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Pre-Registration closes January 15th Receive a $10 discount if you register by December 13th Visit www.nofanyconference.org to register online


WELCOME

WELCOME

REGISTRATION To register for the 2014 NOFANY Organic Farming and Gardening Conference use the form enclosed, go online to www.nofanyconference. org, or contact Stephanie BackerBertsch, Registration Coordinator, at (585) 271-1979 ext. 509 or register@nofany.org. Pre-registration closes January 15, 2014. For general questions about the Winter Conference, please call us at (585) 271-1979. 2

Early Bird Discount To receive a $10 discount, register by December 13. Yo u c a n r e g i s t e r o n l i n e at www.nofanyconference.org, call (585) 271-1979 ext. 509 to register over the phone, or postmark your completed registration form by December 13.

NOFA-NY • 2014 WINTER CONFERENCE

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Brochure Design: David Ford, Artist MediaEye

The Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York (NOFA-NY) is a statewide organization leading a growing movement of farmers, consumers, gardeners, and businesses committed to promoting local, organic food and farming. We provide education, assistance, and support to regionally-based, sustainable farmers to help them thrive; educate consumers about the value in buying local, organic products; help consumers connect with farmers; work to make local, organic food available to all people; and advocate policies that support a sustainable food and farm system.


WELCOME

Preserving the Past, Seeding the Future In January 2014, NOFA-NY will hold its 32nd Annual Organic Farming & Gardening Conference. The theme for the conference— “Preserving the Past, Seeding the Future”—honors the history of the organic movement and those people who pioneered the movement and looks ahead to ensure that future generations have the resources they need to carry on this work. In addition, the topic of seeds is very timely given the concerns about maintaining organic and genetically diverse seed in agriculture. Keynote speaker Gary Paul Nabhan is an internationally-renowned nature writer, food and farming activist, and proponent of conserving the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity. He is a pioneer in the local food movement and seed-saving community. Our 2014 NOFA-NY Farmer of the Year is Brian Bennett from Bittersweet Farm. Brian is a long-time organic farmer in New York’s North Country region where he has helped unify his local community by involving more people in local agriculture. Each year at our conference, we strive to inspire, as well as inform, and to provide an unparalleled opportunity for networking and for reciprocal teaching and learning. We look forward to seeing you in Saratoga this coming January!

Kate Mendenhall Executive Director

WHAT’S INSIDE 2 Welcome 3 Scholarships & Volunteering 5 Keynote Speakers 6 Special Events 10 Schedule at a Glance www.nofanyconference.org

Marne Coit Education Director 12 18 25 42

Friday Intensives Workshop Tracks Pre-Registration Form Children’s Conference & Childcare 46 How to Get There, Hotel, Bus & Train Transit, Ridesharing 47 Conference Sponsors PRESERVING THE PAST, SEEDING THE FUTURE

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SCHOL ARSHIPS & VOLUNTEERING

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE! We’ll be offering a number of scholarships to our conference thanks to the generous support from our members and the USDA-NIFA Beginning Farmer and Rancher Program, grants #2011-49400-30510 and #201149400-30307. To learn more about receiving a scholarship or to fi ll out an application, please visit www.nofany.org/events/2014scholarships or call our office at (585) 271-1979 ext. 511. Aspiring and new farmers with less than 10 years of farm ownership/management experience, as well as mentor farmers, are eligible for scholarships. All applications must be received by 11:59pm on December 1. All scholarship recipients are required to volunteer two hours at the conference.

Josh Levine Scholarship Fund The Josh Levine Memorial Scholarship Fund was established to honor Josh Levine, an inspiring young farmer who tragically died in 2010 in a tractor accident. As a tribute to Josh’s love of organic farming and his support of the larger organic community, the Josh L ev ine Memor ia l Scholarship Fund provides financial support to beginning farmers to enable them to attend ou r con ferences. Each year we select candidates who show exceptional promise to receive as scholarship as funds allow. Please consider contributing to this scholarship fund when registering for the conference. 4

NOFA-NY • 2014 WINTER CONFERENCE

FARMER EDUCATION FUND We also have established the Farmer Education Fund, which allows farmers with financial need to attend this conference. Help make the conference accessible to more farmers. Please consider contributing to this fund when registering for the conference.

Volunteer Opportunities The success of our conference depends upon the hard work of many volunteers. Volunteers receive a $15 rebate after the conference for each two-hour shift for which they volunteer. To volunteer, please e-mail Dana at conference.volunteer@nofany.org or call (585) 271-1979 ext. 517. Volunteer slots will be fi lled on a first-come, first-serve basis. www.nofanyconference.org


KEYNOTES

Keynote Speakers GARY PAUL NABHAN

BRIAN BENNETT NOFA-NY Farmer of the Year

Gary Paul Nabhan is an internationally celebrated nature writer and food and far ming activist. He has been honored as a pioneer in the local food movement and seed saving commu n it y b y Ut ne R eade r, M o t h e r Earth News, The New York Times, Bioneers a nd Time magazine. As the W.K. Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of Arizona Southwest Center, he works with students, faculty and non-profits to build a more just, nutritious, sustainable and climate-resilient foodshed spanning the U.S./ Mexico border. His 26 books, including Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land, Chasing Chiles and Renewing America's Food Traditions, have won numerous awards. Friday Evening

In addition to being a full-time farmer at Bittersweet Farm in Heuvelton, New York, Brian is a mentor to new farmers and teaches handson sustainability to area students and volunteers. He has worked as the Workshop Coordinator for the Local Living Festival and as the Vegetable Specialist for North Country Grown Cooperative. Born in 1958, Brian became interested in plants and gardens during middle school. His mother’s family had long standing farming roots in Indiana where he spent summers dur ing high school hoeing miles of corn. In college, Brian studied plant science, but was not happy with the promotion of chemical pesticides and fertilizers. In 1985, he purc h a sed h i s first farm with his wife Ann, where they farmed part-time using all organic methods. In 1999, they moved to the St. Lawrence River Valley. Bittersweet Farm is certified organic with NOFA-NY Certified Organic, LLC. Saturday Morning

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WAY S T O G E T I N V O LV E D

Ways to Get Involved SPONSORSHIP, TRADE SHOW & ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES New York has the highest number of organic farms in the nation after California and Wisconsin. Not surprisingly, our Winter Conference is one of the largest organic farming conferences with more than 1200 participants attending this annual three-day event. Sponsoring our conference, participating in our trade show, and advertising in the conference program are great ways to reach organic farmers, gardeners, and food advocates with your marketing message while helping to promote local, organic food and farming. Contact Tanya Smolinsky for more information at Tanya@nofany.org or at (585) 271-1979 ext. 502.

ORGANIC FOOD DONATIONS One of the most memorable parts of our conference is the incredible meals. Almost all of the organic food is generously donated by our farmers, business members, and supporters, making each meal a tribute to the diversity and bounty of New York State’s organic agriculture. Please consider donating food to the conference to help make it a success! You will receive a rebate on the wholesale value of your food donation after you’ve paid for your conference registration. Any remaining value that exceeds the total cost of your conference registration will be treated as a tax-deductible donation. Food donors will be listed in the conference program and on a banner in the banquet hall. To contribute food, please contact Millicent Cavanaugh at food@nofany.org or (585) 271-1979 ext. 515. Download a food donation form at www.nofanyconference.org. 6

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FARMHACK: Show, Tell, Ask & Document! Have you designed a tool that better fits the scale and methods of work on your farm? Show off your farm innovations at the conference. FarmHack is a farmer-driven community to develop, document, and build tools for resilient agriculture. Bring your innovative tools and implements for display, or if more convenient, bring your designs or photos. Whether for tillage, transport, power generation, processing, seeding, or spinning—everything is welcome. FarmHack representatives will show you how to document your tools and ideas on the online tool forums. Questions? Contact Dorn Cox at dornawcox@yahoo. com. Find FarmHack and National Young Farmers Coalition in the Trade Show. www.nofanyconference.org


