Issuu on Google+

Nolan Fast

Graphic Design Portfolio Fall 2013


Introduction

This portfolio and the contents within were created while studying for my Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Graphic Design at the Universtiy of Nebraska-Lincoln. –Nolan Fast


Table of Contents

Project 01

01-06

Exercise 01

07-10

Project 02

11-16

Exercise 02

17-20

Project 03

21-26

Exercise 03

27-30

Project 04

31-38

Exercise 04

39-42


01 Project 01

Form as a typology, What is Graphic Design?


Project 01 Project Brief

In Project 01 we were instructed to go out into the city and investigate the presence of graphic design. We were to see the various styles and forms used to communicate with the audience; through this I believe that is was hoped that we would find our own particular area of interest within graphic design and what media we as graphic designers would like to focus on at the end of our time at UNL. After exploring a city block on “O” Street, and taking many pictures of retail signs and some of branding, mainly on vehicles, I decided that none of those media’s really interested me as much as other forms of graphic design. I wouldn’t mind if it became my job to design retail signs for the rest of my life, but to me it seems so limited. There is only so much you can do on a business sign, in comparison to what you could do on a product aimed at a younger, more active, and more accepting crowd, such as Monster Energy drinks. I drink them on a very regular occasion, so I’m very familiar with the many artistic and innovative design choices they use on their products. I would much rather be on the team designing the new can for the latest flavor of Monster than the sign for the new drugstore or gas station down the street. I wanted to show the cans as a whole, as well as show closely the different typefaces used on each can. Monster is very good at using the correct color scheme and type to perfectly represent the specific flavors, and I wanted to showcase that. After some research, I also found that the particular font used for the word “Monster” is a custom, one-off graphic that their company created just for the drink line. You can get a font off the internet that mimics Monster’s font, but it is speculation as to the appearance of the other letters of the alphabet outside of “Monster”. Graphic design is a form of communication, a way of delivering the message of one to many. It is a tool for convincing, persuading, and selling something to an audience. I personally believe Monster is one of the best at this. They direct their message to active youth, and they are spot on with their design and display choices. My presentation is successful because it shows the many forms and display choices used by Monster Energy. It allows you as the viewer to get a complete and whole understanding of Monster’s image, and what they represent. It shows the many forms graphic design takes while being used by this company. There are many examples of graphic design, each aimed perfectly at an audience that is young and active, or at the very least envies the actively athletic individuals sponsored by Monster.

Form as a typology What is Graphic Design?


Project 01

Image Matricies

Matrix One

Objective

Core Image

Index

Connotative

Subjective

Macro

Sign

What is

Graphic Design? Micro

Metaphor

Denotative

Matrix Two Core Image

Index

Connotative

Monster Energy Objective

Subjective

Macro

Sign

What is

Graphic Design? Micro

Metaphor

Denotative

Form as a typology What is Graphic Design?


Project 01

Image Matrix

Matrix Three Core Image

Index

Connotative

Monster Energy Objective

Subjective

Macro

Sign

What is

Graphic Design? Micro

Metaphor

Denotative

Form as a typology What is Graphic Design?


Project 01

Brand Typography

Form as a typology What is Graphic Design?


Project 01

Brand Imagery

Form as a typology What is Graphic Design?


01 Exercise 01

Billboard as a messaging center, What is Graphic Design?


Exercise 01

Black & White Proof

Beautifully Effective Co mm

unication

Yeah, that’s graphic design

Billboard as messaging center What is Graphic Design?


Exercise 01 Color Proof

The objective of exercise 01 was to answer the question, “What is Graphic Design?”.

Beautifully Effective Co mm

unication

Yeah, that’s graphic design

Billboard as messaging center

What is Graphic Design?


