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TERESA DEPPE RIDE OCT. 2 A benefit ride will be held Oct. 2 for Teresa Deppe, Mondamin, who was recently diagnosed with ALS disease. Her son, Tyler is a third grader at Lo-Ma. An auction/bake sale will also be held followed by a street dance to the Byron James Gang band from 8 to 10 p.m.at the Cave Inn in Magnolia. The event is hosted by the 4 Rivers Riding Club. For more information call 402516-2332,402-250-8814 or 712648-2540.

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF LOGAN, HARRISON COUNTY, IOWA

THE LOGAN

Herald-Observer www.heraldobserver.com SEPTEMBER 15, 2010

VOLUME 126, ISSUE 38

SHORT TAKES POLITICAL FORUM OCT. 21 The Logan HeraldObserver and Woodbine Twiner are giving Harrison County residents an opportunity to hear first hand from Harrison County candidates for treasurer and supervisor at a political forum at 7 p.m., Oct. 21 at the Logan Community Center. Candidates confirmed to attend are: Treasurer: Heather Hack Edney, Renee King, Sandy Royer. Supervisor: Russell Kurth, Robert Smith, Norma Coret and Walter Utman. Lorie Thompson, who is running unopposed as Harrison County Recorder will also be in attendance. To submit questions or for more information, call Nikki Davis at 712-647-2821 or Mary Darling at 644-2705. Questions may be e-mailed to nikki.davis@woodbinetwiner.com or mary.darling@heraldobserver.com.

CAN COLLECTION As a fundraiser for postprom, the Lo-Ma junior class has a can collection bin available at the Logan Mini Mart parking lot.

REGISTRATION DEADLINE Sept. 17 is the deadline for on-line registration to join the Harrison County Cure Crusaders team for the Race for the Cure Oct. 3 in Omaha. Go to www.komennebraska.org and click on “Komen Race for the Cure” and then “join existing team.” You can also register the moring of the race. For more information you can call Jim Makey at 644-3511 or Patty Reisz at 712-647-3486.

EXHIBIT OPENS The 2010 “Celebrate the Hills” judged art show at the Moorhead Cultural Center will open Sept. 17. The MCC is open from 1 to 4 p.m., Thursday through Sunday or by appointment by calling Edna Jensen at 712-866-5017.

RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE A Red Cross blood drive will be held from 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Sept. 23 at the Logan Community Center. To make an appointment or for more information call Eleanor at 644-2997.

GOP TO MEET The Harrison County Republicans will meet Sept. 16 at the Junction Cafe in Missouri Valley. Those wishing to eat should arrive at 6:30 p.m., the meeting will be at 7 p.m. The major topic will be county get-out-the-vote efforts. For more information contact chair Sheila Murphy at sheilagop@msn.com or call 712-642-2849.

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Students given in-school suspensions will now be serving time on Saturdays Mary Darling Editor Lo-Ma high school students’ whose behavior is deemed severe enough to warrant an in-school suspension, will now be serving their time on Saturday mornings, instead of in the library during the school day. Junior-senior principal, Christi Gochenour, proposed the plan to the

school board at the Sept. 8 meeting. Superintendent Jim Hammrich and Gochenour had discussed the present plan, its lack of effectiveness and it not being a strong enough deterrent for the students. According Gochenour’s proposal, Saturday inschool suspension will be assigned by an administrator and held from 8 to 11 a.m. at the school. A staff member will supervise the students who will be

“I think it will bring a heightened level of awareness to the students to deter misbehavior.” Christi Gochenour expected to work on school assignments during this time. No cell phones, iPod/iTouch use and no snacks will be allowed. “Teachers have volunteered to come in and

supervise,” Gochenour said. “I am requesting they get a $40 stipend for their services.” According to Gochenour, she feels the new procedure will bring a

heightened level of awareness to the students to deter misbehavior. Gochenour reported on several activities at school including students taking on-line classes and a seventh grader taking high school English. “We’ve never done this before,” Gochenour said. “She goes to Mrs. Lockwood as her proctor SEE BOARD Page 2

Child passenger safety New Lo-Ma week set for Sept. 19-23 staff dive into school year

Nikki Davis For the Herald-Observer Harrison County Home and Public Health officials want the facts made clear for Child Passenger Safety Week, Sept. 19-25. Six out of 10 children killed in crashes are not wearing seat belts or are not secured in safety seats. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children ages 4-14. Unrestrained children are 3 times more likely to be injured in a crash. Seven in 10 people will be in a traffic crash in the next five years. Every eight minutes a crash occurs in Iowa. Three out of four traffic crashes occur within 25 miles from home. Safety seats reduce fatal injury by 71 percent for infants and by 54 percent for toddlers 1-6 years old. Ninety percent of child safety seats are installed incorrectly. These are just a few of the statistics Harrison County Home and Public Health certified safety seat inspectors Sherri Webb, Jodi Roden and Tabitha Melby face. But they’re determined to help Harrison County residents avoid becoming just a statistic.

Kevin Osborn

Mary Darling Editor

According to statistics, unrestrained children are three times more likely to be injured in a car crash. CPS tech Rhonda Anderson of Harlan works on a seat with a Kiwanis volunteer at a recent Harrison County child safety seat check. Submitted photo. “We check seats by appointment,” Melby said. “To get a seat checked, the parent/guardian has to bring their vehicle, the child and their current car seat.” The inspectors prefer to have the vehicle and car seat manuals if available, and will need to know the height/length and weight of the child, which can be done on the premises if the information is not available. Then the check may begin. “We start by checking

the car seat, with and without the child in it, inside the vehicle to see if it is in the vehicle correctly and see if the child fits correctly in the seat,” Melby said. “Then we take out the seat and inspect it – checking dates, recall lists, condition of the seat and more.” After the check is complete, parents or guardians are advised on what, if any, changes can and should be made, and are asked to reinstall the seat appropriately – with help from the certified

inspectors if needed. As an extra step, parents/guardians are given information about the next step they’ll need to make to keep the child safe, such as pertaining to airbags, how to handle unused seatbelts and more. And consistency seems key, according to local HCHPH officials. “A short trip to school or the store deserves as much

New business instructor, Kevin Osborn, said it was the influence of a couple coaches and teachers that sent him in the direction of teaching and coaching for his career. Osborn, a 2006 Harlan High School graduate, went on to play basketball at Buena Vista University, from where he graduated in 2010. “I didn’t want to miss out on the chance to impact students and wanted to follow in my dad’s footsteps as a coach,” Osborn said. Besides serving as LoSEE OSBORN Page 2

SEE CHILD SEATS Page 2

Third annual North American Aronia Berry Festival Sept. 18-19 The third annual North American Aronia Berry Festival is set for 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sept. 18 and 19 at Sawmill Hollow Family Farm near Missouri Valley. The farm, nestled in the Loess Hills, has been designated as the Aronia Berry Capital of the United States, and has reintroduced the nutritious aronia berry to the United States. According to many USDA studies, the aronia berry is the berry with the highest antioxidant level, even more than blueberries. Andrew Pittz, co-owner of the farm , said the pur-

Lauren Roden

Mary Darling Editor Lauren Roden has always loved analytics, so the new Logan-Magnolia business manager/board secretary has landed in the perfect place. Roden, a 1993 Woodbine High School graduate, lives in Logan with her husband Jason and four children, three of which attend Lo-Ma, the fourth is not in school yet. After receiving an accounting degree from

More than 20 artisans display and sample their wares, and a variety of music and aronia food samples will be available throughout the weekend.

SEE ARONIA FESTIVAL Page 2

SEE RODEN Page 2 Upcoming Auctions

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Logan Herald-Observer

2 September 15, 2010

From the Front

CHILD SEATS: Safety week FROM PAGE 1 attention to safety as does a trip out of town. Use consistency when it comes to car seats so your children know what to expect for every ride,” Melby said. Knowledge may be a part of keeping things consistent. Many are unaware of the suggestions, as well as the rules and regulations of child passenger safety seats such as it is best to keep infants in rear-facing child safety seats as long as possible. According to law, at a minimum, infants need to be in rear-facing car seats until a minimum of age 1 and at least 20 pounds. The American Academy of Pediatrics and many other organizations have now decided children are safer if they ride rear-facing for as long as the seat allows. After children outgrow a rear-facing seat, they should ride in a forwardfacing child safety seat in the back seat until they reach the upper weight and/or height limit of the seat. Generally this is around age 4 and 40 pounds. Booster seats would be the next step and should be utilized until the vehicle’s seat belts fit properly. Seat belts fit properly with the lap belt can lie across the upper thighs and the shoulder belt fits across the chest. Generally this is around age 8 or when the child reaches 4 feet, 9 inches tall. As an overall rule, though, HCHPH officials suggest all children

younger than 13 ride in the rear seat of the vehicle for their own safety. Webb believes parents need to know more about the dangers of children riding “shotgun” or in the front, passenger seat. Airbags are a new hazard for children, with eight children perishing in 1996 at the fate of an airbag. Airbags can be dangerous and even fatal to children under 12 by the blast of energy once the airbag is deployed in an accident. Improperly fitted safety belts or incorrectly restrained in a child safety seat, danger lingers that places the child too close to the dashboard during inflation. Not to mention airbags are capable of deploying at 200 miles per hour. “That is a lot of force hitting someone in the face,” Webb said. “Due to a child’s height - that’s why there have been spinal cord injuries as well as deaths.” All in all, child passenger safety is one topic HCHPH officials would like parents to monitor often, considering most vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children ages 3-14 years old. Research has shown that up to 90 percent of car seats are not used correctly – but there’s no reason for them to not be, with the local help offered in Harrison County. Webb has been certified since 2006 and also has completed the training for special needs transportation. Roden and Melby have been certified since

May of 2009. Harrison County residents Karen Androy and Jennifer Muff are also certified instructors. Certification comes after completing a minimum of a four day training class through SafeKids USA and is updated every two years. To remain eligible, technicians have to complete a number of seat checks under the supervision of an instructor, complete six hours of CEU’s and participate in at least one, community event. And while the instructors are focused on the child passenger safety seats, their concern still remains with all Harrison County residents. “After all the steps you take to make your children safe during travel, don’t forget to buckle up yourself and secure all the heavy objects in your vehicle,” Roden said. HCHPH’s next car seat event is being planned for spring of 2011, but car seat check appointments are currently available during the week at their office in Logan. Appoints can be made by calling 644-2220. More information can be found at www.harrisoncountyia.or g/publichealth/carseat.ht ml. A recommended sight by the HCHPH is an informational – and somewhat haunting video, may be found at www.joelsjourney.org/vie wjoelsvideo.html, showing the impact and differences between riding in forward and rear facing car seats.

OSBORN: High School Business FROM PAGE 1 Ma’s business instructor, Osborn will also be assistant boys’ basketball coach and junior class sponsor. One thing Osborn said he has found out since classes began at Lo-Ma is, “That no matter how much they stress it in college, you can never be over prepared,” he said. “You can never over emphasize enough the importance of good organizational skills.” According to Osborn, he is enjoying getting to know the faculty and students more and more each day. “I wasn’t really nervous about the teaching

aspect,” he said. “But getting the first pre-jitters out of the way was good.” Osborn said he really wanted to land in this area for a job. He said though teaching business is a little more of a unique field, his peers did find getting jobs this past year pretty tough with all the layoffs that occurred. “I was either going to take this job or go to graduate school,” Osborn said. “I really wanted to be here because of the tradition of excellence and the small town atmosphere here.” He plans to start his masters program in administration within the next year and eventually hopes to be a principal

and/or athletic director. According to Osborn, his biggest challenge this year will simply be taking a step back, a deep breath and trying to enjoy every minute of it. “Every teacher is warned about how the first year is the toughest,” he said. “I want to be able to look back on it and say it was a great year and take some positives away from it.” Osborn said his goal for this year is for his students to take two or three things away from class and be able to apply them down the road past high school. “I want them to think back and say they learned that in my class,” he said.

ARONIA FESTIVAL: Sept. 18, 19 FROM PAGE 1 pose of organizing such an event is to bring community, economic development and local food to the forefront of agriculture. “The aronia berry is a new crop emerging amongst corn and soybeans,” Pittz said. “This berry has a lot of potential to help diversify family farms.” Pittz said they are thrilled that so many people in the area get into the act each year. “Many of the restaurants serve special aronia berry dishes during the weekend of the festival,” he said. According to Pittz, the festival isn’t just about the farm or the berry anymore. “It’s about bringing the community together over two special days.” Speakers slated for the event include Dr. John

Ikerd, recognized as one of the country’s foremost advocates on sustainability and family farming; Chuck Hassebrook, Executive Director of the Center for Rural Affairs. He specializes in commodity program reform, rural development, extension and rural revitalization; Dave Murphy, founder and director of Food Democracy Now, a national organization dedicated to grassroots community dedicated to building a sustainable food system that protects the natural environment, sustains farmers and nourishes families. The festival will include all things aronia (food, craft beer, recipes), dozens of artisans featuring handcrafted soaps, walking canes, plants, herbs, weavers, photography, hand blended teas, candles, children’s activities, inter-

national, national and local speakers, 18th Century farm equipment demonstrations, wine tastings and winemaking and group demonstrations. These will include biodiesel and wind production. There will also be “slow food” cooking workshops and “perennial ag” that helps family farms diversify into aronia berry production and includes information on organic fertilizing for garden and farm. To reach Sawmill Hollow farm from the Logan area, take State Highway 127 west to Magnolia, turn left onto L23 (Laredo Avenue), then turn right onto Kennedy Avenue. Signs will be posted. For more information contact Pittz at 712-6482432 or Andrew@sawmillhollow.com.

RODEN: Lo-Ma Business Manager FROM PAGE 1 the University of Nebraska at Omaha, Roden worked at America First (now Burlington Capitol Group) as a controller for the property management division for 10 years. She then decided to take some time and stay at home with her children for three years and then worked this past year at Boustead Real Estate in Woodbine as an appraisal trainee.

“When I decided to go back to work, this opportunity came up, and I had to try for it,” Roden said. “I thought it would be a good fit.” Roden began her duties July 1 and has found there is “lots to do.” “It’s a different world from what I did in Omaha,” Roden said. “I did public accounting which has to comply with Financial Accounting Standards. Here, it’s government accounting

which has to meet Governmental Accounting Standards. It’s totally backwards from what I worked with before.” So far Roden is enjoying her new position. “I enjoy interacting with the people and digging in the numbers,” she said. “When it all comes together at the end of the month it’s great.” Roden said there will be a learning curve but she loves tackling the numbers.

BOARD: Saturday school approved FROM PAGE 1 for taking the class online. She’s very excited. If she completes the class she will get one credit as a high school elective and will be able to take English 9 next year.” Gochenour informed the board the lack of instructors available having the required –Master’s Degree plus 12 credits in their content area– may be a problem for the Academy next year. At the present time, American Government will not be available, she said. Gochenour also discussed the data collection that will be necessary for the grant received from Microsoft. The district

received $128,337 through the grant and was able to purchase lap top computers, video projectors and Bright Links which are interactive projectors. The district will need to document the equipment is being used in the classroom and how it is being used for instruction. Elementary principal Jim Makey discussed upcoming testing that will be held in the elementary and professional development for teachers. A minor change was made to the Good Conduct Policy with the first reading waived and second approved at the meeting. Contracts were approved for Samantha

Johnson as the elementary computer lab supervisor; Lynn Killpack and Layna Sertterh as co-sponsors for the basketball cheerleaders; and Trent Lally as a third coach for boys basketball. During the reorganization of the board, Dan Cohrs was re-elected president and Kelly Gochenour vice-president. Meetings will continue to be held at 6:30 p.m., the second Wednesday of each month. Shelley Foutch was appointed as the free/reduced lunch/fee waiver officer, Kelly Gochenour as the board legislative member and Mike Branstetter the county conference board representative.