SPECIAL EVENTS

This is our 32nd annual conference—let’s celebrate! Thursday Evening • Welcome Reception: Greet your friends and meet new ones at a low-key reception where you will be treated to a sampling of tasty snacks and the first of many musical performances by Mulberry Soul. Friday Afternoon • Trade Show Opens. Check out a wide selection of equipment, seeds, and services Friday Evening • Keynote Gary Nabhan and Opening Ceremony • Social Hour & Entertainment in the Trade Show

• Film Screening: Switch: Discover the Future of Energy (2013) • Beginning Farmer Meet & Greet Saturday Morning • NOFA-NY Certified Organic, LLC Open Annual Meeting • NOFA-NY Annual Report and Keynote Brian Bennett, Farmer of the Year Saturday Afternoon • NOFA-NY Annual Meeting • NYSSFPA Annual Meeting Saturday Evening • Social Hour and Live Music in the Trade Show

• Contra Dance with Russet Trio and caller Fern Marshall Bradley • Film Screening: Seeds of Death: Unveiling the Lies of GMOs (2012) • Book Reading and Signing with Scott Chaskey, author of Seedtime (2014, Rodale) Sunday Morning • Closing Ceremony • Last chance to visit Trade Show

Beginning Farmer Meet & Greet Time to party! Enjoy music by Mulberry Soul starting at 8:00pm. At 8:45pm, the National Young Farmers Coalition will lead us in games designed to help beginning farmers find other beginning farmers from their region. In the Farm Consultation Zone, running throughout the Meet & Greet, find some quieter space to talk nuts and bolts with some of New York’s farm mentors and farm business consultants (please bring your mentor with you). Once you’ve sampled the snacks and beverages available at the party, we’ll encourage you to pose with some silly props at the not-to-bemissed photo booth. All conference attendees are welcome to this kickoff party to celebrate organic farming in New York State. Friday 8–10pm www.nofanyconference.org

House Band

MULBERRY SOUL Formed in 2012 at the Folk Art Guild on East Hill Farm in Middlese x, N Y, Mu lber r y Soul's music blends folk, bluegrass, and old-time fiddle music w ith stunningly sou lf u l or ig ina l songs. This six-piece band (see photo below) is set to release their fi rst full-length album at the end of this year. Get your dancing feet ready b e c au s e t he show is sure to be packed w ith some smokin’ picking on mandolin, guitar, banjo, bass and fiddle. Listen for them throughout the conference.

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FILM SCREENINGS

SPECIAL EVENTS

CONTRA DANCE with The Russet Trio & Fern Marshall Bradley The Russet Trio and Fern Marshall Bradley will be joining us once again in 2014. For those of you who didn’t make it to the contra dance at the 2013 conference, you’re in for a foot stompin’ treat. The Russet Trio combines traditional Irish themes with a moder n energ y t h at ’s sure to get your toes a tappin’. New to contra dancing? Fern M a rsh a l l Br ad le y is the perfect caller to get you swingin’. When Fern isn’t calling for contra dances, she’s editing our Ne w York Organic News magazine. Saturday 8:15pm

Switch: Discover the Future of Energy (2013). Every energy resource—fossil, nuclear and renewable— is undergoing profound changes. We’re gradually shifting from coal and oil to the energies of tomorrow. This sweeping transition is the subject of Switch. Friday 8:30pm

Seeds of Death: Unveiling the Lies of GMOs (2012). This movie by award-winning documentary fi lm director Gary Null takes on the seed cartel’s propaganda and political influence to expose a fabric of lies and deceit now threatening the safety and life of every species. Saturday 8:30pm

SPECIAL BOOK READING & SIGNING Join beloved author and NOFA-NY’s 2013 Farmer of the Year Scott Chaskey for a special book reading and signing. Scott will be reading from his new book Seedtime: On the History, Husbandry, Politics and Promise of Seeds. In this book, Scott masterfully weaves history, politics, botany, literature, mythology, and memoir into a beautiful and instructive book. Having coevolved with the Earth’s plants, insects, and animals, seeds are entwined with the core myths of ancient cultures and the development of human 8

consciousness. Their story remains vitally important today as the corporations that manufacture GMOs threaten our food security and the future of seed-cultivated agriculture. Scott Chaskey is a poet, farmer and educator who’s worked the land for the past quarter of a century for the Peconic Land Trust at Quail Hill Farm in Amagansett, New York. A pioneer of the community farming movement, he’s past president of NOFA-NY and author of This Common Ground, a memoir. Saturday 8:30pm

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Trade Show

Special Meetings

The Trade Show runs Friday afternoon-Sunday afternoon and features a wide array of exhibitors and vendors.

NEW YORK SMALL SCALE FOOD PROCESSORS ASSOCIATION MEETING

NOFA-NY CERTIFIED ORGANIC, LLC OPEN ANNUAL MEETING

Bookstore So maybe it’s not a “special event”, but it is special to have such a great bookstore at the conference just for you. Browse and buy a diverse selection of writings on organic agriculture, culture and life. Our conference bookstore includes works authored and recommended by conference presenters and attendees, as well as NOFA-NY merchandise.

Book Signings Throughout the conference, presenter-authors will be available to sign books and chat with you about topics of mutual interest. Check the printed schedule at the NOFA-NY book store. www.nofanyconference.org

Grab some breakfast and join our certification staff and the Management Committee for an open meeting to learn about certification updates and National Organic Program changes. This is an opportunity to ask your certification questions.

The NYSSFPA was formed to build on the resilience of New York State family farms. It works to create valueadded products from farm produce in order to keep small farms prosperous. If interested in learning more about NYSSFPA, grab a plate and join them at their lunch meeting on Saturday. Saturday 11:45am

Saturday 7:15am

NOFA-NY ANNUAL MEETING Members, this is your chance to make your voice heard within your organization. Over lunch, help determine what issues NOFA-NY works on in the coming years. Your participation is important. We will elect new members to the Board of Directors and vote on the 2014 policy resolutions.

If you’re not a member already, join NOFA-NY and join us at our annual meeting. Saturday 12:00pm

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AT A G L A N C E Dairy & Grazing

Livestock

FRIDAY 7:30–9am FRIDAY 9am–12:15pm; coffee break at 10:30am

Vegetables

Beginning Farming

Seed Saving and Production Basics

Starting from Square One: Creating a Farm

Advanced Seed Saving, Seed Production & On-farm Breeding

Breaking Open the Books: Budgets, Cash Flow & Business Planning

Breakfast

Advanced Cheesemaking

Increasing Farm Common Apple Diversity with and Stone Fruit Small Diseases Ruminants

FRIDAY 12:15–1:15pm

Lunch

Keeping Up with Internal Parasites in Goats and Sheep

FRIDAY 1:15–4:30pm; coffee break at 2:40pm

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Fruits

Spotted Wing Drosophila

FRIDAY 4:45–6:15pm

Opening Session and Keynote Address by Gary Paul Nabhan

FRIDAY 6:15–7:15pm

Social Hour with Music and Fun in the Trade Show

FRIDAY 7–8:30pm

Dinner

FRIDAY 8:30–10:30pm

Entertainment

SATURDAY 7–8am

Breakfast & NOFA-NY Certified Organic, LLC Annual Meeting

SATURDAY 8–9:15am

Draft Animal Power: From Homestead to Megafarm!

