1N1 flu outbreak was a hectic time for Harrison County Public Health last year, director Nicole Carritt reported at the Sept. 23 Board of Supervisors meeting. The office coordinated all of the vaccine ordering, shipping, allocations and inventory for Harrison County, with a total of 3,800 doses of H1N1 received. The agency provided 2,136 of these doses to the public through mass public vaccination clinics with the remaining 1,664 doses distributed to the four Alegent Health clinics, Community Memorial Hospital and the Burgess, Dunlap clinic. The state received a little more than 1.2 million doses for allocation to public health agencies. According to Carritt, the county began its response to the event early in 2009 with members of Harrison County Home and Public Health systems in Harrison County and Harrison County Emergency Management monitoring events nationally, statewide and locally. “As local H1N1 activity began to increase, planning meetings were held to coordinate Harrison County’s response,” Carritt said. “The response to H1N1 was agency-wide and required cooperation from all staff to assist with public meetings, staffing clinics or keeping the office open while the majority of the staff were manning mass public clinics. Overall, the H1N1 response in Harrison County was a success.” The department is gearing up again for flu season with 1,200 doses available for adults and 500 for children. Carritt told the board the Home Health program is the largest program in her department at the present time. In fiscal year 2010 the department completed 2,851 home care aide visits for a total of 2,691.75 hours.

SEE PERSIA FIRE Dan and Peggy Manhart, pictured, donated the sign for the Page 2 fire hall in honor of their daughter, Melissa, who was killed in a car accident 10 years ago. Photo: WHNS

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Logan Herald-Observer

From the Front

2 October 13, 2010

MCGREW: Breast cancer survivor PUBLIC HEALTH: Busy office FROM PAGE 1 go home the same day and get on with my life,” she said. But when she woke up, she found out it was a stage two cancer with the lump and 20 lymph nodes removed. According to McGrew, it was a fast growing cancer. “From the time I first found it to the surgery, it had grown from quarter size to golf ball size,” she said. “Cancer was found in nine of the 20 lymph nodes,” McGrew said. “It was shocking,” she said of the cancer diagnosis. “My cousin had gone through it three months before. You just don’t stop and think it could happen to you.” McGrew was in the hospital for three days. Soon after she began four rounds of intense chemotherapy sessions, followed by 99 radiation treatments – three doses every day five days a week. “You ask why and then put your faith in God, that’s for sure,” she said. At the time, her children at home were in eighth grade, first grade and age 4.

According to McGrew, it was tough on the kids. “My aunt had recently died of cancer, so all they knew about it was death. My oncologist gave me a book called ‘Mommy has Cancer,’ and that helped them understand,” McGrew said. She also credited her neighbor for getting her through her recovery. “If it hadn’t been for Jane Michael, I don’t know what I would have done,” McGrew said. “She helped a lot.” McGrew said the chemotherapy treatments were pretty tough. “I lost my hair. We were at the Illinois state fair with my in-laws when it was falling out. My fatherin-law went ahead and shaved my head.” McGrew said she had no energy and didn’t work the entire time she was undergoing treatment. “My husband took off work to drive me to treatments in Omaha,” she said. Besides losing her hair, McGrew said she lost teeth and her veins were shot. “It takes a toll on the body overall,” she said. In 2009, after her cousin was diagnosed with breast

cancer for the second time, McGrew made the decision of having her breasts removed that June. “I did it as a precautionary measure. My cousin’s cancer came back and the odds weren’t very good for her,” McGrew said. Then in December she had reconstructive surgery. It’s been a long year for her. “I’m going to have the implants removed in December,” McGrew said. “My body just isn’t adjusting to them.” McGrew said she has her energy back and for the past two years has been working in the LoganMagnolia school lunchroom. She makes sure her daughters have regular checks now and urges all women to have a yearly mammogram. She also took part in the Susan G. Komen “Race for the Cure” Oct. 3 in Omaha, as a member of the Harrison County Cure Crusaders along with daughters Chanda, Ellen and her granddaughter. This was the second year in a row for her to participate in the event. “It’s a great experience,” McGrew said.

FROM PAGE 1 “A home health nurse is available 24 hours per day/seven days a week to meet the needs of the current clientele and to accept referrals for new clients,” Carritt said. There are currently 24 different programs running out of the Harrison County Public Health office including: home health skilled nursing services; family planning; maternal health; community education and outreach; blood pressure

screenings; emergency planning and preparedness; Learning for Life; Bright Beginnings; child and adult immunizations; influenza immunizations; lead poisoning prevention; child passenger safety; tobacco prevention and control; child health; Hawk-I and hair follicle drug testing among others. Carritt said they are presently working on a community health needs assessment for the county. According to Carritt, after the needs are identified in

the county, the next step is creating a health improvement plan. “This is where we determine what goals and activities we will focus on as a county to combat some of our identified health priorities,” Carritt said. “We will hold this stakeholder meeting later in October. The plan that is developed will look to addressing the health priorities over the next five years, all the while making adjustments as the programs or services change over that time period.”

PERSIA FIRE: Marking 100 years FROM PAGE 1 severe weather spotters for the area. With more space, the department will be able to hold EMT training classes in the near future, Carrigan said. “We hope to get a few more EMTs,” he said, adding the majority of the calls that come into the office are for ambulance transport. In addition to the new building, a brand-new sign trumpeting the fire hall was donated to the city by Dan and Peggy Manhart. Dan has been an EMT for 20 years and is also the treasurer of Persia Fire and Rescue Inc., the fundraising arm of the town’s emergency services department. Peggy is in charge of public relations for the department. To pay for the sign, the couple, from nearby Neola, used leftover money from a memorial account for their daughter, Melissa, who died at the age of 16 in a traffic accident in 2000. “Our daughter always

New Persia fire hall.

Photo: WHNS

helped out at fundraisers and events. It’s something we wanted to put in memory of her,” Dan said. “It’s something to remember her by.” Dan and Peggy help the department raise funds through three, once-a-year events. A breakfast buffet in February, a tractor pull in August and a demolition derby in September. “These firefighters, they donate all their time to the department and then they’re out there with fundraisers helping out,” Peggy said. Volunteer fire and rescue workers are a necessity in the small towns scattered across southwest Iowa.

“In these small towns, it’s getting hard and harder to find people to help,” Dan said. In Persia, as local businesses have dwindled and more and more residents work out of town, having personnel ready to respond during weekdays has become a problem. “During the day, it’s tough to even have an EMT around,” Carrigan said. But the volunteers in Persia persevere. “It’s tough,” Carrigan said, speaking on behalf of his Persia staff and, really, for all fire and rescue volunteers. “There are a lot of people in the community who depend on the stuff we do.”

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Editorial

Logan Herald-Observer October 13, 2010

3

Down Home By Sandy Turner Sandy Turner writes a weekly column “Down Home” which is published in several newspapers in the Midwest. She puts a humorous spin on issues that revolve around families and every day life, drawing from her own experiences.

That’s what I’m talking about As soon as I said my eye was twitching everyone at the table moaned as if it were the plague. Not because eye twitching is a terrible thing – but because they understood the implications – and asked if I needed to talk about it. Stress, in our family, comes in the form of eye twitching, neck rashes and excessive non-sensible talking. After my sister and I and our three daughters shared eye-twitching episodes we moved on to discuss everything – from life to death to what was the most fattening choice on the menu. Sometimes we all talk at once, sometimes we take turns – but one thing for sure – it’s constant. Not that long ago my sister and I were listening to our mom, her sister and grandma talk about these same life issues. It’s an inherited trait – we have the gift of gab. I realize it’s difficult for guys to understand since they don’t normally call their brother to ask how the new shoes are fitting or call dad to ask if he thinks its OK to wear white dress pants after Labor Day. Besides, a guy can say everything he needs to in one sentence, while a woman needs at least four paragraphs. Sometimes after the five of us girls have been together all evening we can still manage to think of things we forgot to say and have to call after we get home. You know, important things like “did you think the waitress was rude?” or “I think I’m going to wear my new boots to work tomorrow.” When guys call each other and ask how things are going they expect a generic response of a simple “good” whether it is or not. Women need 30 minutes to describe how good life is or to detail how crummy things are and can say the same thing 20 different ways until it begins to make sense. I know I’ve talked too long if my boyfriend’s eyes cloud over and he begins to nod in agreement whether the conversation calls for it or not. He’s too polite to tell me that he could care less about the new recipes I found or how I’m going to create a fall wreathe – so he sits patiently and waits for it to be over – unless he can fix or resolve my issue in less than 10 minutes. It’s a good balance I have with the people in my life. When I want to talk in circle I visit with dad, if I need a long-winded conversation about everything and sometimes about nothing, I call my sister or one of my daughters. When I want to know the truth of the matter, I talk with the man in my life that can fix everything from a broken nail to a broken heart – as long as it can be done during half-time. When all else fails I talk to myself and that’s when the eye twitching starts.

LETTERS POLICY

The Logan Herald-Observer will publish letters of up to 300 words in length. Letters must be signed and include a mailing address and daytime telephone number, intended to be used by us to verify authorship. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, accuracy and taste. Leading up to an election, an author may only write one letter every 30 days. Responses will be allowed up to the week before the election. Letters may be submitted to news@heraldobserver.com or directed by mail to P.O. Box 148, Logan, IA 51546.

TH E

LO GAN

Herald-Observer Editor MARY DARLING mary.darling@heraldobserver.com Sales Coordinator LOYAL FAIRMAN loyal.fairman@heraldobserver.com Advertising ads@heraldobserver.com Production Assistant MARY LOU NONEMAN marylou.noneman@woodbinetwiner.com 107 No. 4th Ave. P.O. Box 148 (mailing address) • Logan, IA 51546 Phone 712-644-2705 • Fax 712-644-2788 Published weekly in Logan, Iowa A Western Iowa Newspaper Group Publication of Midlands Newspaper, Inc. The Official Paper of the City of Logan and the Logan-Magnolia Community School District Periodical Class Postage Paid at Logan, IA 51546 USPS 317-740 Subscription Rates $31.50 per year for Senior Citizens (Age 62 years or older in county) $38.50 per year in Harrison County, Panama, Portsmouth and Moorhead $41.00 per year outside of Harrison County in Iowa and Nebraska $45.00 per year elsewhere in the United States $24.00 college/academic (9 month) The contents of this newspaper are protected by copyright. Other than non-commercial, personal use of a limited nature, no part of this publication may be copied and reproduced in any way without the prior written consent of the company.

Boredom in Harrison County Many immigrants worked together to create a modern society in an erstwhile wilderness. They came from different countries and backgrounds, but a trait they shared in common was the desire to improve their lives and also the new society where they made their homes. One such man was Thomas M. C. Logan, an intelligent man who hated boredom. Thomas enjoyed a comfortable early childhood in Indiana. His father was a prosperous business man who traveled a lot but found time to be with his family. The family’s fortunes crashed in 1834 when Thomas was four. His father was conducting business in Cincinnati, Ohio during a cholera epidemic, and though he planned to go home as soon as possible, he sickened and died. However, Logan’s family’s more limited resources were still sufficient for an education. Logan saved his money and in 1857, he started his first livestock and grain business. He was successful and decided as many others did, that his future was farther west. He moved progressively from Illinois to

Cedar Rapids and to Logan in 1877. Thomas was brighter than normal, and he seemed easily bored. He needed a challenge. Once again, he started a live stock and grain trading business, and as before, the enterprise thrived. Thomas seemed to enjoy the challenge of creating businesses from scratch, but once they were established, the thrill was gone and he longed to start over again. Without realizing it, Thomas’ tendency to be easily bored influenced the county as he built a network of businesses which laid the ground work for similar operations in the next century. As his business in Logan felt more stultifying, it wasn’t long before Logan moved to River Sioux to begin again. As before, he prospered, and by 1889, his company shipped 200,000 bushels of grain from River Sioux and another operation in Blencoe. Perhaps Thomas had decided it was time to settle down, but he could not stop himself from creating new businesses. A flour mill in River Sioux soon reached a capacity of 60 barrels a day. As farmers’ grain flowed in, Logan saw anoth-

Perley’s Bits & Pieces By Jim Perley Logan Herald-Observer Columnist jperley@iowatelecom.net

er opportunity. More prairie land was being changed to farm ground, and the added grain threatened to overwhelm existing facilities. The logical choice was a grain elevator which Logan built in River Sioux. It had a capacity of 10,000 bushels and earned Logan enough money that he started another in Onawa. Farmers came to depend on both elevators and they were the progenitors of cooperative elevators in the 20th Century. Thomas was a voracious reader and had definite opinions on how the government should be run. After his business enterprises gave him a comfortable financial base, he turned his attention to politics. In 1891, he was elected to the Harrison County Board of Supervisors. His main issues were education and

temperance. At the time, the county budget was in such dire straights, county warrants were at 20 to 25 percent discount. Through his and others persistent efforts, the debt was bonded and the county’s credit rating improved. The leaders efforts saved Harrison County thousands of dollars. Logan’s success also propelled him into the state legislature. Mr. Logan was well read and felt driven to learn all he could which he then applied to his businesses and private life. His contemporaries knew he was something special. The author of an 1891 Harrison County history observed that “not infrequently do you hear the remark that certainly one can learn more from Mr. Logan in one evening than from many others in a lifetime.”

News from the Extension Service

The gift of a childhood friend Pleasant fall days bring me fond memories of Rosie McGivern. A few years ago at a training session I attended, we were asked to share who it was who first gave us an interest in plants and growing things, and for me it was Rosie. She was the live-in great aunt of neighborhood friends when I was growing up and had a kind demeanor, and was liked by all the kids. But I remember the long row of 4-o’clocks that she grew each year along the driveway and one fall she set me gathering seed for next year’s planting all the while explaining the cycle of life (actually it may have been mostly a way to occupy a curious and active 6-year old for awhile, but just the same…). But for me to this day, it is now “Rosie” season. I credit her with helping me see the happiness and challenges of helping things grow. People today can still

emulate my mentor by saving a bit of seed or overwhelming a few plants. Many flowers and other ornamentals have been bred up by breeders, with some incapable of bearing fertile seed. Even those that do bear seed will produce plants with different traits than the parent. But there still remain old “open pollinated” types that set viable seed and can be saved overwinter. There is something about providing nature with an assist to conquer the cold of winter that can be fulfilling. If you have never overwintered seeds, here are a few good bets for success: 4-o’clocks: The plants are about two to three feet tall and fill the summer with various brightly colored flowers. Each flower produces a seed that is black when mature, and can be easily picked from the annual plants. Easy to find, painless to pick and

Rich Pope Harrison County Extension Program Coordinator generally pretty successful growing the coming year. Moss rose (portulaca): This is an annual, low growing succulent that is great in beds where a carpet of red, pink, while and yellow showy flowers is desired. The seeds are formed in capsules that dehisce (come apart) like a candy dish lid. Each capsule contains many tiny black seeds. Snapdragons: Another popular annual that develops seed pods along the stem, containing dry brown seeds at maturity. Harvest the seed when the pods are

just starting to open on their own, but remember the pods ripen sequentially, so there are likely some ready now. While I am talking, some adventurous folks may want to try looking for perennial plant seed and experimenting with that. Last week I noticed that the peonies outside of my house had managed to set seed. The pods are at the top where the flowers were and are now brown to black and in three parts. Within a See EXTENSION Page 6

Letter to the Editor Importance of mammograms Dear Editor, October is Breast Cancer Awareness month; thus the importance of this article. At the end of this month I will complete a year of treatment for breast cancer. I can’t stress enough the importance of getting a mammogram and doing monthly breast examinations. In May 2009 I had a digital mammogram that

reflected calcification in one of my breasts and four months later I found I had a malignant tumor that had grown to 2.2 centimeters. In the days and weeks to follow I went through a barrage of tests, a biopsy and ultimately a lumpectomy. In November I began a treatment protocol that would involve chemotherapy, radiation and a weekly infusion that would aggressively attack the fast growing breast cancer that I had. I have been able to take all

my chemo and weekly infusions of Herceptin at Community Memorial. I am so very grateful for the wonderful hospital staff and doctors at Community Memorial and for the extraordinary care, concern and friendship that have extended to me in so many ways. To all of you at the hospital, to the area churches, to my family and other friends, thank you from the bottom of my heart for praying, supporting, loving and encouraging my family.

