Page 1

Ho’oulu I Ka Lama HO`OULU I K A LAM A

VOLUME I ISSUE 3

April 2011

Inside This Issue The Hawaiian 1 Cultural Center From a Native Hawaiian Youth Observation

Cont.—HCC Observation Community Gathering

2 3

Poke Challenge 2011

4

Don Carey Book Signing

5

LAOKO Family Activity Creating `Ohana Umeke

6

Save the Date

7

Book Review Acknowledgement

8

Pupukahi i holomua. Unite to move forward. By working together we make progress.

THE HAWAIIAN CULTURAL CENTER FROM A NATIVE HAWAIIAN YOUTH OBSERVATION Recently, High School senior Garin Richards, a Native Hawaiian attending Hunter High School, was assigned to do an observation essay for his English 1010 Intro to Writing Class. Richards chose to observe an activity held at the Hawaiian Cultural Center. The following is the essay which Richard’s submitted: The afternoon of the 30th, I remember I was tired. My school day was anything but exciting, and I was more than happy to be home on my bed rather than on the cold, hard plastic desks of my high school. I was contemplating taking my dogs on a walk when my Mother reminded me that we had to go down to the center. I promised my dogs I’d be back before it got too late, and my family and I loaded up and left. I have been to the Hawaiian Cultural Center a number of times this past year, ever since my involvement with the summer camp that was ran last July, and tonight did not seem to be different than any other night. It was community Ku`i at the center, or a community poi pounding if you were born in the mainland. I could tell that it had drawn quite a crowd by the overflowing of cars from the parking lot. Probably partly due to the Facebook campaign that the center puts on before events. I could vividly remember the event invitation emails I had received prior to today and how it had filled my inbox. Entering the building, the warm friendly atmosphere contrasted against the nippy post winter weather outside. The sounds of my little cousins and other children attacked my ears first, but rather calmed me instead of another feeling that is commonly evoked by the sound of toddler cries. I saw the familiar faces of my aunt, uncle, and many other family friends. At one side of the open room floor, you could see a row of pots and pans that contained the potluck dinner that was scheduled for tonight as well. Everyone else seemed to be in deep conversation and groups of people talking never went under three. Was it the incessant talking the reason for everyone’s spike in hunger? Because less than five minutes later, we were already being called to make our plates.


PAGE 2

HO`OULU I KA LAMA

VOLUME I ISSUE 3

LEI ALOHA O KA `OHANA-FAMILY THE NEVER ENDING CIRCLE OF LOVE ...Native Hawaiian Youth Observation Continued from page 1:

The amount of food in one place was staggering. There seemed to be at least a dozen pots and warmers that left very little room on the surface of the table. Different smells from all corners of Polynesia filled the room and had drawn the crowd over. The older adults and then the children were first ones to eat, which I had learned to accommodate for since I was only a child. By the time I was only done populating my plate with what seems like a weeks’ worth of food for a small family, I could hear my aunts already telling me that I’ll be back for seconds. While it may have sounded patronizing at the moment, they were undoubtedly correct. I sat and watched our friends and family bounce back and forth between different stories. The amount of people trying to fit in on one are made it so that one moment the topic may be about next week’s meet up, and all of a sudden now the focus is on their own jobs. In Polynesian company it’s quite common to see warm emotions when food is around; it’s almost as if it is not a party without a pot of rice and a main dish to go along with it. After only an hour and a half, I was caught up on every scoop of gossip in the community, and I had polished my plate of rice and vegetables. I let out a content sigh from the fullness and good company I was in, the center had accomplished at bringing that “Hawaiian” spirit to Utah. But, before I could doze off and enjoy a nap I had almost forgotten the main reason as to why we are here. There was a number of people gathering around the poi pounders that I had noticed earlier, so as to not feel like a stranger, I hurried over before anyone realized I was still sitting at the table with my pen and paper. My aunt led a chant in Hawaiian that I had heard numerous times before, but due to my faulty ability at being a good native Hawaiian and knowing my own tongue, the meaning has only come to me in lost explanations and repetition. After another short speech in that same vernacular, but yet so foreign language to me, they were ready to begin the pounding. At an effort of trying my best to not look awkward, I declined the offer to join them and instead and headed over to the other side of the room; it had dawned to me that all of a sudden those books looked like the most interesting thing in the world. After some light skimming in the history of the center, I had learned that it was opened in 2006. The Hawaiian Cultural Center is funded by a grant from the ANA (Administration for Native Americans). The Ka Lama Mohala Foundation describes themselves as “A nonprofit organization focused on the perpetuation of Native Hawaiian cultural arts.” They were founded by five individuals, and I had discovered that it was my aunt, whom was only ten feet away currently taking pictures of tonight’s festivities, that came up with the name for the foundation. Ka Lama Mohala, which translated into something understandable I could comprehend, meant “Blossoming or blooming light.” I glanced around the open floor and admired the Polynesian décor, paintings, and the attendees of tonight’s event to realizes something. The center may have only been open for five years, but it had already done the work of twenty The community had already taken advantage of the building as a central place for meeting and learning. As seen from their past calendars and agendas, it’s evident that they’re living up to their mission statement quite truthfully. I wandered away from the books in hopes that my family hadn’t noticed that I was gone for too long. While I was away they had already pounded their own poi and were making the final touches to pack them up and be ready to take them home for dinner later this week. I was offered that perhaps next time I could try it out. While I did not want to disappoint, I had not pounded since grade school, and the last thing I’d want to do is furthermore show off my inability to be a model Hawaiian. It was nearing almost nine o’clock and my parents decided to call it a night. I bid our family and friends farewell, and hoped that my dogs had not rememGarin Richards bered my promise.