Production & Marketing of Raw Milk

Nuts 101

No-Till Spring Vegetables with Cover Crops

Scaling Up to Farm Scale Composting

SATURDAY 9:45–11:30am

Annual Review; Keynote Address by Farmer of the Year Brian Bennett

SATURDAY 11:30am– 1:15pm

Lunch & NOFA-NY, Inc. Annual Meeting

SATURDAY 1:15–2:30pm

SATURDAY 2:45–4pm

SATURDAY 4:15–5:30pm

High Tunnels

Slow and Steady StartUp: Building Experience & Capital

Extending the Diversified Dairy Growing Figs In Grazing Season CSA Cold Climates for Livestock

Managing Insects & Insecticide Resistance for Organic Potatoes

Potatoes 101

100% Grass The Udder Fed Beef: Low Basics of Cost Inputs for Starting a SmallHigh Quality Scale Dairy Finish

Growing Better Melons, Summer Squash & Cucumbers

Know Your Insurance, Protect Your Farm

Cattle Fly Management Using IPM

SATURDAY 5:30–7pm

Meat Yields & Marketing

Commercial Organic Orchards: Late Season Tree Fruit Harvest

Starting Right: Establishing Young Trees

Social Hour with Music and Fun in the Trade Show

SATURDAY 7–8:30pm

Dinner

SATURDAY 8:30–11pm

Entertainment

SUNDAY 7–8am

Breakfast

SUNDAY 8–9:15am

Cows, Climate & Why Grazing Matters

Brambleicious Advances in OnIdeas to Farm Poultry Increase Farm Breeding Diversity

SUNDAY 9:45–11am

Flaxseed & Ryegrass for Improving Milk Fatty Acids & Forage Production

Small Scale Pig Breeding

Cider Apples

Advanced Seed Saving: Biennials

Guiding New Farmers

How to Grow Tomatoes & Potatoes Despite the Blight

Cooperative Farming Ideas

SUNDAY 11am–1pm

Last Chance to Visit the Trade Show & Bookstore

SUNDAY 11:30am–1pm

Lunch, Goodbyes & Filling Out Evaluations

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AT A G L A N C E Urban Farming

Marketing & Business

Grains & Field Crops

Other NY Enterprises

Gardening & Homesteading

Policy & Community

Breakfast Sustainably Integrated Aquaponics

Farmer's Guide Long Range Grains at the to On-Farm Planting of Farmers' Market Food Safety Medicinal Herbs Certification

Adapting to Climate Uncertainty

Lunch

Group GAP: Introduction for Practitioners & Support Organizations

Using The Grains at the Flower Growing: Entire Animal: Farmers' Market Hide Tanning & Strategies (continued ) Soap Making

Introduction to Organic Certification

Opening Session and Keynote Address by Gary Paul Nabhan Social Hour with Music and Fun in the Trade Show Dinner Entertainment

Breakfast & NOFA-NY Certified Organic, LLC Annual Meeting

Success on the Ground

Sourcing for Urban Markets: Pancakes: Snail of Field to Griddle! Approval & Producer Matrix

Agriculturally Productive Buffers: Agroforestry Strategies

Herbs for the Winter Blues

Where Do We Stand with FDA's Food Safety Regulations?

Annual Review; Keynote Address by Farmer of the Year Brian Bennett

Lunch & NOFA-NY, Inc. Annual Meeting

Drought & FloodSmall Scale Rice Production Proofing the 101 Farm

Espalier Fruit Plants ——— Yes We Can! Preserve Your Harvest! Part 1

Justice for Farmworkers! And How About Farmers, Too?

A Local Grain Renaissance in the Northeast, Part 1 : Baking Bread with Local Flour

Farming with Rocks

Quality in Cider Making  ——— A Farm Bill — Ferment For All of Us Change! Preserve Your Harvest! Part 2

May All Be Fed: A Unique Farm to Food Pantry Model

A Local Grain Renaissance in the Northeast, Part 2 : Into the Dough

Bouquet Making Basics: Floral Design 101 for New Flower Growers

Creating a Compost Heated Greenhouse in the City

Negotiation Makes It Happen!

Lots of Food: Feeding Folks with Urban Food Forests

Finances of Farming, Especially in a City

Teaching a Science Curriculum in a School Garden

Close the Loop! Building Support for Food Scrap Collection & Composting

Seeds and Breeds: Classical Breeding in a GMO World

Social Hour with Music and Fun in the Trade Show Dinner Entertainment Breakfast

Empowering Youth in Urban Farming

Choosing a Business Structure for Your Farm

Rotations for a Quality Grain Farm

Sugaring 101: Why Every Farm Should Have a Sugaring Operation

The Essential Small Farm Greenhouse

Just Label It! NYS Campaign for GMO Labeling

Growing Urban Soil for Food Production

Profitability of the Paper Pot Transplanter on a Small Vegetable Farm

High Performance Cover Crops

Sugaring 102: Developing a Productive & Profitable Sugaring Operation

The Resilient & Regenerative Homestead

NOFA-NY's Farmer's Pledge

SC H E D U LE AT A G L A N C E

Establishing an Urban Market Garden

Last Chance to Visit the Trade Show & Bookstore Lunch, Goodbyes & Filling Out Evaluations

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F R I DAY F U L L DAY WO R K S H O P

GRAINS AT THE FARMERS’ MARKETS Learn how to grow many different cereal grains on a small scale. Most importantly, learn how to grow, harvest, clean, store and mill right at the farmers’ market on a small and realistic budget. Join us for a discussion of how rolling and steel cutting oats have eclipsed George’s flour sales. We will learn about the possible successes and failures one can encounter selling grains at the farmers’ market. Presenter: George Wright, Castor River Farm Friday Full Day 9am–4:30pm

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as you are getting started, they will continue to keep you on track and guide the growth of your farm for many years. Presenters: Erica Frenay, ShelWhen starting a farm, gaining terbelt Farm & Cornell Small Farms hands-on experience is essential. Program, and Kylie Spooner, Equally important is developing Spooner and Daughter Farm Friday 9am–12:15pm a process for navigating the thousands of complex decisions you’ll need to make, and creating a plan ADVANCED for a manageable start-up (the in- CHEESEMAKING visible side of farming)! We will This workshop is designed for lead you through activities and in- people who have made cheese betroduce you to resources that will fore and want to advance to more help you create a written farm/fam- difficult styles of cheesemaking. We ily goal to aid in decision-making, will make two types of cheese with determine what social, physical, very different recipes to demonbiological, and financial resourc- strate a variety of techniques. es you can draw from to create your Note: Attendance is limited to 30. farm, and help you assess your Presenter: Peter Kindel, Hawskills so you can prioritize the next thorne Valley Farm steps in your learning process. If Friday 9am–12:15pm you take the time to do these things

STARTING FROM SQUARE ONE: Creating a Farm to Match Your Goals, Skills, Values, and Resources

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COMMON (AND A FEW UNCOMMON) APPLE AND STONE FRUIT DISEASES

FARMER’S GUIDE TO ON-FARM FOOD SAFETY CERTIFICATION

Diseases of tree fruit crops are perhaps the one remaining area that truly bedevil organic orchardists. While there may be as many ways to tackle the problems as there are varieties of apples, until one really understands what one is up against, all controls are merely prophylactic. In this workshop we’ll cover the major (and a few minor) diseases of apples and stone fruit, traditional and innovative control tactics, and orchard design considerations for avoiding them altogether. Presenter: Mike Biltonen, Red Jacket Orchard

Are you hearing that getting GAP certified is a good idea? We’ll explore why you might want to consider getting certified, introduce you to some of the concepts behind GAP, introduce Group GAP—an innovative approach to food safety certification—and point you in the direction of some great resources. We’ll also talk about mitigating risk through available crop insurance options, as well as how to evaluate insurance options to determine the best fit with your operation. Presenters: Steve Warshawer, National Good Food Network, and Jeff Farbman, Wallace Center at Winrock International

Friday 9am–12:15pm

Friday 9am–12:15pm

INCREASING FARM DIVERSITY WITH SMALL RUMINANTS

MEDICINAL HERBS: Increasing Bio-Diversity Small ruminants (sheep and on the Farm and Creating goats) can bring new management Value-Added Income and marketing opportunities as well as needed ecological services to any farm. We will explore how grazing small ruminants can enhance the farm ecosystem, as well as provide income from dairy, meat, and fiber enterprises. Presenters: Joyce Henion, Acorn Hill Farm, Maryrose Livingston, Northland Sheep Dairy, and Lisa Ferguson, Laughing Goat Fiber Farm. Friday 9am–12:15pm

What are the long range plans for the land you steward? Will you leave it for your family and future generations so they can sustain a living from the land? Learn how to produce and market value-added products such as herbal salves, creams, teas, and tinctures in conjunction with growing and harvesting medicinal herbs. Discuss how these perennials increase farm net income, long term sustainability, and profitability. Presenters: Matthias and Andrea Reisen, Healing Spirits Herb Farm