God met our needs and strengthened us through all of you; for that we are most grateful. Please don’t put off a mammogram; it can save your life. Early detection really is the best prevention. Community Memorial has recently obtained a digital mammography machine – take advantage of it and the professional staff to take care of your healthcare needs. Pam Johnson Missouri Valley


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Courthouse

Logan Herald-Observer October 13, 2010

4

1301 Normal St • Woodbine, IA • 712-647-2627

Harrison County Sheriff Report By Sheriff Pat Sears Sept. 30 •A total of 50 males and 13 females were booked into jail the month of September. Oct. 1 •Deputy Knickman checked on a report of a young man walking on the roadway south of Little Sioux. The young man was found and said he was mad at his foster parents and was walking to Council Bluffs. The young man was taken back to his foster parents. •Deputy Knickman assisted Dunlap rescue with a reported dog bite on 111th Street. The dog attacked the woman who was there to care for the dog. The attack was unprovoked and did require medical attention. The dog will be destroyed and tested at the owner’s request. Oct. 2 •Deputy Knickman responded to the Interstate to check on a report of an erratic driver. The car was located and stopped. After testing, the driver was arrested for OWI. The driver, Pedro Hernandez of Omaha, was arrested and transported to jail. Hernandez was charged with OWI and child endangerment. Oct. 3 •Deputy Clemens assisted with a domestic situation on Orrick Avenue. Both parties were

interviewed with no charges being filed at this time. •Deputy Doiel transported a mental patient from the Missouri Valley Hospital to Mercy Hospital. An emergency committal order had been issued. Oct. 4 •Deputy Klutts arrested Darcie Cates of Atlantic on an outstanding Harrison County warrant. She was unable to post bond so she was transported to jail. •Deputy Cohrs assisted with an ongoing dispute on a rental property. •Deputy Knickman is investigating a residential burglary on 260th Street. Oct. 5 •Deputy Knickman arrested Nekysha Bradley and Tee Jay Wood, both of Council Bluffs. They were found in possession of property that was stolen in a recent burglary. They were charged with possession of stolen property and Wood was also charged with felon in possession of a firearm. Both remain in jail. A search warrant was conducted at their residence in Council Bluffs and more reported stolen items were recovered. •Deputy Doiel assisted Missouri Valley Police with the theft of a vehicle. The theft resulted in a pursuit which ended in the Logan area when the vehicle was lost. The area

111. S. First Ave. Logan, Iowa 51546 712-644-2244

Courthouse Fines & Fees MARRIAGES Tracy Eugene Tietsort, Woodbine and Sharon Ann Hatcher, Woodbine.

was checked and a report came in that a vehicle had been stolen from a residence west of Modale. Deputy Doiel responded and a broadcast was put out to locate the stolen vehicle. The stolen vehicle that was taken from Missouri Valley was left behind when the second vehicle was stolen. The vehicle and a suspect were located in Blair. Richard Garule of Missouri Valley was charged with theft of a motor vehicle, reckless driving, eluding and driving under suspension. Warrants were requested as Garule faces several charges in Blair. Oct. 6 •Deputy Cohrs transported a female from Missouri Valley hospital to Mercy on an emergency committal order. •To report crimestopper information call 1800-247-0592. •To report littering call 1-888-665-4887. Any criminal charge is merely an accusation and the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

VOTE

SMALL CLAIMS Wm Davis Roberts and Elizabeth Roberts vs Ronda Minor, Missouri Valley. Capital One Bank, N.A. vs Rex Meeker, Woodbine. Hauge Associates, Inc. vs Diane Suhr, Roger Suhr, Logan. General Service Bureau Inc. vs William Gilbert, Logan. General Service Bureau, Inc. vs Ryan Cox, Logan. LVNV Funding Inc. vs Loni Harper, Woodbine. Medivac Corp vs Anthony Ritterbush, Dunlap. LVNV Funding LLC vs Beth Oloff, Missouri Valley. Heller Implement Inc. vs Rod Olson, Arthur, Iowa, R & P Custom Inc., Carroll, Iowa and Bob Staiert, Carroll, Iowa. MM Finance LLC vs Richard Yancy, Missouri Valley. VIOLATIONS Richard Rowan, Little Sioux, maximum hours of service violation. Cynthia Conyers, Mondamin, operation without registration. Kevin Sears, Woodbine, unsafe passing. Marlee Jensen,

• Ready to Listen Ready to Serve • Trusted and Respected • Wanting the chance to serve Harrison County residents and make sure their tax dollars are used efficiently and effectively • 25 years experience working with Harrison County Landowners and operators to protect and improve their land • 25 years experience managing an office, staff and multi-agency programs, developing and implementing budgets • Experience working with local citizens and Federal, State and Local units of government to promote conservation projects. • 1977 Iowa State University Graduate in Animal Science. • Retired Natural Resource Conservation Service 34 years of service • Certified Crop Advisor and Farm Operator since 1994 • Harrison County Extension Council since 1998, Treasurer - 12 yrs. • Harrison County Farm Bureau Board member since 1998, Treasurer - 12 years.

Woodbine, operation without registration. Marlee Jensen, Woodbine, financial liability Emma Wiggins, Missouri Valley, failure to yield upon entering through highway. Dorothy Hoffman, Dunlap, fail to maintain control. Daniel Mefferd, Dunlap, unsafe backing on highway. SEAT BELTS Ted Webb, Woodbine Blake Ruffcorn, Missouri Valley Joshua Townsend, Missouri Valley Robert Ellison, Missouri Valley SPEEDING Christina Dow, Dunlap Teresa Kierscht, Missouri Valley Brian Hatterman, Dunlap Clark Mikels, Woodbine Debra Surber, Logan DISTRICT COURT State of Iowa vs Warren E. Hall, driving under suspension, 30 days in jail, $315. fine. State of Iowa vs Rodney Keith Overman, possession of marijuana with intent to deliver. Five years in jail, suspended and placed on supervised probation for three years. $750 fine, suspended. Ordered to obtain

2001 and Sept. 30, 2009, due to stop loss are entitled to retroactive payments of $500 for each month they were extend-

PANCAKE DAY and

BISCUITS and GRAVY Saturday October 16, 2010 Serving 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Paid for by Kurth for Supervisor Committee, Treasurer Brad Kurth

When Investing, Don’t Stop at U.S. Border In less than two weeks, United Nations Day will be celebrated. It’s an occasion to highlight and reflect on the work of the United Nations, whose mission is to promote understanding and cooperation among the world’s countries. Of course, in an era of instantaneous communications and speedy global travel, we are all connected much more closely than ever before. And that’s certainly true in the financial markets, too, because as an investor, you’ve got a world full of opportunities. Many people, however, still think the U.S. totally dominates the investment scene. But the fact is that U.S. stock markets make up less than half of the total global stock market value, according to the Census Bureau. And that should come as no surprise to you when you consider many of the products you use on a daily basis, from the Hyundai (South Korea) you drove to work to the Nestle Crunch bar (parent company in Switzerland) you snacked on at lunch to the Sony television (Japan) you watch at night. Not only are many strong companies based in the developed countries, but some emerging markets — countries such as China, India, Brazil and Mexico that are characterized by younger, lessmature economies — are growing rapidly, which may produce good investment opportunities. Keep in mind, though, that emerging markets do involve investment

risks different from those of more developed countries. Securities may be less liquid and more volatile because economic structures are generally less diverse and mature. And by investing internationally, you can gain another key benefit — improved diversification. If you only invested domestically, and a downturn hits us, your portfolio will likely take a hit. But, at any given time, international markets may perform quite differently than the U.S. market. Consequently, if you expanded your investment horizon beyond U.S. borders, your foreign investments could be doing relatively well, even if your American investments were lagging. Keep in mind, though, that diversification, by itself, cannot guarantee profits or protect against loss, though it may be able to help reduce the effects of volatility. While you can gain some benefits by investing internationally, you’ll also need to consider the risks, such as political risk. For example, new governments can come in, nationalize companies, drastically change policies or rules affecting commerce, or take other actions that could have a big effect on your investments. You might also encounter currency risk — that is, changes in the value of the U.S. dollar, relative to foreign currencies, could nega-

Scott Thompson 115 N. Ave., Suite 200 Logan, IA 51546 (712) 644-3692 www.edwardjones.com Toll Free: 866-644-3692 Member SIPC

tively affect the value of your investments. Another factor to consider is the difference in accounting standards between the U.S. and other countries, a difference that can result in difficulty analyzing the true value and performance of foreign investments. You can enhance your portfolio's diversification without investing a lot abroad. If you are considering international investments you may want to limit the foreign exposure to no more than 20 to 25 percent of your overall portfolio, with the exact amount depending on your individual risk tolerance, time horizon and long-term goals. Also, given the more complex issues involved in international investing, you’ll want to consult with a professional financial advisor before taking action. But once you’ve done your “due diligence,” don’t be afraid to launch your voyage to the world of international investing. You might like what you see on your journey. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

drug/alcohol evaluation. State of Iowa vs Nikkilas S. Taggart, OWI first offense. $1,250 penalty. Deferred judgment for one year. Ordered to obtain drug/alcohol evaluation. State of Iowa vs Jacqueline Elizabeth Poppen, assault on police officer, 30 days in jail, $315 fine. State of Iowa vs Janelle Spencer, driving while barred. Sixty days in jail, $625 fine. 59 days suspended and placed on unsupervised probation for one year. State of Iowa vs Eric Hiles, OWI, first offense. Sixty days in jail. $1,250 fine. 58 days suspended. Ordered to obtain drug and alcohol evaluation and complete drinking driver’s course. State of Iowa vs Kyle Thomas Coleman, OWI first offense. Deferred judgment for one year. Ordered to obtain drug and alcohol evaluation and complete drinking driver’s school. $1,250 fine. State of Iowa vs Benjamin A. Crumb, OWI second offense. 180 days in jail and $1,875 fine. 150 days suspended and placed on supervised probation for one year. Ordered to complete drinking driver’s school.

Deadline nearing for extended service payments Military members whose service was involuntarily extended, or whose retirement was suspended between Sept. 11,

November 2nd RUSSELL KURTH Harrison County Supervisor

111. N. 2nd Ave. Logan, Iowa 51546 712-644-2665

Logan Community Building

$5.00

Hope to see everyone there!!

ed, according to Department of Defense officials. But the deadline to receive benefits is rapidly drawing to a close. The deadline to apply for benefits is Oct. 21. Only about 58,000 of the 145,000 eligible claims have been paid, leaving more than $300 million available to eligible veterans. The average payment for each veteran is close to $4,000. Eligible members should print, complete and sign Department of Defense Form 2944, Claim for Retroactive Stop Loss Payment. They must then select the appropriate method for submitting their claim form based upon their service requirements. The information can be found on their service’s stop loss Web site, accessible from www.defense.gov/home/fe atures/2010/0710_stoploss/ or call Army 877736-5554; Navy 901-8744427; Marine Corps 877242-2830 and Air Force 800-525-0102.

WANTED

Renee King Republican Candidate for Treasurer r er Leade G stom u N c O y g R r le A ST orkin g eve vice ndab n e i p d i e v r Hardw D se Pro uality with q

The MOST knowledgeable and experienced; the BEST candidate for county treasurer! “I ask for YOUR vote on Nov. 2nd.” Paid for by Harrison County Republican Women


Neighbors Audit report released for City of Logan Muxfeldt Associates, CPA, Harlan, has released the audit report for the City of Logan. The City’s receipts totaled $2,140,232 for the year ended June 30, 2010, a 31 percent decrease from 2009. The receipts included $559,904 from property tax, $760,197 from charges for services, $177,365 from operating grants, contributions and restricted interest, $106,204 from capital grants, contributions and restricted interest, $81,619 from local option sales tax, $1,713 from unrestricted investment earnings and $453,230 from note proceeds. Disbursements for the year totaled $2,228,683, a 34 percent decrease from 2009, and included $516,680 for capital projects, $347,786 for culture and recreation and $244,918 for debt service. Also, disbursements for business type activities totaled $557,385. The significant decrease is primarily due to the completion of the aquatic center. A copy of the audit report is available for review in the office of the city administrator, in the office of the Auditor of State and on the Auditor of State’s Web site at http://auditor,iowa.gov/repo rts/reports.htm.

ServSafe class Oct. 27 and 29 ServSafe, the national certification program for food service employees, will be in Malvern Oct. 27 and 29 at the extension office. Participants must attend both sessions. For more information, contact the Mills County Extension Office at 712-624-8616.

October 13, 2010

5

Visit Hutson at UNO Trick-or-treat Oct. 21 at Welcome Center

Several Lo-Ma volleyball players went to see Lo-Ma alum Megan Hutson play for the University of Nebraska-Omaha Sept. 24. Hutson, a freshman at UNO has been the starting middle hitter for the UNO Maverick’s recently. Pictured from the left are, Kylee Loftus, Isabelle Winchell, Amelia Kline, Shelby Marquardt, Megan Hutson, Karen Hutson, Andrea Willard, Jocelyn Camenzind and Maysen Jones. Submitted photo

Deadline for Byways of Excellence nominations The deadline for nominations for the 2011 Byways of Excellence Awards sponsored by the Alegent Health Community Memorial Hospital Medical Services Foundation is Nov. 15. The Byways of Excellence awards dinner is a celebration of the communities. It is a time set aside each year to honor three adults and one youth from Harrison County. These honorees have enriched our communities and estab-

lished a legacy on which future Excellence Awards honorees will build. The Byways of Excellence Award is an honor given for work in four fields of endeavor: Agriculture and/or Business, Education and/or Arts and Humanities, Health, Medicine, and other professionals and youth 18 and under. The Byways of Excellence Awards Dinner will be held Feb. 19, 2011 at

Shadow Valley Golf Club in Woodbine. Chairing the event are Heath and Sara McIntosh of Modale and co-chairs are Brandon and Amy Doiel of rural Mondamin. Nomination forms can be obtained at the CMH reception desk in the front lobby or by contacting the Medical Services Foundation office at 712642-9213. A nomination form is on page 2 of this paper.

Logan council meeting agenda The Logan City Council will meet at 7 p.m., Oct. 18. Items on the agenda include: decision on whether to apply for the Community Design Program spon-

sored by the Iowa Architectural Foundation; approve Class C beer permit and Sunday sales for Fuel-N-Shine, Inc., Mark and Jill Madsen, owners; Chief Smith to talk about

street side pick up of garbage; review FY 20092010 city financial audit; chamber representative to update city council; citizens questions and comments.

Student of the Week

Contact Your Local Farm Bureau Agent

HARRISON MUTUAL

Serving the Area Since 1887 One day last week, two different employees came to me and informed me how Jacob had helped them. In the classroom, he is a great role model for his peers. He demonstrates good behavior and positive attitude.

a great way to celebrate the end of the farmer’s market season and give people, especially children, another opportunity to wear their Halloween costumes,” said coordinator Kathy Dirks. The Welcome Center Farmer’s Market has been held from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. each Thursday with the final date Oct. 21. For more information on the market and upcoming events, contact Dirks at 712-642-2114.

Historic barn tour set for Oct. 16, 17 Historic restored barns throughout Iowa will be open to the public Oct. 16 and 17 for a free two-day self-guided tour. The purpose of the tour is to encourage barn preservation in the state, to teach young people about Iowa’s rich agricultural heritage and to renew pride in the heritage said Iowa Barn Foundation officials. Barns open in West Central Iowa include: Finken Barn: 3005 335th St., Logan. ‘Take I80 west to I-680. Proceed west to Exit 21 which is L 34 (Beebeetown). Turn east (F 66) for 1.5 miles. Land has been in the family since 1892 and the barn was built in 1917. The roof has laminated rafters which were raised into place with a gin pole and horses. Each rafter is five boards thick bolted together and cut in curved shape. Ellis Barn: 2370 Fletcher Ave., Lytton (Calhoun County). The barn is three

miles east and 2.5 miles north of Lytton. Landmark red barn used to raise Red Rock Arabians and is called the “big red barn.” Renze Barn: 22695 Highway 71, Carroll (Carroll County). Three miles west of Carroll. Farm was known as “Old Mattes Place.” Wooster Barn: 2435 2100th St., Manning (Shelby County). From Irwin take the highway east five miles; turn north on gravel for one mile and turn east for ¾ miles. From Manning go seven miles south on Airport Road on the west side of town. Turn west for 1 ¾ miles. Heflin Barn: 837 Orange Rd., Harlan. From the intersection of U.S. 59 and State Highway 44, go four miles east on 44 to Orange Road. Then go one and a fourth miles south. For more information contact Roxanne Mehlisch, 641-487-7690 or www.iowabarnfoundation.o rg.