02 Project 02

Form as language, Designing visual communications


Project 02 Project Brief

The idea behind Project 02 was to use form as language. The goal was to be able to communicate a word or a “feeling” using only form and non-specific imagery. I believe the learning outcome from this project would be that as a graphic designer we would have the skills and the know how to deliver a full and complete message and feeling on a limited and momentary media. We began with the most basic of marks to communicate a set of given words. We used pen and ink studies to get a feeling for what the words may look like as basic forms. Next, we were given a specific word to investigate using print and mark making with pen and ink. My word was “scintillate”. The images we collected were to be abstracted as much as possible while still delivering the message or feeling of our word. This whole process gave me a much greater understanding of how to better convey a feeling or message through imagery effectively. Lastly, we took the images we’ve made and/or collected and made a 17” by 11” poster for our word. The images were to be unaltered by “effects”, they were to simply be organized effectively on the paper to make an attractive composition that precisely delivers the feeling and message of our word. Admittedly, this was a bit of a difficult task because there are endless possibilities and arrangements that you could make, and picking the best and most effective one isn’t the easiest task. Also, art and graphic design rely heavily upon interpretation, so what may look good to you or I may not appear as beautifully to another. I believe in the end I came up with a beautiful composition that conveyed “scintillate” accurately and effectively, not to say there isn’t a million other alternatives to what I created, but I’m confident in what I created, and I learned a great deal from the process leading up to my final product.

Form as language Designing visual communications


Project 02

Shape/Line Studies

Form as language Designing visual communications


Project 02

Shape/Line Studies

(Scintillate)

Form as language Designing visual communications


Project 02

(Edited) Print Images

(Scintillate)

Form as language Designing visual communications


Project 02

Final Poster Design

Form as language Designing visual communications


02 Exercise 02

Quiz, Visable Signs and Visual Research


Exercise 02

Quiz (Front)

Readings and lecture quiz What is Graphic Design?


Exercise 02 Quiz (Back)

Readings and lecture quiz What is Graphic Design?


03 Project 03

Form as Identity, Logo Transformation


Project 03 Project Brief

Project 03 was all about creating identity with form. In other words it was about creating an abstract form that represented a company or organization, as well as form specific to a target audience such as youth or adults. First we collected a library of logos and emblems from print and web, then picked one and practiced using Adobe Illustrator’s pen tool to trace the logo and recreate it. After we had a grasp on how the pen tool works and how it could be used to essentially create anything, we were assigned a logo and traced it. Once we had a traced image we went through an exercise of transforming the logo into a whole new form while keeping the same idea or identity as the original. The logo went through 5 phases of change before becoming a new logo. We sketched out a few different iterations getting different ideas of how the logo could transform into something new and interesting. After deciding which new logo was the best option we used illustrator to animate the process through a series of frames so that the process could be displayed and learned from. It was very interesting to see what other people who were assigned the same logo as myself, came up with for their new logo. Some people’s new design kept essentially the same feeling and audience as the original, whereas mine kept the same general message, but was clearly more applicable to a younger audience unlike the original which fit an older more mature clientele. Lastly, we experimented with the addition of color to our designs. We were given a loose set of guidelines and set free to add color how we saw fit. The final products were very interesting looking, and color was just a whole new dimension to be explored to further the effectiveness of our new and improved logos.

Form as Identity Logo Transformation


Project 03

Prelim. Sketches

Form as Identity Logo Transformation


Project 03

Prelim. Sketches

Form as Identity Logo Transformation


Project 03

Evolution of Logo

Disturbance

Disintegration

Recollection

Diffusion

Reorganization

Evolution of new Logo

Form as Identity Logo Transformation


Project 03 Logo Analysis

Form as Identity Logo Transformation


03 Exercise 03

Logo Colorization


Nolan Fast

Triad

Exercise 03

Logo Colorization

Contrasting pairs of conditions (gloomy vs. happy)

Complimentary

Nolan Fast

Nolan Fast

Nolan Fast


Monochromatic

Nolan Fast

Exercise 03

Logo Colorization

Analogous

Nolan Fast

Wildcard

Nolan Fast

Form as Identity Logo Transformation


04 Project 04

Form as System, Working With a Typographic Grid


Project 04 Project Brief

Project 04 was about using type as image, and arranging it effectively in a grid layout. To begin, we sketched out grid layout designs on paper, gathering ideas and information on what would make a good and effective layout and what wouldn’t. We used many small lines to represent smaller more condensed copy, and fewer thicker lines to represent bigger type such as titles and other more pertinent copy. In doing this we created a composition as well as guide the reader through the layout, showing where to begin reading (bigger, bolder type) and what to read last (smaller, denser copy). Next, we put together a large library of type and copy that we thought were attractive or interesting. We then cutout the type and arranged it on 8” by 8” grids, creating a composition. We were to abstract the type as much as possible, so as to focus solely on the composition of the type instead of what the type itself says. The type will almost always still deliver a portion of its message, regardless of how much you abstract the type. This is because branding is so heavily successful that even a small portion of a certain type or copy could be immediately recognized as a certain brand. However, which the right amount of cutting, pasting, and abstracting we were able to make effective and attractive compositions on the 8” by 8” grid layout. We did multiple layouts with different grid systems in order to make sure we had the most effective and attractive layouts possible. The final 5 compositions were done using the Adobe applications, which added a whole extra element to the process. We were able to adjust the size of the type as well as opacity to add another level of depth and visual interest that couldn’t be achieved in the planning stage using only the basic tools. This whole project gave me a great deal of information and practice using the grid system. It showed me how to correctly and effectively make a layout that my audience will actually want to read and be enticed by.