F R I DAY I N T E N S I V E S

F R I DAY M O R N I N G WO R K S H O P S

Friday 9am–12:15pm www.nofanyconference.org

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F R I DAY M O R N I N G WO R K S H O P S

ADAPTING TO CLIMATE UNCERTAINTY: Crop Diversity and Pollinator Habitat Enhancement

F R I DAY I N T E N S I V E S

Keynote Speaker Gary Nabhan will discuss means to adapt to climate uncertainty by using on-farm biodiversity, from crop variety diversification and intercropping to enhancing populations of pollinators and soil microbes. Because climate change is affecting crop and livestock production in different ways in each food scape, the feedback one gains from making daily observations of how elements of this diversity are responding is key to long term adaptation and survival of farmsand to our food security as well. Presenter: Gary Nabhan, University of Arizona and Almuniya de los Zopilotes Experimental Farm Friday 9am–12:15pm

SUSTAINABLY INTEGRATED AQUAPONICS This workshop will cover the design and construction of a smallscale closed-loop aquaponic system appropriate for a cool climate. Topics will include fish and plant selection, tank sizes and siting, educational possibilities, and marketing strategies. We’ll also discuss how to build a terrestrial food chain for fish that includes silkworms, black soldier fl ies, worms, and duckweed, and how to integrate aquaponics with greenhouses, ducks, and vermicomposting. Presenter: Scott Kellogg, Radix Ecological Sustainability Center Friday 9am–12:15pm

SEED SAVING AND PRODUCTION BASICS The fundamentals of seed saving will be covered in this workshop including plant reproduction, basic plant biology, harvesting and cleaning dry versus wet seeded crops, cross-pollination/isolation, maintaining seed quality, and seed storage. Participants will also learn why seed saving is important and where they are on the continuum from backyard seed saver to commercial seed producer/breeder. Presenters: Ken Greene, Hudson Valley Seed Library and Michael Glos, Kingbird Farm Friday 9am–12:15pm

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BREAKING OPEN THE BOOKS: Discussing WholeFarm Budgets, Cash Flow and Beginners’ Business Planning Farmer-owners will bare their books to participants in order to demonstrate tools for whole-farm planning, enterprise budgeting, cash flow forecasting, and marketing. This workshop is best for the beginning farmer with a defined farm plan and business idea, as well as some farm work experience. Presenters: Melissa Madden, Good Life Farm, and Anton Burkett, Early Morning Farm Friday 1:15–4:30pm

Friday 1:15–4:30pm

USING THE ENTIRE ANIMAL: Hide Tanning and Soap Making

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA Does SWD have you (and your berries) down? Learn ways to fight back with the organic control management options that can be combined to work on your farm. This workshop starts by covering the basic biology of SWD, its regional (and international!) distribution, and the crops that it currently or potentially impacts (berries, grapes, soft tree fruit, and maybe even tomatoes!). Presenters will share the www.nofanyconference.org

most current research and what showed promise at their farm trials this season. SWD controls covered during this workshop include cultural practices like exclusion and netting, mass trapping, and altered post-harvest handling of berries, as well as spray options including which pesticides effect this tricky pest, how to most efficiently apply them, and potential bio-controls. Presenters: Emily Cook, Ulster County CCE’s Commercial Organic Production Resource Educator, Laura McDermott, Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program, Lawrie Nickerson, Hay Berry Farm

Participants will learn about the hide tanning process to produce buckskin and non-chemically treated pelts. There will be hands-on demonstrations of both hide tanning and soap making. At the end of the conference, attendees will be able to take home their own bar of soap made during the workshop. Presenter: Peter Sutera, farmer and homesteader

F R I DAY I N T E N S I V E S

F R I DAY A F T E R N O O N WO R K S H O P S

Friday 1:15–4:30pm

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F R I DAY A F T E R N O O N WO R K S H O P S

KEEPING UP WITH INTERNAL PARASITES IN YOUR GOATS AND SHEEP

FLOWER GROWING: Strategies to Grow and Sell the Best Flowers in Your Join us to learn about current re- Market

F R I DAY I N T E N S I V E S

search on promising innovations in integrated parasite management for sheep and goats. We’ll also discuss some of the old standbys in terms of FAMACHA and pasture management to identify parasite problems and reduce parasite pressure in your flock. Presenter: Tatiana Stanton, Cornell University Small Ruminant Extension Specialist Friday 1:15–4:30pm

GROUP GAP: A Detailed Introduction for Practitioners and Support Organizations Group GAP is an innovative approach to GAP now being offered as an option by the USDA. It utilizes a central organization to organize a group of growers under a unified food safety plan with particular features so that growers receive support and are able to reduce the costs of audits. This workshop serves as a detailed introduction to groups who might manage a group, experienced farmers who might consider joining a group, and those people who might support or educate others about Group GAP. Presenters: Steve Warshawer, National Good Food Network, and Jeff Farbman, Wallace Center at Winrock International

In this workshop, we will cover production of several popular cut flower crops and general tips on sustainable/organic pest and disease control. We will also discuss key tips on harvest and post harvest techniques to make sure your customers have long lasting, gorgeous blooms. Presenters: Polly and Mike Hutchison, Robin Hollow Farm Friday 1:15–4:30pm

INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC CERTIFICATION Join the NOFA-NY Certified Organic, LLC staff for a discussion of certification requirements, timelines, highlights of application forms, and the USDA National Organic Program regulations. There will be plenty of opportunity for questions. Whether you intend to apply for organic certification in the coming year, or you’re seeking information to help you decide, certification staff members will provide an informative overview of the certification process. Presenters: NOFA-NY Certification Staff Friday 1:15–4:30pm

Friday 1:15–4:30pm

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F R I DAY A F T E R N O O N WO R K S H O P S

ADVANCED SEED SAVING, SEED PRODUCTION, AND Thinking about starting an urban ON-FARM BREEDING

farm, but not sure where to start? Already have land, but not sure what to do next? This workshop will help beginners understand the challenges and methods of starting a not-for-profit urban market garden. Topics will include visioning, planning, forming community and government partnerships, site development and running a viable farm during and beyond the initial start-up phase. The workshop will give special focus to the programmatic side of urban agriculture projects. Presenters: Sean Cummings and Lauren Tonti, Binghamton Urban Farm and Volunteers Improving Neighborhood Environments Friday 1:15–4:30pm

This session will build on the fundamentals covered in the morning session. Attendees of this session should already understand the material covered in the morning session. We will go through the fundamentals of integrating seed saving and seed production in diversified farms including on-farm selection/breeding. We will cover skills, affordable tools, and specific seed harvest practice along with organic practices to ensure seed health for annual and biennial crop families including peppers/tomatoes, brassicas, greens, beans, and alliums. Awareness of seed borne diseases and seed quality will be discussed along with results from the Hudson Valley Seed Library’s SARE Grant findings on NY farmbased seed production. Presenters: Michael Glos, Kingbird Farm, and Ken Greene, Hudson Valley Seed Library Friday 1:15–4:30pm

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PRESERVING THE PAST, SEEDING THE FUTURE

F R I DAY I N T E N S I V E S

ESTABLISHING AN URBAN MARKET GARDEN

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B EG I N N I N G FA R M E R TR AC K

SCALING UP TO FARM SCALE COMPOSTING

B E G I N N I N G FA R M E R S

You are well acquainted with the basics of home composting, and are eager to get started making your own luscious, biologically-active compost to build fertility on your farm. What do you need to know, and what tools and techniques are being used successfully by farmscale composters in the Northeast? Current information and research about compost quality and compliance with organic regulations will also be covered. Presenter: Grace Gershuny, Green Mountain College and Highfields Center for Composting Saturday 8–9:15am