Dean Koster Logan, IA • (712) 644-2701 ®

312 E. 7th-Logan, IA 51546 ■ Phone 644-2710 Pam Parsons, Paula Stueve

The Welcome Center Farmer’s Market will be hosting trick-or-treating at the final farmer’s market of the season Oct. 21. Treats will be available for all ages from the vendors and at the counter in the Harrison County Welcome Center. To reward those who are showing their Halloween spirit, double treats will be given to everyone in costume. “We thought it would be

Great Rates on The Blues

INSURANCE ASSOCIATION

Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Des Moines, Iowa Form No. FB-24-P-07

Congratulations to the Farm Bureau-Dean Koster/Logan-Magnolia Athlete of the Week!

Congratulations to the Lo-Ma/Harrison Mutual Student of the Week!

Jacob Fiddelke Fourth Grade

Logan Herald-Observer

ATTENTION TEACHERS!

To nominate your student of the week, call 712-6442705 or e-mail marydarling @heraldobserver.com

Paid for by committee to elect Sandy Royer

Evan Mikels

Evan had (13 tackles) Led the Team Nominate your Lo-Ma Athlete of the Week by noon each Monday by calling 712-644-2705 Mary Darling @heraldobserver.com.

October 15 & 16 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Entire Shop 20% Off Fat Quarters 99¢ each Special Sale Table

$2 and up

Nancy’s Quilt Shop 2224 295 St. 642-3288 Missouri Valley, IA 51555


6

Logan Herald-Observer

Neighbors

October 13, 2010

Harrison County Fliehe earns award Named to Dean’s List at Buena Vista Forestry Field Day

Nature Tots learn about leaves at HCCB program

Local food, sustainable food and traditional food systems: Where does food come from and does it matter?: This question is the focus for Current Issues in Nutrition, a two-part online conference beginning Oct. 18 from Iowa State University Extension. Media and government attention to local, sustainable and traditional food systems has prompted discussions among policy makers, environmentalists and healthcare providers, said Sarah L. Francis, an ISU Extension nutrition specialist and assistant professor in Iowa State’s Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Discussions often center on perceived benefits and risks related to health, economics and environment and as well as how these systems might work together. “This conference will focus on the social and economic perspectives of what really are three complementary food systems,” Francis said.

The conference starts with archived presentations that registered participants can view online at anytime beginning Oct. 18. The conference concludes with a live Webcast question and answer session, from noon to 1:30 p.m., Nov. 18. Register online at www.cepd.iastate.edu/cin. The registration fee is $35 per person. Registered participants will be e-mailed instructions for viewing the online presentations and participating in the live question and answer session. Featured speakers are Alison Harmon and John Lawrence. Harmon is an associate professor in the Department of Health and Human Development at Montana State University. Lawrence is the director of ISU Extension to Agriculture and Natural Resources and associate dean for extension programs and outreach in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

EXTENSION COLUMN: Richard Pope FROM PAGE 1 few of these pods were some round buckshot sized seeds that I have harvested and will start in the late winter indoors. I have a place that I can play with plantings outside, and I plan on trying to start peonies from seed out there. Another fun one that I know works is cannas. Cannas are very showy, tall flowers that grow from underground stems called rhizomes. They are native to the tropics, so the rhizomes must be dug for overwintering (by-the-way, I am told that cannas are quite edible, like potatoes, but I have not had them to try them as a food source.) The canna seed is ¼ -inch diameter round balls, and before they germinate, it is best to file a notch in the seed coat to allow water to enter. I have germinated cannas, and they grew quite easily. But remember, what you get from them might be quite different in foliage and flower than the parents, depending on the genes that matched up at pollination. Again, if you have some extra room, it might be fun to try. My final thoughts is that there is an organization to preserve many old-fashioned varieties that our grandparents and before enjoyed called the Seed Savers Exchange. They are

based in Decorah, Iowa and have been in existence since 1975. If for nothing else but fun on a cold winter day, go to the Seed Savers Exchange site at www.seedsavers.org and look at the catalog of “heir-

loom” varieties of plants. As an example, a friend of mind grows several tomato varieties each year, and the diversity of flavors is stunning compared with commercial tomatoes available today. So think of my old

friend Rosie and save some seed (or get an heirloom variety) for fun this fall. For more information contact Pope at the Harrison County Extension Office at ropope@iastate.edu or call 644-2105.

Missouri Valley; Bryce Warner, Woodbine, received a perfect 4.0 grade point average for the two terms. Students named to the Dean’s List must have a minimum grade point average of 3.5 for the two terms based on a 4.0 grade point system.

Don’t get left

inside the cold.

Up to an additional

Receive up to a *

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Toddlers and their families came out to Willow Lake to learn about trees, leaf shapes and why leaves change color in the fall at a recent workshop. Connie Betts, Naturalist for Harrison County Conservation Board, read Leaf Man, by Lois Ehlert and they designed their own leaf boys and girls to take home. Pictured are Jeremy Butrick with his son Hayden doing bark and leaf rubbings to see the designs and patterns on a tree. For more information about HCCB’s environmental education programs visit www.HarrisonCountyParks.org. Submitted photo

Students from this area have been named to Buena Vista University Professional and Online Studies Dean’s List for terms five and six. They include: Roshelle Downey, Logan, received a perfect 4.0 grade point average for the two terms; Jennifer Rife, Modale; Amber Tracy,

T

restoration in the area. Presenters include Lindsey Barney, Iowa Department of Natural Resources; Brent Olson, Loess Hills Area Forester; Aron Flickinger, IDNR Special Projects Forester; Rich Pope, Harrison County Extension Program Coordinator and Jesse Randall, Iowa State University Extension Forester (Ames). Participants are encouraged to participate with questions. There is no fee for the program. For more information contact Olson at 712-4562924 or Pope at 644- Nedra Fliehe, Logan City Clerk/Administrator, was the recip2105. ient of the Serving Bright Award at the Southwest Iowa Planning Council annual meeting Sept. 30. Fliehe was recognized for her outstanding service in southwest Iowa. She began her career with the City of Logan in March, 1981, as an administrative assistant and has served as City Administrator since 1998. She will retire in March 2011 after 30 years of service. Fliehe has spearheaded many projects including the new community center, pool and park shelter. She has also been active in the local Kiwanis club and Catholic Church. Photo: Mary Darling

w! on. No ding So ct are En , A redits rry l Tax C Huhe Federa

The public is invited to a Harrison County Forestry Field Day Oct. 14, at the Loess Hills State Forest headquarters at 206 Polk St. in Pisgah. The program will start with an overview of the history and development of the Loess Hills State Forest. The primary focus of the day will be a review of the reforestation efforts in place in the area in and around Preparation Canyon State Park and also demonstration of the Superior Walnut and Butternut improvement project. The program will conclude with an overview of prairie

$1,200 Rebate

with the purchase of a qualif ying Lenn o x ® H ome C omf o r t S y s tem.

$1,500

in Federal Tax Credits** And may be available with the purchase and installation of qualifying high-efficiency products.

WWW.LOFTUSHEATINGANDAC.COM (712) 644-3260 Serving Harrison County & Surrounding Areas NATE Certified

Offer expires 11/30/2010. *Rebate offer is valid only with the purchase of qualifying Lennox products. **See dealer for details and visit www.energystar.gov for more information on the credit guidelines and list of qualifying heating and cooling equipment. © 2010 Lennox Industries Inc. See your participating Lennox dealer for details. Lennox dealers include independently owned and operated businesses.

Community Memorial Hospital 631 N. 8th St. Missouri Valley, IA

712-642-2784

OCTOBER OUTPATIENT SPECIALTY CLINICS For Scheduling Appointments Call 712-642-9347

AUDIOLOGY Rhonda Ward, M.S., CCC-A......................Oct. 4, 18 & 25 CARDIAC Heart Consultants..........Every Wed. all day & Friday PM Cardio Vascular Services...............Mon. P.M. & Fri. P.M. CARDIAC/PULMONARY REHABILITATION Cindy Sproul, R.N.......Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday CARDIOVASCULAR NON-INVASIVE STUDIES..................................................Every Mon AM EAR, NOSE, THROAT Iris Moore, M.D.................................................Oct. 4, 18 GASTROENTEROLOGY John Ferry MD............................................Oct. 12 & 26 GENERAL SURGERY Roalene J. Redland, M.D.......Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29 Andrew Y. Reynolds, M.D....Every Thurs. A.M. and Wed. OB-GYN JOrge Sotolongo, M.D..........................................Oct. 13 ONCOLOGY Heartland Oncology & Hematology..........Every Thursday OPHTHALMOLOGY Michael Feilmeier, M.D..........................................Oct. 19 ORTHOPEDICS Thomas Atteberry, M.D...............1st, 3rd, 5th Thurs A.M, 2nd & 4th Thurs. all day PODIATRY John Weremy, DPM.....................................Oct. 14 & 28 Indergit Panesar, M.D.....................................Oct. 7 & 21 UROLOGY Larry Siref, M.D............................................Oct. 11 & 25 MAMMOGRAPHY..............................Monday thru Friday MOBILE NUC MED........................................Oct. 4 & 18 . PT/OT......................................Mon.-Fri........642-2179

ANYTIME DAY OR NIGHT Announce, Sell, Advertise, Recruit

24/7 Can’t Wait to Spread the News 24/7 or Sell Your Goods in our classifed section? Visit us at www.heraldobserver.com Logan Herald-Observer • 712-644-2705

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH.............................642-2045 Judith Benson, Psych ARNP Nancy Cyr LISW, Rebecca Eilers, LISW


Logan Herald-Observer

Church

Attend ISU cattle workshop

Obituaries LAVETAH BERTELSEN LaVetah LaVonne (Lane) Bertelsen, 81, died Oct. 10 at Community Memorial Hospital in Missouri Valley. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m., Oct. 15 at Fouts Funeral Home in Woodbine with Rev. Dr. J. Samuel Subramanian officiating. Musicians will be Mrs. Merril McElwain and Beth Fouts. Selections will be “In the Garden” and “Sweet Hour of Prayer.” Honorary pallbearers will be Richard Bertelsen, Jeremy Bertelsen, Jackie Marcum, Chad Bertelsen, Clint Bertelsen, Jami Helgenberger, Cassie Jensen and Ellen Cox. Final resting place will be Grange Cemetery in Honey Creek. LaVetah was born Aug. 17, 1929 to Charles and Faye (Carson) Lane in Missouri Valley. She was raised in Missouri Valley and attended school with the graduating class of 1947. LaVetah married Virgil Bertelsen Feb. 27, 1947. The couple farmed outside of Missouri Valley until 1967. After their farm was sold, they continued to live and work in the Missouri Valley area where LaVetah held many jobs in

October 13, 2010

the community. Virgil died Oct. 9, 1992. LaVetah had been a resident of the Rose Vista Nursing Home in Woodbine since 2003. LaVetah loved her family and spending time with them. She enjoyed reading, playing cards and working puzzles. She also enjoyed dancing and cooking. LaVetah was preceded in death by her parents; husband Virgil Bertelsen; daughter, Kathleen Sue Bertelsen in 1969; two brothers, Charles Lane and Bill Lane and sister Lois (Hatcher) Dunbar. She is survived by her five children, Maggie and her husband Mick Meredith of Omaha, Neb., Richard Bertelsen and his wife Shirley of Washington, Ill., John Bertelsen and his wife Carol of Missouri Valley, Leo Bertelsen of Missouri Valley, Juli and her husband Lauren Cox of Woodbine; brother Ralph Lane and his wife Herma Lou of Missouri Valley; eight grandchildren; 11 great grandchildren and many other relatives and friends. Fouts Funeral Home 501 Normal Street Woodbine, Iowa 51579 712-647-2221

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Modale and Missouri Valley Pastor Kim Crummer 642-3168 or 642-2464 Modale Worship, 9:30 a.m. Missouri Valley No Sunday School until Sept. Missouri Valley Worship, 10:30 a.m. CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS Logan Branch Pres. - Wayne Kennedy Sunday Sacrament, 10 a.m. Sunday School, 11:20 a.m. Primary 11:20 a.m. Priesthood and Relief Society, 12:10 p.m. Seminary and MIA, 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays Mutual/Scouts, Wed. 7 p.m. LITTLE SIOUX CHURCH OF CHRIST 403 Mulberry Little Sioux, Iowa 51545 (712) 646-2644 Wayne Bahr, pastor Sunday School, 10:15 a.m. Worship 9:00 a.m. COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Persia Pastor Kirk Parsons Youth Leaders Kirk and Pam Parsons

Arbor Day free trees

Iowa State University Extension offered a workshop on Women Managing Cattle in Red Oak in September. It was a three-week course designed especially for women cattle operators. The instructors provided resources and tools so participants could make decisions based on their herds and feedlots. Participants were, in front from the left, JoAnn Barker, Mt. Ayr; Shelly Hayden, Mondamin; Roberta Vorwerk, Shenandoah; Angela Wallick, Villisca; second row, Lois Miller, Hamburg; Linda Shadden, Villisca; Star Ann Kloberdanz, Shenandoah; Vicki Sunderman, Villisca; third row, Julie Walters, Villisca; Sarah Long, Afton; Janna Karwal, Elliot; and Vickie Conrad, Emerson. Not pictured are Anne Bennett, Red Oak; Terri Johnston, Nodaway and Mary Robinett, Elliott. Submitted photo

New Arrival

LIFELINE ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH Pastor Ray Sorenson Assoc. Pastor Hank Gruver 1207 Harrison St., Dunlap, Iowa - 6435475 Sun.: 9:30 a.m., Sunday School; 10:30 a.m., Morning Worship; Thurs.: 7 p.m., Intercessory Prayer. PERSIA TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH Vacancy Pastor: Rev. Merlene Ostebee Sunday worship at 8:30 a.m. Communion the 2nd and 4th Sundays of the month GRACE COMMUNITY FELLOWSHIP of the CHRISTIAN and MISSIONARY ALLIANCE

Missouri Valley Pastor Brad Westercamp 9:00 a.m. Sunday School for all ages. Nursery through adults. 10:30 a.m. Worship Nursery and children’s church provided during worship - infants through 3rd grade. Wed., 7 p.m.,men’s

and women’s fellowship study and prayer MONDAMIN BAPTIST CHURCH Pastor Harley Johnsen Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday - Youth Group “Magnolia Fire Escape” 7:30 p.m. at Magnolia Fire Hall Wednesday Family NIghts 6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m. (during school year) LOGAN CHRISTIAN CHURCH Minister Ron Riley Youth Minister Nate Powell, 644-2642 www.loganchristianchurch.org Saturday Service - 7 p.m. Sunday Worship, 8:15 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. 6th - High School Youth, 6-8 p.m. COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Mondamin Co-Pastors Tomm Bothwell and John Carritt Sunday School, 9:15 a.m. Worship, 10 a.m PERSIA METHODIST CHURCH Rev. Orris Drake Sunday

712-644-2710

ST. PATRICK’S Dunlap Saturday Mass, 5:30 p.m. Sunday 11a.m. SACRED HEART Woodbine Saturday Mass, 4 p.m. Sunday 9:30 a.m. HOLY FAMILY Mondamin 645-2683 Sunday Mass, 8 a.m. ST. PATRICK’S Missouri Valley Rev. Michael Berner, Pastor Saturday Mass, 5 p.m. Sunday Mass, 9:30 a.m. UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pisgah Pastor Jim Young Sunday Service, 10 a.m. Sunday School, 11 a.m. United Methodist Women, 1:30 p.m.

Wednesdays MONDAMIN CHURCH OF CHRIST (Christian) 207 Noyes Mondamin, Iowa 51557 (712) 646-2644 Wayne Bahr, pastor Jeff Bierbrodt, Youth Pastor Worship – 10:30 a.m. Sunday School – 9:30 a.m. ST. JOHN LUTHERAN CHURCH Honey Creek 545-3022 Pastor David Kuhnle Bible Study, 9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Adult Bible Class - 9 a.m. Children’s Church in 10 a.m. service ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH Magnolia -Sunday Worship at Immanuel Lutheran Church Logan MAGNOLIA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pastor. Jack D. Hofmockel Sunday Worship, 9:00 a.m. PERSIA ST. JOHN’S

Church Services

Logan Memorial Chapel Strong Insurance Agency

Worship, 8:45 a.m. ST. ANNE’S Logan Rev. Michael Berner, Pastor 644-2535 • 644-2092 Saturday Mass, 4:00 p.m. Sunday Mass, 8:00 a.m.