VOLUME I ISSUE 3

HO`OULU I KA LAMA

VOLUME I ISSUE 3

COMMUNITY GATHERING Affirmative Action Community Meeting By: Tina Cabiles-Carden

These past few months have seen our community be mobilized in an effort to combat pieces of legislation we believe would be detrimental to our people and our community. From a small gathering at the beginning, we were humbled to see it grow four times in size by the last one. Not only did it grow in the number of attendees, but also in the different types of people who attended. It was a clear indication of our communities wanting to reach out to one another and work together. It was also a sign for us, that we need strong leadership if we are to provide opportunities for the next generation. We are happy to report that SJR2, Equal Treatment by Government, the bill we were focused on, did not go to committee, did not go further than receiving a number and title. We know, however, that it will more than likely surface in some shape or form next year. We are better prepared as a community, and it’s our goal that when this issue does arise again, we will be even more prepared to inform, educate and mobilize our community. We hope to build upon the connections made, and grow them into bridges that connect our communities.

(L.) Anapesi Ka`ili and (R.) Lavinia Taumoepeau discuss legislation issues that affect the community to those in attendance at an Affirmative Action Community Meeting.

Utah Health Department Collaborate Pacific Islander Health Issues On February 9, the Hawaiian Cultural Center hosted a meeting with the Utah Department of Health and a Pacific Islander focus group which consisted of leaders representing the Hawaiian, Samoan, Tongan and Maori—Pacific Islander communities. The focus group was to review questions for a phone survey that would specifically be used in contacting Pacific Islanders here in Utah. Being sensitive that questions are culturally competent and ensuring questions were framed best as possible for the Pacific Islander population was part of the evenings agenda. The health barriers Pacific Islanders have in health care: 1) Pacific Islander babies are twice as likely that white babies to die before they turn 1 years old; 2) Pacific Islander’s have the highest rate of diabetes in Utah; and 3) Pacific Islanders are not receiving more preventive health care. According to statistics these 3 health issues are highly prevalent among Pacific Islander’s and when introduced to the group it brought some shocking reaction along with discussion revealing that the lifestyles and diet habits of our elders were quite compatible proving that they lived healthier lives then we are today. When the surveys are completed and analyzed, the expectation of Utah Health Department is to be more educated on how to help Pacific Islander’s to decrease rates in babies death, diabetes and access to regular health care.


PAGE 4

HO’OULU I KA LAMA

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 3

Lei Aloha O Ka ‘Ohana-Family:The Never Ending Circle of Aloha Poke Challenge 2011 By: Ui Keo

Lei Aloha O Ka `Ohana hosted its 2nd Annual Poke Challenge on Saturday, January 22 at the Hawaiian Cultural Center. This year we had a few repeat challengers from last year, and few newbie’s. Our repeat contestants included the Au, Kuwada and Carden families, and the newcomers included the Tejada, Stroud and AhQuinn families. Each family came prepared with not one, but TWO secret ingredients to add to their recipe to make their poke stand out from the rest. The rules of the challenge were simple. Each family team had an hour to prep, cut, mix, and present their creations for the judges and 100 + taste testers patiently waiting on deck. Throughout the hour, those in attendance were able to visit each team and take note of their different techniques. Raffle prizes, including Hui Paoakalani t-shirts, paddle memberships, and even a paddle donated by Team Kalea were being given away. The judges, including Vaughn Mossman of Pounders Island Grill, Jake Fitisemanu of the Pacific Island Medical Student Association (PIMSA), and Winona Lolofie, the Ka Lama Mohala Quilt Instructor had the hardest task of the evening...determining a winner. Aside from the overall score, contestants were judged on best presentation, best tasting and most original. The crowd however voted on the “crowd favorite.” After the hour came to an end, and everyone had their fare share of Poke, the results were in. Ka `ohana Au swept the competition by placing first in every category including overall winner, with ka `ohana Tejada coming in a close second, and ka `ohana Stroud placing third. The Au family took the Poke Challenge by storm with their secret ingredients including rice wine and coconut vinegar. Next year’s Poke Challengers sure do have big shoes to fill, but we look forward to yet another successful event!!! Poke Challenge 2011 1) Ka `ohana Au Poke Challenge 2011 Winner’s