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Editorial

Logan Herald-Observer September 15, 2010

3

Down Home By Sandy Turner Sandy Turner writes a weekly column “Down Home” which is published in several newspapers in the Midwest. She puts a humorous spin on issues that revolve around families and every day life, drawing from her own experiences.

Getting flowers again and again and again My parents said that I had a one-track mind when I was a kid. Apparently, I was stubborn and wouldn’t stop until I got my way. I haven’t changed much. I’m sure I inherited this trait from dad. His memory may be fading, but that doesn’t stop him from having a onetrack mind. Writing about life with dad, for me, is therapy. I deal with dad dilemmas the only way I know how – with humor. I’m not making fun of him, and he doesn’t get his feelings hurt because he doesn’t read the paper and, even if he did, the information would be gone shortly afterward. Nearly every day he tells me how glad he is that he can be in his own home – to work in the yard and visit with his neighbors. With the late frost in the spring, dad’s lilies came up – only to be frozen a few days later. He worried about it for weeks, grumbling that his only flowers died and he didn’t get a chance to enjoy them. I planted over 50 pansies soon after that, but the lilies continued to be his favorite. He called Monday morning, excited with the news that the lilies came back to life and he was going to pick me some to take back to the office. And sure enough they had. We had our regular nutritious lunch that I provide – cheeseburger, fries and a chocolate shake – and I went back to the office with Easter lilies in a nice vase. On Wednesday he called, irritated that I hadn’t retrieved the flowers he had picked for me on Monday and wanted to know when I was coming. I learned early on that his one-track mind would always prevail over mine, so I apologized and said I would get them at lunchtime. With a different vase and a different batch of flowers, I took the lilies back to the office to add to the ones that were about ready to be pitched anyway. Late in the afternoon on Friday, dad called to say that he was disappointed that I hadn’t come by to get the lilies that he had picked for me on Monday. I was amazed that these four plants had produced that many lilies in the heat of the summer, but I reassured him that I would be by to get them. He must have run out of vases because this time the lilies were in a homemade contraption. Inside of a galvanized bucket was a flowerpot that was full of rocks and inside the flowerpot was a plastic jug holding the flowers and water, duct taped securely in place. In between the flower pot and bucket were sponges, wet with water, and one of those plastic cold compacts. I will never tire of dad’s antics or contraptions. I love every minute of it. When his mind, that once was a prominent engineer, kicks into gear, I’m reminded of how ingenious he really is. Trying to get ahead of the game on this flower exchange, I called dad and asked if any lilies were ready to be picked. “Do you really think lilies grow in this heat,” he said. “You must have a one-track mind.”

LETTERS POLICY

The Logan Herald-Observer will publish letters of up to 300

words in length. Letters must be signed and include a mailing address and daytime telephone number, intended to be used by us to verify authorship. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, accuracy and taste. Leading up to an election, an author may only write one letter every 30 days. Responses will be allowed up to the week before the election. Letters may be submitted to news@heraldobserver.com or directed by mail to P.O. Box 148, Logan, IA 51546.

TH E

LO GAN

Herald-Observer Editor MARY DARLING mary.darling@heraldobserver.com Sales Coordinator LOYAL FAIRMAN loyal.fairman@heraldobserver.com Advertising ads@heraldobserver.com Production Assistant MARY LOU NONEMAN marylou.noneman@woodbinetwiner.com 107 No. 4th Ave. P.O. Box 148 (mailing address) • Logan, IA 51546 Phone 712-644-2705 • Fax 712-644-2788 Published weekly in Logan, Iowa A Western Iowa Newspaper Group Publication of Midlands Newspaper, Inc. The Official Paper of the City of Logan and the Logan-Magnolia Community School District Periodical Class Postage Paid at Logan, IA 51546 USPS 317-740 Subscription Rates $31.50 per year for Senior Citizens (Age 62 years or older in county) $38.50 per year in Harrison County, Panama, Portsmouth and Moorhead $41.00 per year outside of Harrison County in Iowa and Nebraska $45.00 per year elsewhere in the United States $24.00 college/academic (9 month) The contents of this newspaper are protected by copyright. Other than non-commercial, personal use of a limited nature, no part of this publication may be copied and reproduced in any way without the prior written consent of the publisher.

What couldn’t be done - Part 2 Marc Bolan’s trip to France had renewed his faith in himself. To date, he was a failed musician, but he thought if he just kept trying, something would work. All he needed was faith and perseverance. He played one of his songs for a producer and it was good enough for a contract with Decca Records. At last his first song was played on British radio, and he knew he was on his way. Marc made public appearances and interviews to promote his record but people were too polite to tell him what they really thought. One disk jockey recalled, “He played the record which I thought was appalling, and showed me some poetry which struck me as unmitigated rubbish. I never thought he’d make it, but then, I predicted that TV would never catch on either.” His future publicists thought “nice little bloke, Marc. No one really expected him to get too far.” No one except Marc. Marc’s big break came with an appearance on a television show, “Ready, Steady, Go.” Unfortunately, the band missed the intro, played too fast and in the wrong key. Technological

problems made the signal go dead while Marc sang. It was a disaster. Soon, Marc’s contract with Decca expired and he was on his own again. He called Columbia Records producer Simon Napier-Bell and told him he was the next Elvis. Simon told him to send a demonstration tape and he would listen. Marc had no demonstration tape. He said he was in the neighborhood and could drop by to sing. Ten minutes later, Marc was sitting cross-legged in Simon’s office playing a song. Simon made a few calls and Marc played his songs again. No one liked his music. One man said he was a mixture of a bad African American blues singer and Harry the Lamb. Marc was devastated. Simon took pity on Marc and got him back on “Ready, Steady, Go.” His performance went much better, but unfortunately, Jimmy Hendrix overshadowed him. Hendrix told him he liked his voice, but he would never make it. Simon manager groups like the Yardbirds and he advised Marc to form a group. He offered to help. But what to name the

Perley’s Bits & Pieces By Jim Perley Logan Herald-Observer Columnist jperley@iowatelecom.net

group? Marc was interested in paleontology and dinosaurs, and he decided to name his group after the meanest dinosaur of all, Tyrannosaurs Rex. They performed in Covent Hall with no time to rehearse. The band was incompatible and the result was another disaster. A record company repossessed their instruments and once again Marc seemed destined for another career path. Then he met John Peel, a disc jockey for an offshore pirate rock station. His position as a renegade let him promote music mainstream stations ignored. Peel liked Marc’s music and promoted it whenever he could. Fortunately for Marc the station was just outside territorial waters, and by the time Britain shut down

the station, T Rex became successful and was earning a living. Steve Tork, one of his band mates and collaborators fancied the group to be part of a sixties revolution, but Marc only wanted to be a rock star. In spite of his sometimesbizarre outlook, Marc opposed drugs and this also put him at odds with the band. Steve became so drugged out, his performances reminded some of a singing vegetable. Near the end of the tour, Steve removed his belt and beat himself until he drew blood. Much to Marc’s relief, Steve eloped with an American woman and was never seen again. In spite of it all, Marc was not yet ready to give up. He knew the stars would come together. It was only a matter of time.

News from the Extension Service

Fall yard and garden clean up Last week I wrote about the importance of sanitation in storing grain and keeping it in good condition. This week I turn the focus on lawns and gardens. As summer turns over to fall, there are a number of issues to remember to help you in management around the yard. Try to think a bit like the organisms you are dealing with (yes, seek out your inner cherry tree). Plants we want like bluegrass or cherry trees or tomatoes do have things in common with pests – the weeds and insects and diseases – that we fight. They all have to live in the environment we provide for them, and they all have to find a way to get through our winters. So try to understand the good guy’s needs and favor those, and also understand the things that favor the bad (past) guys, and try to disrupt those. Here are three examples: *Finish seeding any bare sports in the lawn immediately. Now is the time to start management to reduce and even elimi-

nate annual weeds from flourishing in your lawn. These include crabgrass, the foxtails, stinkgrass, and even lambsquarters. These annual plants must start from seed each spring and for that they need open spots. So if you remove the open spots, they cannot get established. A little dose of nitrogen fertilizer now will be available to the plants for their fall, coolseason growth period. Don’t wait too long, but about one to two pounds of nitrogen per 1000 square feet should do wonders. Read the fertilizer analysis; the first number is the pounds of nitrogen in 100 pounds of fertilizer material. For instance a 10-pound bag of fertilizer with a 15-10-5 guaranteed analysis contains 1.5 pounds of nitrogen. If we get the grass stand filled in, in the fall, and stimulate the plants with a little nutrition, it really discourages the weeds. *For garden areas, and particularly squash and other vining cucurbits

Logan City Council First and third Mondays, 7 p.m.

Lo-Ma Board of Education Second Wednesday, 6:30 p.m.

Rich Pope Harrison County Extension Program Coordinator (including zucchini), remove the vines from the garden area immediately after frost (within a couple of days). Squash vine borer larvae will bore through the dead stems and overwinter in the soil, ready to emerge when next year’s garden is just starting. Cut those larvae off at the pass by removing them after the frost but before they burrow into the soil, and you have cut into their live cycle. While you are at it, the other garden crop residues can allow a number of insect and foliar diseases to overwinter as well, so fall cleanup can help considerably in your overall pest management strategy. *Remember that newly planted tree and other

ornamental plants may be tenuously established, and will need to go through the winter. Try to reduce stresses by thorough mid to late fall watering. Even though we have had unusually high volumes of rain this summer, remember your plants may run a bit short, depending on the fall we will have. Mulching can also help. Avoid mulching materials that get waterlogged and pack tightly, for example shredded newspaper. Newspaper has its uses as mulch, but save it for other seasons, not winter. For additional information contact Rich Pope at the Harrison County Extension Office at 6442105 or ropope@iastate.edu.

Harrison County Landfill Second Wednesday, 7 p.m.

Logan Public Library Board Second Monday, 4 p.m.


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Logan Herald-Observer September 15, 2010

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1301 Normal St • Woodbine, IA • 712-647-2627

111. S. First Ave. Logan, Iowa 51546 712-644-2244 it appeared a subject was living out of his vehicle and had parked for the night. Klutts advised the subject to move out of the area. •Deputy Killpack investigated a complaint of a four-wheeler being ridden on the roadway on 300th Street. Killpack talked with the offender and advised it was not legal to ride on the roadway. •Deputy Killpack responded to 270th Street per a property dispute. The property owners are in the process of a divorce. •Deputy Klutts investigated identity fraud where a person’s identity was used for an arrest. The investigation continues. Sept. 9 •Deputy Klutts responded to Mondamin per a report of suspicious activity. The caller advised that a man was walking around with what appeared to be a shotgun. The deputy checked the area but found nothing. •Deputy Klutts took a report of public urination at Woodland Campground. The complainant only wanted this noted in case of further altercations. •Deputy Doiel arrested Warren Hall of Magnolia on a Harrison County probation violation charge. Hall was transported to jail without incident. •To report crimestopper information: Call 1-800247-0592 •To report littering: Call 1-888-665-4887. Any criminal charge is merely an accusation and the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

Harrison County Sheriff Report By Sheriff Pat Sears Sept. 2 •Deputy Clemens assisted a Lyons County deputy and an Osceola County deputy with a search warrant on Mobile Avenue. •Deputy Knickman arrested Alex Carstens on a statewide warrant out of Polk County. Carstens was transported to jail and admitted. Sept. 3 •Deputy Clemens investigated the recovery of a stolen motorcycle. The motorcycle had been observed in a road ditch. •Deputy Killpack and Deputy Doiel assisted Little Sioux first responders with a subject that was refusing treatment. After some discussion, the subject agreed to be transported. •Deputy Doiel arrested Sean Coldewey of Council Bluffs for OWI after assisting Missouri Valley officers with a traffic stop. •Deputy Clemens investigated a recovered stolen vehicle at a residence on Mobile Avenue. Charges have been filed against the offender. •Deputy Clemens investigated a marijuana grow on Mobile Avenue. Charges are pending. Sept. 4 •Deputy Doiel investigated an attempted burglary to a business in Mondamin. •Deputy Doiel investigated a burglary to a business in River Sioux. •Deputy Cohrs investigated the possible theft of a bobcat skid loader located at a residence on Mobile Avenue. Sept. 6

•Deputy Cohrs investigated an assault that occurred at West Harrison School. •Deputy Cohrs investigated criminal mischief to a mailbox on 160th Street. •Deputy Cohrs received a call of a golf cart accident on Benton Avenue. •Deputy Cohrs investigated a harassment complaint from a resident on 300th Street. Sept. 7 •Deputy Killpack investigated an attempted break in to a vehicle at a residence in Pisgah. •Deputy Killpack investigated an assault and or bullying complaint from a resident in Persia. The complainant advised her son had been assaulted by two other juveniles. After investigating, it appeared the action occurred on the school bus. Deputy Killpack will make contact with the school superintendent. Sept. 8 •Deputy Cohrs investigated a trespass complaint from a resident on Lima Trail. The complainant had requested to discontinue service from a local business and that business came to the residence to remove property. •Deputy Cohrs investigated an animal neglect report at a residence on Vine Street in Little Sioux. The animal will be monitored. •Deputy Cohrs investigated a stray bullet that struck a vehicle in the area of Crete and Austin Avenue. The investigation continues. •Deputy Klutts investigated suspicious activity near Modale. Upon arrival,

Courthouse Fines & Fees SMALL CLAIMS Capital One Bank, N.A. vs Darren Binkley, Dunlap Community Bank vs Jonathan Wensel, Pisgah Capital One Bank vs Tory Adam Hoden, Missouri Valley Merchants Credit Adjusters, Inc. vs Eric Lorenen, Woodbine Merchants Credit Adjusters, Inc. vs Cindy Basch, Joseph Basch, Missouri Valley Merchants Credit Adjusters, Inc. vs Monte Scobba, Robin Scobba, Missouri Valley Agriland FS, Inc. vs Steve Brandon, Carol Killpack, Logan Agriland FS, Inc. vs Charlie Evans, Missouri Valley Foodland vs Gary Collins, Judeth Collins, Little Sioux Foodland vs Steve Ehlert, Woodbine David Jones, Lacie Jones vs Jason Spence, Panama SE Smith & Sons Lumber vs Crocker Enterprz AKK Doug, Croker, Missouri Valley SPEEDING Jill Waderich, Dow City Jessica Cox, Little Sioux Fernando Salinas

Alberto, Denison Barbara McClary, Missouri Valley Joshua Long, Logan Brittany Blodgett, Missouri Valley VIOLATIONS Judith Collins, Little Sioux, fail to maintain control Nicholas Pleas, Missouri Valley, fail to maintain control Jonathan Cook, Onawa, fail to maintain safety belts Joseph Brown, Woodbine, fail to yield upon entering through highway; financial liability Douglas Williams, Logan, operation without registrations James Roach, Logan, fail to maintain control Brock Kuhlman, Moorhead, fail to obey traffic control device Jason Wojcik, Onawa, unsafe passing Daniel Holker, Winterset, failure to comply with safety regulations/rules DISTRICT COURT State of Iowa vs Zachary J. Wheeler, third degree theft. 365 days in jail with all but 30 suspended. Fined $1,625. Credit given for

111. N. 2nd Ave. Logan, Iowa 51546 712-644-2665 time served. Unsupervised probation for one year. State of Iowa vs Derek B. Ahmed, driving while barred. Sixty days in jail with all but 15 days suspended. Fined $625. Credit given for time served. Unsupervised probation for one year. State of Iowa vs Shari A. Giboo, OWI, first offense and amended counts II and III child endangerment. Two days in jail. Fined $1,250. On counts II and III, two years jail, sentences to run concurrently. Credit for time served. Sentence on Counts II and III suspended and defendant placed on supervised probation to Department of Correctional Services for two years. Ordered to obtain alcohol evaluation and complete drinking drivers course. Ordered to reside at Women’s PCF until maximum benefits are achieved. State of Iowa vs Anthony Caniglia, OWI first. Sentenced to 60 days in jail with all but 2 suspended. Fined $1,250. Credit for time served. Unsupervised probation for one year. Ordered to complete McCartney program.