215 N. 4th Ave. Logan 644-2929 Randall D. Scott ~ Funeral Director

LOGAN SuperFoods ‘Proudly offering Best Choice brands’ 644-2260 Logan, IA

Your Hometown Newspaper

Your Hometown Newspaper

644-2705

644-2234

644-2705

Logan

LUTHERAN CHURCH Rev. Dale Jenson Sunday Worship, 8:30 a.m. Communion, Every 1st Sunday PISGAH COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Pastor Terry McHugh Co-Pastor Ralph Hussing Sunday School, 9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Mondamin Pastor Jim Young Sunday School, 10:30a.m. Sunday Worship, 9:45 a.m. THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Little Sioux Pastor Jim Young Sunday Worship, 8:45 a.m. Fellowship Hour, 9:30 United Methodist Women, 3rd Wednesday Every Month LANDMARK BAPTIST CHURCH Logan Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m. and Sunday night 6:30

in Pisgah Hosting annual Turkey dinner with all the trimmings. Sat., Oct. 16, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Adults $7.50 Children 5-10, $3 Preschool - free Carryouts, $7.50 Call 712-456-2190

p.m. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Missouri Valley 642-2538 Rev. Barbara Todd firstpresbymvmsn.com Adult Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:00 a.m. Sunday School, 11:15 a.m. IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH Logan Pastor Jerald Firby 644-2384 • 642-2842 Sunday Worship, 9:00 a.m. Fellowship: 10:00 10:15 a.m. Sun. School, 10:15 11:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study: 10:15 0 11:00 a.m. LOGAN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pastor Jack D. Hofmockel Worship, 10:00 a.m. Contemp. Sun. School, 10:15 a.m. NEW LIFE CHURCH Logan Comm. Center Pastor Stan Udd 642-9363 Kids/Adult Classes 9:30 a.m. Worship: 10:30 a.m.

Eby Drug Store 3 Generations of Pharmacists 644-2160 Logan

Missouri Valley/Mondamin Helping You Reach Your Dreams

Member FDIC

Equal Housing Lender

Warner Insurance Agency, Inc.

MOSAIC “A life of possibilities for people with intellectual disabilities” Serving Western Iowa since 1988 217 E. 7th Street

The Arbor Day Foundation is offering 10 free autumn classic trees when you join the organization in October. The trees will be shipped postpaid at the right time for planting between Nov. 1 and Dec. 10. The six to 12-inch trees are guaranteed to grow or they will be replaced free of charge. To receive 10 free autumn classics, send a $10 membership contribution to Autumn Classics Trees, Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE 68410 by Oct. 31 or join online at www.arborday.org/october.

Community of Christ Church

Jack Wilson Heim was born to Jake and Tamara Heim of Logan, on Oct. 6 at Memorial Community Hospital in Blair, Neb. He weighed 7 pounds 12 ounces and was 19 3/4-inches long. Grandparents are Jay and Sharon Heim, Logan and Jim and JoAnn Cogil, Des Moines.

Cabinet,” by Amy Scurlock; “House in the Woods,” by Dick Schlitter and “Robins at the Water Fountain,” by Sue Cutler. Awards of Excellence were “Murray Hill” by Linda Lee Herman and “Loess Hills” by Bettina Perkins.

Sunday School 9:30 Worship Service 10:30 First Sunday of every month, 9:30 worship followed by fellowship

Meeting cancelled The Harrison County Public Health breast feeding support group will not meet Oct. 19. The next meeting will be Nov. 2.

Art exhibit at MCC “March Lambs” by Duane Simmons was selected as the Best of Show at the “Celebrate the Hills” art exhibit. His “Preparation Trail” was also selected for an Award of Excellence. The Judge’s Awards were “Grandma’s

7

FEED at

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LOGAN

712-644-2456

644-3298 219 E. 7th

Please send your church service changes and/or notices to The Logan Herald-Observer, P.O. Box 148, Logan, IA 51546, or e-mail them tomary.darling@heraldobserver.com.


8

Logan Herald-Observer

Sports

October 13, 2010

Lo-Ma sweeps Nishnabotna VB tourney Judy Adair For the Herald-Observer Former Buffalo Bills coach Marv Levy once commented, “It feels great to win.” On Oct. 9 the Lady Panthers felt great after both junior varsity and varsity volleyball teams won their respective classes in the Nishnabotna Tournament in Farragut. In the varsity class, only three teams competed – Logan-Magnolia, Nishnabotna and Stanton. This very small, but very talented field would make for an exciting day. The Panthers first opponent was the Nishnabotna Blue Devils. The Blue Devils would bring in a slightly better winning percentage than the Panthers and it was expected the two teams would match up well. Game one started with Lo-Ma jumping off to an early lead and never facing a serious challenge from Nishnabotna as the Panthers won 25-13. The Panthers opened game two with as solid play as they have played all season. Lo-

Ma totally dominated game two, as the final score was 25-6. In game three, Nishnabotna showed some spark and kept the game close until late, but didn’t have enough gas in the tank to keep pace with the Lady Panthers, as the final score was 25-18. Next to take the court against Lo-Ma was the class one sixth ranked Stanton Viqueens led by one of Western Iowa’s most versatile athletes Kadie Subbert. In game one, the Viqueens and Panthers traded volleys and kills with Lo-Ma performing slightly better as game one ended with a Panthers win 25-19. The second game saw Lo-Ma frustrating Stanton as the Panthers showed solid performances on both offense and defense. Lo-Ma took game two 25-15. The Panthers would learn why in game three the Viqueens are ranked in Class 1. LoMa and Stanton battled back and forth throughout as the game came down to the final points. Lo-Ma squeaked out a victory in game three winning 26-24, winning the tournament.

“Defensively we played very well,” said coach Jacob Hedger. “We didn’t make a lot of mistakes and we were very aggressive at the net. Everyone did a great job.” Audrina Dickman ended the day with serving perfection going 32-for-32. Abby Foutch added 48 assists and the trio of Shelby Marquardt, Kelsey Frisk and Karen Hutson combined on the day for 43 kills, 29 blocks and 27 digs. Kylee Loftus added 6 kills and 8 blocks during her rotation. The Lo-Ma junior varsity decided they didn’t want to be outdone by their varsity counterparts. A field of six teams took part in the junior varsity division broken up into two pools. The Panthers started play in Pool 2 facing the Nishnabotna white team. Lo-Ma won its first match by sweeping both games from the white team 21-19 and 21-14. Getting help from good back row play from Emily Clark, Cheyenne Jensen, Isabelle Winchell and Kaitlyn Gochenour was key in

Members of the winning junior varsity volleyball team include, in front from the left, Jocelyn Camenzind, Courtney Oviatt, Amelia Klein, Kaitlyn Gochenour; in back coach Judy Adair, Emily Clark, Maysen Jones, Cheyenne Jensen, Emily Dickinson, Kia Fender and Isabell Winchell. Photo: Ed Adair helping the Panthers with their wins. Next up for Lo-Ma was the Freemont Mills white team. Lo-Ma had little trouble dispatching the Fremont Mills team winning both games 21-13 and 21-16. Excellent net play from Kia Fender, Maysen Jones and Amelia Klein helped Lo-Ma win the victory. Coming out as the winner of Pool 2, Lo-Ma would pace Pool 1 winner

Fremont Mills black. The young Panthers built an early lead in game one, winning 25-13. Game two was a little tighter as Fremont stayed in contention until serves by Jocelyn Camenzind put the game away with Lo-Ma winning 25-21. In game three, Lo-Ma opened an early lead and defeated Fremont Mills 25-14. Strong serving by Camenzind, Courtney Oviatt and Emily

Dickinson kept the Panthers on top of their opponents all day. The junior varsity team rolled through its tournament without a loss making this their second tournament win in a row. “I am very proud of these girls. This is the time of year you want your team to peak and getting backto-back tournament wins is proof that is exactly what they are doing,” Hedger said.

Neighborhood network grants Lo-Ma JV volleyball team wins home tourney The Logan-Magnolia junior varsity volleyball team didn’t have to travel too far to win its first tournament of the season. For the first time in several years, the junior varsity won the Lo-Ma Panther volleyball invitational. Teams participating included Logan-Magnolia, Woodbine, ElkhornKimballton, West Harrison, Missouri Valley and Charter Oak-Ute. The teams were split into two pools. In the gold pool was Lo-Ma, Woodbine and Elkhorn-Kimballton. The purple pool was West Harrison, Missouri Valley and COU. In their first game the Panthers met Woodbine. Woodbine started the day early winning both games against Lo-Ma 23-21 and 21-17, putting the Panthers down one match. Not to be deterred, the lady’s from Lo-Ma met Elkhorn-Kimballton next.

Behind strong serving from Courtney Oviatt and good net play from Kia Fender and Jocelyn Camenzind, Lo-Ma handily defeated ElkhornKimballton 21-12 in game one and 21-10 in game two. With a record of 1 and 1, Lo-Ma entered bracket play against West Harrison defeating the Hawkeyes in two games, 21-19 and 21-16. Arguably the best play of the tournament happened during game two as Camenzind was able to perform a dig with her back to the net, setting up a kill by Fender that kept Lo-Ma in the lead. Next up for the Panthers were the Bobcats from Charter-Oak-Ute. Game one saw a battle back and forth with LoMa squeaking out a victory 22-20. The second game was all Lo-Ma as the Panthers defeated the Bobcats 21-12. After dis-

patching the Bobcats the day came full circle as LoMa would play Woodbine in the championship match. As game one progressed, there were several extended volleys that went in favor of Lo-Ma. The game ended on a kill from Lo-Ma’s Fender and the Panthers winning 2115. Game two continued the excitement as the scoring went back and forth. Lo-Ma sealed the win on a tip over the net by Mayson Jones, ending the game with a 22-20 victory and securing the tournament championship. Playing for the Panthers this day were Jones, Camenzind, Fender, Oviatt, Amelia Klein, Emily Dickinson, Cheyenne Jensen, Kaitlyn Gochenour and Emily Clark. All-tournament selections from Lo-Ma included Courtney Oviatt and Emily Dickinson.

OTE DEMOCRATIC TUES., NOV. 2 CHET CULVER For Governer

Norma CORET For Supervisor

FRANCIS THICKE For Secretary of Agriculture MICHAEL MAURO For Secretary of State

Russ KURTH For Supervisor

TOM MILLER For Attorney General JON MURPHY For State Auditor Heather EDNEY For County Treasurer

MATT CAMPBELL For Congress

Jennifer MUMM For CountyAttorney

ROXANNE CONLIN For U.S. Senate

PAID FOR BY THE HARRISON COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY - RENEE HACK, TREASURER

Harrison, Monona, Shelby Decategorization project announces requests for proposals to support neighborhood-based projects. The Neighborhood Network Community grants will be awarded to successful applicants in Harrison, Monona and Shelby counties. The board will award grants with a maximum total of $2,000 for each community partnerships. Funding for this project comes from the Community Partnerships for Protecting Children. Neighborhood groups can

submit proposals requesting funds to promote the vision of strong families, safe children and concerned and caring neighbors. Successful projects will bring neighbors together and build lasting relationships that will result in reduced family stress and help protect children from child abuse by connecting people in neighborhoodbased activities. Possible ideas for projects include neighborhood clean-ups, community gardens, beautification activities, or anything that brings neighbors

together to develop relationships and make a lasting impact to their neighborhoods. Each neighborhood proposal should include participation from community members. The Community Partnerships for Protecting Children Planning Committee will close the application process Oct. 29. To request an application, contact Diane Foss, Executive Director of Harrison, Monona and Shelby Decategorization Project at 712-433-9553 or dfoss@dhs.state.ia.us.

T C E L E RE ROBERT V.

SMITH

Harrison County Supervisor ✓ Reasonable ✓ Reliable ✓ Responsible ✓ Experienced & Knowledgeable in County Government • No axes to grind or personal agendas • Fiscally accountable & trustworthy • Learns quickly and adapts to changes, yet does not rush to judgment • Will put in the time required to do the job • Willing to listen • Uses common sense & good judgment • Working to make Harrison County a better place to live, work & raise a family • Keep dedicated experience working on the Board of Supervisors

“I thank you for your past support, and would humbly ask for your continued support November 2nd.”

Bob Paid for by Smith for Supervisor Committee


Neighbors

Logan Herald-Observer October 13, 2010

9

126 YEARS

Members of the department present for a photo were in front from the left, RC Androy, Derek Bucy, Craig Charbonneau, Teri Dunn, Gail Dickinson; middle row, Casey Charbonneau, Rusty Guirtz, Pat Tillinghast, Jason Fisher, Bob Michael, Boone Christo, Bill Buffum, Andy Charbonneau, Chris Dickinson, Brittnay Nordby; in back, Ryan Nordby, Mike Clausen and JJ Decker(cadet). Not present were Donas Charbonneau, Rick Charbonneau, Larry Landon, Mark Armstrong, Emily Walker, Gary Nordby, Todd Wills. Photo: Donas Charbonneau

OF SERVICE TO LOGAN

PRESENT MEMBERS AND CERTIFICATIONS •R.C. Androy – EMT-B; FFI; board chair •Mark Armstrong – EMT-B; FFA •Bill Buffum – Fire captain; EMT-B; FFI; Board Member •Derek Bucy – Treasurer; EMT-B; FFI; Assistant Chief •Andy Charbonneau – FFI •Craig Charbonneau – Fire Chief; EMT-B; FFI •Donas Charbonneau – Lt. Unit Chief; EMT-B; FFI •Rick Charbonneau – FR •Boone Christo – FR; board member •Mike Clausen – EMT-B; FFI •Gail Dickinson – EMT-B; FF2 •Jason Fisher – Vice President; EMT-B; FFI •Rusty Guritz – EMT-B; FFI; Fire Captain •Larry Landon – Unit Captain; EMT-B; board member; FFI •Joe Maguire – EMT-B; FFI

•Robert Michael - FFI •Teri Moss – Secretary; FFI •Gary Nordby – EMT-B; FFI; board member •Ryan Nordby – FFI •Pat Tillinghaust – President; EMT-B; FFI; Fire Captain •Emily Walker – FFI •Todd Wills - FFI PROBATION •Chris Dickinson – FF2 •Mandy Pippitt – FFI •Kevin Thacker CADETS •Brittany Nordby – EMT-B; FFI •Casey Charbonneau – EMT-B; FFI CADET 2010 •JJ Decker

THE COMMUNITY HONORS OUR HEROES Thank You For Your Dedication

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10

Logan Herald-Observer October 13, 2010

Sports

Panthers ground Underwood Eagles 62-7 Nancy Voggesser For the Herald-Observer The Lo-Ma football team was able to capitalize nine times on each of the varsity’s nine offensive possessions, a 100 percent record, in the 62-7 win over Underwood Oct. 8. The Underwood Eagles started off the game on offense and it looked like they were ready to give the Panthers a good game. Despite some good hits by Dominic Snyder, Dillon Miller, Troy Sodders and Nate Morton, Underwood was able to move easily down field until they hit the red zone where they stalled out. The Eagles’ field goal attempt on fourth and eight went wide right, to give the Panthers the ball on the 20-yard line. The Panthers struck early on a 30-yard pass play from Nate Fender to Evan Mikels. With the ball at true midfield, Fender handed the ball off to Marrick Loftus who outraced the defense to make it into the end zone with 8:38 left in the first quarter. Levi Ettleman’s kick was good to make the early score, Panthers 7-Eagles 0. The Panther defense that fans know and love showed up on the second Underwood possession. Morton and Mikels combined for loss of yardage tackles and Caden McDonald opted through for a sack to encourage the Eagles to punt the ball back to the Panthers. Nate Fender returned the ball to the Eagles 24 yard line to give the Panthers excellent field position. Despite a fumble, recovered by Ettleman on the 11, and another fumble, recovered by Miller on the 11, the Panthers were able to regroup on a pass from Fender to Mikels for an 11-yard touchdown. Ettelman’s kick was good with 4:25 left in the first quarter to increase the margin 14-0. Underwood’s next

attempt was foiled by Mikels who recovered a fumble to put the Panthers back on offense. Although Loftus was backed up early, Zach Hatcher got the next call and took the ball to the Eagles’ 20-yard line. Loftus was able to sweep left a couple plays later to sweep left for a 5-yard touchdown run. Ettleman’s kick with 1:26 left in the first quarter brought the score to 21-0. The Eagles offense met up with Mikels, Miller, Travis Jones and Paul Hutson in their next series, which resulted in little gain for them. With a first down achieved, the Eagles chose to attempt a pass, but Mikels easily tipped it incomplete. The defensive line then swarmed the runner, led by Ben Kill and the Eagles were forced to punt. The Eagles’ punt did not end up with a good Homecoming result, however, as Quin Mann returned the punt all the way into the end zone with 10:32 left in the second quarter. Ettelman’s kick was good to make the score lopsided in favor of the Panthers 28-0. The Panthers then kicked off the ball, which went out of bounds, so Ettleman was forced to rekick. This time he tried an on-side kick, which the Eagles fumbled and was recovered by the Panthers. From midfield, the Panthers kept the ball on the ground and ran their way consistently downfield, where, with 8:41 left in the second quarter, Mikels powered through on a 4-yard touch down run. Ettleman’s kick ensured that the clock would run during the second half of play. The Panthers kicked off again. The Eagles fumbled again. This time Sodders covered the ball. Fender spread the ball around to all available runners and even connected with Ettleman for a first down on the Eagles’ 16-yard line, to show the Underwood fans they weren’t backing down. With 5:51 left in the

The defense shut down Underwood on the ground and in the air. Travis Jones, Paul Hutson and Dominic Snyder bring down the Underwood ball carrier to end another scoring opportunity. Photo: Angela Winther half, Snyder was successful on a one-yard touch down run. This time Ettleman’s kick went wide right to set the score at 41-0. The Panthers weren’t done yet for the half, however, as the defense held the Eagles to short yardage, forcing a punt downed at the Panther 5yard line. The Panthers weren’t to be held in their own territory for long, though, and with 48 seconds left in the half, Zach Hatcher broke free on a 28yard touch down run. Ettleman’s kick ended scoring for the quarter at 48-0. One of the problems with being so prolific in the first half means the clock runs in the second half. While that seems to be a good thing, being so prolific in so many games means the Panther varsity players don’t get to play full games. Coach Straight chose to keep his varsity in throughout the third quarter to give them a bit more game time in preparation for the rest of the season.