SLOW AND STEADY START UP: Starting Small to Build Experience and Capital Farm start up on $3000 is not easy. For the low-risk entrepreneur starting small and part-time can slowly build a business without betting the farm. We’ll discuss the details of a tiny farm start-up from 3 to 20 CSA shares over 3 years. From greenhouse schedules to fertility plans and budgets, low cost greenhouse designs and equipment lists, we will look at examples of a system at the scale a lot of new, part time growers might be planning for. Presenter: Tianna DuPont, Shooting Star Farms Saturday 1:15–2:30pm

POTATOES 101 Potatoes are an essential crop, and not like many others on the farm. Learn the basics of growing this staple food organically, including variety selection, tillage and cultivation, disease and pest management, harvest and storage, and more. Presenter: Ken White, Saranac Valley Farms Saturday 2:45–4pm

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B EG I N N I N G FA R M E R TR AC K

COOPERATIVE FARMING IDEAS

Your small sustainable farm is a place of business, so find out why and how to protect this business and yourself from a variety of risk factors. This workshop is designed to provide easy-to-follow-and-implement advice. Learn about crop insurance, the different categories of insurance for your farm, and what questions to ask your insurance agent. Pick up ideas on how to protect your property better and help your business grow safely while containing costs. Presenter: Bob Bleistein, Eastern Classic Coverage

Cooperative farming has the power to ease certain challenges that come with starting farm businesses. Learn how some farmers have found ways to combine their enterprises, pool capital, purchase land together, share equipment, and otherwise collaborate to manage land and farm businesses. Faith will report back on her SARE-sponsored research work, in which she maps out the legal, financial, and social considerations for starting a cooperative farm. We will share examples of existing multi-owner farms and provide resources for Saturday 4:15–5:30pm further support on your cooperative venture. P resenters: Fa it h G i lber t , GUIDING NEW FARMERS Letterbox Farm Collective, and This discussion among mentors Dr. Lynda Brushett, Cooperative will develop your personal list of Development Institute best practices to use when advising Sunday 9:45–11am new farmers who request your help. Learn about structuring a mentorship, guiding new farmers through production and business analyses, communication techniques to try out, and techniques to improve your impact on new farmers’ confidence and skills. For current Mentorship Program participants, hosts of on-farm apprentices, and anyone who teaches new farmers. Presenters: Rachel Schell-Lambert, NOFA-NY, Sarah Williford, Holistic Management International, and Claudia Kenny and Willy Denner, Little Seed Gardens

B E G I N N I N G FA R M E R S

KNOW YOUR INSURANCE, PROTECT YOUR FARM

Sunday 8–9:15am

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DA I RY & G R A ZI N G TR AC K

PRODUCTION AND MARKETING OF RAW MILK

EXTENDING THE GRAZING SEASON FOR LIVESTOCK

Learn about all of the steps required to produce high quality raw milk, including proactive on-farm testing. We will also talk about our own approach to marketing. Presenter: Steffen Schneider, Hawthorne Valley Farm

DA I RY & G R A Z I N G

This workshop will explain how to set up a pasture grazing rotation system that will allow for pastures to be grazed into the fall and early winter, which reduces the cost and labor needed to produce hay and other stored feeds. Also learn Saturday 8–9:15am how to calculate the excess amount of pasture forage needed by livestock for maintenance during coldCATTLE FLY er weather conditions and to size MANAGEMENT USING pasture accordingly. THE 1, 2, 3’s OF IPM Presenter: Dave Roberts, NatuFly pests can affect animal ral Resources Conservation Service health, decrease milk producof NY tion and weight gain, transmit disSaturday 2:45–4pm ease causing agents, reduce grazing time, annoy and irritate animals and more. Who are the usual sum- THE UDDER BASICS mer time pest species and what can OF STARTING A SMALLyou do about them? You will learn SCALE DAIRY to correctly identify and manage After being given an overview on the most important fly pests af- Ashlee and Steven’s experience with fecting cattle in the Northeast us- starting their farm during the past ing an integrated pest management year, workshop attendees will be inapproach. vited to choose from a number of Presenter: Keith Waldron, Cor- discussion topics. Options will innell University Extension, NYS In- clude infrastructure, breeding, ortegrated Pest Management Program ganization and systems, equipment Saturday 1:15–2:30pm sourcing, pasture management, holistic herd health techniques, and mooo-re! Presenters: Ashlee Kleinhammer and Steven Googin, North Country Creamery Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

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COWS, CLIMATE AND WHY GRAZING MATTERS

FLAXSEED & PERENNIAL RYEGRASS FOR IMPROVING Discussions about climate change MILK FATTY ACIDS AND tend to focus on the sky, particu- FORAGE PRODUCTION larly on greenhouse gas emissions. In this workshop, we’ll look at climate dynamics from a ground perspective, specifically as it relates to livestock. While livestock are often maligned for their environmental impact, proper management that situates animal behavior in a holistic context can play a key role in addressing climate change. We’ll discuss soil carbon, hydrology, biodiversity, and how new research on climate empowers organic farmers and land managers. Presenter: Judith Schwartz, author of Cows Save the Planet and Other Improbable Ways of Restoring Soil to Heal the Earth (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2013)

It’s well known that flaxseed improves the milk content of hearthealthy fatty acids such as omega-3 and CLAs. Perennial ryegrass can also enhance the content of omega-3 and CLAs in cow’s milk. In addition, high quality forage is generally produced with perennial ryegrass, which can increase milk production. This workshop will provide information about the potential benefits and limitations of feeding flaxseed and perennial ryegrass in Northeastern organic dairy farms. Presenters: Richard Smith and Andre Brito, University of New Hampshire

DA I RY & G R A Z I N G

DA I RY & G R A ZI N G TR AC K

Sunday 9:45–11am

Sunday 8–9:15am www.nofanyconference.org

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FRUIT TR ACK

NUTS IN NEW YORK

F RU ITS

Participants will get an overview about growing the wide range of nut trees adapted for New York including chestnuts, English and black walnuts, fi lberts, hickory, and even pine nuts. We will cover planting, cultivation, harvesting, processing, and how to eat these delicious crops. Presenter: Bill MacKentley, St. Lawrence Nurseries

training systems, the importance of high yield and fruit size along with topics on organic disease, insect, pest, and weed management will be presented. Tasting of selected disease resistant varieties will bring the presentation to a sweet and crunchy end. Presenters: Peter Jentsch, Cornell Cooperative Extension, and Dave Rosenberger, Cornell University Saturday 1:15–2:30pm

Saturday 8–9:15am

GROWING FIGS IN COLD COMMERCIAL ORGANIC CLIMATES ORCHARDS IN NY: The seductress fig can be successDiversifying Your Farm for fully grown throughout the NorthLate Season Tree Fruit Harvest east. Learn to site the tree for Workshop presenters will discuss a variety of topics to assist farmers in designing organic apple orchards to optimize the organic production practices. Introduction to orchard preparation, selection of up and coming commercial apple varieties with in-depth discussions of disease resistant apples, pruning and 22

NOFA-NY • 2014 WINTER CONFERENCE

optimum ripening, prune, harvest, and, of course, getting it through our frigid winters. Figs need just a bit of help because they are subtropical, not tropical, and are hardy between 10° and 20°F. Presenter: Lee Reich, farmer, gardening consultant, and author Saturday 2:45–4pm www.nofanyconference.org


PLANTING THE YOUNG APPLE ORCHARD

CIDER APPLES: Growers’ Descriptions

This workshop covers all aspects of planting and early care for young trees, including site location, soils, water and air flow drainage considerations, planting depth, and more. We will also cover cultivar options, uses for the different types of apples, how to maintain an orchard organically, and planting dos and don’ts. Presenter: Bill MacKentley, St. Lawrence Nurseries

Join Finger Lakes orchardists and cider makers to learn about all things cider apples! Hear about what characteristics make a good cider apple, what varieties they prefer to use and why, how growing cider apples can be different from “normal” orcharding, some of the challenges and opportunities of growing cider apples, and how to connect with cider makers who might want to use your apples. Presenters: Autumn Stoscheck, Eve’s Cidery and Eric Shatt, Redbyrd Orchard Cider and Cornell University’s Ithaca Research Orchard

Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

BRAMBLEICIOUS IDEAS TO INCREASE FARM DIVERSITY Brambles comprise the raspberry and blackberry crops many are already familiar with. Over the past few years many new varieties and production techniques have made growing brambles easier and more profitable than ever. We will cover basic bramble types, production techniques, diseases, insects, postharvest handling, and marketing in a nutshell. Presenter: Mike Biltonen, Red Jacket Orchard

Sunday 9:45–11am

F RU ITS

FRUIT TR ACK

Sunday 8–9:15am

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GR AINS & FIELD CROP TR ACK

Workshops continue on page 27

PANCAKES: Field to Griddle!