Weight Watchers open house in Mo. Valley Weight Watchers in Woodbine will no longer be holding meetings for members. Due to this, the Weight Watchers group in Missouri Valley will be hosting an open house from 5 to 5:45 p.m., Sept. 22. The event will be held at the Georgia Riley dining room in the lower level of Alegent

Health Community Memorial Hospital, Missouri Valley. Regular meetings are conducted at the hospital on Wednesdays and include weigh-in from 4:45 to 5:15 p.m., program from 5:15 to 5:45 p.m. with weigh-in also available after the meeting. Anyone in Harrison County

is invited to attend the informational meeting as well as join the weekly group. At Weight Watchers, you learn how small changes can lead to big changes so you can lose weight and keep it off. For more information call Weight Watchers at 1800-379-5757 or Pam Johnson at 712-642-9209.

2010 Harrison County Political Forum sponsored by

107 N. 4th Ave., Ste 3 644-2705 Logan, IA

509 Walker St. 647-2821 Woodbine, IA

Thursday, October 21, 2010 • 7:00 p.m. at the Logan Community Center Committed candidates includes: • Harrison County Supervisor Robert Smith • Harrison County Recorder Lorie Thompson • Supervisor candidate Russell Kurth • Supervisor candidate Norma Coret • Supervisor candidate Walter Utman • Treasurer candidate Heather Hack Edney • Treasurer candidate Renee King • Treasurer candidate Sandy Royer Send questions to ndavis@woodbinetwiner.com or call 712-647-2821 Please send questions by Thursday, October 7th at noon. Candidates will be available after the forum for individual questions.


Neighbors Safe Food class set for Oct. 26 A Safe Food class will be offered from 2 to 4 p.m., Oct. 26 at the ISU Extension Office in Adair County in Greenfield. Barb Fuller, ISU Extension Nutrition and Health Program Specialist, will conduct the training program. The program is designed to provide basic food safety and sanitation information useful to all foodservice employees. This does meet the state sanitation training requirements for most foodservice operations. Topics covered include employee health and hygiene, prevention of cross contamination, time/temperature of foods and proper cleaning and sanitizing practices. Material is based on Food Code 2005. Cost is $35 per person. Deadline for registration is Oct. 19. Call ISU Extension, Adair County7 at 641-7438412.

Mether on orientation staff at NWC Michelle Mether, of Logan, was among 39 Northwestern College students who were on the orientation staff to begin the new school year. The orientation staff planned a variety of events to welcome freshmen and transfer students to campus Aug. 20-23, the weekend before the beginning of fall semester. With a theme of “Northwestern: Dive In!” the weekend included informational sessions for new students and their parents, a variety of fun activities, small group meetings and worship services. Mether is a senior majoring in biology health professions.

September 15, 2010

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REUNITED WITH FAMILY Bus tours planned for Lincoln Hwy. Heritage Byway

The Harrison County Humane Society has helped reunite a lost dog with its family. Chewy, missing since July 4 from her home outside of Logan, had been at the HCHS kennel, and her owners, the Mary Coffin family of Logan had been looking for her since that time. Chris Gochenour, wife of veterinarian, Jack Gochenour, saw a flyer about the dog at the office and LuAnn Helen of the HCHS saw it when she took her dog in for its yearly checkup. It all came together and Chewy was reunited with his family in this photo. Submitted photo

Leonard family returns for annual reunion Sept. 5 The Leonard reunion was held Sept. 5 at the Logan Methodist Church fellowship hall. After dinner, each family gave an update of their family events. They were entertained by Claire Hennessy, doing cheers. Those attending were: Patricia Leonard, James Underland from Omaha, Neb.; Phyllis Reynolds, Onawa; Mary Jane Foutch, Woodbine; Jeffrey Kies, Grain Valley, Mo.; Merle and Marjorie Sass, Mike

and Betty Ringstad, Missouri Valley; Bud and Janet Kies, Sandy and Judy Bucheit, St. Louis, Mo. From Logan: Zoe Leonard, Larry, Linda and Claire Hennessy, Hazel Black, Kris Gash, Skip and Sharon Leonard, John and Charlotte Burbridge, Marvin, Barbara and Matt Leonard, Richard and Barb Bendgen and Lois Hatterman. Births: Allison Jane Lacy, granddaughter of Jane Leonard Weis. Lawson

Richard Bendgen, son of Cheryl Bendgen; Dahlia Bendgen, daughter of Rick Bendgen. Marriages: Trace Weis and Matt Lacy, Trudy Weis and Rob Colby, Kurt Lee Koenig and Jeanne Hansen, Marc Leonard and Sharon James, Becky Leonard and Jacob Branstetter, Stephanie Koenig and Austin Schemmel and Lindsay Stoner and Zachary Fox. Deaths: Laura Mae Leonard; Alice Leonard, wife of Reuben.

Two bus tours of the historic Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway are planned for Harrison and Pottawattamie counties. Tours are set for noon to 4 p.m., Sept. 22 and Sept. 29. The tours are open to the public and highlight historic and tourism features along the byway. The bus tour on Sept. 22 will board in Dunlap and travel to Crescent and back. The tour on Sept. 29 will board in Crescent and travel to Dunlap and back. Each tour will make several stops including the Harrison County Welcome Center, Hitchcock Nature Center and brief stops to view historic architecture and projects in progress. Each tour will be slightly different. Parking locations and additional itinerary information will be available at sign up. Experience the route with a guided tour, or help as a guide in your community. Volunteer guides are needed for both tours in Harrison and Pottawattamie Counties.

Guides will showcase communities on the byway, share ideas for byway and community development and network with neighbors. Tourism and economic development professionals are strongly encouraged to reserve a seat. Bus seating is limited and pre-registration is required for planning purposes. Contact M&M Divide RC&D at 712-792-4415 to reserve your seat. There will be no charge for the bus tour, but donations will be accepted. Events are funded, in part, by Humanities Iowa and the National Endowment for the Humanities. This program is funded, in part, by a grant from the Iowa Community Cultural Grant program administered by the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information on any of the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway events contact Frances O’Leary, project manager, at 712-792-4415 or e-mail FrancieOLeary@gmail.com

Loess Hills grant funds available

USDA announces loan program for conservation USDA Farm Service Agency State Executive Director John Whitaker announced the launch of a Conservation Loan Program that will provide farm owners and farm-related business operators

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Music furnished by DJ

Sat., Sept. 18 9:00 p.m. - ??????

CORN PALACE 417 Walker

Logan Herald-Observer

647-2122

Woodbine, IA

access to credit to implement conservation techniques that will conserve natural resources. “This will provide farmers, who want to implement conservation measures on their lands, a chance to do so by providing assistance with their up-front costs,” said Witaker. “In return, these producers will help reduce soil erosion, improve water quality and promote sustainable and organic agricultural practices.” Direct conservation loans can be obtained through local Farm Service Agency offices with loan limits up to $300,000.

Guaranteed conservation loans up to $1,112,000 are available from lenders working with FSA. Conservation Loans can be used to implement conservation practices approved by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, such as the installation of conservation structures; establishment of forest cover; installation of water conservation measures; establishment or improvement of permanent pastures; implementation of manure management; and the adaptation of other emerging or existing conservation practices, techniques or technologies. For more information on the program, contact a local FSA office or visit the FSA Web site at www.fsa.usda.gov.

The Loess Hills Alliance Protection Committee has grant applications available to any person, agency, group or community who’s project supports the goals to protect and or preserve the natural and cultural resources of western Iowa’s Loess Hills region. Grants will be awarded on a competitive basis for projects that benefit one of, or all of, the seven Loess Hills counties in western Iowa. The committee anticipates awarding up to $48,000 for projects that support the mission of the protection committee. Grant awards require a 3-to-1 match, with not much more than 10 percent in-kind contributions. Grant applications may

be obtained by contacting the Loess Hills Alliance, 318 E. Iowa Ave, Onawa, IA 51040, or call 712-4332400. Grant applications will also be available on the following Web site www.loesshillsalliance.com. Completed applications are due by Jan. 7, 2011 with awards to be announced in March. The Loess Hills Alliance Protection Committee is part of the Loess Hills organization that was formed by the Iowa Legislature in 2000 to foster protection, stewardship and economic development in the seven county Loess Hills region. The Iowa Legislature appropriated $177,000 to achieve results in each of the interest areas listed above.

Avoid Dangers of “Over-concentration” When you were in school, you had to concentrate on your studies. When you began your career, you had to concentrate on your work. In fact, in just about every endeavor in life, concentration is essential for success. However, as an investor, you may find that you actually don’t want to concentrate too much. That’s not to say you shouldn’t concentrate on your investment decisions — you should. But if you concentrate too much money in one investment, or one type of investment, you could run into problems. Suppose, for example, that your portfolio is almost entirely devoted to growth stocks. During a good economy, growth stocks generally tend to do well, so if we’re enjoying a period of sustained growth, your portfolio might show some good returns. But if the economy slumps while you own only growth stocks, you could sustain losses that may take a long time from which to recover. On the other hand, if you over-concentrate on fixedincome investments, such as bonds, your principal value might increase when interest rates are falling (as interest rates and bond prices are inversely related), but when interest rates rise, your bond portfolio will likely lose principal value. To help avoid the problems

of over-concentration, it's important to own a range of investments, which may include stocks, bonds, government securities and certificates of deposit (CDs). While this type of diversification cannot, by itself, guarantee a profit or protect against loss, it can help reduce the effects of volatility on your portfolio. Of course, how you choose to allocate your assets will depend on a variety of factors, including the following: • Your goals — Your ultimate objectives should help govern your investment strategy. If you are planning to retire early and then start a new business, you may need to invest more aggressively than, say, your neighbor, who wants to work as long as possible and then stay close to home, pursuing inexpensive hobbies. • Your risk tolerance — Just as we all have different personalities, we have different tolerances for investment risk. If you can assume greater risk in exchange for potentially higher returns, you may be a more aggressive investor. Conversely, if you’re willing to take lower returns as a trade-off for greater protection of your principal, you’re probably a more conservative investor. However, to achieve your goals, you may consider

Scott Thompson 115 N. Ave., Suite 200 Logan, IA 51546 (712) 644-3692 www.edwardjones.com Toll Free: 866-644-3692 Member SIPC

moving outside your investment “comfort zone” from time to time. • Your time horizon — Your stage of life will also affect your investment choices. If you are just starting your career, you can probably afford to invest more aggressively than if you are nearing retirement, at which time you may want to cut down on risks. To build a diversified portfolio that reflects your goals, risk tolerance and time horizon, you may want to work with a professional financial advisor — someone who can assess your situation and recommend choices that are

appropriate for your needs. By concentrating on a unified investment strategy — instead of over-concentrating on a specific type of investment — you can focus on where you want to go and what you need to do to get there. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.


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Logan Herald-Observer September 15, 2010

Neighbors

2010 THE R OY AL CO UR T

Kendra Holcomb and Jacque DeWitt strike a pose in their pajamas for pajama day at Lo-Ma.

Brady Charbonneau got all dressed up for pamaja day during Lo-Ma Homecoming Week.

Members of the 2010 Lo-Ma Homecoming Court were, in front Hannah Winchell, Hannah Colpitts; in back, Levi Ettleman, queen Macy Cohrs, king Evan Mikels and Nolan Oviatt. Photo: Nikki Allen

Kyle Dickman shows his school spirit in his western wear. Looks like Abby Straight’s favorite super hero is from Iowa State. Victoria Johnson poses behind her.

The football players were treated to yummy sandwiches at the pep rally Friday made of peanut butter, jelly, chocolate chips and marshmallow cream. Nolan Oviatt, left, Evan Sears and Nate Morton race to be the first to finish theirs.

Librarian Jodi Hinsdale reads to the kindergarten dressed up for Super Hero Day.

Lo-Ma students decorated the windows of businesses in town with a variety of school spirit to mark the start of Homecoming Week.

On Super Hero Day, Ben Kill, left, Austin Ettleman, Alex Gochenour and Chelsea Mayer were dressed as their favorite super hero.

The cheerleaders sold chances to toss a pie at a teacher to raise funds for the food pantry. Here Melina Lambson tosses one at coach/AD Kevin Patterson.

2010 Homecoming Queen, Macy Cohrs, receives her crown from dad Dan, while mom Chris watches. Macy was escorted by Zeth Earlywine.

Hayley Whisney and Jessica Mausbach show their Panther Pride at the football game.

Photos by Nancy Voggesser, Angela Winther Unless indicated otherwise

Catherine and Elizabeth Beall perform with the band.


Logan Herald-Observer

Church

September 15, 2010

7

Obituaries LORENE MINSHALL Lorene F. Minshall, 96, of Logan, passed away Aug. 31 at the Community Memorial Hospital in Missouri Valley. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Sept. 4 at the Logan Memorial Chapel with Pastor Jack Hofmockel and Pastor Robert Abbott officiating. Organist was Barb Sherer and vocalist David Dickinson. Selections were “Always” and “This is MyFather’s World.” Casket bearers were Eric Bakken, Jack Meadows, Kenny Padgett, David Hoten, Gabe Meadows and Scott Meadows. Final resting place was the Logan Cemetery. Lorene was born Oct. 25, 1913 in Perry, Okla., to Nicholas and Florence (Downs) Mace. She attended school in Missouri Valley and graduated from Missouri Valley High School. She then attended Normal training to become a teacher. Lorene taught country schools near Missouri Valley for several years. She was married to Meredith Minshall in 1934 in Council Bluffs. Lorene enjoyed reading, music and her family. Meredith passed away in 1980. Survivors include her son John Nicholas Minshall and wife Cheryl of Phoenix, Ariz.; daughter, Eileen Meadows and husband Ron of Council Bluffs; grandchildren, Millie Padgett and husband Kenny, Scott Meadows and wife Tina, Bill Meadows, Ann Bakken and husband Eric, Jennifer Hoten and husband Dave, Becky Walters and husband Rob; greatgrandchildren Jack Meadows, Gabriel Meadows, Thomas Meadows, Logan and Lindsey Walkers. Lorene was preceded in death by her parents, husband Meredith, grandson Nicholas, two sisters and

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Modale and Missouri Valley Pastor Kim Crummer 642-3168 or 642-2464 Modale Worship, 9:30 a.m. Missouri Valley No Sunday School until Sept. Missouri Valley Worship, 10:30 a.m. CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS Logan Branch Pres. - Wayne Kennedy Sunday Sacrament, 10 a.m. Sunday School, 11:20 a.m. Primary 11:20 a.m. Priesthood and Relief Society, 12:10 p.m. Seminary and MIA, 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays Mutual/Scouts, Wed. 7 p.m. LITTLE SIOUX CHURCH OF CHRIST 403 Mulberry Little Sioux, Iowa 51545 (712) 646-2644 Wayne Bahr, pastor Sunday School, 10:15 a.m. Worship 9:00 a.m. COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Persia Pastor Kirk Parsons Youth Leaders Kirk and Pam Parsons

two brothers. Visitation with the family was held from 6 to 8 p.m., Sept. 3 at the Logan Memorial Chapel. Logan Memorial Chapel 214 N. Fourth Ave. Logan, Iowa 51546 644-2929

EILEEN SCHRAEDER Eileen Frances (Herman) Schraeder, 87, passed away Sept. 8 at Rose V i s t a Nursing Home in Woodbine. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Sept. 10 at Zion Lutheran Church in Magnolia with Rev. Jerald Firby officiating. Musicians were Janice Salz and Rick Powell. Selections were “Amazing Grace” and “Fly Away.” Honorary pallbearers were Brittany Schraeder, Eric Schraeder, Dan Perkins and Lynn Schraeder. Pallbearers were Dennis Perkins, Ronnie Mann, Raymond Mether and Marcus Weigelt. Eileen was born Sept. 30, 1922 to Ernest and Margaret (Plath) Herman in Magnolia. She was raised in Magnolia and graduated from Magnolia High School in 1940. Eileen then attended Boyle’s College in Council Bluffs for two years. She worked at the First Peoples Bank in Omaha and continued her education at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. During World War II she worked at the Martin Bomber Plant. Eileen married Joe Schraeder on April 3, 1946, at Zion Lutheran Church in Magnolia. The couple farmed northeast of Magnolia. In 1968, Eileen took a job at Wilkerson’s Manufacturing in Fort Calhoun and worked there until 1975. The couple moved to Woodbine in 1992.