Center, Ben Kill, hands the ball off to quarterback Nate Fender in a lopsided showdown between the Panthers and the Underwood Eagles. Photo: Angela Winther Lo-Ma started off on offense, moving as easily as they did in the first quarter. With 7:44 left in the third quarter, Mikels sprinted for a 36-yard touch down run. Ettleman’s kick was good to set the score at 55-0. Underwood finally got on the scoreboard on its next possession completing a pass into the end

zone. Their kick was good with 5:13 left in the third quarter, to put their first and final seven on the scoreboard. The Panthers turned around and capitalized on the runs of Hutson and McDonald. Six seconds into the fourth quarter, Hutson broke free on a 5yard touch down run. Ettleman’s kick was good

to end the scoring at 62-7 for the night. The Panther junior varsity got some muchyearned for game time experience in the rest of the game. Although neither team scored again, the junior varsity showed they could keep up with the Underwood starters, a good sign for the rest of the season and future.

Cross country competes in Woodbine, Atlantic invitationals Taylor Olsen For the Herald-Observer Oct. 4, the Lo-Ma cross country team ran in the Woodbine Invitational at the Shadow Valley golf course. The varsity boys placed second, 10 points behind Missouri Valley. Final standings were: Missouri Valley, 80; Lo-Ma, 90; Tri-Center, 110; Woodbine, 118; Riverside, 127; Treynor, 130; Boyer Valley, 147; Audubon, 177; Underwood, 180. The top 20 individuals medaled with Lo-Ma having three receiving medals. Ellis Johnson, 13th in 20:02, E.J. Darnell, 15th in 20:16 and Joel Pixley, 17th in 20:20. Alex Skeen just missed medaling by placing 21st in 20:37. Following Skeen was Grady Killpack, 24th in 20:52, Wyatt Schultz, 27th in 21:03 and Braden Rosengren, 37th in 21:26. “The boys all competed well today on a very tough course,” said coach Pam Olsen. “The first 300 yards of the race is straight uphill and is very challenging and they did a great job of getting out in front early. Our conference meet is held here next Saturday so they got a good feel for the course. Alex Skeen ran one of his best races this year.” The girls team had two medalists, Karen Holcomb

in 18th place at 18:17 and Haley Whisney, 19th in 18:19. Alexa Meeker was 45th in 20:27 and Jacque DeWitt, 48th in 20:46. “The girls continue to work hard and really push each other in the meets and practice to lower their times,” Olsen said. Tri-Center won the girls’ with 36 points, followed by Missouri Valley, 88, Underwood, 95, Woodbine 107, Treynor, 118, Audubon, 129, and Boyer Valley, 201. The junior varsity boys were first place with 25 points. Tommy Peterson was first in 21:45, Daniel Cox, second in 21:51, Adam Thompson third in 22:57, Ridge Meeker, fourth in 23:05, Alex Fanning, sixth in 23:48 and Owen Pitt, seventh in 24:26. In the junior high races’ there were 25 boys competing with Justin Thomas leading the Panthers in third place in 13:24. Brett Rosengren was ninth in 14:03, Andrew Walski, 21st in 16:20 and Gage Killpack, 22nd in 16:39. In the girls’ race, there were 31 competitors with Victoria Johnson placing 16th in 16:11. “This is the last regular meet for the junior high and they will run their conference meet Oct. 11 at Ida Grove,” Olsen said. “They have had a great season and have shown a lot of

improvement throughout the season.” Atlantic Invite October 7 The Logan-Magnolia Panthers competed in the Atlantic High School invitational Oct. 7. This is a very competitive meet due to a large number of large schools and small schools that attend. The boys’ high school race had more than 159 runners participate. Leading the Panthers in 60th place was Ellis Johnson with a time of 18:59. Following Johnson was E.J. Darnell running 19:08 in 69th place. Only a few seconds behind was Joel Pixley with a time of 19:12 placing 71st. In 89th place, Grady Killpack ran a quick time of 19:28. In 110th place was Wyatt Schultz in a time of 20:08. Nearly stride-for-stride were Braden Rosengren in 120th place with a time of 20:31 and senior Alex Skeen in 122nd in 20:33. Skeen concluded the Panthers statement on the vicious course in Atlantic. The boys placed 14th out of 23 teams. The junior varsity boys also had a great race. Tommy Peterson led the Logan-Magnolia junior varsity boys in 37th place with a time of 20:47. The hardworking Adam Thompson ran a time of 22:02 in 76th place. Junior Alex Fanning

Tommy Peterson stays ahead of a group of runners.

Photo: Daniel Norton

ran a time of 23:57 in 120th place. In 144th place, Owen Pitt had a time of 25:41. The junior varsity boys showed a large amount of hard work throughout the race. The high school girls were led by Kendra Holcomb with a time of 17:24 in 42nd place. Shortly behind was Harley Whisney in 46th place in a time of 17:29. Jacque DeWitt came in 107th with a time of 19:19, and finishing 129th was Alexa Meeker with a time of 21:20 and Jessica Mausbach in 129th place in 29:08. The girls placed 17th out of 20 full teams. This is the first time all season the girls have been able to compete as a full team.

Photo: Daniel Norton

Kendra Holcomb leads the pack.


Logan Herald-Observer

Legals CITY OF LOGAN PUBLIC HEARING October 4, 2010 At 6:50 p.m., Mayor Fetter called the public hearing to order. Those present were council members Johnson, Hartwig and Crum. Clark and Moss was absent .................... The mayor asked if there were any additions or deletions to the agenda. There were none. Motion was made by Johnson and seconded by Hartwig to approve the agenda. 3 ayes. Courtney Harter from SWIPCO was present to report to the council that the project had gone well and the administrative costs were slightly under budget so that should leave some money to help with the small addition of a change order that was approved. No other citizens were present to speak. Motion was made by Johnson and seconded by Crum to adjourn. 3 ayes. Randy Fetter, Mayor Attest: Nedra Fliehe, City Clerk/Administrator 42-1

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S LEVY AND SALE STATE OF IOWA HARRISON COUNTY IOWA DISTRICT COURT CASE #EQCV028760 Special Execution PLAINTIFF NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC VS. DEFENDANT (Judgment Debtor) MARY E. VANDEMARK, RUSSELL A. VANDEMARK As a result of the judgment rendered in the above referenced court case, an execution was issued by the court to the sheriff of this county. The execution ordered the sale of the defendant(s) real estate to satisfy the judgment. The property to be sold is: A parcel of land located in part of the SE1/4 of Section1, Township 79 North, Range 43 West of the 5th Principal Meridian, Harrison County, Iowa, more fully described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of the SE1/4SW1/4 of Section1; thence N 00 degrees 00’ 00” E along a portion of the East line of the SE1/4SW1/4 of Section 1 a distance of 459.12 feet to the point of beginning; thence N 00 degrees 00’ 00” E continuing along the East line of said SE1/4SW1/4 and the centerline of a county road a distance of 290.98 feet; thence S 88 degrees 18’ 22” W a distance of 248.53 feet; thence S 03 degrees 48’ 30” E a distance of 59.40 feet; thence S 26 degrees 07’ 42” W a distance of 112.79 feet; thence N 87 degrees 57’ 33” W a distance of 63.17 feet; thence S 02 degrees 33’ 44” E a distance of 95.66 feet; thence S 33 degrees 59’ 01” E a distance of 106.13 feet; thence N 89 degrees 05’ 53” E a distance of 47.58 feet; thence N 01 degrees 02’ 04” E a distance of 54.59 feet; thence S 86 degrees 57’ 38” E a distance of 237.83 feet to the point of beginning. Said parcel excludes presently established county road right-of-way and is subject to all easements of records. Note: The

East line of the SW!/4 of Section 1 is assumed to bear N 00 degrees 00’ 00” E for this description. LOCAL ADDRESS: 2289 NORTON AVENUE, LOGAN, IOWA. The described property will be offered for sale at public auction for cash only as follows: Date of Sale, Nov. 5, 2010; Time of Sale, 10:30 a.m.; Place of Sale, Harrison County Sheriff’s Office. This sale not subject to redemption. Judgment Amount, $119,257.86; Costs, $461.25; Accruing Costs, $4,526.00 plus sheriff; Interest, 7.0% from 6-6-10 plus $9,158.07; Date, Aug. 4, 2010; Sheriff, Patrick Sears, Harrison County, Iowa; Attorney, Theodore R. Boecker. 42-2

LOGAN CITY COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS October 4, 2010 At 6:55 p.m., immediately following the public hearing, Mayor Fetter called the meeting to order. Those present were council members Johnson, Hartwig, and Crum. Clark and Moss were absent. Mayor Fetter asked if there were any additions or deletions to the agenda. There were none. Motion was made by Hartwig and seconded by Crum to approve the agenda. 3 ayes. Motion was made by Hartwig and seconded by Johnson to approve the consent agenda which consisted of approval of the 9-20-10 regular council meeting minutes, set date of 10-18-10 for the next council meeting, approve claims register, treasurer and department reports and building permits for: Roger Seeley, 126 E. 10th St., fence and bathroom

addition;

Hartwig

Investments LLC, 123 E. 9th St., replace deck and front porch. 3 ayes. Motion was made at 7:00 p.m. by Johnson and seconded by Hartwig to go into closed session according to the State Code of Iowa, Chapter 21.5 (c) for the purpose of discussing strategy with counsel in matters that are presently in litigation. 3 ayes. The council came out of closed session at 7:43 p.m., Mayor Fetter stated there were no decisions made in closed session. Motion was made by Hartwig and seconded by Johnson to authorize the City Administrator to consult with the City Attorney concerning pending litigation. 3 ayes. Agenda item 7 was to accept the completed CDBG Retention Pond and Ditch Project. The council stated they were very pleased with the completed project. Motion was made by Johnson and seconded by Crum to accept the completed CDBG Retention Pond and Ditch project. 3 ayes. Agenda item 8 was a decision on applying for the Community Design Program sponsored by the Iowa Architectural Foundation. The council had discussed this at the last meeting. They have reviewed the information they received at that time. The clerk discussed the committee that was formed in 1999 to come up with a 20-year comprehen-

sive plan for the city. Some of the ideas that were discussed at that time have no happened yet due to the other large projects the city has completed such as the swimming pool and the park shelter. The council discussed a few possible projects they would like to see happen but weren’t sure any of those projects were far enough along in the process to qualify for the $2,500 grant being offered by the Community Design Program. This is a matching grant so the other $2,500 would have to be paid by the city and this is for the research and design phase only, not the actual construction. The council agreed that the clerk should talk with Renea Anderson of HCDC and see if other cities have already started receiving these grants as only a few are available. No action taken. Item 9 was approve a cigarette permit for Fuel-N-Shine, Mark and Jill Madsen. They are purchasing the current Fuel & Shine. Motion was made by Johnson and seconded by Crum to approve a cigarette permit for Fuel-N-Shine, Mark and Jill Madsen, owners. 3 ayes. Chamber update: None Citizens questions and comments: none CLAIMS Brown Supply Co., decals.$300.00 Data Tech., fall 10 user grp. ..95.00 Douglas Johnsen, sidewalk Repair ...............................272.25 Dultmeier Sales, valve ..........84.29 Earhugger safety equip., repair Vid Mic ...............................60.00 First National Bank, payroll Taxes.............................3,169.90 Gary Nordby, aerate/spray ..732.00 Lois Hall, contract serv........446.35 Harr. Co. Landfill, assmt. ..3,107.00 IA Codification Inc., update Ordinances ......................182.50 Iowa Telecom, telephone ....246.54 IA Workforce Dev., unemployment Tax ...................................669.89 IMFOA, fall IMFOA training.136.00 JP Cooke Co., dog tags........40.84 Logan Fire Dept., reimb. 28E/agreement ...........10,514.50 Logan Herald-Observer, Publish .............................194.86 Logan Pub. Lib., reimb. ....4,725.00 Logan Super Foods, shop Supplies .............................34.87 Logan Water Dept., deposit Refund .............................100.00 Matt Parrott & Sons., print Water bills ........................854.68 Mid American Energy, Utilities ...........................5,706.93 Papillion Sanitation, trash Removal.............................68.50 Solution One, copier .............69.91 Terracon Consultants Inc., Soil testing .......................281.25 Ultra No Touch, city vehicle Wash..................................22.00 Upper Boyer Drainage Dist., Drainage tax ......................57.94 Verizon Wireless, cell ph.....205.56 TOTAL ............................32,378.56 PAYROLL THRU 10/4/10........................10,890.98 PAID TOTAL ...................43,269.54 Motion was made by Johnson and seconded by Crum to adjourn. 3 ayes. Randy Fetter, Mayor Nedra Fliehe, City Clerk/Administrator 42-1

October 13, 2010

11

2010

Harrison County

POLITICAL FORUM Sponsored by

Thursday, October 21, 2010 • 7:00 p.m. at the Logan Community Center Committed candidates include:

Harrison County Supervisor Robert Smith Harrison County Recorder Lorie Thompson Supervisor candidate Russell Kurth Supervisor candidate Norma Coret Supervisor candidate Walter Utman Treasurer candidate Heather Hack Edney Treasurer candidate Renee King Treasurer candidated Sandy Royer Send questions to: ndavis@woodbinetwiner.com or call 712-647-2821 Please send questions by

Thursday, October 7th at noon.

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF ELECTION NOTICE is hereby given to the qualified electors of Harrison County, State of Iowa, that a General Election will be held on Tuesday, November 2, 2010. Polls open at 7:00 a.m. and close at 9:00 p.m. Location of polling places are as follows: VOTING PRECINCTS Precinct 1: Little Sioux Township

and City of Little Sioux, City Hall, Little Sioux. Precinct 2: Jackson and Allen Townships, City of Pisgah, Fellowship Hall, Methodist Church, Pisgah. Precinct 3: Harrison Township and City of Dunlap, City Hall, Dunlap. Precinct 4: Morgan and Raglan Townships, City of Mondamin, Community Center, Mondamin.