A LOCAL GRAIN RENAISSANCE IN THE Freshly ground flours from lo- NORTHEAST, Part 1: cally grown grains make fantas- Baking Bread with Local Flour

G R A I N S & F I E LD C RO PS

tic pancakes—the original fast food! Learn the history and basics of pancakes and homemade mixes, including gluten-free cornmeal pancakes. Presenter: Amy Halloran, writer and grain grower

Just as the myth that good bread wheat cannot be grown in the Northeast has been debunked, so too has the myth that bakers cannot bake good bread using local flour. Join us for a screening of the GrowNYC and OGRIN produced Saturday 8–9:15am video A Local Grain Renaissance in the Northeast, Part 2: Baking Bread with Local Flour. The video will be SMALL SCALE RICE followed by a panel discussion. PRODUCTION 101 Presenters: June Russell, Randall’s Island Park Alliance GrowNYC, and Stefan Senders, in New York City has been growing rice for 3 years in small exper- Wide Awake Bakery Saturday 2:45–4pm imental and educational plots. We will describe the process of growing rice on a small scale from seed- A LOCAL GRAIN ing through transplanting, heading RENAISSANCE IN THE and harvest, in order to encourage NORTHEAST, Part 2: other growers to explore this in- Into the Dough teresting new grain in the region. Building on the conversation Is rice the next production grain in from the earlier workshop entitled the Northeast? “Baking bread with Local Flour,” Presenter: Nick Storrs, Randall’s join us for this hands-on baking Island Park Alliance demonstration. We will demonSaturday 1:15–2:30pm strate some of the key elements of quality bread making. Learn to see and feel stages of dough development and begin learning important hand skills. Taste the results in the wonderful breads from the Wide Awake Bakery in Trumansburg, New York made using local flour from Farmer Ground Flour. Presenter: Stefan Senders, Wide Awake Bakery Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

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2014 WINTER CONFERENCE Preserving the Past, Seeding the Future Pre-Registration Form: Postmark by January 15th! Visit www.nofanyconference.org to register online.

Attendees Adult #1 Name_____________________________________________________________ Adult #2 Name_____________________________________________________________ Child #1 Name _________________________________ Age at Conf.: ______________ Child #2 Name _________________________________ Age at Conf.: ______________ Child #3 Name _________________________________ Age at Conf.: ______________ Farm/Company Name ______________________________________________________ Which best describes you:  Farmer  Consumer  Gardener  Business Owner Billing Address ____________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip _____________________________________________________________ County ________________________ Phone _____________________________________ Email ____________________________________________________________________

Pre-Registration Deadline: January 15, 2014 Registration includes breakfast and lunch. Dinners are available for $16 each. Full Conference (Friday–Sunday) Friday: Full Day Friday: Morning Friday: Afternoon Friday: Free Intro to Certification Friday: Dinner Saturday: Full Day Saturday: Dinner Sunday: Full Day Organic Certification Application Packet

Adult #1  $275  $130  $ 80  $ 70 $ 0  $ 16  $110  $ 16  $ 80  $ 53

TOTAL INDIVIDUAL REGISTRATIONS

$

TOTAL REGISTRATIONS ADULT #1 + ADULT #2

$

Adult #2  $275  $130  $ 80  $ 70 $ 0  $ 16  $110  $ 16  $ 80  $ 53 $

Adult #1 – Friday Workshop Selections: am

pm

Adult #2 – Friday Workshop Selections: am

pm

Students receive a 20% discount off the cost of registration for groups of 3 or more. Not subject to Early Bird Discount. Valid Student ID required. To apply, contact Stephanie at 585-271-1979, ext. 509.


Children’s Conference & Childcare Children ages 6–12 (at the time of the conference) may attend the children’s conference. Children ages 3–5 (at the time of the conference) may attend childcare. Registration for children’s programming is fi rst come, fi rst serve and is not guaranteed. You MUST PREREGISTER for children’s programming; we cannot accept walk-in registrations. Child #1 Child #2 Child #3 Full Conference (Friday–Sunday)  $125  $125  $125 Friday  $ 50  $ 50  $ 50 Friday: Dinner* (5 and under eat free)  $ 16  $ 16  $ 16 Saturday  $ 50  $ 50  $ 50 Saturday: Dinner* (5 and under eat free)  $ 16  $ 16  $ 16 Sunday  $ 50  $ 50  $ 50 TOTAL INDIVIDUAL REGISTRATIONS

$

TOTAL REGISTRATIONS (Child #1+#2+#3)

$

$

$

Membership Your membership donation directly supports NOFA-NY programs and services. Please choose a membership level that is meaningful and affordable to you.  $50  $75  $100  $250  $500  Other $ ______________________ At the $75 level, get your FREE NOFA-NY hat. At the $100 level or above, get two FREE NOFA-NY hats. All membership donations entitle you to our two quarterly publications, New York Organic News magazine and The Natural Farmer, and our 2014 Food & Farm Guide.

Totals Combined Adult Registration Total: $ Combined Child Registration Total: $ NOFA-NY Membership Donation: $ Donation to the Farmer Education Fund: $ Donation to the Josh Levine Memorial Scholarship Fund: $ $(–) Early Bird Discount (−$10 per Adult: Dec.13th Deadline) TOTAL ENCLOSED $ Pre-Registration Form: Must be postmarked by January 15th! After January 15, adult walk-in registrations will be accepted at the conference. Additional fees will apply. Please make checks payable to NOFA-NY. Submit form and payment to: NOFA-NY Attn: Conference Registration 249 Highland Avenue Rochester, NY 14620 For questions, please call (585) 271-1979, ext. 509.

Credit Card Information (MasterCard/VISA only) Card # Expiration Date: _____ / _______

CCID# _______

Signature Date

Volunteer Opportunities  Yes! I would like to volunteer at the 2014 NOFA-NY Winter Conference. Please contact me.

Cancellation and Refund Policy Refunds requested prior to January 15th will be charged a $25 processing fee. No refunds after January 15th. Sorry, no exceptions.


Workshops continued from page 24

GR AINS & FIELD CROP TR ACK

This workshop will explore organic disease management practices and crop rotations essential for producing quality food-grade grain crops in the Northeast. Grain farming is like rocket science if you plan on success in the changing climate and specialty markets which demand perfection. From seed to weeds, and grains to bread, this is the whole grain primer for beginning farmers and experienced growers hoping to improve their farm plan for the future. Presenter: T hor Oesc hner, Oechsner Farms, Farmer Ground Flour, and Wide Awake Bakery

Cover crops can greatly benefit your soil and crops, but only if they reach their full potential. In this workshop we will explore optimum planting and termination dates for legume and non-legume cover crops. We will also discuss nitrogen tie-up, pests, weeds, and other aspects of using cover crops. Presenter: Brian Caldwell, Cornell Organic Cropping Systems Project Sunday 9:45–11am

Sunday 8–9:15am

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G R A I N S & F I E LD C RO PS

ROTATIONS FOR A QUALITY HIGH PERFORMANCE GRAIN FARM COVER CROPS

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GARDENING & HOMESTEADING TR ACK

G A R D E N I N G & H O M E ST E A D I N G

HERBS FOR THE WINTER BLUES

SEEKING QUALITY IN CIDER MAKING

Herbs can gladden the heart and boost the spirit. Learn about herbs that relieve the winter blues. Grow and use some helpful plants! Presenter: Betty Pillsbury, Green Spiral Herbs