1

2

3

2) Mike Tejada demonstrates his cutting skills. 3) Teams work on preparing ingredients that will go into their poke. 4) Team Carden work together as they prepare their ingredients. 5) Ka `ohana Au prepare their secret ingredients that won top honors during the challenge.

4 6 5

6) Ka `ohana Tejada, 2nd place winners in the Poke Challenge. 7) Ka `ohana AhQuinn, cuts ahi and onions that would be part of their poke .

7 9

8) Father and daughter waiting for the challenge to begin. 9) Ka `ohana Stroud, 3rd place winners in the 2011 Poke Challenge.

8


PAGE 5

HO’OULU I KA LAMA

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 3

Lei Aloha O Ka ‘Ohana-Family:The Never Ending Circle of Aloha Don Carey Book Signing By: Ui Keo

On the evening of Thursday, January 13, the Hawaiian Cultural Center was proud to support a local author as he launched the release of his new book, “Bumpy Landings.” Don Carey, a Kahuku Alum, lived in La`ie for a few years while his father taught at BYU-Hawaii. Carey used his childhood experiences growing up in Hawai`i as a backdrop to this exciting story about a young man who longs to live his dream of becoming a pilot, much to his mother’s dismay. With the debut of his first novel, Carey started the promotion of the book with a signing here at the Hawaiian Cultural Center. Many friends and family, and others from the Hawaiian community came out to support Carey’s new venture. Those in attendance were able to purchase the novel, and get it personally signed by the author himself. Carey was generous enough to donate $5 for every book sold here at the center to the center itself. With that, a big mahalo goes out to Don and we here at the Hawaiian Cultural Center wish you luck with the success of your book!!!

Author Don Carey with his family at the book signing for his novel Bumpy Landings at the Hawaiian Cultural Center, January 13, 2011. Friends and family enjoyed delicious refreshments and visiting with each other.


PAGE 6

HO’OULU I KA LAMA

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 3

Lei Aloha O Ka `Ohana-Family:The Never Ending Circle of Aloha Family Activity—Creating `Ohana Umeke Families participating during the current or past, weekly LAOKO family sessions had the opportunity of creating their own `ohana umeke or a family bowl to be used in whatever capacity that fit their family use. The bowls would also serve as a reminder of the wonderful knowledge families received during their participation in the Lei Aloha O Ka `Ohana program. The activity gave families an opportunity to apply the different Hawaiian practices introduced during the weekly sessions they attended. Sisters enjoy some family Parents and children worked through the diftime together. ferent steps of crafting their umeke while talking about what theywould use their bowls for, sparking some excitement during the evenings activity. He ipu ka`eo—a full calabash Na Kupuna prepare their gourds in crafting their umeke

Literally refers to a container, filled to overflowing, abundant. Figuratively refers to one who is knowledgeable, “filled” with knowledge, overflowing refers to knowledge put to use, and shared willingly with others.

STEP 3 STEP 1 Choosing the right ipu or gourd for families `ohana umeke

STEP 2

Dry cleaning-Soak the gourd in water, using a knife or scouring pad clean scrape away the outer skin. Remembering to keep it wet is an effective tool.

Cutting the tops off Remember gourd dust is very bad. Draw a circle around the neck as a guide for cutting with a jig saw. Be very careful not to inhale the dust after cutting the top off.

STEP 4

Cleaning the interior - gourds are full pithy fiber and seeds like a pumpkin. Use a mask to avoid inhaling dust, clean out the interior using a wire brush, and any remaining fibers clinging to the inside.


PAGE 7

HO`OULU I KA LAMA

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 3

SAVE THE DATE Interested in PADDLING?  Utah has TWO OUTRIGGER CLUBS. Check the following websites for  information and paddling schedules: 

HUI PAOAKALANI OUTRIGGER CANOE CLUB  Great Salt Lake Marina  www.huipaoakalani.blogspot.com    TEAM KALEA OUTRIGGER CANOE CLUB  Lindon Harbor  www.teamkalea.blogspot.com 