Precinct 5: Magnolia Township and City of Magnolia, City Hall, Magnolia. Precinct 6: Douglas, Lincoln, and Boyer Townships, Sacred Heart Parish Center, Woodbine. Precinct 7: City of Woodbine, Sacred Heart Parish Center, Woodbine. Precinct 8: Clay, Taylor and Cincinnati Townships, City of Modale, American Legion Hall,

Modale. Precinct 9: Calhoun, Jefferson, and LaGrange Townships, Community Center, Logan. Precinct 10: City of Logan, Community Center, Logan. Precinct 11: St. John Township, Rand Center, Missouri Valley. Precinct 12: City of Missouri Valley, Rand Center, Missouri Valley. Precinct 13: Cass, Union and

Washington Townships, City of Persia, PIC Hall Persia. I, Susan E. Bonham, Harrison County Auditor and Commissioner of Elections, do hereby certify that the proceeding is a facsimile of the ballots to be voted upon at the General Election, November 2, 2010. A public test of the voting equipment that will be used at this election will be held on Tuesday,

October 19th at 11:00 a.m. In testimony thereof, I set my hand and seal as Auditor of Harrison County, Logan, Iowa, this 8th day of October, 2010. Susan E. Bonham, Harrison County Auditor and Commissioner of Elections 42-1


12

Logan Herald-Observer October 13, 2010

HARRISON COUNTY CLAIMS GENERAL BASIC FUND Betty J. Abrams, emp. mi. ...$38.00 Agriland FS .........................201.64 Alltel ......................................48.40 American Hotel Register, cust. Supplies .............................88.49 AT&T .....................................33.10 Lance Baldwin, twnsp. Trustees & clerk................................12.36 Joseph A. Ball, twnsp. Trustees & clerk.................................15.10 Roger Barry, twnsp. Trustees & clerk................................14.02 Better Business Equip., office And data processing..........85.12 Connie Betts, wearing apparel & uniform .........................116.99 Bill’s Water Cond.................312.20 Tonia Birks, emp. mil. ............92.95 Bonsall TV & App., .............157.26 Patty Booher, emp. mil. .........15.95 Briggs Corp., health supp. & equip.............................219.52 Nichole Briggs, emp. mil. ......43.10 Business Cleaning Solutions, Custodial services ...........200.00 C&H Hauling .......................361.00 Care Facts Info. Sys., computer Updates ...........................793.50 Carpenter Paper Co., custodial Supplies ............................188.34 Nicole Carritt, emp. mil..........78.52 CCPOA of IA, meeting reg..180.00 Central IA Dist., custodial Supplies .............................40.71 Lowell Chapman, twnsp. Trustee & clerk..................................3.67 Donas Charbonneau, emp. Mileage ..............................35.50 Cheryl Smith Cleaning Service, Other personnel...............480.00 City of Logan.......................330.99 City of Mo. Valley.................300.00 Clark Pest & Termite Control 40.00 Continental Research Corp., Cleaning & painting ........922.57 Susan Corrin, emp. mil. & Subs..................................138.35 Counsel Office & Document, Office equip. ................1,204.94 Daryl Cox, twnsp. Trustees & Clerk ........................................82 Cutler O’Neill Funeral Home, Funeral service ................450.00 Cyclone Awards, office Supplies ...........................228.00 DC Electric ..........................445.00 Deb’s Deli & More, sales Items ..................................12.00 Gary Dickinson, twnsp trustee & clerk...................................3.51 Lynn Dickinson, twnsp trustee & clerk...................................7.79 Sandra Dickman, emp. mil. .315.85 Display Sales Co., bldg. Maint. ...............................185.00 District IV Auditors, meeting Registrations......................40.00 Denise Dobbs, emp. mil. .......12.50 Dollar General.......................12.75 Brian Donn, Twnshp. Trustee & clerk.....................................82 The Dunlap Reporter, legal Notice.................................75.80 Eby Drug ...............................18.95 Echo Group Inc., electrical Supp. & par ........................30.78 Myrna Ehlert, twnsp. Trustees & Clerk ....................................4.21 Employee Data Forms, office Supplies .............................26.25 Farm Plan, parts .................172.94 Farner Bocken Co., food & Provisions .........................767.42 Mark Flint, twnsp. Trustees & Clerk ....................................9.89 Julie Florian emp. mil. ...........44.50 Foodland ...............................46.47 Fourth Ave. Bldg. Corp., ................ Service contracts .............120.00 Frain’s Trash Removal...........90.00 Dixie Frisk, .........................473.00 Judson Frisk........................600.00 John Ganzhorn, abandon well Exp. & water......................600.00 Jack Gochenour, emp. mil.......8.50 Reanna Gochenour, emp. Mileage ............................192.00 Dr. Carrie Grady, emp. mil.....12.00 Paula Greene, emp. mil. .......31.50 Gary Hall, twnshp. Trustees & Clerks..................................15.14 Lois Hall, custodial..............480.00 Russell Hansen, twnsp. Trustees & clerks................................4.17 Harr.Co. Auditor, bldg. Maintenance ....................200.00 Harr. Co. Landfill Comm., Permanent landscaping ........9.60 Harr. Co. Law Enf., utilities Payments ...........................10.00 Harr. Co. Pub. Hth., juvenile Programs ......................3,950.00 Harr. Co. REC ..................2,902.88 Harr. Co. Secondary Road, Fuel & Oil..........................220.00 Harr. Co. Treas., dues & Memberships ......................25.00 Carla Head, contracted service Hours .................................90.10 Hennessey-Aman Funeral Home, ............................1,800.00 Vernon Henrich, emp. mil........8.50 Hobby Lobby, env. Ed/awds ..27.53 Robert Hodge, twnsp. Trustees & clerk ..............................11.30 Home Town Hdw., ................96.99 Hopkins Medical Products, Hth. Supp. & equip. ............88.95 Horizon Equipment, minor equip. & hand tools.......................38.75 Hy-Vee, sales items ..............11.80 Hygienic Laboratory............750.00 IKON Fin. Serv., office & data Processing .........................340.00 IKON Office Solutions Central, Office & data processing .107.52 IMAGETek Inc., office & data Processing .........................57.50 Ingenix, hth. Supp. & equip. 128.36 IA State Asso. Of Counties, Meeting reg......................130.00 IA State Medical Exam. ...1,400.00 IA Western Comm. College, Meeting reg.........................60.00 Jensen’s Ace Hdw.................77.93 Calvin Johnsen, twnsp. Trustees & Clerks....................................7.79 Lehman Printing....................49.00 Clarence Leonard, twnsp. Trustees & clerk ....................3.86 Barbara Lewis, cust. Serv. ..150.00 Lincoln Hwy. Trading Post, Sales items .......................765.13 Loess Hills Vineyard & Winery..............................684.00 Logan Auto supply ................85.94 Logan Do It Best Hdw.........232.90 Logan Mini Mart ..................621.46 Logan Postmaster ...............975.80 Logan Super Foods .........2,047.46 Logan Woodbine Newspaper, Office supplies ..................913.88 Loganet ...............................291.90 Mail Services, office supp.1,053.82 Marathon Sys., custodial Supp. ...............................343.85 Danny Mathison, twnsp. Trustees & clerk.................................12.36 Matt Parrott & Sons, office Supplies ............................895.82 Teresa McCandless, emp. Mileage ................................2.16 Gene McGinn, twnsp. Trustees

& clerk..................................8.57 Kenneth McIntosh, twnsp. Trustees & clerk .................10.30 Sara McIntosh, autopy & Coroner expense .............400.00 Diane Meeker, emp. mil. .....111.36 Gay Melby,emp. mil. ............105.60 Tabitha Melby, emp. mil...........9.50 Menards ...........................1,092.34 Curtis Mether, twnsp. Trustees & clerk.................................10.19 Mid Country Automotive........65.00 MidAmerican Energy .......4,145.00 Midlands Dental Center ......140.00 Midwest Taxidermy, env. Ed Awards .............................840.00 Midwest Turf & Irrigation, Parts ...................................71.78 Miller Fuel & Oil ..................941.00 John Mock, office supp. ........48.00 Solomon Mohn, twnsp. Trustee & clerk...................................9.61 Moore Medical LLC, health Supplies & equip...............138.65 Moores Portable Toilets & Pump ..................................90.00 Mr. Ed’s Flag Pole, bldg. Maintenance ......................73.00 Harold Muell, twnsp. Trustees & Clerks..................................11.08 Mumm Law Firm ..............4,134.61 Anjie Myer, utilities pmts. ......56.51 Scott Nelson, emp. mil. .........19.00 Noble Popcorn Farms, sales Items ..................................64.20 O’Keefe Elevator Co., equip. Repair & maint.................552.74 Office Stop ..........................599.05 Omaha ASC Pain Clinic, Prescription medicine .........85.00 On Trac, service contracts ..259.95 Pamida ................................426.67 PayLess Office Products, Office supplies ...................91.47 Paymaster sales & service, Office supplies .................599.50 Pearl Pinkham, emp. mil. ......43.00 Pitney Bowes, postage meter Rental ...............................624.00 Prevention Research Inc., Juvenile programs ...........200.00 Angie Pryor, emp. mil..............9.00 Pryors K&L Repair ................21.98 Qwest ..................................106.73 Reserve Acct., postage....2,000.00 Kristine Rife, emp. mil. ..........39.43 Jodi Roden, postage.............47.40 Sam’s Club..........................376.26 Sanofi Pasteur Inc., flu Clinics ...........................2,528.71 The Sassi Institute, juvenile Programs .........................178.00 Seeley Service ....................574.62 Ricky Shearer, twnsp. Trustees & clerk.................................12.36 Julie Shelton, twnsp. Trustees & Clerk ....................................9.50 Shirley Sigler, emp. mil. ........11.50 Robert Smith, emp. mil. ..........9.00 Snodgrass Custom Floors, Office & data processing ..150.00 Lynn Stamp, twnsp. Trustees & Clerk ..................................10.42 Cindy Stessman, deputies Salaries..........................3,600.00 The Stone Age Rick Neppl, Sales items ......................128.50 Jay Straight, twnsp. Trustees & Clerk .....................................2.05 Linda Stueve, emp. mil........118.55 SWI Juvenile Emergency Serv., Juvenile detention costs13,344.21 Swift Locksmithing, off. Supp.66.50 Tof C Commercial Laundry ...20.40 Therapy Place, utilities pmts .75.00 Lorie Thompson, emp. mil.....21.00 Tribune Newspapers, magazines Periodicals .........................44.00 Uline, office supp. ...............120.61 Ultra No Touch ......................50.00 United Health Care, contracted Service hours.....................90.10 US Bank, recreational Supplies ........................3,532.48 Walter Utman, twnsp. Trustees & clerk..................................9.50 Valley Times News, magazines Periodicals .......................540.33 Vandemark Htg. & cooling ..401.00 Byron Vinnink, emp. mil. .......13.00 Verizon Wireless .................589.69 Kandice Wallis, emp. mil. ......28.32 Sherrill Webb, emp. mil. ......193.66 West Group, magazines, Periodicals ........................639.16 Wildlife Artist Supply, environ. Ed/awards..........................42.58 Windstream......................2,127.88 Gail Witt, township. Trustees & clerks................................9.52 Woodhouse Chev. ..................4.67 GENERAL SUPPLEMENTAL FUND American Legion Hall, polling Places ................................75.00 Lori Aschenbrenner, election Officials ..............................90.00 Susan Bonham, elec. supp. ..93.18 Patricia Boustead, elec. off. ..81.00 Christian Home Asso. Children’, Sheltered care ..............1,352.85 Nick DeBolt, elec. off.............42.00 Nancy Foutch, elec. off. ........81.00 Barbara Guyett, elec. off. ......87.00 Brian Heffernan, emp. group Ins. ..................................166.66 Henry Adkins & Son Inc., Printing of ballots .............167.23 Jim Herman, elec. off. ...........18.00 Peggy Hill, elec. off. ..............90.00 Rene Hiller, employee group Ins. ...................................166.66 IMWCA, workmen’s comp Ins. ..............................13,254.00 IA Secetary of State Lucas, Voter reg. Serv. ..............1,261.44 Larry King, emp. group ins..166.66 Elizabeth Lenz, emp. group Ins. ....................................166.66 Logan Woodbine Newspaper, Legal notice .....................165.29 Sherrill Lubbers, elec. off. .....81.00 Matt Parrott & Sons co., Printing of ballots ..........4,678.43 Gay Melby, emp. group.ins..166.66 Tabitha Melby, emp. group Ins. ...................................166.66 Richard Ohl, Sr. emp. group Ins. ....................................166.66 Kristina Pauley, emp. group Ins. ...................................166.66 Floyd Pitt, emp. group ins. ..166.66 Mary Poe, elec. off. ...............81.00 Pott. Co. Sheriff, sheltered Care ...................................40.00 Quakerdale, sheltered Care ..............................2,612.60 Lynette Sell, elec. off...........114.00 Denis Stueve, elec. off. .........42.00 Lorie Thompson, emp. group Ins. ...................................166.66 Treas. State of IA, sheltered Care .............................15,619.24 Valley Times News, legal Notice...............................151.82 RURAL SERVICES BASIC FUND Harr. Co. Landfill Comm., dues & memberships............13,094.00 Harr. Co. Lib., contrib......32,000.00 JAIL G & M Refrig. & App. ..........526.40 Harr. Co. Secondary Rd., Personal items & cloth. .....180.00 Loftus Htg. & AC .................557.92 Larry Oliver, personal items &

Legals Clothing.............................429.78 US Bank..............................619.73 MH-DD SERVICES FUND Concerned Inc., work activity Services........................2,655.01 Country Care Center Corp. RCF ..............................8,276.54 Country View Estates, RCF ..............................2,614.00 Crossroads of Western IA, Work activity serv........11,368.10 DHS ...............................74,784.16 Faith Ridge Life Center, adult Day care .......................3,100.00 Harr. Comm. Mental Hth., Outpatient ......................8,333.33 Home Care Services, blank Record .............................639.00 Horizons Unlimited, work activity Servies.............................439.74 Ida Services, work activity Services........................1,155.84 Jennie Edmundson Hospital, Inpatient/hospital...........1,999.00 Nishna Prod., work activity Services...........................832.95 Partnership for Progress, RCF ...............................1,611.69 The Pride Group, RCF.....1,499.78 REM Developmental Serv., Adult day care..................924.00 SW IA Plan. Co., blank Record ..........................1,166.43 Treas. State of IA, blank Record ......................139,422.96 Vocational Development Center, Work activity serv.............349.28 SECONDARY ROAD FUND AA Wheel & Truck Supply, Minor MV parts & acc. ........49.65 Agriland FS ......................2,000.09 Baum Hydraulics Corp., minor MV parts & access. ......1,065.07 Bedrock Gravel, cover Aggregate & sand.......88,380.38 Bi-State Motor Parts, minor MV Parts & access.................268.71 Bill’s Water Cond...................28.00 Bonsall TV & Appliance ......113.70 Brown Supply co., safety Items .................................403.28 Cheryl Smith Cleaning Serv., Bldg. Maint.......................220.00 City of Logan.......................133.94 City of Mo. Valley...................16.25 The Cure, safety items..........40.85 CWC Chem., chem.. & gassesHerbic ............................2,989.80 Diamond Mowers, minor MV pts. & access. ......................3,920.30 Dultmeier Sales, minor MV pts. & Access. ..............................79.25 Farm Plan, minor MV pts. & acc....................................1.30 Timothy Faylor, eng. Serv....138.05 Graham Tire Co. .................176.76 Harr. Co. REC .....................709.83 Heller Implement.................195.93 Husker Chem. Sales, Other.............................2,130.56 IA Bridge & Culvert, flood & Erosion const. St.........85,708.80 IA Dept. Transp., meeting Registration......................325.00 IA Dept. Transp., food & erosion Const. St. ..................136,416.04 IA Prison Ind., traffic & st. Sign material.................1,064.40 JD Graphics, safety items ...262.60 Jensen’s Ace Hdw.................10.48 KRIS Eng., minor MV parts & Access. ..........................2,359.63 Lawson Prod., minor MV pts. & access. .........................645.75 Leinen Welding, flood & erosion Const. St. .........................342.00 Linweld Inc., minor equip. & hand tools......................260.52 Loess Hills Country Corner.243.53 Logan Auto Supply..............306.49 Logan Do It Best ...................51.84 Logan Postmaster ...............636.00 Meeker Well Co.....................86.50 MidAmerican Energy .......1,257.00 Miller Fuel & Oil .............17,250.00 MINK conf., meeting reg. ......55.00 Mo. Valley Impl., outside repair Service.............................435.05 Mo. Valley NAPA....................54.55 New Sioux City Iron, shop Equip. ...............................181.80 Nuts & Bolts, minor equip. & Hand tools.........................188.14 Oppold Lumber .....................50.32 Palfleet Truck & Equip., minor MV pts. & access. ............382.35 Powerplan, outside repair Service..........................5,692.64 Qwest ....................................53.68 Reedsburg Hdw. Co., minor MV Parts & access....................57.33 Regional Water .....................42.00 Ri-Tec, minor MV pts. & acc.617.00 Royal Towel, minor MV pts. & Access. ............................826.50 Rubber Inc., tires & tubes .....15.84 Sam’s Club..........................323.82 Searle Petroleum co., Lubricants ......................7,198.96 Sta-Bilt Const., concrete & Clay products.................1,355.34 JT Stoner, mileage................92.95 Sundquist Eng., flood & erosion Const. St. ......................1,821.50 Thermo King Christensen, minor MV parts & access. .........502.63 Ultra No Touch ......................35.00 United Western Coop.......4,703.16 US Bank..............................899.35 Valley Times News, legal Notice.................................43.00 Verizon Wireless .................214.38 Wick’s Sterling Trucks, minor MV Pts. & access................60.11 Windstream.........................496.02 Wise-Mack, minor MV pts. & Access ..........................1,487.79 Woodhouse Chev., Buick, .....43.86 Wright Express Fleet Serv., Fuel & oil.......................1,444.25 Zep Sales & Serv., minor MV Fleet & access. ................212.84 Ziegler Inc., minor MV pts. & Access. .........................1,866.84 RECORDER’S RECORDS MGT. IMAGETek Inc., data proc. Services.............................57.50 E911 SERVICE COMMISSION AT&T .....................................33.11 Bill’s Water Cond...................21.00 Bonsall TV & App................129.95 Cushing Tech. Inc., misc. .2,250.00 Harr. Co. REC .......................51.97 IA Prison Ind., traffic & st. Sign material.......................83.85 MidAmerican Eng. ................15.48 Qwest ..................................477.15 Sam’s Club............................49.76 Sign-Up Ltd., traffic & st. Sign material....................218.30 United Western Coop..........233.20 Windstream......................2,651.59 EMERGENCY MGT. City of Logan.........................82.94 Counsel Off. & Doc., office And data process...............19.89 Loftus Htg. & AC .................109.92 MidAmerican Energy ..........716.32 MV Fire & Res., radio and Comm.. .........................1,000.00 Mondamin Fire & Rescue, Radio & comm.. ............1,000.00 Office Stop ............................20.14 US Bank..............................377.56 Verizon Wireless ...................54.37