Form as system Working with a typographic grid


Project 04 Grid Sketches

Form as system Working with a typographic grid


Project 04

Grid Layouts

Form as system Working with a typographic grid


Project 04 Grid Layouts

Form as system Working with a typographic grid


Project 04

Grid Layouts

Form as system Working with a typographic grid


Project 04

Final Grid Layouts

Form as system Working with a typographic grid


04 Exercise 04

Graphic Design History, Eward Tufte


Tufte is an expert in the presentation of informational graphics such as charts and diagrams, and is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. Tufte’s writing is important in such fields as information design and visual literacy, which deal with the visual communication of information. He coined the term “chartjunk” to refer to useless, non-informative, or information-obscuring elements of quantitative information displays. Other key concepts of Tufte are the lie factor, the data-ink ratio, and the data density of a graphic.

Exercise 04 Close-Up

Edward Tufte wrote three books, Visual Explanations, The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, and Beautiful Evidence. All of which were very successful books. He financed his first book, Visual Explanations, himself by taking out a second mortgage on his home. The book quickly became a commercial success and secured his transition from political scientist to information expert. On March 5, 2010, President Barack Obama appointed Tufte to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act’s Recovery Independent Advisory Panel “to provide transparency in the use of Recovery-related funds.” Which only goes to show how well he knew his craft. Tufte also invented sparklines – a condensed way to present trends and variation, associated with a measurement such as average temperature or stock market activity, often embedded directly in the text; for example see image 01. These are often used as elements of a small multiple with several lines used together. Tufte explains the sparkline as a kind of “word” that conveys rich information without breaking the flow of a sentence or paragraph made of other “words” both visual and conventional.

Image 02 “Collection of Works”

Image 01 “Sparklines”

Image 03 “Dear Leader”


Exercise 04 Final Product

Edward Tufte The Pioneer in the Field of Data Visualization 1982-Present By Nolan Fast

Tufte is an expert in the presentation of informational graphics such as charts and diagrams, and is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. Tufte’s writing is important in such fields as information design and visual literacy, which deal with the visual communication of information. He coined the term “chartjunk” to refer to useless, non-informative, or information-obscuring elements of quantitative information displays. Other key concepts of Tufte are the lie factor, the data-ink ratio, and the data density of a graphic. Edward Tufte wrote three books, Visual Explanations, The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, and Beautiful Evidence. All of which were very successful books. He financed his first book, Visual Explanations, himself by taking out a second mortgage on his home. The book quickly became a commercial success and secured his transition from political scientist to information expert. On March 5, 2010, President Barack Obama appointed Tufte to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act’s Recovery Independent Advisory Panel “to provide transparency in the use of Recovery-related funds.” Which only goes to show how well he knew his craft. Tufte also invented sparklines – a condensed way to present trends and variation, associated with a measurement such as average temperature or stock market activity, often embedded directly in the text; for example see image 01. These are often used as elements of a small multiple with several lines used together. Tufte explains the sparkline as a kind of “word” that conveys rich information without breaking the flow of a sentence or paragraph made of other “words” both visual and conventional.

Image 02 “Collection of Works”

Image 01 “Sparklines”

Image 03 “Dear Leader”

Graphic Design History Edward Tufte


Nolan Ray Fast University of Nebraska-Lincoln BFA Graphic Design Fall 2013 Typeface: Univers Print Location: Office Max 2301 O St. Lincoln, NE 68510


“The public is more familiar with bad design than good design. It is, in effect, conditioned to prefer bad design, because that is what it lives with. The new becomes threatening, the old reassuring.” — Paul Rand



Nolan Fast: Graphic Design Portfolio