Improve your cider making abilities with this intermediate workshop on cider making. After a brief overview of the basic cider making practice, we will discuss some factors that change the quality and character of the cider produced. Main topics will be the quality of cider-appropriate apples, blending for a well balanced cider, and controlling the fermentation (including different yeast strains). Presenter: Claude Jolicoeur, author of The New Cider Maker’s Handbook (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2013)

Saturday 8–9:15am

ESPALIER FRUIT PLANTS

An espalier can yield very highquality fruit while making a decorative and edible covering for a fence or a wall. Learn which plants work best as espaliers and the theory and practice involved in bending and pruning branches to train and Saturday 2:45–4pm maintain the plants. Presenter: Lee Reich, farmdener, FERMENT CHANGE! gardening consultant, and author Saturday 1:15–2:30pm

YES WE CAN! PRESERVE YOUR HARVEST! Part 1 Using time-honored techniques of canning, learn the best methods for preserving the wide variety of produce you harvest. Getting hands-on during our session, participants will learn the theory and practice of canning. We will discuss the nutritional benefits of canned foods as well as how to implement canning safely. Presenters: Michaela Hayes, Crock & Jar, and Angela Davis, Just Food and NYC Ferments

PRESERVE YOUR HARVEST! Part 2

Using time-honored techniques of fermentation, learn the best methods for preserving the wide variety of produce you harvest. Getting hands-on during our session, participants will learn the theory and practice of fermenting. We will discuss the nutritional benefits of fermented foods as well as how to implement fermentation safely. Presenters: Michaela Hayes, Crock & Jar, and Angela Davis, Just Food and NYC Ferments Saturday 2:45–4pm

Saturday 1:15–2:30pm

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GARDENING & HOMESTEADING TR ACK

We’ll discuss the joys and pitfalls of working with 7th grade science students in a garden. This workshop will take you through the logistics of covering the New York State science curriculum, while maintaining a 6,000 square foot vegetable garden that provides food to the cafeteria. Participants will be presented with some challenges to explore including how to involve students in controlled experiments when most crops aren’t harvested until the summer. Presenter: Wayne Gottlieb, science teacher and gardener at Dewitt THE RESILIENT AND REGENERATIVE FARM AND Middle School

HOMESTEAD

Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

THE ESSENTIAL SMALL FARM GREENHOUSE Build your own greenhouse for under $300! This 10' x 20' greenhouse is simple to build. Two people can move it by hand, and it can be used alone or in tandem for more growing area. This workshop will provide greenhouse plans as well as 15 years of experience using this greenhouse for plant propagation, season extension, and even raising chickens. Presenter: Eric de Long, farmer in Greene County, New York Sunday 8–9:15am

Using images and illustrations, the workshop will provide a visual tour of the primary principles and their application in establishing and operating a high diversity, nutrient-dense food, medicine, and fuel-producing homestead and small farm. Aspects covered include rapid fuelwood production in hedgerows, integrating grazing with perennial woody crops, wood and compost-heated hot water, rice paddy construction and management, ducks, sheep and perennial crop integration, earthworks for drought, flood prevention and much more. Presenter: Ben Falk, homesteader and author of The Resilient Farm and Homestead, (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2013)

G A R D E N I N G & H O M E ST E A D I N G

TEACHING A SCIENCE CURRICULUM IN A SCHOOL GARDEN: A Worthy Challenge

Sunday 9:45–11am www.nofanyconference.org

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LIVESTOCK TR ACK

LI V E STO C K

DRAFT ANIMAL POWER: DIVERSIFIED DAIRY CSA: From Homestead to Megafarm Benefits and Challenges to See and hear about all the differ- Alternative CSA Models ent uses for these incredible work partners on your homestead or farm. Ask questions about training, keeping, and working with draft animals. Presenter: Donn Hewes, Northland Sheep Dairy Saturday 8–9:15am

MEAT YIELDS AND MARKETING This workshop will provide an in depth discussion of meat yields for all red meat. Learn the basics for optimizing your meat yields and participate in a conversation about current market trends and marketing options. Presenter: Richard Beckwith, Hilltown Pork Inc.

The presenter will discuss the various iterations of a diversified CSA that her farm has gone through over the past three years. The CSA includes dairy (raw milk, cheese, butter, buttermilk, whey), eggs, bread, and beef. Challenges and benefits of the different models will be covered. Presenter: Suzy Konecky, Cricket Creek Farm Saturday 2:45–4pm

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LIVESTOCK TR ACK

ADVANCES IN ON-FARM POULTRY BREEDING

Understand and produce high quality, in demand, 100% grass fed beef. It all starts with the pasture. The workshop topics will cover MIG (managed intensive grazing), salad bar grass production, holistic health care, AI breeding, calving, pasture improvement, high tensile wire fencing, organic-approved mineral supplements, and fall and winter feeding. Presenter: Steven Rockcastle, Blue Heron Growers Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

This workshop will provide a description of our poultry breeding experience and a platform for discussing others’ experiences. We will cover small-scale breeding, incubating, and hatching chickens, ducks, and turkeys. Presenters: Karma and Michael Glos, Kingbird Farm Sunday 8–9:15am

SMALL SCALE PIG BREEDING We will cover our hog breeding programs from boar selection to weaning piglets. We will delve specifically into the economics of organic sow management. Presenters: Karma and Michael Glos, Kingbird Farm Sunday 9:45–11am

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LI V E STO C K

100% GRASS FED BEEF: Low Cost Inputs for High Quality Finish

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M ARKETING & BUSINESS TR ACK

REGIONAL SOURCING FOR URBAN MARKETS: Snail of Approval & Producer Matrix

M A R K ETI N G & B U S I N E S S 32

communication, interest based negotiation, collaborative problem solving, consensus building, and confl ict management are what NYSAMP brings to the table. Presenter: Charlotte Carter, NYSAMP

Slow Food NYC will describe how its Snail of Approval & Producer Matrix drives regional producer sales in the New York City market. Saturday 1:15–2:30pm Learn how to become a Producer Matrix farmer and get introduced JUSTICE FOR to NYC Snail of Approval buyers. Presenter: Anthony Fassio, Slow FARMWORKERS! AND HOW ABOUT FARMERS TOO? Food NYC Saturday 8–9:15am For years, farmworkers and advocates in New York State have been trying to pass the Farmworker NEGOTIATION MAKES IT Fair Labor Practices Act. NOFA-NY HAPPEN! Organic farmers experience a members support the central denumber of unique challenges, and mand—freedom of association. often experience barriers to land How can we make this bill a win for and credit. While there is a grow- family-scale organic farmers as well ing field of advisers, resources, and as farmworkers? We will review retechnical advice available, the abil- sults from NOFA-NY’s farmer surity to negotiate and form collabor- vey. Come join the discussion. Presenter: Elizabeth Henderative partnerships is the common son, co-founder of Peacework Ordenominator to success in accessing ganic CSA and co-chair of NOFA-NY credit and land ownership. Skills Policy Committee and resources to facilitate clear Saturday 2:45–4pm

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M ARKETING & BUSINESS TR ACK

Food pantries and soup kitchens are more than just donation sites for your excess harvest. In this workshop, we will provide a thorough overview of Local Produce Link. LPL is a unique Farm to Food Pantry model of sourcing culturally-appropriate, locally-grown food to emergency food relief organizations in New York City. Workshop presenters will discuss how this program benefits food pantry clients, how partnerships with at-risk populations benefit New York State farmers, and how education can benefit both the recipients of local produce as well as those that produce it. Presenters: Rachelle Faroul, Just Food, and Katie Sheehan-Lopez, United Way NYC Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

DOING BUSINESS AS. . . Choosing a Business Structure for Your Farm In this workshop, we will explore the various options for structuring a farm business, including sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, and LLC. Participants will gain an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of each entity type so they can make a more informed decision about structuring their farm business. Presenter: Elizabeth Lappin, GrowNYC Sunday 8–9:15am