Sunday School 9:30 Worship Service 10:30 First Sunday of every month, 9:30 worship followed by fellowship LIFELINE ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH Pastor Ray Sorenson Assoc. Pastor Hank Gruver 1207 Harrison St., Dunlap, Iowa - 6435475 Sun.: 9:30 a.m., Sunday School; 10:30 a.m., Morning Worship; Thurs.: 7 p.m., Intercessory Prayer. PERSIA TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH Vacancy Pastor: Rev. Merlene Ostebee Sunday worship at 8:30 a.m. Communion the 2nd and 4th Sundays of the month GRACE COMMUNITY FELLOWSHIP of the CHRISTIAN and MISSIONARY ALLIANCE

Missouri Valley Pastor Brad Westercamp 9:00 a.m. Sunday School for all ages. Nursery through adults. 10:30 a.m. Worship Nursery and children’s church provided during worship - infants through 3rd grade. Wed., 7 p.m.,men’s

Eileen was baptized at the Zion Lutheran Church Nov. 12, 1922 and confirmed there July 8, 1934. She was a member of the Zion Lutheran Church in Magnolia and was currently a member of the Immanuel Lutheran Church in Logan. She was also a member of the Jolly Makers Neighborhood Club. Eileen enjoyed playing softball for the Martin Bomberettes. She was a teacher of Sunday school and Bible school, sang in the choir and was active in the ladies aid. She was a wonderful cook and known for her pies and also enjoyed cross stitch and latch work. She also dedicated her time to volunteering at Rose Vista. Eileen was preceded in death by her parents; sister Lucille Perkins and “brother” Bernard Plath. Survivors include her husband Joe Schraeder of Woodbine, daughter, Jane Schraeder of Omaha, Neb., son, John and Kim Schraeder of Ostrander, Minn.; two grandchildren, Brittany Schraeder of Saratoga, Iowa and Eric and Becky Schraeder of Lime Springs, Iowa; “sister” Agnes Haubold of Woodbine and many other relatives and friends. Fouts Funeral Home 501 Normal Street Woodbine, Iowa 51579 712-647-2221

DONALD WILSON Donald Lyle Wilson, 84, passed away Sept. 8 at the Humboldt County Memorial Hospital. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Sept. 10 at the Oakcrest Funeral Services in Renwick, Iowa. Clergy was Rev. Karen Dearchs. Inurnment was in the Linwood Cemetery near Logan. Donald was born Aug. 25, 1926 in Logan to Robert P. and Hester (Campbell) Wilson on the family farm in LaGrange township in Harrison

and women’s fellowship study and prayer MONDAMIN BAPTIST CHURCH Pastor Harley Johnsen Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday - Youth Group “Magnolia Fire Escape” 7:30 p.m. at Magnolia Fire Hall Wednesday Family NIghts 6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m. (during school year) LOGAN CHRISTIAN CHURCH Minister Ron Riley Youth Minister Nate Powell, 644-2642 www.loganchristianchurch.org Saturday Service - 7 p.m. Sunday Worship, 8:15 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. 6th - High School Youth, 6-8 p.m. COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Mondamin Co-Pastors Tomm Bothwell and John Carritt Sunday School, 9:15 a.m. Worship, 10 a.m PERSIA METHODIST CHURCH Rev. Orris Drake Sunday

712-644-2710

Cole Davis, John Benedickt and Seth Jimmerson. Final resting place was Harris Grove Cemetery near Logan. Military honors were by the VFW Post 6256 and O’Hara Seeley Post. Don was born Feb. 19, 1947 in Logan to Arthur and Doris (Moss) Fetter. He attended school in Logan and graduated from Logan High School. He served in the Navy and Army Reserves. He was married to Bev Jacobsen and to this union four children were born. Don owned and operated Fets Restaurant in Logan for several years. He married Colleen Thomas in 2003. He was employed with E.J. Rath in the maintenance department retiring in 2009. Don loved being outside working or building, spending time with his family, watching grandkids at sporting events and spoiling them rotten. He always said, “We don’t spoil them, we just give them anything they want and that’s it!” Survivors include his wife Colleen (Thomas) of Missouri Valley; children, Chris Bonham, Randy Fetter, both of Logan, Diane Davis and husband Rick of Missouri Valley, Jeff Fetter and wife Jodi of Logan; step-children

215 N. 4th Ave. Logan 644-2929 Randall D. Scott ~ Funeral Director

Donald R. Fetter, 63, of Missouri Va l l e y, passed away Sept. 6 at his h o m e . Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Sept. 11 at the Christian Church in Logan with Pastor Ron Riley officiating. Pianist was Bryan Jimmerson. Selections were “I Have a Dream,” “Amazing Grace” and “What a Wonderful World.” Casket bearers were Troy Roth, Randy Moore, Eugene Jacobsen,

Worship, 8:45 a.m. ST. ANNE’S Logan Rev. Michael Berner, Pastor 644-2535 • 644-2092 Saturday Mass, 4:00 p.m. Sunday Mass, 8:00 a.m. ST. PATRICK’S Dunlap Saturday Mass, 5:30 p.m. Sunday 11a.m. SACRED HEART Woodbine Saturday Mass, 4 p.m. Sunday 9:30 a.m. HOLY FAMILY Mondamin 645-2683 Sunday Mass, 8 a.m. ST. PATRICK’S Missouri Valley Rev. Michael Berner, Pastor Saturday Mass, 5 p.m. Sunday Mass, 9:30 a.m. UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pisgah Pastor Jim Young Sunday Service, 10 a.m. Sunday School, 11 a.m. United Methodist Women, 1:30 p.m.

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644-2705

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Hennessy-Aman Funeral Home 310 East Huron Street Missouri Valley, Iowa 712-642-2745

Recognized

Cindy Collins, left, and Matt Dooley were recently recognized for their years of service at Perfection Learning and Perfection Press. Collins has worked at Perfection Learning for 30 years and Dooley at Perfection Press for five years.

Wednesdays MONDAMIN CHURCH OF CHRIST (Christian) 207 Noyes Mondamin, Iowa 51557 (712) 646-2644 Wayne Bahr, pastor Jeff Bierbrodt, Youth Pastor Worship – 10:30 a.m. Sunday School – 9:30 a.m. ST. JOHN LUTHERAN CHURCH Honey Creek 545-3022 Pastor David Kuhnle Bible Study, 9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Adult Bible Class - 9 a.m. Children’s Church in 10 a.m. service ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH Magnolia -Sunday Worship at Immanuel Lutheran Church Logan MAGNOLIA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pastor. Jack D. Hofmockel Sunday Worship, 9:00 a.m. PERSIA ST. JOHN’S

LUTHERAN CHURCH Rev. Dale Jenson Sunday Worship, 8:30 a.m. Communion, Every 1st Sunday PISGAH COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Pastor Terry McHugh Co-Pastor Ralph Hussing Sunday School, 9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Mondamin Pastor Jim Young Sunday School, 10:30a.m. Sunday Worship, 9:45 a.m. THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Little Sioux Pastor Jim Young Sunday Worship, 8:45 a.m. Fellowship Hour, 9:30 United Methodist Women, 3rd Wednesday Every Month LANDMARK BAPTIST CHURCH Logan Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m. and Sunday night 6:30

p.m. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Missouri Valley 642-2538 Rev. Barbara Todd firstpresbymvmsn.com Adult Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Sunday Worship, 10:00 a.m. Sunday School, 11:15 a.m. IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH Logan Pastor Jerald Firby 644-2384 • 642-2842 Sunday Worship, 9:00 a.m. Fellowship: 10:00 10:15 a.m. Sun. School, 10:15 11:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study: 10:15 0 11:00 a.m. LOGAN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pastor Jack D. Hofmockel Worship, 10:00 a.m. Contemp. Sun. School, 10:15 a.m. NEW LIFE CHURCH Logan Comm. Center Pastor Stan Udd 642-9363 Kids/Adult Classes 9:30 a.m. Worship: 10:30 a.m.

Eby Drug Store 3 Generations of Pharmacists 644-2160 Logan

Missouri Valley/Mondamin Helping You Reach Your Dreams

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MOSAIC “A life of possibilities for people with intellectual disabilities” Serving Western Iowa since 1988 217 E. 7th Street

Jennifer Jimmerson and husband Bryan of Norfolk, Neb., Carie Wohlers and husband Brent of Missouri Valley, Rod Thomas and wife Brooke of Cameron, Mo., Cindy Ferris and husband Ron of Missouri Valley; grandchildren, Cole and Brodie Davis, Dillon and Austin Bonham, Jacob and Hadley Fetter, Seth, Emma and Chloe Jimmerson, McKenna and Taylor Wohlers, Gage, Riley and Logan Thomas; Parker Ferris and number 16th grandchild due in early December; brothers, Rick Fetter and wife Toni of Council Bluffs, Gary Fetter and Kim of Columbus, Neb.; brothers-in-law, Randy Moore and wife Beth of Missouri Valley, Jeff Moore of Missouri Valley; sister-inlaw, Debbie Skelton of Shell Knob, Mo.; stepbrother Lyle Moss and wife Sharolyn of Logan; nieces and nephews. Don was preceded in death by his parents, son-in-law Gene Bonham, brother-in-law Richard Skelton.

DONALD FETTER

Church Services

Logan Memorial Chapel Strong Insurance Agency

County, five miles south of Beebeetown. He attended Linwood and East Harris Grove rural schools. He was called to serve his country in the United States Army from 19451947, serving in Korea. Upon his return from service, he farmed with his brother in the Harris Grove area before going to help his brother-in-law, Henry Goge, near Humboldt, Iowa in the summer of 1947. In 1948, he started working for Donie and Elsie Clowes of Renwick and became part of their family. In later years, he lived at Springvale Independent Living in Humboldt and Humboldt Care Center South. Don was a private person, very helpful, enjoyed a good joke, visiting with friends and neighbors and loved his dogs. Preceding him in death were his parents, a sister Wilma Boge Rutledge, a brother Robert E. Wilson and a nephew Bill Boge. Survivors include a sister, Ruth Heim of Logan, as well as four nephews and three nieces. Oakcrest Funeral Services P.O. Box 186 Algona, Iowa 50511 515-295-3731

FEED at

Your Independent Insurance Agent

LOGAN

712-644-2456

644-3298 219 E. 7th

Please send your church service changes and/or notices to The Logan Herald-Observer, P.O. Box 148, Logan, IA 51546, or e-mail them tomary.darling@heraldobserver.com.


8

Logan Herald-Observer September 15, 2010

Community

Former Lo-Ma star Alvis Long time voice of Panthers retires making waves at Iowa By Kevin White, WHNS There was some conflicted football fans on S a t u rd a y in the L o g a n area. While that part of western Iowa seems to have more Iowa State followers than Iowa or Nebraska, one of their own already is making waves with the Hawkeyes. Redshirt freshman Dominic Alvis, a 2009 Logan-Magnolia graduate, is listed as a No. 2 defensive end for No. 9 Iowa, which hosted Iowa State at 2:30 p.m., Sept. 11 at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City. Alvis saw his first career game action the previous Saturday, playing about six snaps at left defensive end in the Hawkeyes’ 37-7 win over Eastern Illinois. “It felt great, and I can’t wait to taste it again,” said Alvis, a 6-foot-4, 245pounder. Even Alvis’ high school coach at Lo-Ma, Matt Straight, will have mixed emotions Saturday. Straight was a two-year starter at safety for Iowa State in the mid-90’s. “I think my head coach at Logan kind of brainwashes a lot of students,” Alvis said, smiling. “He does a great job of that. He’s very positive though with me playing for the Hawks.” Taking a redshirt season allowed Alvis to grow and learn. The Hawkeyes’ entire defensive front four is back, after all earned at least honorable mention All-Big Ten

honors a year ago. The group is led by 2009 consensus All-America defensive end Adrian Clayborn, who could have been a first-round NFL draft pick but returned to school. “They’re probably the best in the country,” Alvis said of his fellow D-linemen. “They’re going to be hard to beat. They’re good role models. There’s so much technique that I’d never even heard of. I’ve been able to grasp that, and got a good start.” Straight redshirted during his first year in Ames, so he related to some of Alvis’ struggles in getting acclimated to college life. “That first year is really hard, just adjusting, coming from a small setting like we both did,” Straight said. “I think it was tough for him. I know it was tough for me my first year. But I think he’s settled and feels comfortable there now.” Straight said the average fan may not realize how much of an achievement it is to make the two-deeps as a redshirt freshman in a top 10 program. “We knew as long as he could keep his health under control over there that he’d so well,” he said. “We didn’t think he’d do this well this early. The coach who recruited him, Reese Morgan, had nothing but great things to say about his progress last spring. So we knew he was doing well then. “And what a great defensive line they have to learn from. To see how it’s supposed to be done at the highest college level imagi-

nable.” All the hard work paid off Sept. 4 as Alvis made his college debut. “That thrill of getting on the field for the first time is something he’ll never forget, I’m sure,” Straight said. A 3.8 student in high school, the former Lo-Ma star hopes to make an even greater impact as his football career moves forward. Straight said he’s already made an impact in the Logan community, and not just for his on-field exploits. “If you know Dominic well enough, I think no matter if you’re a Nebraska, Iowa State or Iowa fan, that you’re in his corner and you want to see him do well,” he said. “He’s just such a positive kid and has done so much in the community for volunteer services, and just being active in so many different things, that everybody really thinks very highly of him. It’s easy to root for those kids.” Even so, many in the Logan area, including Straight, will never become full-fledged converts to Iowa football. Here’s how Straight resolves it: “I’ll always cheer for Dom. I’ll cheer for his plays. But that’s as far as I can go,” he said. Alvis completely understands. Besides, what’s Iowa-Iowa State week without a little good-natured ribbing? “It’s a Hawkeye state, that’s for sure,” Alvis said. “It’s going to be fun. I have a lot of friends that go to Iowa State. I can’t wait to rub it in, hopefully, if we come out with a win.”