Woodbine Fire & Rescue, Radio & comm.. ...............500.00 CONSERVATION LAND ACQUISITION TRUST FUND Dollar General.........................6.00 Gerhold Concrete................189.85 Harr. Co. REC .....................506.37 Barbara Lewis, park land Dev...................................281.00 Menards ..............................210.92 United Seeds, park land Dev....................................157.50 US Bank................................42.74 ASSESSOR Dennis Alvis, con. Ed. ...........65.00 Counsel Office & Doc., Office supplies .....................7.32 IA State Asso. Of Assessors, Cont. ed. ..........................275.00 Logan Do It Best Hdw...........13.79 Verizon Wireless ...................37.26 Windstream...........................24.73 SEPTEMBER 2010 WITHHOLDING GENERAL FUND FICA...............................15,441.79 IPERS ............................12,065.23 GENERAL SUPPLEMENT FICA...............................15,687.35 IPERS ............................16,839.75 LINCOLN FINANCIAL.........367.20 BC/BS ............................54,459.62 FIRST HORIZON .............3,476.94 RURAL BASIC FICA......................................43.56 IPERS ...................................32.60 SECONDARY ROAD FUND FICA...............................20,029.46 IPERS ............................15,400.99 LINCOLN FINANCIAL.........209.70 BC/BS ............................35,623.56 FIRST HORIZON .............1,182.88 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FUND FICA.................................3,278.44 IPERS ..............................2,602.44 LINCOLN FINANCIAL...........42.00 BC/BS ..............................5,500.31 FIRST HORIZON ................295.72 ASSESSOR FUND FICA.................................1,400.94 IPERS ..............................1,134.12 LINCOLN FINANCIAL...........18.00 BC/BS ..............................2,865.05 SEPTEMBER SALARIES Margie Heffernan ................710.61 F. Irene Churchill .................500.58 Janet Wilderdyke.................444.96 Shirley Sigler.......................138.91 Nichole Briggs.....................748.00 Jodi Roden.......................1,397.75 Ruth Heim ...........................398.61 Juanita Johnsen..................342.99 Lyla Olson .............................25.00 Betty Stamp ..........................25.00 Patty Booher .......................757.44 Patricia Hazen..................2,338.05 Connie Leighton....................25.00 Pearl Pinkham..................1,545.54 Dedra Hatcher..................2,090.17 Kandice Wallis.....................410.13 Donald Rodasky....................35.00 Clifford Raper......................614.60 Eugene Jacobsen .................31.00 Robert Hodge .......................25.00 Lloyd Swift.............................25.00 Randy Zacharias...................25.00 Lynn Stamp...........................25.00 Gary Wenninghoff ............1,697.60 Neil Jensen ...........................32.00 Ronald Greenwood .............284.72 Ried Matthies ...................1,152.00 42-1

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S LEVY AND SALE STATE OF IOWA IOWA DISTRICT COURT CASE #EQCV028507 HARRISON COUNTY Special Execution PLAINTIFF WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. VS. DEFENDANT (Judgment Debtor) JOE M. HOFFMANN; JENNY S. HOFFMANN FKA JENNY S. OLSON; ET AL As a result of the judgment rendered in the above referenced court case, an execution was issued by the court to the Sheriff of this county. The execution ordered the sale of defendant(s) real estate to satisfy the judgment. The property to be sold is: THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTH QUARTER (E1/2S1/4) OF THE SOUTHEAST SECTION FOURTEEN (14), IN TOWNSHIP EIGHTY-ONE (81) NORTH, RANGE FORTY-ONE (41) WEST OF THE 5TH P.M., HARRISON COUNTY, IOWA SUBJECT TO PUBLIC ROADWAY. LOCAL ADDRESS: 3765 130TH ST., DUNLAP, IOWA. The described property will be offered for sale at public auction for cash only as follows: Date of Sale: Oct. 29, 2010; Time of Sale, 10:00 a.m.; Place of Sale, Harrison County Sheriff’s Office. This sale not subject to redemption. Judgment Amount, $140,684.45; Costs, $526.74; Accruing Costs, $2,590.64 plus sheriff; Interest, 5.75% from 4-30-10 on $133,412.89 plus $7,019.70; Date, July 20, 2010; Sheriff, Patrick Sears, Harrison County, Iowa; Attorney: David M. Erickson. 41-2

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S LEVY AND SALE STATE OF IOWA HARRISON COUNTY IOWA DISTRICT COURT CASE #EQCV028794 Special Execution PLAINTIFF BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., VS. DEFENDANT (Judgment Debtor) MICHAEL J. LISTON; THERESA L. LISTON; COMMERCIAL FEDERAL BANK; PARTIES IN POSSESSION As a result of the judgment rendered in the above referenced court case, an execution was issued by the court to the Sheriff of this county. The execution ordered the sale of defendant(s) real estate to satisfy the judgment. The property to be sold is: Parcel “A” – A parcel of land located in part of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW1/4SE1/4) and part of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW1/4SE1/4), all in the Section Sixteen (16), Township Eighty (80) North, Range Forty-one (41) West of the 5th P.M., Harrison County, Iowa, more fully described as follows: Commencing at the Southwest corner or the SE1/4 of section 16; thence N 00 degrees 33’ 20” E along a portion of the West

line of said SE1/4 a distance of 1178.91 feet to the point of beginning; thence N 00 degrees 33’ 20” E continuing along said west line a distance of 453.02 feet; thence S 81 degrees 25’ 51” E a distance of 574.35 feet; thence S 03 degrees 43’ 46” W a distance of 249.54 feet; thence S 26 degrees 13’ 56” W a distance of 59.12 feet; thence S 64 degrees 32’ 10” W a distance of 57.88 feet; thence S 85 degrees 09’ 19” W a distance of 479.45 feet to the point of beginning. Said parcel contains 4.94 acres, more or less, 4.50 acres excluding presently established county road right of way and is subject to all easements of record. Note: The West line of the SE ¼ of Section 16 is assumed to bear N 00 degrees 33’ 20” E for this description. LOCAL ADDRESS: 1870 TILDEN AVE., WOODBINE, IOWA. The described property will be offered for sale at public auction for cash only as follows: Date of Sale: Oct. 29, 2010; Time of Sale, 10:30 a.m.; Place of Sale, Harrison County Sheriff’s Office. This sale not subject to redemption. Judgment Amount, $72,906.30; Costs, $381.70; Accruing Costs, $2,890.06 plus sheriff; Interest, 6.5% from 8-1-10 on $63,544.88 plus $5,246.36; Date, July 20, 2010; Sheriff, Patrick Sears, Harrison County, Iowa; Attorney, Brian G. Sayer. 41-2

THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT HARRISON COUNTY PROBATE NO. ESPRO14219 NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL, OR APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTORS, AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LORENE F. MINSHALL, Deceased To All Persons Interested in the Estate of LORENE F. MINSHALL, Deceased, who died on or about 31st day of August, 2010: You are hereby notified that on the 27th day of September, 2010, the last will and testament of LORENE F. MINSHALL, deceased, bearing date of the 29th day of March, 1961, was admitted to probate in the above named court and that John N. Minshall was appointed executor of the estate. Any action to set aside the will must be brought in the district court of said county within the later to occur of four months from the date of the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice to all heirs of the decedent and devisees under the will whose identities are reasonably ascertainable, or thereafter be forever barred. Notice is further given that all persons indebted to the estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned, and creditors having claims against the estate shall file them with the clerk of the above named district court, as provided by law, duly authenticated, for allowance, and unless so filed by the later to occur of four months from the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid) a claim is thereafter forever barred. Dated this 1st day of October, 2010. John N. Minshall, Exector of Estate 3824 W. Villa Theresa Dr. Glendate, AZ 85308 Eileen Meadows, Executor of Estate 1206 Eastwood Ln. Council Bluffs, IA 51503 Alan J. Anderson, ICIS PIN No: 28 Attorney for Executor Firm Name: Altwegg & Anderson Address: 110 North 2nd Ave., Logan, Iowa 51546. Date of second publication 20 day of October, 2010. 42-2

CITY OF LOGAN REVENUE SEPTEMBER 2010 Building Permits ................$322.00 Rent for Comm. Center.......840.00 Capital Projects..............52,323.00 Court Fines .........................495.86 Interest ....................................7.06 FEMA ..................................266.59 Landfill Charges ...............2,755.17 Lease of Land .....................200.00 Local Option Tax ..............6,921.28 Misc. Income Police ................5.00 Office Reimburse ....................5.00 Parking Fines ........................50.00 Park Shelter Rent................100.00 Pet License .........................375.00 Property Taxes ...............30,511.12 Reimb. Goods/SVC .............110.00 Sewer Rental .................22,171.66 Street Road Use ............14,855.64 Street Repairs .....................149.80 Swim Fees/Lessons............121.00 Swim Concessions..............104.52 Swim Donations ....................80.00 Water Sales ...................27,574.28 Water Deposits ...................500.00 TOTAL REVENUE REC. BY CITY..........................160,843.98 TRANSFERS ...................2,822.19 TOTAL REVENUE & TRANSFERS ............163,666.17 LIB. REVENUE FROM CITY/COUNTY .............4,367.01 LIB. FINES/MEMORIALS/ GIFTS ................................84.50 LIBRARY TOTAL ..............4,451.51 TOTAL CITY & LIBRARY REV. & TRANS. ........168,117.68 42-1

PISGAH CITY COUNCIL MINUTES October 6, 2010 Mayor Donald Clark called the Pisgah city council meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. on October 6, 2010. Roll call showed council members Rick Dilley, Sherrie Sherer, Peggy Hussing present. Council members Annie Freihage and Heather Freihage absent. Staff present: City clerk Darlene Hammack and maintenance Rod Holben. Visitor present was Joy Carson. Motion was Sherer to approve the agenda. Seconded by Hussing. All yeas. Motion carried. Motion by Dilley to approve the agenda. Seconded by Hussing. All yeas. Motion carried. Motion by Dilley to approve the minutes and the bills. Seconded by Hussing. All yeas. Motion carried. Maintenance report: Rod asked

the council about snow for the city truck. Council approved Rod getting snow tires from Stump’s Repair. Rod had information on lawn mowers for the council to look at. Glenwood Farm Equipment and Midwest Turf brought lawn mowers here for Rod to try out. Midwest Turf brought a Scag and Glenwood Farm Equipment bought a Bad Boy. Both mowers worked about the same. The Toro mower is not in good shape. Council will make a decision on a new mower in the spring. Joy was present to state that PROG has changed the soup and sandwich supper to November 6 at the Methodist Church. Joy stated that someone fell going into the shelter house in the park. The handicap ramp was not put out and used. Rod will paint that yellow and put a sign to use the handicap ramp for future rentals. Joy wanted to know if paint had been ordered for the baseball grandstand. She was told not yet. Financial Report: Motion to approve by Sherer. Seconded by Dilley. All yeas. Motion carried. Public Information Meeting: Preapplication to USDA Rural Development for financial assistance to purchase a new fire truck. There were no written or oral comments. Motion by Dilley to approve 30 gallons of paint for the grandstand. Seconded by Hussing. All yeas. Motion carried. The council discussed the state of the old Ford garage. Motion by Sherer to have the city lawyer send letter to property owner. Seconded by Hussing. All yeas. Motion carried. Motion to adjourn by Hussing. Seconded by Sherer. All ayes. Motion carried. Meeting adjourned at 7:45 p.m. Donald Clark, Mayor Attest: Darlene Hammack, Clerk CLAIMS OCTOBER 2010 IRS, fed w/h ......................$871.25 Doris Woodward, clean. ........80.00 Harr. Co. Landfill, fees.........628.00 IPERS, Ipers .......................401.98 C&H Hauling, garbage pickup Fees..............................1,054.50 Iowa Telecom, 3 phones .....228.52 MidAmerica, elec. ...............996.72 Darlene Hammack, salary ..869.21 Rodney Holben, salary ....1,815.92 Siouxland Dist. Hth., lab Fees ....................................13.00 Treas. State of IA, sales tax 170.00 Logan Herald-Obs., renewal/ Fees ..................................128.12 Harr. Co. Auditor, law enforcement Service.............................790.00 Harr. Co. Eng., sand/salt F20/F20L .........................250.00 Bank of the West, gas/supp.125.80 UECO, supplies ..................119.02 Berry Lumber, supp. .............32.98 Farm Plan, bumper/mower ...26.50 United Western Coop, Diesel...............................187.20 Postal Service, stamps .........36.80 IA State Medical Examiner, Autopsy.........................1,415.00 Fouts Funeral Home, trip to Ankeny for autopsy .............26.50 TOTAL ............................10,267.02 CITY OF PISGAH REVENUE RECEIVED IN SEPT. 2010 Garbage ...........................1,802.00 General ............................5,801.61 RUT..................................1,224.07 Sewer ...............................2,337.01 Water................................2,289.87 TOTAL ............................13,454.56 42-1

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S LEVY AND SALE STATE OF IOWA HARRISON COUNTY IOWA DISTRICT COURT CASE #EQCV028729 Special Execution PLAINTIFF BANK OF THE WEST, A CALIFORNIA BANKING CORPORATION VS. DEFENDANT (Judgment Debtor) LARRY K. MENSCHING, SPOUSE OF LARRY K. MENSCHING, PARTIES IN POSSESSION. As a result of the judgment rendered in the above referenced court case, an execution was issued by the court to the Sheriff of this county. The execution ordered the sale of defendant(s) real estate to satisfy the judgment. The property to be sold is: A tract of land in the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SE1/4NW1/4) in Section Thirty (30), Township Seventy-Nine (79) North, Range Forty-four (44) West of the 5th P.M., Harrison County, Iowa, described as follows: Beginning at a point 240.4 feet North and 33 feet West of the center of Section 30, Township 79 North, Range 44 West, Harrison County, Iowa; thence running West 179 feet to an iron pin; thence running North 100 feet to an iron pin; thence running East 179 feet to the West right-of-way line of County Road to an iron pin; thence running South 100 feet along the West rightof-way line of County Road to the point of beginning; containing 0.43 acres, more or less AND Beginning at a point 370.4 feet North and 33 feet West of the center of Section 30, Township 79 North, Range 44 West, Harrison County, Iowa; thence running West 179 feet to an iron pin; thence running South 30 feet to an iron pin; thence running East 179 feet to the West right-of-way line of County Road to an iron pin, thence running North 30 feet along the West rightof-way line of County Road to the point of beginning Now known as Lot Four (4), Block One (1), Four R addition to the City of Modale, Harrison County, Iowa. LOCAL ADDRESS: 603 N. MAIN ST., MODALE, IOWA. The described property will be offered for sale at public auction for cash only as follows: Date of Sale, Nov. 5, 2010; Time of Sale, 10:00 a.m.; Place of Sale, Harrison County Sheriff’s Office. This sale not subject to redemption. Judgment Amount, $102,935.87; Costs, $285.00; Accruing Costs, $1,556.31 plus sheriff; Interest, 8.99% from 6-18-10 on $88,514.57 plus $11,989.69; Date, Aug. 4, 2010; Sheriff, Patrick Sears, Harrison County, Iowa; Attorney, Camille R. Hawke. 42-2