Hawaiian Cultural Center -Lei Aloha O Ka `Ohana 2011 Calendar of Events APRIL 30—`OHANA SATURDAY—3PM TO 6PM—HAWAIIAN CULTURAL CENTER MAY 20—KANIKAPILA/POTLUCK—6:30PM—HAWAIIAN CULTURAL CENTER MAY 27, 28 & 29—IOSEPA MEMORIAL FESTIVAL—SKULL VALLEY,UTAH JUNE 4—DUKE KAHANAMOKU WATER FESTIVAL—10AM—GREAT SALT LAKE MARINA JUNE16 & 17—1ST SESSION OF KEIKI CAMP (5 yrs. to 8 yrs. ) —11AM TO 3PM—HCC JUNE 22 TO 24—2ND SESSION OF KEIKI CAMP (9 yrs. to 11 yrs.)—11AM TO 3PM—HCC

Lei Aloha O Ka `Ohana Cultural Sessions

Visit our website and blog for updates: WWW.HAWAIIANCULTURALCENTER.ORG WWW.LEIALOHAOKAOHANA.BLOGSPOT.COM

MAY 2—`OHANA MAY 9—ALOHA / MAHALO MAY 16—ACTIVITY: OLI MAY 23—LOKAHI / HA`AHA`A JUNE 2—ACTIVITY: MOVIE JUNE 6—MALAMA / KULEANA JUNE 13—HO`IHI / HO`OKO JUNE 20—ACTIVITY: `OHANA UMEKE JUNE 27—`OLU`OLU / AHONUI / AKAHAI JULY 11—HO`OPONOPONO JULY 18—HO`OPUKA 6:30 PM TO 8:00 PM DINNER SERVED


PAGE 8

HO’OULU I KA LAMA

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 1

Book Review: AROUND THE WORLD WITH A KING WILLIAM N. ARMSTRONG - Member of the Cabinet of Kalakaua Last King of Hawaii With an introduction by GLEN GRANT Here is an account of King Kalakaua’s famous world tour, which made him the first monarch to circumnavigate the globe. By being present with His Majesty at receptions, meetings and visits with heads of state, we are allowed to enter the world of late nineteenth-century diplomacy and royalty, a world now barely faded from memory and alive only on the written pages. Around the World With a King dramatically reminds the modern reader that Hawai`i was once a sovereign nation. As we join Kalakaua circling the globe, a Kalakaua alert to the problems of his people and the threats to his kingdom, we note the world-wide recognition and acceptance he and his Hawai`i received as an independent ruler and nation having separate and legitimate treaties with scores of nations. Kalakaua’s quest in circling the globe was to reach out to the rest of the world to bring to his island nation immigrants from other countries to repopulate his land and revigorate the lives of his declining people. Kalakaua embraced a culturally pluralistic world where races, cultures and various religions could live together in harmony but with independence. Glen Grant’s introduction focuses on the one-sided tension and jealousy of the author, whose writing, despite reflecting his racial prejudices and political agenda, nevertheless documents a political triumph and an amazing feat for a Hawaiian King now being reexamined and appreciated for his efforts to preserve Hawaiian sovereignty. Review by Scott P. Crawford, Hana, Hawaii This book provides a fascinating in sight into a historical adventure that most people are unaware of. King Kalakaua of Hawaii was the first monarch ever to circumnavigate the globe, visiting man of the countries with whom Hawaii had treaties . Kalakaua was a highly educated and intelligent man and an exceptional diplomat who spoke numerous languages including the Queen’s English, and courts around the world were highly impressed with his character and knowledge. He also liked to party and could be a bit of a rascal, so there are some quite humor-

Ka Lama Mohala Foundation Board of Trustees

Lei Aloha O Ka `Ohana Team Kathleen Madsen 

Marcia Stroud—President 

Project Manager   

Scarlett Pate—Vice President 

Nohea Hanohano 

Ben Au—Treasurer 

hawaiian cultural center 741 west smelter street Midvale, utah 84047 Phone: (801) 56aloha Website: www.hawaiianculturalcenter.org. Www.leialohaokaohana.blogspot.com Center hours Monday—2pm to 9pm Tuesday—10am to 8 pm Wednesday—10 am to 6 pm Thursday— 10am to 6pm Friday—10 am to 6pm Closed Saturday and sunday

Angie Kawakoa—Trustee 

Accountant  

Pat Leong—Trustee 

Tina Cabiles‐Carden  Cultural Specialist    

Darren Medeiros—Trustee 

Ui Keo 

Stacey Woods—Member 

Task Manager 

KULIA I KA NU`U Strive for the summit.

Strive for the very top of the mountain, strive for excellence. This was the motto of Hawaii’s Queen Kapi`olani who did much for her people.

A special mahalo to the Administration for Native Americans for the funding of our Lei Aloha project.

April 2011  

Hawaiian Cultural Center from a Native Hawaiian Youth Observation, Community Gathering, Poke Challenge, Book Signing

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you