Lo-Ma freshmen top MV

For 28 years, Alvin Dinkel, left, has been the voice of the Lo-Ma Panther football team announcing each home game. His dedication to the team showed throughout the years’ and even a broken ankle didn’t stop him from announcing. He some how made his way up the ladder to the crows nest at the football field to announce the game for the team. At the Sept. 3 game, Dinkel announced he was retiring. Scott Muxfeldt, right, will be taking over the duties. Pictured in the center is Gale Muxfeldt. Photo: Angela Winther

Cross country at Treynor Taylor Olsen For the Herald-Observer The second meet of the season is complete and the young athletes did a fine job competing. The high school girls showed some improvement as they raced for the finish line. Top 20 medalist, Kendra Holcomb, was the first finisher for LoganMagnolia, receiving a 12th place medal running at a time of 17:51. Only a second behind, was Haley Whisney who earned a 13th place medal with a time of 17:52. Jacque DeWitt finished next at 28th at 19:17 and Alexa Meeker followed with a time of 20:03 receiving 31st place. Meeker commented on why she runs. “I don’t run because I have to,” Meeker said. “I run because I want to. No matter if it is rain, sleet or snow, I won’t be running slow.” The large team of Lo-Ma boys were like a stampede of terror at they stepped onto the course. Ten boys ran for Logan-Magnolia and four medaled in the top 20. Sophomore Ellis Johnson ran a 18:39 race and received 15th place. Seconds behind was Wyatt Schultz running with a time of 18:43 and receiving an 18th place medal. EJ Darnell had a time of 18:45. Joel Pixley was next across the finish line in 20th place

with a time of 18:46, he was followed by Wyatt Schultz at 18:47. Grady Killpack came in 33rd with a time of 20:02 and at 35th place was Alex Skeen. Braden Rosengren finished at 49th with a time of 21:35. Five men back was Adam Thomsen in 54th place with a time of 22:10. Fighting freshmen, Ridge Meeker was 59th with a time of 22:54 and Owen Pitt, 71st at 25:21. Schultz commented on how the team did at the meet. “Overall we did pretty good as a team,” Schultz said. “But I must say that my favorite part is running downhill.” The junior high top 10 runners received ribbons. Brett Rosengren was the first runner across the line for the Panther junior high boys. He ran at time of 12:09 and received a third place ribbons. Seconds behind was Justin Thomas with a time of 12:38 which earned him seventh place. Andrew Walski came in 14:49 and Gage Killpack, 14:58. Victoria Johnson, the lone junior high girl, ran a time of 14:20 and earned a 10th place ribbon. The Panthers’ next meet,

Wyatt Schultz

Jacque DeWitt Sept. 16, is at Panorama, a very wood and prairie-like course. “

The Daily Nonpareil presents Lo-Ma freshmen, Tanner Winther and John Smith make the stop during the Maple Valley freshmen game. Lo-Ma won 14-6. Photo: Angela Winther

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE All political candidates are reminded that Iowa law prohibits the placement of any political signs on public rights-of-way. Because of their proximity to the roadway, these signs distract drivers, impede roadway maintenance, and in some cases, due to the size of the sign and/or the type of mounting, can represent a contact hazard to drivers. For these reasons, the Harrison County Roads Department will be removing any signs located on County rights-of-way as soon as they are discovered. The law further allows that the cost of these removals may be billed to the responsible party. The signs that can be salvaged will be stored for a reasonable period of time at a county facility and can be recovered by the owner after contacting the County Engineer’s Office. Each candidate’s cooperation in assuring compliance with Iowa Law is appreciated. 38-1

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We invite you to be a part of our Fall Daily Nonpareil’s “Ladies Night Out” on Wednesday, October, 13, 2010. We have a wonderful evening planned with entertainment and informational presentations, refreshments and the opportunity for you to showcase your business and/or services to the ladies of Council Bluffs and surrounding areas. To register as an exhibitor, please fill out the following information: Company Name: _________________________________________________ (as you want to appear in promotional materials) Contact Name: __________________________________________________ Street Address: ___________________________________________________ City: ___________________________State: ____________Zip: ___________ Phone: _______________________ Email: ____________________________ $_________ Standard Booth – 1 eight-foot skirted table, draping behind and between each table, 2 chairs. 6 column inch ad in our Ladies Night Out program. $299.00 - Registration received on or before September 10, 2010 $349.00 – Registration received after September 10, 2010. $_________ Add electricity - $27.00 Add Premium Box Dinner (includes sandwich, chips, fruit and dessert) $_________ $12.50 each – please specify number of dinners _____________ $_________ Add additional skirted table - 6’ - $38.00 $_________Add additional chair(s) $10.00 each – specify number of chairs ________

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Logan Herald-Observer 644-2705

$_________ Total amount Enclosed Return n by y maill to o Cindy y Bunten,, Thee Daily y Nonpareil,, 535 5 W.. Broadway,, Suitee 300,, Councill Bluffs,, Iowaa 51503 3 by y Septemberr 17,, 2010.. You u may y faxx registration n form m to o 712-325-5675.. Forr additionall information,, pleasee calll 712-325-56766 orr emaill cindy.bunten@nonpareilonline.com.. Makee check k payablee to o Thee Daily y Nonpareil.. Paymentt in n fulll iss required d no o laterr then n Octoberr 1,, 2010.. Visa,, Mastercard d orr Discoverr paymentss aree also o accepted..


Neighbors CLASS OF 1955

Logan Herald-Observer September 15, 2010

9

CENTURY FARM

Members of the Logan Class of 1955 that returned for the reunion in June were, from the Pictured from the left, are Craig Hill, Farm Bureau Financial Services, Steve, Larry, Berniece, left, Wilma Wagner, Dean Van Cleave, Maxine Lesline, Betty Hansen, Harold Powers, Cole Roger and Kirk Hammitt and Bill Northey, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture. The photo was taken Archer-Sidler, Gary Pitt and Harold Kierscht. Submitted Photo at the 2010 Iowa State Fair. Submitted photo The Hammitt farm southeast of Logan, was honored as a Century Farm in a ceremony Aug. 17 at the Iowa State Fair. In 1904, Oscar Ernest and Sadie (Fitch) Hammitt moved to the farm and rented the land. third degree, driving while They purchased the farm revoked and possession of a controlled substance. He is being held in the Lyon County jail on a $50,000 bond. Wensel was charged with possession of burglary tools and burglary third degree. He is currently out on a $5,000 bond. Freihage is a 2005 West Harrison graduate and Wensel a 2008 West Harrison graduate. The investigation is ongoing and involves numerous agencies. Additional charges are pending.

Local men arrested for attemping to steal hogs According to the Lyon County Iowa Sheriff department, Eric Robert Freihage, Logan, and Jonathan Charles Wensel, Pisgah, were arrested Sept. 3 for attempting to steal hogs northwest of Little rock, Iowa. Due to the help of concerned citizens, the subjects were followed until their vehicle could be stopped by law enforcement. According to the report, it was determined that Freihage and Wensel had the intent to steal hogs

from a hog confinement and load them into the trailer they were pulling. During a search of the vehicle, law enforcement officials located many burglary tools and a small amount of marijuana. Freihage and Wensel were arrested at the scene. Freihage, the driver of the vehicle, was charged with two counts of failure to stop at stop signs, failure to display registration plates and failure to maintain insurance. He was also charged with possession of burglary tools, burglary

in 1909. Their children, Vern, Wildon, Lucille, Dorance, Helen, Lyle, Stella and Claude Hammitt were all born and raised on the farm. After Claude and Berniece (Osdiek) were married in 1943, they settled on the farm and

raised their four sons, Steve, Larry, Roger and Kirk, there as well. Claude purchased the farm in 1967 from his siblings. The farm remains in the family and is considered to be a Century Farm. Claude passed away in 2005.

HARRISON COUNTY CHAMPS

National public lands day There will be free admission all day, Sept. 25, at all national refuges and parks during national Public Lands Day. It is the nation’s largest hands-on volunteer effort to improve and enhance the public lands like national

wildlife refuges that Americans enjoy. Volunteers are needed. For more information or to register, call the DeSoto Visitor Center at 712-6424121. Volunteers will meet at DeSoto Visitor Center parking lot at 8:30 a.m.

Community Memorial Hospital 631 N. 8th St. Missouri Valley, IA

712-642-2784

AUGUST OUTPATIENT SPECIALTY CLINICS For Scheduling Appointments Call 712-642-9347

AUDIOLOGY Rhonda Ward, M.S., CCC-A..............................Sept. 20 Trish Morrow, M.S., CCC-A.........................Sept. 13 CARDIAC Heart Consultants..........Every Wed. all day & Friday PM Cardio Vascular Services...............Mon. P.M. & Fri. P.M. CARDIAC/PULMONARY REHABILITATION Cindy Sproul, R.N.......Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Crews will work from 9 a.m. to noon. Pre-registered participants will be assigned to one of the following activities: • Transplanting Prairie Cordgrass: Crews will harvest plugs of this native species and replant them in areas where needed throughout the refuge. • Seed Harvesting: Crews will harvest Prairie Cordgrass. These seeds will be sent to a nursery to produce plugs for future restoration projects on the refuge. • Planting Cottonwood tree samplings • Trail inspection and maintenance Registration is encouraged, however, equipment will also be available for any other volunteers that wish to stop and help that day.

The Lo-Ma Gold B Cub team from Logan, won first place in the county tournament this summer. Pictured in front from the left are, Colton Small, Robert Perkins, Jack Forsen, Brady Charbonneau, Keleb Reynek, Colton Fisher; second row, Dillon Knudsen, Tyler Clark, Jason Yost, Ty Pitt, Joe Small, Dillon Bonham; in back coaches Joel Clark, Craig Charbonneau and Scott Fisher. They fished their season 15-5. In the districts the team beat Guthrie Center and lost to Elk-Horn Kimballton. Submitted photo

Reserve a tree for Museum program The Museum of Religious Arts has started taking reservations for groups, organizations and businesses that wish to participate in the Reason for the Season Christmas program. It is on a first-come, firstserve basis for those wanting to decorate a tree. As in the past, the museum supplies and sets up the trees. Due to limited electrical hook-ups and space available for location of the trees, it is recommended you sign up soon so you can be the first to get a tree that can be allowed to have lights.

“People should sign up quickly as our goal is to have all 60 trees sponsored by folks from the local and surrounding communities again this year,” said LeeAnn Clark, museum director. A few changes will also take place this year. There will be three prize categories – traditional Christmas, best of business and most unique. Voting will be by the most dollars collected in the vote box next to each tree. This donation will be split 50/50 with the museum to help cover costs. Votes can be

made as often and for as many trees as you wish. Voters will have a better chance at getting their votes in this year since the event is being extended through January. “We have found it’s the popularity of our visitors coming out after their busy holiday schedules and will give all of us leeway for the possibility of the snow days such as last year,” said Rhonda McHugh, museum assistant director. Museum admission will apply. Call 644-3888 or www.mrarts.org for more information.

CARDIOVASCULAR NON-INVASIVE STUDIES..................................................Every Mon AM EAR, NOSE, THROAT Iris Moore, M.D...................................................Sept. 20 Gary Moore, M.D................................................Sept. 13 GASTROENTEROLOGY John Ferry MD............................................Sept. 14 & 28 GENERAL SURGERY Roalene J. Redland, M.D...................Sept. 10, 17 & 24 Terrence Ciurej, M.D.......................Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 Andrew Y. Reynolds, M.D....Every Thurs. A.M. and Wed.

PUBLIC NOTICE Long Lines® participates in the state-funded Lifeline and Link Up programs. These programs assist low-income individuals with discounts on telephone connection fees as well as discounts on their monthly phone bill. For questions about program eligibility or participation, contact 1.866.901.5664

Student of the Week

ONCOLOGY Heartland Oncology & Hematology..........Every Thursday OPHTHALMOLOGY Peter Whitted, M.D...........................................Sept. 21 ORTHOPEDICS Thomas Atteberry, M.D...............1st, 3rd, 5th Thurs A.M, 2nd & 4th Thurs. all day PODIATRY John Weremy, DPM......................................Sept. 9 & 23 Indergit Panesar, M.D............................................Sept. 2 UROLOGY Larry Siref, M.D..........................................Sept. 13 & 27 MAMMOGRAPHY..............................Monday thru Friday MOBILE NUC MED..............................................Sept. 20 . PT/OT......................................Mon.-Fri........642-2179

HARRISON MUTUAL INSURANCE ASSOCIATION

312 E. 7th-Logan, IA 51546 ■ Phone 644-2710 Pam Parsons, Paula Stueve, Trudy Pitt

Congratulations to the Farm Bureau-Dean Koster/Logan-Magnolia Athlete of the Week!

Serving the Area Since 1887

Catrina always takes her work seriously. She enjoys every subject. She listens, follows the rules and is polite.

Levi Ettleman 12th Grade First game against Missouri Valley, 6 of 6 kicking pat’s, 2 catches for 48 yards 1 touchdown

Congratulations to the Lo-Ma/Harrison Mutual Student of the Week! ATTENTION TEACHERS!

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH.............................642-2045 Judith Benson, Psych ARNP Nancy Cyr LISW, Rebecca Eilers, LISW

Nominate your Lo-Ma Athlete of the Week by noon each Monday by calling 712-644-2705 or e-mail to mary darling@heraldobserver.com.

Catrina Sears Third grade

To nominate your student of the week, call 712-6442705 or e-mail marydarling @heraldobserver.com