Community

Logan Herald-Observer October 13, 2010

13

Logan police report for September By Sgt. Richard Hiatt Sept. 1 Officer conducted follow up investigation on a burglary that had taken place. Officer arrested Brock Kuhlman of Logan for burglary third degree and criminal mischief. Sept. 2 Officer conducted follow up investigation on illegal activity taking place in Logan. Areas are being watched. Officer arrested Brock Kuhlman of Logan for attempted burglary third degree. Sept. 3 Officers participated in sTEP program that ended Sept. 6. Sept. 4 Officer took report of a gas drive off that had occurred in town. Officer took report of harassment by text messaging. Officer spoke to both parties and advised them to cease activity. Sept. 5 Officer took report of dog running at large on West Fourth Street. Officer unable to locate. Sept. 6 Officer arrested Bradley

Tuel of Storm Lake for operating while intoxicated. Sept. 7 Officer assisted juvenile female with locating a lost bike on North Fifth Avenue. Sept. 8 Officer called to an alarm at Super Foods. Officer arrived and found building to be secured. Officer assisted Harrison County Sheriff’s office and Missouri Valley Police Department with locating a male subject who had been involved in an altercation. Sept. 9 Officer took report of a possible assault that had taken place in Logan. After speaking with parties involved, the situation had taken place in another county. Officer out at a residence on West Seventh Street to assist with civil matter. Sept. 10 Officer charged Shawn Stolley of Woodbine with open container after a traffic stop. Officer took report of underage party taking place on North Tower Road. Officer was unable to locate

any party taking place. Charges are pending as this was found to be a false report. Officer took report of ongoing property dispute on North Maple and West Sixth Street. Both parties advised it was a civil matter and to contact an attorney. Sept. 11 Officer took report of ongoing parking dispute on North Sixth Avenue. Officer informed parties that the vehicle is parked legally. Officer took report of a dog running loose on Kerry Lane. Officer arrived and found dog had broken chain. Owner was notified and took care of the situation. Officer arrested Fred Swanger of Logan for disorderly conduct after an altercation with another male subject. Officer took report of a prowler on 217 East Sixth Street. Officer patrolled area and found it to be citizens walking by. Officer took report of another prowler at 217 East Sixth Street. Officer found it to be people walking by. Officer called to an

address on North Linn for a burning complaint. Sept. 13 Officer took report of an accident that had occurred on private property. Officer advised to exchange information. Officer called to a suspicious person behind the Fourth Avenue Grill. Officer located female subject and found everything to be OK. Officer found an open door at the school. Everything found to be secured. Sept. 14 Officer assisted with call back with information regarding an accident. Officer located an open door at a residence on North Third Avenue. Officer searched residence and found it to be vacated. Sept. 15 Officer called to 217 East Sixth Street in reference to threatening text messages. Officer spoke with both parties and advised to cease activity. Officer called to a residence on East Third Street for a parking complaint. Sept. 16 Officer took report of

illegal activity in Logan. Sept. 17 Officer assisted with civil matter in reference to paying for services done to a vehicle. Sept. 18 Officer called to 217 East Sixth Street in reference to a civil matter. Officer called to a residence on West Fifth. Officer arrived and found everything to be OK. Sept. 19 Officer assisted Logan Fire and Rescue with call on East Ninth Street. Sept. 20 Officer assisted Harrison County Sheriff’s Office with stopping of a suspicious vehicle. Sept. 21 Officer called to 217 East Sixth Street and arrested Ellis Robinson and Terry Fleming for disorderly conduct. Sept. 22 Officer assisted Iowa State Patrol with a reckless driver west of Logan. Sept. 24 Officer assisted with patrol on South Third Avenue for complaint of speeders coming up and down the street. Sept. 26

Officer took report of a parking complaint on West Sixth. Officer advised vehicle to be legally parked. Sept. 27 Officer took report of a suspicious vehicle driving around town. Officer located vehicle and found everything to be OK. Officer took report of a theft on South Fifth Avenue. Sept. 28 Officer took report of a possible reckless driver. Officer located driver and found to be tired. Officer took complaint of an incident that had occurred at a youth football practice. Sept. 29 Officer took report of criminal mischief to a car. This remains under investigation. Officer called to Boyer View Apartments for a disturbance. Officer deemed situation verbal. Sept. 30 Officer called to Co-op for a possible disturbance taking place. Officer arrived and found situation to be a verbal confrontation. Both parties were asked to leave.

Classifieds Contact Jo Houser (308) 254-7002 for more info and application. Deadline 10/22. EOE MCAN

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED: Motel maintenance experienced, must have own tools and pickup truck send resume to EJ Rath Inc., 206 East Erie, Missouri Valley, IA 51555.

NOTICE NOTICE: Iowa Permit to Carry Class Nov. 15th in Council Bluffs, $50. For more info, email paul@shootingsafely.com OWL

HELP WANTED: Chief of Police. City of Sidney, NE (pop. 6,443) is seeking a Police Chief. $1.3 M. annual budget w/14 sworn FT officers and 2 civ. Staff.

FOR SALE GARAGE SALE: Huge Fall and Winter Inside Sale. Sat. &

Sun. 9-3. Missouri Valley City Park Commercial Bldg. 1,000’s of Holiday decorations, trees, lights, wrapping, inside and outside decorations, village, older decorative, over 150 totes of holiday decorations, housewares, 2 kitchen table sets, coffee table, twin bed complete, like new, lamps, wood bench, pictures, aprons, old sewing notions, crafts, linens, bedding, sm. appliances, silverware, primi-

421 E. Erie, Missouri Valley, IA For information on all area listings go to: www.npdodge.com

REDUCED! NEW LISTING!

NEW LISTING!

NEW LISTING!

131 W. 4th St.

2970 Par 5 Trl.

1 bdrm, 1 bth, 942 sf, 1 car gar., NEW LISTING

3 Bdr, 2.5 baths, 3,302 sf GOLF COURSE

NEW LISTING

2525 Hwy. 127

2011 Perry Trail

3bed, 2 bth, 1,600 sf 1 acre, 4 car gar.

4 Bdfm, 2 bth, 2274 sf, 12 acres

Logan $121,500

Woodbine $219,000

a

REDUCED!

Logan

$55,000

Woodbine $259,000

NEW LISTING

2041 Tama Trail 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 car Acreage, 14 acres m/l REDUCED

Woodbine $129,000

702 Court Beautiful Victorian built in 1898, 4 bed, 3 bth, 2+ car, 3430 sf, 120x180’ lot

Dunlap

$197,000

113 N. 3rd Ave.

Logan

3 bed, 2.25 bth, ,2 car 3,667 sf

$120,000

Logan

Chuck & Ravae Smallwood 402-639-6106 • www.chucksmallwood.com

Now Accepting Applications For: 1 bedroom apartment at Boyer View Apts., Logan, IA. Quiet complex, stove & refrigerator furnished. Rent based on income. 62 years or older or persons with disabilities of any age. Call 1-712-647-2113 or 1-800-762-7209. Boyer View is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

M U LT I - F A M I LY GARAGE SALE Vicki Cunards, 2274 Lawton Trail, (north on Loess Hills Trail Old 183 - from Mo. Valley) Sat., Oct. 16, 8:30 a.m. Baby swing, girls 2T and smaller, men and womens clothes from 2X, jewelry, decorations, queen box springs and mattress, Troy built tiller, much more. Spend $5 get free pumpkin.

FOR RENT 1019 Skyline Drive

Commercial Building or Residence,

tives, cookie jars, nic-nacs, toys, baby stuff, sport cards, baby, kids, adult winter clothes, coats, costumes, accessories and more. Everything clean and ready for a new home. Bake Sale, Saturday, No junk, crafts, Filled Wall to Wall.

$229,000

FOR RENT: Very nice upstairs apartment in Logan for non smokers. No children or pets. References required.

The Harrison County Homemaker Agency has an opening for a Part-Time Home Care Aide. Qualifications include a CNA certificate, valid driver’s license, and a dependable auto. Requires flexibility in work times and the ability to work independently. Competitive Wages. Call Kathy at (712) 644-3437

712-644-3297. FOR RENT: Nice 2, could be 3 bedroom ranch house, main floor laundry, full basement, detached 1 car garage. 22 - 8th St., Woodbine, Call 712-647-2517 CARD OF THANKS CARD OF THANKS: The family of Velma Perkins would like to thank everyone who brought food, flowers, cards and memorials. Thank you to the ladies who prepared the lunch at Community of Christ hall. Our special thanks go to the

staff at Rose Vista Nursing Home for her care while there. Ed Perkins, Mike and Carolyn Perkins, Janice and Mike Kozeny, Nancy and John Thomas and Toni and Chris Oakes.

STATEWIDES ENTERTAINMENT AND EVENTS Iowa’s Largest Arts & Crafts Show, UNIDome, Cedar Falls, Iowa Oct. 16-17, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-4, Adm. $6, the 21st year, A Fantastic Shopping Event. (INCN) HELP WANTED MISCELLANEOUS Between High

REAL ESTATE and HOUSEHOLD AUCTION NOTICE 721 Glen Road, Logan, IA Sunday, October 24, 2010 1:00 p.m. Real Estate 1:30 p.m. Household We will sell the home located at 721 Glen Road, Logan, IA at 1:00 p.m. Please see complete terms and details on www.edspencer.com or next weeks paper.

*HOME OPEN FROM 12:00 - 1:00 P.M. On Sunday, October 17, 2010 for viewing or by appointment. 921 Sq. Ft. Ranch Home. (more details on Website www.edspencer.com) HOUSEHOLD: Refrigerator, gas stove, microwave, couch, love seat, trundle bed, dishes, pots, pans, glasses, plates, figurines, tools, saws, coolers, kitchen table. ANTIQUES: Phonograph Flumes, suitcase, light fixtures, wood stove base.

Ercal Lebarge, Owner Ed Spencer Real Estate 322 E. 7th St. Logan, IA 51546 712-5929794 - 712-644-2151 or 712-322-7653 www.edspencer.com

School and College? Over 18? Drop that entry level position. Earn what you’re worth!!! Travel w/Successful Young Business Group. Paid Training. Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n , Lodging Provided. 1877-646-5050. (INCN) REGIONAL CDL DRIVERS NEEDED! Gordon Trucking, Inc. Immediate O p e n i n g s ! Consistent Miles & Time Off! Full Benefits, 401k. We have lots of freight! www.TEAMGTI.com 888-832-6484. (INCN) Owner Operators PSS Trucking has dedicated Midwest lanes, off weekends, paid daily, top miles / money, customer freight - drop and hook dedicated customers - paid orientation 800-494-3532 w w w. p s s j m s . c o m (INCN) *Most Updated Equipment on the Road** OTR Drivers, PrePass EZ-pass, 100% APU equipped, Latest Q u a l c o m m Navigation. 2007 and newer equipment Pass-Pet Policy 800-5287825 (INCN)

PUBLIC AUCTION SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17th 1:00 P.M. First Baptist Church, 6th St. and Huron Missouri Valley, IA Yamaha Electone HS-8T electric organ Brother’s typewriter Korg Electric Piano Copy Machine (Panasonic) Baldwin Electric Organ Semi circle tables Electric Organ - Wurlitzer Metal Bookcases Communion Table/communion sets Filing Cabinets Brass Candles with propane Podium Offer plates (wooden & brass) Metal folding chairs Overhead projector

Sound System/standing microphones Song books/bibles/pictures Sharp 24” T.V. Pews/Altars High Chair/play pen Rocker-glider Computer desks/office desks Refrigerators/convection oven Small appliances Commercial stove Banquet tables Brass cross/entry table Rakes/shovels/brooms Step ladder

Wide variety of items that must go! The First Baptist Church is closing its doors and

needs to liquidate everything! There is much more to see with items too numerous to list. Missouri Valley, Iowa Rex Gochenour 642-3370 Craig Gochenour 256-4897 Terms: Cash or good check day of sale. Proper I.D. required to register. All items sell where is/as is. All items must be paid for before being removed. No guaranties implied by auctioneers or owners. Any announcements made day of sale take precedence over printed matter NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS OR THEFTS. Go to www.gochenourauctioneering.com to see pictures and full listing.


Logan Herald-Observer

14

Congratulations Are In Order! These businesses received Readers Choice Awards in the Annual Nonpareil Poll

October 13, 2010

Thank you for making us #1! Supporting all area teams!

Wrestling !

2010

irls & G all s y Bo sketb Ba hoes! S

DAILY AILY NONPAREIL

305 E. Broadway • Council Bluffs 712-328-7424

F AMILY O WNED AND O PERATED Complete High Quality Auto Body Repair Free Estimates Insurance Claims Welcome Lifetime Limited Warranty

CAR RENTAL ASSISTANCE

12166 N.. 16th Stt 7122 3288 7224

Thankk youu forr makingg uss #1 - 2 yearss inn a row!

2008

2010

DAILY AILY NONPAREIL ONPAREIL

DAILY AILY NONPAREIL ONPAREIL

Wee thankk alll off the voterss forr choosingg uss # forr thee 7th time.. Sincee 19944 Steven’ss Jewelerss hass beenn fortunatee too havee thee nicestt customerss inn thee world.

1

Council Bluffs Largest Independent Jeweler

17222 Madisonn Avenuee • 325-6769

2010

2010

DAILY AILY NONPAREIL ONPAREIL

Harrison County

POLITICAL FORUM Sponsored by

322-0102

322-0102 2006

2009

DAILYY NONPAREIL AREIL

2010

DAILYY NONPAREIL ONP DAILY AILY NONPAREIL ONPAREIL

Thank you

Council Bluffs & SW Iowa

Mike Meiers

Brad Trede

B.S. Horticulture

B.S. Horticulture

Iowa State University

Northwest Missouri State

Thursday, October 21, 2010 • 7:00 p.m. at the Logan Community Center Committed candidates include:

Matt Wiese A.S. Horticulture

Pat Tinley

Iowa Western Community College

6 Yrs. Experience

Lawn Tech

VOT E D # 1 L AW N S E RV I C E 7 S T R A I G H T Y E A R S . Moisture penetrates deeper, encouraging strong roots

Seed falls or is watered into holes for proper germination

Air enhances metabolic action to literally eat thatch

Compact -ion is relieved, grass has room to spread out

Late Fall Nitrogen Fertilizer Application

AERATE THIS FALL STRENGTHEN YOUR LAWN

AERATE & OVERSEED!

August through November

600750 Blade Growth 50 650 0

Root Growth

For a greener, healthier, thicker lawn next year

WHY?

• • • • • • •

Decrease in disease activity is likely. Improved stress tolerance. Increased rhizome-tiller development. Deeper, stronger roots. Extends the greening of the turf later into the fall and winter. Spring green-up will normally occur earlier. Provides root development until the ground freezes.

www.struykturf.com

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED BY THE STRUYK FAMILY SINCE 1970

Harrison County Supervisor Robert Smith Harrison County Recorder Lorie Thompson Supervisor candidate Russell Kurth Supervisor candidate Norma Coret Supervisor candidate Walter Utman Treasurer candidate Heather Hack Edney Treasurer candidate Renee King Treasurer candidated Sandy Royer Send questions to: ndavis@woodbinetwiner.com or call 712-647-2821 Please send questions by

Thursday, October 7th at noon.


Logan Herald-Observer 10-13-2010