10

Logan Herald-Observer September 15, 2010

HARRISON COUNTY SUPERVISORS CLAIMS GENERAL BASIC FUND Betty J. Abrams, emp. mil. ..$18.50 Agriland FS, emp. mil..........253.59 Alegent Hth. Clinic, prescript. Medicine ...........................111.00 Alltel, ....................................96.20 AmSan, custodial supp. ......393.07 AT&T .....................................33.34 Kathy Baer, emp. mil. ..........198.35 Barone Sec. Sysm., bldg. Maintenance ....................540.00 Better Business Equip., office And data processing...........85.12 Connie Betts, env. Ed/awds 400.54 Bill’s Water Cond.................304.90 Tonia Birks, emp. mil. ..........125.55 Susan Bonham, emp. mil. ...386.50 Bonsall TV & App., ...............65.70 Patty Booher, emp. mil. .........73.20 BP .........................................25.00 Briggs Corp., health supp. And equip.........................667.65 C&H Hauling .......................361.00 CareFacts Info Sys., computer Updates ............................793.50 Carpenter Paper co., latrine Chemicals ........................605.69 Nicole Carritt, emp. mil..........18.88 Carsonite Composites, Campground .....................494.36 Casey’s Gen. Store, .............28.00 CDW Gov., office & data Processing ........................790.00 Cheryl Smith Cleaning Serv., Other personnel...............540.00 City of Logan.......................341.61 City of Mo. Valley.................132.00 Clark Pest & Termite Control 40.00 Dr. Enrique Cohen ..............200.00 Continental Research Corp., Cleaning & painting .........908.84 Susan Corrin, emp. mil. ......114.05 Counsel Office & Document, Office equip....................1,060.65 Crawford Co. Sheriff, legal & Court-related ser................21.67 Robert Cunard MD .............400.00 The Cure, food & prov...........59.57 Cyclone Awards, office sup.....7.25 Deb’s Deli & More, sales Items ..................................14.00 Denison Mustard Co., sales Items ................................178.50 Sandra Dickman, emp. mil. .180.65 Kathy Dirks, emp. mil. .........368.50 Dollar General.......................44.50 Jennie Dugan-Hinrichs .........75.00 Dultmeier Sales, parts ........495.47 John Espenmiller, mileage..152.00 Farm & Home Pub., office Supplies ............................629.50 Farm Plan, const. Equip. repair And maint. ...................1,882.18 Farner Bocken Co., food & Provisions .........................814.40 Julie Florian, emp. mil. ........134.00 Foodland ...............................44.05 Fourth Ave. Bldg. Corp., Service contracts .............120.00 Dixie Frisk ...........................473.00 Judson Frisk........................600.00 G&G Mfg. & Souvenir Co., Sales items ......................184.47 Gateway Hotel & Conference, Emp. mil. & subs ................99.68 Reanna Gochenour, emp. Mileage ..............................72.20 Paula Greene, emp. mil. .....136.60 Lois Hall, custodial..............550.00 Hamilton Color Lab Inc., Environmental ed/awds ...699.14 Harr. Co. Auditor, bldg. Maint. ................................450.00 Harr. Co. Dev., Harr. Co. Improvement A. ..........10,902.12 Harr. Co. REC ..................2,802.04 Harr. Co. Treas. .....................44.08 Hobby Lobby .........................46.32 Home Town Hdw. ................384.35 Horizon Equip., machinery & Equipment.........................374.00 Hy-Vee ..................................49.37 IKON Financial Services, Office & data processing .340.00 IKON office solutions central, Office & data processing .104.82 IA Workforce Dev., extra help Salaries..........................6,833.00 Jaybird Enterprises, rent Payments .........................250.00 Jensen’s Ace Hdw.................62.67 Patricia Kelley, emp. mil. .....119.00 Larry King, officers salaries ..29.46 Lehman printing ..................709.00 Barbara Lewis, custodial Services...........................150.00 Logan Auto Supply..............111.84 Logan Do It Best Hdw.........212.85 Logan Mini Mart ..................429.02 Logan Postmaster ...............105.00 Logan Super Foods .........1,782.70 Logan Woodbine Newsp., legal Notice............................1,301.29 Loganet ...............................291.90 Mail Services, office supp. ..553.53 Teresa McCandless, emp. Mileage ................................4.68 Ladon McColley, funeral Services...........................200.00 Dean McIntosh, mileage .....190.90 MECO-HENNE Contracting, Building maint. .................650.00 Diane Meeker, emp. mil. .....120.48 Gay melby, emp. mil............130.64 Tabitha Melby, emp. mil.........18.50 Menards, minor equip. & Hand tools.........................372.53 Microfilm Imaging Sys., office & Data processing...............155.00 MidAmerican Energy .......5,777.39 Miller Fuel & Oil LLC........2,134.40 Monica’s ...............................49.94 Monona Co. Pub. Hth., juvenile Programs .......................2,432.12 Moores Portable Toilets And pump ..........................90.00 Mumm Law Firm ..............3,315.77 Kim Nunez, mileage............241.50 O’Keefe Elevator Co., equip. Repair & maint..................276.37 Office Depot ........................194.16 Office Stop .......................1,254.58 On Trac, service contracts ....86.00 Oppold Lumber, wood & lumber Products...........................108.46 Pamida ..................................26.98 Kristina Pauley, emp. mil. ....168.00 Pat Perry, mileage...............264.50 Pitney Bowes, office supp. ..221.80 Floyd Pitt, emp. mil................70.00 Postive Promotions Inc., office Supplies ...........................150.90 Pryors K&L Repair ................40.68 Qwest ..................................157.56 Kristine Rife, emp. mil. ..........18.72 Jodi Roden, emp. mil. ...........28.50 Santa Maria Vineyard & Winery, Sales items ......................325.44 Seeley Service, emp. mileage & subs................................25.00 Shirley Sigler, emp. mil. ........15.50 Solutions, maint. Contracts .388.80 Timothy Sproul, postage .......41.62 Squire Boone Village, sales Items .................................246.77 Stericycle Inc., service Contracts .........................274.66 Cindy Stessman, deputies Salaries..........................2,350.00 Linda Stueve, emp. mil........127.95 Connie Surber, emp. mil. ......25.10 T of C Comm. Laundry .........10.40 Tek-Supply, elec. supplies & Parts ................................420.15

Telecom USA a Verizon Co.....9.71 Telrite Corp..........................390.12 JA Thomsen MD LLC..........900.00 Ultra No Touch ......................63.00 United Health Care, contracted Service hours.....................90.10 United Western Coop..........310.00 US Bank...........................5,540.70 Valley Times News, legal Notice...............................308.34 Verizon Wireless .................606.41 Dwayne Walker, mileage.......56.40 Kandice Wallis, emp. mil. ........5.64 Sherrill Webb, emp. mil. ......165.80 Wellmark Blue Cross & Blue Shield, cont. serv. Hrs. ......253.41 West Group, mag. Period.1,671.08 Wildlife Artist Supply, env. Ed/awards..........................50.70 Windstream......................2,120.16 Woodbine Farm Supply, chem.. And gasses-herbic...........223.75 GENERAL SUPPLEMENTAL FUND Renee Hack, emp. mil...........45.00 Brian Heffernan, emp. grp. Ins. ....................................166.66 Rene Hiller, emp. grp. Ins....166.66 IMWCA, workmen’s comp. Ins. ...............................13,254.00 Larry King, emp. grp. Ins.....166.66 Elizabeth Lenz, emp. grp. Ins. ....................................166.66 Matt Parrott & Sons, printing Of ballots ...........................91.82 Gay Melby, emp. grp. Ins.....166.66 Tabitha Melby, emp. grp. Ins. ....................................166.66 Richard Ohl, emp. grp. Ins. .166.66 Kristina Pauley, emp. grp. Ins. ...................................166.66 Floyd Pitt, emp. grp. Ins. .....166.66 SilverStone Group, emp. Grp. Ins. ........................6,750.00 Lorie Thompson, emp. grp. Ins. ....................................166.66 Wellmark Blue Cross & Blue Shield, emp. grp. Ins. .....1,436.70 Mandy Whiddon Attorney at law, Legal rep..........................204.00 RURAL SERVICES BASIC FUND Bonsall TV & Appliance ........45.95 Harr. Co. Landfill, dues & Memberships ..............13,094.00 JAIL G&M Refrig. & App. ............785.56 Loftus Htg. & AC .................249.58 MH-DD SERVICES FUND Abilities Unlimited, work activity Services........................1,662.47 Cass Inc., work activity Services........................3,220.64 Concerned Inc., work activity Services........................2,478.01 Country Care Ctr., RCF ...4,184.77 Country View Estates, RCF ...............................5,098.00 County Rate Info Sys. ......1,484.00 Crossroads of West. IA, Work activity serv.........14,485.25 Elec. Trans. Clearin, blank Record ..........................2,635.00 Faith Ridge Life Center, adult Day care .......................6,100.00 Harr. Comm. Mental Hth., Outpatient ......................8,333.33 Home Care Services...........236.25 Horizons Unlimited, work Activity services ...............444.12 Ida Services, work activity Services........................1,197.12 Kanesville Therapy, Outpatient ......................1,118.00 Nishna Prod., work activity Services........................1,409.46 Parnership for Progress, RCF ...............................1,611.69 The Pride Group, RCF.....1,499.78 REM Dev. Services, adult Day care .......................1,113.00 SW IA Plan. Co., .............2,023.34 Treas. State of IA, inpatient/ Hospital........................21,635.25 Vocational Dev. Ctr., work Activity services ...............392.94 Wesco Industries, work activity Services........................2,184.06 SECONDARY ROAD FUND A Glass Time, minor MV pts. And access. .....................215.00 Agriland FS ....................21,123.49 David Albers, safety items ....52.99 Aramark Uniform Services, Elec. light & power .............51.21 Atco Inter., lubricants ..........867.40 Barco, safety items ...............92.11 Baum Hydraulics, minor MV Parts & access..............3,419.04 Bill’s Water Cond...................35.00 Bonsall TV & App., .............139.80 Certified Lab., lubricants .....373.20 Cheryl Smith Cleaning Service, Bldg. Maint.......................275.00 City of Little Sioux ............6,718.00 City of Logan.......................129.58 City of Magnolia ...............1,220.00 City of Missouri Valley...........16.25 City of Modale................16,904.00 City of Persia....................5,676.00 City of Pisgah...................6,994.00 Electronic Eng., off. Supp........9.70 Farm Plan, minor MV pts. & Access. ............................245.00 Fuel & Shine .........................48.16 Harr. Co. REC .....................693.27 Har. Co. Treas., drainage Assmts. .......................14,827.18 Heartland Tires & Treads, 2,362.14 HGM Asso., eng. Serv. .......690.53 Hotsy Equip., minor MV parts & Access. ............................155.48 Georgia Parham Inst., meeting Registrations....................285.00 IA Bridge & Culvert, flood & Erosion const. St.........20,098.01 IA Dept. of Transp., traffic & St. sign material ...............279.84 IA Prison Ind., traffic & st. sign Material ............................495.00 Jensen’s Ace Hdw.................12.56 John’s Body Repair, outside Repair services.............1,888.20 Lawson Products, minor MV Parts & access..................471.72 Lindweld Inc., minor equip. & hand tools.....................289.23 Logan Auto Supply................87.19 Logan Do It Best Hdw...........88.75 Logan Woodbine Newsp., legal Notice.................................38.50 Mark Hydraulic Co., minor MV Parts & access.................361.21 Martin Marietta Materials, Concrete and clay prod. ...276.07 MidAmerican Energy .......1,375.00 Miller Fuel & Oil .............16,793.46 Mo. Valley Imp. ....................724.24 Murphy Tractor & Equip., Machinery & equip....196,454.00 New Sioux City Iron, shop Equip..................................52.18 Northern Safety Co., safety Items ................................380.99 Nuts & Bolts, minor equip. & hand tools......................143.27 Oppold Lumber .....................65.83 Palfleet Truck & Equip., outside Repair service...............1,393.20 Powerplan, minor MV parts & Access. .........................2,178.96 Qwest ....................................51.97 Reesburg Hdw., minor MV Parts & access..................255.39 Regional Water .....................42.00 Rexo Equip., minor MV pts. & Access. ............................765.33

Legals Sam’s Club............................90.30 Schildberg Const............13,674.14 Searle Petroleum Co., Lubricants .........................455.51 Sioux City Foundry Co., minor Equip. & hand tools.......1,234.88 Sundquist eng., flood & erosion Const. St. ......................1,383.75 Thermo King Christensen, minor MV parts & access. ......1,670.08 Ultra No Touch ......................12.00 Verizon Wireless .................205.70 Wick’s Sterling Trucks Inc., Minor MV pts. & acc. .......217.72 Windstream.........................685.36 Wise-Mack Inc., minor MV Parts & access..............4,180.67 Wright Express Fleet Serv., Fuel & oil.......................1,749.24 Ziegler Inc., outside repair Service...........................2,045.41 E911 SERVICE COMMISSION AT&T .....................................33.11 Bill’s Water Cond...................21.00 Bullberry Sys., eng. Serv. 2,700.00 Farm & Home Pub., misc....110.30 Harr. Co.. REC ......................53.08 ILLOWA Comm. Inc., radio & Related equipment .......1,218.25 MidAmerican Energy ............15.48 Qwest ..................................477.12 Sam’s Club............................36.94 SDN Tech., misc. .............6,577.00 Windsteram ......................2,723.57 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT City of Logan.........................72.43 Counsel Office & Document, Office & data proc...............23.93 Loftus Htg. & AC ..............1,060.95 MidAmerican Energy ..........716.32 Office Stop ..........................185.11 US Bank..............................458.12 Verizon Wireless ...................54.37 CONSERVATION LAND ACQUISITION TRUST FUND ABC Painting....................8,177.50 D&M Concrete ......................40.00 Dollar General.......................49.50 Dunbar/Jones PLC, consult. Service..........................4,025.00 Foodland ...............................54.00 Harr. Co. REC .....................384.69 Jack Hytrek Const., park Land dev. ......................7,798.00 Barbara Lewis, park land Dev....................................536.00 MECO-HENNE Contracting Inc., park land dev. ......74,508.00 Menards ..............................211.29 Pheasants Forever-Native Grass, park land dev........307.30 RDG Plan. & Design, park Land dev. ....................37,768.01 Schildberg Const.................143.93 Swift Locksmithing ................33.00 Treas. State of IA, tax & fee Disbursement....................159.26 US Bank..............................427.96 ASSESSOR Adventureland Inn, cont. ed 199.36 Dennis Alvis, cont. ed. ..........65.00 Counsel Office & Doc., office Supplies .............................11.10 Verizon Wireless ...................37.45 Windstream...........................24.42 AUGUST 2010 WITHHOLDING GENERAL FUND FICA...............................15,211.68 IPERS ............................11,717.26 GENERAL SUPPLEMENT FICA...............................15,457.24 IPERS ............................16,474.41 LINCOLN FINANCIAL.........373.20 BC/BS ............................52,999.67 FIRST HORIZON .............3,772.66 RURAL BASIC FICA......................................43.56 IPERS ...................................32.60 SECONDARY ROAD FUND FICA...............................17,034.98 IPERS ............................13,418.33 LINCOLN FINANCIAL.........209.70 BC/BS ............................35,623.56 FIRST HORIZON .............1,182.88 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FICA.................................3,106.54 IPERS ..............................2,473.73 LINCOLN FINANCIAL...........42.00 BC/BS ..............................5,500.31 FIRST HORIZON ................295.72 ASSESSOR FUND FICA.................................1,400.94 IPERS ..............................1,134.12 AFFINITY CARE .....................7.65 LINCOLN FINANCIAL...........18.00 BC/BS ..............................2,865.05 AUGUST SALARIES Margie Heffernan ..............$825.59 F. Irene Churchill .................333.72 Janet Wilderdyke.................435.69 Shirley Sigler.........................77.17 Nichole Briggs.....................136.00 Jodi Roden.......................1,298.46 Ruth Heim ...........................417.15 Juanita Johnsen....................74.16 Donas Charbonneau...........395.45 Connie Ball............................25.00 Susan Gilfillan .......................25.00 Peggy Shearer ......................25.00 Paticia Hazen ...................2,593.11 Pearl Pinkham..................1,259.52 Dedra Hatcher..................1,308.30 Tori Bryceson ......................380.00 Kandice Wallis..................1,190.22 Donald Rodasky....................35.00 Kevin Killpack......................306.00 Clifford Raper......................636.32 Eugene Jacobsen .................31.00 Joseph Ball ...........................25.00 Gary Hall...............................25.00 Roger Barry ..........................25.00 Gail Witt ................................25.00 Kenneth McIntosh .................25.00 Ricky Shearer .......................25.00 Danny Mathison ....................25.00 Lance Baldwin.......................25.00 Michael Perkins.....................25.00 Lowell Arps ...........................25.00 Mark Flint ..............................25.00 Michael Stolz.........................25.00 Kent Beebe ...........................25.00 Russell Hansen.....................25.00 Jeremy Yost......................1,496.25 Gary Wenninghoff ............1,697.60 Milo Ruffcorn.........................25.00 Ronald Greenwood .............284.72 Louis Valles ......................1,492.47 Ried Matthies ......................128.00 38-1

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE TO: REBECA SIPP, LEGAL MOTHER, MATHEW SIPP, LEGAL FATHER, BRETT MCHUGH, PUTATIVE FATHER, JOHN DOE, UNKNOWN BIOLOGICAL FATHER, AND TO ALL UNKNOWN FATHERS OF J.R., A MINOR CHILD BORN AUGUST 2, 2007, AT COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA. You are hereby notified that there is now on file in the Office of the Clerk of Court in Harrison County, a Petition in Case Number JVJV001292 which prays for the termination of your parent-child relationship to J.R., a minor child born August 2, 2007 at Council Bluffs, Iowa. For further details, please contact the Clerk’s Office. The Plaintiff’s attorney is Judson L. Frisk, 207 E. 7th St., Logan, Iowa

51546, phone 712-644-2833. You are further notified that there will be a hearing on the Petition to terminate parental rights before the Iowa District Court for Harrison County, at the Courthouse in Logan, Iowa at 11:00 a.m. on the 20th day of October, 2010. Vicki Krohn Clerk of the District Court for Harrison County Janice K. Allen, Designee 36-3

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S LEVY AND SALE STATE OF IOWA IOWA DISTRICT COURT CASE #EQCV028750 Special Execution PLAINTIFF U.S. BANK, N.A. VS. DEFENDANT(Judgment Debtor) REGINA L. DUNLOP; SPOUSE OF REGINA L. DUNLOP; SOUTHWEST IOWA HOUSING TRUST FUND, INC. As a result of the judgment rendered in the above referenced court case, an execution was issued by the court to the sheriff of this county. The execution ordered the sale of defendant(s) real estate to satisfy the judgment. The property to be sold is: THE WEST 100 FEET OF LOT ONE (1) AND THE WEST 100 FEET OF THE NORTH HALF (N1/2) OF LOT TWO (2), BLOCK FIFTY-SIX (56) IN THE TOWN OF WOODBINE, HARRISON COUNTY, IOWA. LOCAL ADDRESS: 310 NORMAL ST., WOODBINE, IOWA. The described property will be offered for sale at public auction for cash only as follows: Date of Sale, Oct. 1, 2010; Time of Sale, 10:30 a.m.; Place of Sale, Harrison County Sheriff’s Office. This sale not subject to redemption. Judgment Amount, $81,025.91; Costs, $338.70; Accruing Costs, Sheriff’s fees; Interest, 6.5% from 10/29/2009; Date, June 17, 2010; Sheriff, Patrick Sears, Harrison County, Iowa; Attorney, James V. Sarcone, Jr. 37-2

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S LEVY AND SALE STATE OF IOWA HARRISON COUNTY IOWA DISTRICT COURT CASE #EQCV028806 Special Execution PLAINTIFF BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP VS. DEFENDANT(Judgment Debtor) PETRA NIHSEN; GARY NIHSEN; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. As a result of the judgment rendered in the above referenced court case, an execution was issued by the court to the Sheriff of this county. The execution ordered the sale of defendant(s) real estate to satisfy the judgment. The property to be sold is: A tract of land lying in the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE1/4SE1/4) OF Section Eleven (11), Township Eighty-one (81), Range Forty-four (44) West of the 5th P.M., Harrison County, Iowa, containing 1.53 acres, more or less. More particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE1/4SE1/4) of Section Eleven (11) and assuming the East line of said Quarter Quarter to bear North 01 degrees 10’ 36” West; thence North 88 degrees 47’ 35” West along the south line of said Quarter Quarter, a distance of 421.31 feet; thence Course .............................Distance North 0 degrees, 38’ 03” .177.92 ft. North 88 degrees, 37’07” ......80.89 South 01 degrees, 29’ 11”.....15.42

North 88 degrees, 34’ 24” ...120.38 South 67 degrees 49’ 28”......31.09 South 76 degrees 42’ 33”....153.91 South 89 degrees 43’ 49”......40.34 Feet to the East line of said Quarter Quarter; thence South 01 degrees 10’ 36” East, a distance of 129.03 feet to the point of beginning. LOCAL ADDRESS: 1177 HYW. 183, PISGAH, IOWA The described property will be offered for sale at public auction for cash only as follows: Date of Sale, Oct. 1, 2010; Time of sale, 10:00 a.m.; Place of Sale, Harrison County Sheriff’s Office. This sale not subject to redemption. Judgment Amount, $82,990.46; Costs, $323.40; Accruing Costs, $7,548.75 plus Sheriff; Interest, 7.5% from 6/24/10 plus $9,191.83; Date, 6/14/10; Sheriff, Patrick Sears, Harrison County, Iowa; Attorney, Benjamin W. Hopkins. 37-2

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE The Harrison County Planning and Zoning Committee will hold a public hearing on Thursday, September 16, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. in the Engineer’s building located at 301 N. 6th Ave. in Logan, Iowa. The purpose of the hearing to review the Zoning Map Amendment 9-2-10 and minor subdivision submitted by Nancy Powell. The amendment will change approximately 6 acres from A-1 Agricultural to R-1 Rural Residential. The property is located in part of the NE1/4NE1/4SE1/4NE1/4 of Section 30, Township 78 North and Range 43 West. The Board of Supervisors will hold a public hearing on the same day at 10:00 a.m. 38-1

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE TO: ROBERT RUSCHTON, PUTATIVE FATHER, JOHN DOE, PUTATIVE FATHER, AND ALL UNKNOWN FATHERS OF C.W. BORN SEPTEMBER 3, 1998M AT SIOUX CITY, IOWA. You are hereby notified that there is now on file an active Child in Need of Assistance Petition in the Juvenile Court of Harrison County in Case Number JV001295, JVJV 001296 and JVJV 001297 which prays to determine a placement for C.W., a minor child born September 3, 1998 at Sioux City, Iowa. For further details, please contact the Clerk’s Office. The Plaintiff’s attorney is Judson L. Frisk, 207 E. 7th Street, Logan, IA 51546, phone 712-644-2833. You are further notified that there will be an Adjudication Hearing to determine such placement before the Iowa District Court for Harrison County, at the Courthouse in Logan, Iowa at 10:15 a.m. on the 19th day of October, 2010. Vicki Krohn Clerk of the District Court for Harrison County Susan J. Baker, Designee 38-2

PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF LOGAN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING STATUS OF FUNDED ACTIVITIES NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON THE STATUS OF FUNDED ACTIVITIES FOR THE CITY OF LOGAN LAGOON IMPROVE-MENTS PROJECT. Pursuant to the requirements of Section 508 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1987, as amended, the Logan City Council will hold a public hearing on October 4, 2010 at 6:45 p.m. at City Hall, 108 West 4th Street. The purpose of the hearing will be to discuss the status of funding for the lagoon improvement project where the soil surrounding the lagoon had washed away and began collecting rainwater. The project is being fund-

ed in part through a Community Development Block Grant provided by the Iowa Department of Economic Development. If you have questions concerning the project or if you require special accommodations to attend the hearing such as handicapped accessibility or translation services, you may contact Nedra Fliehe, City Clerk at 712-6442425. Persons interested in the status of funding or the progress of the project are welcome to attend this meeting. 38-1

PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF LOGAN RESOLUTION #10-22 PERTAINING TO OFFICIAL MUNICIPALITY REPORT FOR MUNICIPAL STREETS AND PARKING WHEREAS, the City Council of Logan, Iowa, has approved this report for it’s Official 2010 Fiscal Year Street Financial Report upon motion of Council Member Moss and seconded by Council Member Crum and upon roll call vote, the vote being: Aye: Council Members: Clark, Hartwig, Johnson, Moss and Crum. Nays: Council Members: None. WHEREUPON the mayor declared this motion carried and this resolution duly adopted and passed this 8th day of September, 2010. Randy Fetter, Mayor Attest: Nedra Fliehe, City Clerk/Administrator 38-1

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S LEVY AND SALE STATE OF IOWA HARRISON COUNTY IOWA DISTRICT COURT CASE #EQCV028776 Special Execution PLAINTIFF WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. VS. DEFENDANT (Judgment Debtor) SUZANNE M. HEJLIK NKA SUZANNE M. MCDAID; SPOUSE OF SUZANNE M. HEJLIK NKA SUZANNE M. MCDAID; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR ADVANCED FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. & PARTIES IN POSS. As a result of the judgment rendered in the above referenced court case, an execution was issued by the court to the Sheriff of this county. The execution ordered the sale of defendant(s) real estate to satisfy the judgment. The property to be sold is: Part of Lot 4, Block 67, Town Lot Company’s third Addition to Missouri Valley, Harrison County, Iowa, commencing 113 feet North of the Southeast corner of said Lot, and running West 150 feet, thence North 53 feet, thence East 150 feet, thence South 53 feet to the starting point, all in Harrison County, Iowa and the West 10 feet of the South 53 feet of the North 108 feet of Lot 4, in Block 57, Town Lot Company’s Third Addition to Missouri Valley, Harrison County, Iowa: otherwise described as: Commencing 113 feet North of the Southeast corner of Lot 4, Block 67, Town Lot Company’s Third Addition to Missouri Valley, Harrison County, Iowa; thence West 150 point to the point of beginning; thence West 10 feet; thence North 53 feet; thence East 10 feet; thence South 53 feet to the point of beginning. LOCAL ADDRESS: 511 N. 8TH ST., MISSOURI VALLEY, IOWA. The described property will be offered for sale at public auction for cash only as follows: Date of Sale, Oct. 8, 2010; Time of Sale, 10:00 a.m.; Place of Sale, Harrison County Sheriff’s Office. This sale not subject to redemption. Judgment Amount, $104,265.58; Costs, $396.70; Accruing Costs, $2,685.87 plus sheriff; Interest, 6.25% from 5-25-10 on $96,230.14; Date, 06/24/10; Sheriff, Patrick Sears, Harrison County, Iowa; Attorney, David M. Erickson. 38-2

United Western Coop Woodbine, IA

Friday September 17 11:30 - 3:00 Lunch will be served

All welcome to come down and check out our new grain bin expansion and new dump area. Lots of new improvements being made to better serve our customers for a faster, friendlier service. We look forward to seeing you this fall. Have a Safe Harvest.

We look forward to seeing you this fall. Have a Safe Harvest.


Classifieds FOR SALE

NOTICE

• Technology Coordinator Coordinates computer networks and maintains hardware and software. Position could be shared with neighboring district. Please send letter of application and resume to: Superintendent Tom Vint 501 Weare Street, Woodbine, IA 51579 Equal Opportunity Employer 712-647-2411

FOR SALE: Queen size Croscell comforter. Matching shams and bedskirt. Perfect condition. Also curtains for double window. $85 for all. Hummel’s in Woodbine, 712-6472606.

NOTICE: Mondamin Fruit Market is open daily 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. We accept senior and WIC coupon checks. 712-6462193.

Now Accepting Applications For: 1 bedroom apartment at Boyer View Apts., Logan, IA. Quiet complex, stove & refrigerator furnished. Rent based on income. 62 years or older or persons with disabilities of any age. Call 1-712-647-2113 or 1-800-762-7209. Boyer View is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Logan-Magnolia School has a para-educator opening for a junior high student. Applications available in the high school office , 1200 N. 2nd Ave., Logan. For more information call: 644-2250

Woodbine Community School Needs:

421 E. Erie, Missouri Valley, IA For information on all area listings go to: www.npdodge.com

NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING!

NOTICE: Have openings for child care in my home. No contracts to sign. Flexible hours. Any ages. Angie, 6443168.

FOR RENT FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apartment. Washer/dryer, refrigerator and stove furnished. References and security deposit r e q u i r e d . $400/month, plus utilities. 712-6472323, ask for Roger.

NEW LISTING

2525 Hwy. 127

2011 Perry Trail

702 Court Beautiful

4 Bdfm, 2 bth, 2274 sf, 12 acres

103 N. Noyes St.

3bed, 2 bth, 1,600 sf 1 acre, 4 car gar.

Thriving bar/lounge, contract poss.

Victorian, blt 1898, 4bed, 3 bth, 2+ car, 3430 sf, 120,180’ lot

Logan $129,000

Woodbine $219,000

Mondamin $80,000

Dunlap $197,000

a

2041 Tama Trail

1019 Skyline Dr.

3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 car Acreage, 14 acres m/l REDUCED

3 bed, 2.25 bath, 2 car, 3667sf Beautifl home

Woodbine $129,000

Logan $229,000

205 Iowa St.

102 Chestnut St.

2 bdrm, 1 bath, 888 sf some updates have been done.

Pisgah

$28,500

FOR RENT: Apartment, Logan, 2 bed ground floor, utilities included, heat and cooling, water,

3 bed, 2 bth, 4+ car 2,653 sf

Little Sioux $177,500

Chuck & Ravae Smallwood 402-639-6106 • www.chucksmallwood.com

Direct Support Associates in Logan $8.41 per hour with eligibility for two increases during the first year.

PUBLIC AUCTION SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 1:00 P.M. Corner of W. Huron St. and Windom

Missouri Valley, IA

(one block east of the swimming pool)

HOUSEHOLD: Large Oak Desk, recliners, swivel rocker & stool, stereo (8 track, cassette tape, turntable), metal cabinet, metal clothing racks, TV’s, wood chairs, king size head board, exercise bikes, exercise trampoline, stereo in cabinet, card tables,Singer (Dressmaker) sewing machine in cabinet, Kitchen table with 4 chairs, Rotisserie Faberware, anniversary clock, puzzles and games, dishes, books (hard and soft back), pictures, Lg. metal roaster, counter top roaster, food processor, electric skillets, crock pot, waffle iron, set of silverware in wood case, cooking utensils, fruit jars & rings, Teddy Bears, Christmas decorations, glider sofa for porch, patio table & 4 chairs, umbrella and stand, lawnmower, dehumidifer, diamond ring, Stihl Straight weedeater, Stihl MS310 chainsaw, Makita power planer, Red Spring compressor, 6 knives in a display case, cordless drills, 1/2” drive air impact with hose, Craftsman socket set, 16’ Black & Decker Scroll Saw, Black & Decker jig saw, Black & Decker 7 1/4” drill, GRI bench grinder, Craftsman 4 1/2” joint planner, Milwaukee Heavy Duty Grinder, Black & Decker 1/2” angle grinder, Craftsman Router Table, misc. tool boxes and tools, 2 swords, 56 quart cooler. Missouri Valley, Iowa Rex Gochenour 642-3370 Forrest 642-3556 Craig 256-4897 Terms: Cash or good check day of sale. Proper I.D. required to register.All items sell where is/as is. All items must be paid for before being removed. No guaranties implied by auctioneers or owners. Any announcements made day take precedence over printed matter. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS OR THEFTS. Go to www.gochenourauctioneering.com

Seeking Full Time and Part Time Overnight Staff Our employees work to help individuals with intellectual disabilities live independently at home. Experience is not necessary, just a desire to make a difference in the lives of those we support. (You must also be at least 18 and have a high school diploma or equivalent and valid driver’s license.) FT positions offer a generous benefit package including paid time off and a FREE medical plan. $100.00 hiring bonus (after 6 months of successful employment). Mosaic also offers Tuition Reimbursement, a 403B Retirement Plan, and Dental to FT and PT.

Contact: Dennis at 644-2234 Mosaic is an equald opportunity employer

CDS Global in Harlan is expanding due to additional business! If you’re looking for a new career or additional spending money, then stop by the

CDS GLOBAL CAREER FAIR Thursday, September 16 1 p.m. - 7 p.m. or Saturday, September 18 8 a.m. - Noon Typing tests, interviews and department tours will be available during the above hours.

Be sure to apply on-line at www.cds-global.com PRIOR to the Career Fair. Applications will be accepted through Noon on September 18, 2010.

• Seeking qualified candidates for the following open positions: Image Entry Operators to type data from images within imaging computer system. Minimum typing skill of 25 wpm. Work Hours = All Shifts, Saturday through Friday. (20-40 hours per week) Starting hourly wage = $9.75, plus appropriate shift differential Data Entry Operators to type data from documents via PC-based program. Minimum typing skill of 25 wpm. Work Hours = 7 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. Monday through Friday (20-40 hours per week) Starting hourly wage = $9.75,plus appropriate shift differential Mail Extraction Equipment Operators to operate mail extraction equipment to extract contents from envelopes. Work Hours = All shifts available, Saturday - Friday. Starting hourly wage = $9.25, plus appropriate shift differential.

• Post-offer, pre-employment exam will be required. • Criminal background check will be conducted on qualified candi dates. • Training is paid and scheduled to begin Monday, October 4, 2010. Training hours will vary by position and discussed at the time of an in-person interview • All positions are non-benefited (Temporary - no benefits package available). Minimum Qualifications: • Must be age 16 or older • Typing test required for qualified candidate for Image Entry Operator & Data Entry Opeator positions - 25 wpm minimum skill. • Verbal & written communication skills - ability to read, write and com prehend the English language and make appropriate decisions. • PC knowledge and keyboarding skills beneficial and required for some positions. • All positions require either sitting or standing for long periods of time (complete job descriptions are available upon request). • Commitment to minimum of 20 hours per week. 3107 Shelby Street, Harlan, IA 51537 (712) 755-2135 EOE/Affirmative Action Employer

electric, mowing, and snow removal, off street parking, no pets $550 - per month. Call 402-6396106.

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED: Harvest help for this fall in Modale area. 712-592-0386. 38-2p HELP WANTED: Seasonal help, mainly tractor work. Call 712-592-1905. HELP WANTED: Asst. Mgr. Now!! Fast track mgr. Outstanding compensation package!! Relocation to Omaha, Lincoln, Auburn, Crete or Beatrice will be required. Apply Now by calling with questions or sending resume to: Sami Flewelling, 4200 S. 14th, Lincoln, Nebraska 68502. Tel: 800-825-0012 ext 111. Fax: 402-4880926 Email: apps @ amigos-gmc. com E.O.E. MCAN HELP WANTED: Dispatcher wanted full time in Logan, IA. Experience in the trucking industry preFollow my campaign for Harrison County Supervisor at www.normacoret.org Paid for by Coret for Harrison County Supervisor

Drivers: CDL-A: Our Top 25 OwnerOp Teams Avg. $244,417 last year! Co. Teams: .46 upto .82cpm split! Sign-On Bonus PAID at Orientation! R&R Trucking: 866-204-8006

WANTED Person(s) to mow Calhoun Cemetery, starting spring 2011. Send bid to Calhoun Cemetery % Don McIntosh 2778 Loess Hills Trail Missouri Valley, IA 51555 Bids will be accepted until Oct. 1, 2010

Dietary Manager Advance Your Career Full-time position in SNF. Responsible for over all operation of Dietary Dept. Must prepare menus, cook, supervise, purchase food/supplies; conduct dietary assessments, write care plans, meet federal/state food/safety regulations and maintain dept. in a clean safe and sanitary manner. Prefer food service and sanitation experience. Westmont Care Center 314 S. Elm, Logan, IA 51546 Apply in person, mail original copy of resume or fax to Cecil 712-644-3509 or Call 712-644EOE 2922 opr email hrdept@lantisnet.com

ANTIQUE & HOUSEHOLD

AUCTION Sat., Sept 18, 2010 • 10 AM 807 Ely St. • Woodbine, Iowa Antique, Primatives, Glassware, Sauna, Household Goods, Collectables & Collections, Misc. household, Appliances, 1983 Lincoln Town Car, Furniture Many high quality items too numerous to mention

Dale & Edith McHugh Estate, Owners, Woodbine, IA For complete sale bill visit www.randypryorauctioneer.com

Randy Pryor -

Broker & Auctioneer

Swain Realty - Cell 712-644-7610 Office: 712-647-2741 428 Walker St. • Woodbine, Iowa

Logan Herald-Observer September 15, 2010 ferred but not necessary. Email resume to tammy@pntrucking.com. NO PHONE CALLS. HELP WANTED: We will pay top dollar for your oil and gas royalities and mineral rights. Foreman Enterprises (405) 341-2057 or (405) 921-7232 or e-mail us at ForemanEnterprisesi nc@gmail.com MCAN CARD OF THANKS CARD OF THANKS: With great gratitude, I want to thank Woodbine Student Council, Woodbine B e t t e r m e n t Fo u n d a t i o n , Woodbine Main Street Chamber, Kiwanis and all volunteers for painting my home. When I finally got outside to see it, I was pleasantly surprised. My house and garage looks beautiful! Your thoughtfulness will always be remembered. Helen Monahan. CARD OF THANKS: The family of Joy Mether would like to thank everyone for the cards, flowers, visits, food and memorials. We would like to thank her caregivers Gwen Straight, Sharon Smith and Carla Davis for their caring love. Our thanks to the Longview Home staff and Iowa Drivers: Certified, Top Pay Carrier. Great Regional Routes! Home weekly! CDL-A, 1 yr. T/T exp. Hazmat/ TWIC pref. Owner Ops Welcome! EEOE/AA 8 8 8 - 7 9 0 - 8 2 9 8 www.Drive4Marten..com

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Hospice for their help. Our thanks to our pastor, Harley Johnson, for his visits and the funeral service and Tammi Mether for playing and singing mom’s favorite songs. Our thanks also to Fouts Funeral Home. God Bless You all. Leota Mether, Don and Jane Mether, Sondra Straight, Jim and Lorita Rider and families.

CARD OF THANKS: The family of Norma Jean Heistand wishes to thank everyone who provided help and support during this time of loss. We greatly appreciate all of the food, flowers, memorial gifts and acts of kindness. A special thank you to Pastor Bill and the Disciples Women from the First Christian Church. The Family of Norma Heistand.

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RN Help make a difference in someone’s life. If you enjoy working with seniors, join our team of professional care givers. Positions available now. Apply in person, mail original copy of resume or fax to LeAndrea 712-6443509 or call 712-644-2922 or email brdept@lantisnet.com EOE Westmont Care Center 314 S. Elm, Logan, IA 51546 HELP WANTED NOTICE: The Harrison County Road Department is currently soliciting applications for one (1) Truck Driver. The successful applicant will be assigned to the County Work Center in Cincinnati Township southwest of Modale. He/She must possess a current Commercial Driver’s License valid in the state of Iowa and will be required to pass a pre-employment physical and drug screen. For a job description and employment application, contact the Iowa Workforce Development Center at 300 W. Broadway, Council Bluffs, IA 51503. Applications will be accepted until 10:00 a.m. on Friday, October 1, 2010. Previous applicants must re-apply to be considered. All applications must be submitted through Iowa Workforce Development. Harrison County is an Equal Opportunity employer.


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Logan Herald-Observer September 15, 2010

Sports

Lo-Ma Panthers dance their way to 60-12

Homecoming win over Audubon Wheelers Nancy Voggesser For the Herald-Observer The Logan-Magnolia Panthers football team continued its season scoring extravaganza with a 60-12 win over the Audubon Wheelers Sept. 10. Although it looked early on as if the Wheelers would give the Panthers their first tough test of the season, the Panthers rallied in the second quarter to push the game into yet another running clock situation at the second half. Audubon started the game on offense and, despite a first-play first down, they met the big playmaker, Evan Mikels, who connected on three tackles for loss to force the Wheelers into punting on their first drive. The Panthers started their first offensive series with 9:04 left in the quarter. The Panthers relied heavily on their running game through three first downs and then opened up the game through the air with 4:54 left in the first quarter when Nate Fender connected with the sure hands of Levi Ettleman on a 15-yard

passing touchdown. Ettleman’s kick was no good. The Wheelers’ second series didn’t fare much better than their first, ending after just two first downs. They did, however, test the Panthers defensive secondary, but to little success. Lo-Ma regained possession of the football with 2:22 left in the first quarter. Working on the swift lefts of Marrick Loftus, the Panthers coasted 66 yards on three plays to end up with a Loftus touchdown with 44 seconds left. This time Ettleman’s kick was good to end the first quarter at 13-0. The Wheelers opened up through the air on their next series, which ended in their first score of the night. Quarterback Jay Blomme handed the ball off to Zach Bohlmann who ran four yards into the end zone with 9:57 left in the first half. The kick was handily blocked by Evan Mikels to stall their scoring at 6. The Panther offense quickly turned around and powered its way toward the end zone. Paul Hutson, Nolan Oviatt, Loftus and Dominic Snyder took on

rushing duties in the drive. With 8:20 left in the half, Snyder scampered four yards up the middle for a touchdown followed by a good Ettleman kick. The Lo-Ma defense quickly shut down the next Wheeler drive. Following a first down pass from Fender to Quin Mann, Mikels, Oviatt and Loftus took on the rushing duty to set up a 14-yard passing touchdown with 3:56 left in the half from Fender to Ettleman. Ettleman’s kick went wide right. On the next Wheeler drive, Blomme attempted a pass that was read expertly by Mann who sprinted 62yards into the end zone with 3:41 left in the half. Ettleman’s kick was good to push the score to 33-6. Bohlmann’s next return was moving well until Loftus connected on a resounding tackle. On the next play, the Wheelers fumbled the ball. Dillon Miller recovered the ball on the 35-yard line to set up another first half score. With 2:30 left in the half, Fender connected with his favorite target, Ettleman, on a 25-yard pass. Ettleman’s kick was good.

Dillon Miller recovers the Audubon fumble and gives the Panthers good field position to set up another score. Photo: Angela Winther The Wheeler’s were able to put together their final scoring drive of the game when Jarred Packard ran up the middle for a four-yard touchdown with 19 seconds left. The Wheelers attempted a 2-point conversion that failed, due to a strong Panther stand. The Panthers’ weren’t going to let that end the scoring for the half as they put together a hurry-up offense to orchestrate three quick plays ending with

Zach Hatcher breaking free on a 40-yard touchdown run at the whistle. Ettleman’s kick was again good which assured a second half running clock with a score of 47-12. The Panther varsity played much of the third quarter. With 8:34 left in the third quarter, Fender found an opening and ran eight yards for a touchdown. Ettleman’s kick was again good. As the play moved

quickly into the fourth quarter, Lo-Ma junior varsity and freshmen players eagerly ended the game. With 6:32 left in the game, Ettleman attempted a 33yard field goal, which ended up just short of the uprights. Hutson put the frosting on the homecoming cake with 2:06 left in the game on a 23-yard touchdown run. Ettleman’s kick failed, and the final score was 6012.

Panthers ground the Lo-Ma Volleyball team Clarinda Eagles 63-0 improves record to 2-2

Karen Hutson and Shelby Marquardt at the net in the game with Charter Oak-Ute. Photo: Gene Esser

Judy Adair Zach Hatcher makes a nice run and gets a first down in the game with Clarinda, Sept. 3. Photo: Angela Winther

Nancy Voggesser For the Herald-Observer The Logan-Magnolia Panthers football team opened up its first home game of the season with a resounding win over the Eagles of Clarinda. The Panthers were able to succeed on the ground and through the air to rack up 63 unanswered points. Clarinda’s offense could not gain ground in their first offensive series. Led by tackles for loss by Evan Mikels and Levi Ettleman, the Eagles were forced to punt on a three and out. The Panthers capitalized on their first series with a short 33-yard field. Nolan Oviatt broke loose for a first down, followed by Marrick Loftus who scampered 27-yards into the end zone with 9:28 left in the first quarter. Ettleman’s kick failed to make it through the uprights. Both teams traded possessions. The Eagles couldn’t seem to move the ball at all, while the Panthers moved at will, but lost the ball due to a fumble. With 1:29 left in the first quarter, Oviatt finished a 57-yard drive by scrambling two

yards into the end zone. Ettleman’s kick set the first quarter score 13-0 Lo-Ma. The Panthers seemed to have used the first quarter for a warm-up, racking up four scoring drives and a safety. With 10:41 left in the first half, Loftus scored on a 13-yard run to the outside. Ettleman’s kick was good. With 8:59 left in the first half, Levi Ettleman intercepted an Eagle pass to set up the first passing touchdown of the night when Nate Fender connected with Ettleman on a 26-yard pass play. Ettleman’s kick was again good. With 7:58 left in the half, the Eagles were tackled in the end zone which resulted in a 2-point safety awarded to the Panthers who followed up on a one and a half minute drive during which Mikels barreled through on a five-yard run up the middle. Ettleman’s kick was good. The Panthers’ next possession went well until Fender fumbled the ball on the 12-yard line to give the ball back to Clarinda who then fumbled the ball. Ben Kill recovered the ball on that fumble to set up Lo-Ma’s

final score of the first half with 57 seconds left. Fender threw a 16-yard bullet to Quin Mann. Ettleman’s kick sailed through the uprights to send the Panthers to the locker room up 43-0. The clock ran continuously the second half, which featured Lo-Ma’s junior varsity. The Panthers showed that they have capable ball carriers in Oviatt, Mikels, Loftus, Zach Hatcher as well as backups in Paul Hutson, Caden McDonald, Evan Sears and Nick Knudsen. Hutson made the first score of the second half with 11:14 left in the game on an 84-yard sprint into the end zone. Ettleman’s kick was good. With 8:53 left in the game, Sears intercepted a Clarinda pass and returned it for 21-yards. He followed that up with a 2-yard touchdown. Ettleman’s kick was good. Finishing out the night’s scoring was Nick Knudson who broke free for a 62-yard touchdown with just 2:19 left in the game. Ettleman’s kick was good, which ended the scoring for night at 63-0 Panthers.

For the Herald-Observer The Logan-Magnolia volleyball team traveled to Woodbine Sept. 2, to match skills against a very improved Tiger volleyball team. In game one, the talent on each side of the net complimented the opposing team. With serving going back and forth, neither team had a distinct advantage. The Lady Panthers started two, small serving runs to gain momentum and held on and squeaked out a victory 25-19. In the second game, the Panthers jumped out to a short-lived lead as the Tigers came back to tie the game. As the teams traded points, Audrina Dickman served a string of points to give Lo-Ma the lead. The Panther defense did a great job moving the ball to the back corners and finally extending the lead in game two and winning 25 - 17. In the third game both teams again battled back and forth as each side successfully returned volleys. Every time Kelsey Frisk, Andrea Willard or Karen Hutson attacked and killed the ball, Woodbine’s Justina Royer would return the favor keeping the Tiger’s in the game. A final succession of good serves by the Panthers lifted LoMa over Woodbine with a final score of 25-18, win-

ning the match. Offensively, Lo-Ma had a good night serving the ball successfully. In the defensive spot light were Kylee Loftus who had numerous blocks and Dickman with several saving digs. On Sept. 9, the Panthers hosted the Bobcats of Charter Oak-Ute. The Lady Panthers jumped out to an early lead in game one and never looked back. With solid serving and good defense, the Panthers handily Abby Foutch hits the ball back over won game one by the net. Photo: Gene Esser a score of 25-9. Game two was a little more of a challenge as attacks, respectively. On Charter Oak-Ute battled the defensive end Hutson the Panthers. Again, with had a solid night with four solid serving by Frisk and blocks and seven digs. Andrea Willard the Frisk also had nine digs on Panthers went on a run the night and solid defenand won by a score of 25- sive support from Loftus, 14. Game three was a mir- Marquardt and Foutch ror of game two with Abby who provided the bang the Foutch and Dickman Panthers needed to keep showing their serving the Lady Cats in check. “Our team is working skills as the Panthers went on a 14-2 run and sealed very hard and we are up the match by winning showing marked improvement on both defense and 25-14. Perfect serving percent- offense,” said head coach ages for the night were Jacob Hedger. “We still Frisk, Willard, Foutch and have a little bit of technical Dickman. Karen Hutson improvement to work on, and Shelby Marquardt pro- but overall I’m very vided a one-two punch on pleased with how we’ve offense with 12 and 9 progressed.”

Logan Herald-Observer 9-15-10  

The Sept. 15, 2010, edition of the Logan Herald-Observer.

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