PROFITABILITY OF THE PAPER POT TRANSPLANTER ON A SMALL VEGETABLE FARM The paper pot transplanter—it looks cool, but is it a practical tool for small scale vegetable farms? This nifty tool quickly puts little plants into the ground in special paper pots that are linked together. Learn about the benefits and downfalls of the transplanter, what five test crops were profitable, and potential future uses of the transplanter. Presenters: Matthew Glenn and Liz Martin, Muddy Fingers Farm

M A R K ETI N G & B U S I N E S S

MAY ALL BE FED: A Unique Farm to Food Pantry Model

Sunday 9:45–11am www.nofanyconference.org

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NYS ENTERPRISES TR ACK

AGRICULTURALLY PRODUCTIVE BUFFERS: Agroforestry Strategies for Riverlands and Beyond

OTH E R N E W YO R K E N T E R PR I S E S

perennial crop and shade integration, among other strategies. Presenter: Ben Falk, homesteader and author of The Resilient Farm and Homestead, (Chelsea Green Agriculturally productive buffers Press, 2013) (APBs) are an emerging agroforestSaturday 1:15–2:30pm ry option for vulnerable river lands in the Northeast. APBs combine crop production, conservation, and FARMING WITH ROCKS Do you suffer from soil envy? Is flood resilience into a single manyour farm lined by far too many agement strategy. This workshop stone walls? Are rocks and pebbles will provide an overview of ecologyour best crops? If so, come to this ical functions, crop systems, and support group for those suffering planning and economic considerfrom PRSS (Poor Rocky Soil Synations for productive riparian bufdrome). We will share stories and fers. We will also discuss the use of ideas on how to farm with this terproductive buffers as an agroforestrible affl iction. ry strategy elsewhere in the workPresenter: Eric de Long, farmer ing landscape. in Greene County, New York Presenter: Connor Stedman, Saturday 2:45–4pm ecological designer and agroforester based in southern Vermont and co-organizer of the Carbon Farm- BOUQUET MAKING BASICS: ing Course Floral Design 101 for New Saturday 8–9:15am

DROUGHT AND FLOODPROOFING THE FARM This workshop will provide an overview of the primary strategies for decreasing one’s vulnerability to problematic inundation and drought. We will cover techniques for handling major precipitation events and for extending these events to help a farm resist acute drying when the rains stop. These include ponds, swales, hugelculture,

Flower Growers Seasoned flower farmers and floral designers will share how rewarding and lucrative working with local flowers can be. If you’re new to growing flowers, chances are you’ll pick up the growing techniques; however, making marketing bouquets takes some know-how and creativity. Learn tips on basic bouquet making and floral design including styles, materials, and resources. Presenters: Molly Culver, Youth Farm and Molly Oliver Flowers, and Deborah Grieg, East New York Farms! and Molly Oliver Flowers Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

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SUGARING 101: Why Every Farm Should Have a Sugaring Operation Even if You Don’t Have Maple Trees

SUGARING 102: Tips and Tricks for Developing an Enjoyable, Productive, and Profitable Sugaring Operation

This workshop will explore the benefits of developing a maple sugaring operation and offer ideas for expanding existing sugaring operations. You will learn about the economics of sugaring and marketing opportunities with maple, birch, and walnut sap. Several examples of community-based sugaring models will be covered to demonstrate how you can work with others to develop a sugaring operation through buying sap, boiling it on shares, or leasing other’s trees for tapping. If you don’t already have a sugaring operation, by the end of this workshop you’ll be making plans to buy your first evaporator, and if you are already sugaring, you will be well equipped to expand your production and sales. Presenter: Michael Farrell, Cornell University’s Sugar Maple Research & Education Center

You already have a sugaring operation. Now it’s time to focus on the nuts and bolts of modern syrup production. This workshop will highlight the most efficient and effective technologies and techniques that will help you save time, money, fuel, and frustration as you gather sap and process it into syrup. If you would like some new ideas to enhance your existing operation, this workshop is for you. Presenter: Michael Farrell, Cornell University’s Sugar Maple Research & Education Center Sunday 9:45–11am

Sunday 8–9:15am

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PRESERVING THE PAST, SEEDING THE FUTURE

OTH E R N E W YO R K E N T E R PR I S E S

NYS ENTERPRISES TR ACK

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POLICY & COMMUNIT Y TR ACK

WHERE DO WE STAND WITH FDA’S FOOD SAFETY REGULATIONS?

P O LI C Y & CO M M U N IT Y

With the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) now in the final rule-making phase for the national food safety regulations, there is much that farmers and supporters of localized food systems need to know and prepare for. This interactive workshop takes a proactive approach toward better protecting our farms and positioning ourselves to take the next steps. Presenter: Steve Gilman, NOFAInterstate Council Saturday 8–9:15am

CLOSE THE LOOP! Food Scrap Collection, Composting and Rotstar Training We will present an overview of how the Close the Loop VT! food scrap composting program was developed, the program’s role in implementing Vermont’s new law banning all organic materials from landfi lls by 2017, and how to train communities to implement composting programs. Presenters: Grace Gershuny, Green Mountain College and Highfields Center for Composting, and Tyler Buswell, Highfields Center for Composting Saturday 1:15–2:30pm

A FARM BILL: For All of Us We will go over a brief history and lively discussion about the Farm Bill and how and why the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is and should continue to be a part of it. What’s the political landscape, and what you need to know to get engaged to change the Farm Bill to better support organic, sustainable, diversified farming, reduce the grip of agribusiness, promote healthy foods and family farmers, and sustain emergency food programs. Presenters: Liana Hoodes, National Organic Coalition, and Mark Dunlea, Hunger Action Network of NY Saturday 2:45–4pm

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POLICY & COMMUNIT Y TR ACK

Organic farming is dependent on diverse, locally-adapted seed and livestock varieties, yet most public and private funding for breeding in recent decades has been for genetic engineering. The state of public varieties is in disarray and has an effect on seed and breed availability. Learn how seeds are adapted to local conditions and changing climates, the importance of locallyadapted varieties to our local food supply and continuing diversity in the marketplace, the knowledge and resources needed for public cultivar development, and the status and funding of non-GE breeding in our public institutions. Presenters: Liana Hoodes, National Organic Coalition, and Michael Mazourek, Cornell University Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

JUST LABEL IT! NYS Campaign to Pass GMO Labeling Legislation

Presenters: Elizabeth Henderson, co-founder of Peacework Organic CSA and co-chair of NOFA-NY Policy Committee, and Danielle Pinkerton, lead organizer for the Rochester chapter, NY March Against Monsanto Sunday 8–9:15am

NOFA-NY’S FARMER’S PLEDGE The Farmer’s Pledge was created by the NOFA-NY Board and member-farmers in 2002 as a means for farmers to describe their sustainable growing practices for the consumer. Each year, farmers are asked to evaluate the stated principles and make recommendations to the Pledge. If you’re interested in learning more about this program and how it might benefit your farm, or if you’re already a Farmer’s Pledge farm and would like to contribute to the program’s evolution, join us for this annual workshop on our Farmer’s Pledge program. Presenter: TBD Sunday 9:45–11am

Help NOFA-NY and the NYS GMO Labeling Coalition pass legislation this year! We’ll present updates on actions so far, background on the successful campaigns by NOFA chapters in CT and VT, and a draft plan of action. Bring your ideas for how we can pass a bill this year. Prepare to roll up your sleeves and sign up for action!

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PRESERVING THE PAST, SEEDING THE FUTURE

P O LI C Y & CO M M U N IT Y

SEEDS AND BREEDS: The State of Classical Breeding in a GMO World

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U R BA N FA R M I N G TR AC K

U R BA N FA R M I N G

SUCCESS ON THE GROUND

CREATING A COMPOSTHit the ground running before HEATED GREENHOUSE IN the first seed is planted, wheth- THE CITY er planning an urban farm plot or community garden. Learn how to establish your organization’s framework, form community alliances, forge partnerships, connect diverse constituencies, and communicate your success. Presenter: Annette Nielsen, food writer and sustainable community activist Saturday 8–9:15am

Grow your own healthy seedlings in an urban environment. We’ll review the ins and outs of creating a low-cost, off-grid greenhouse, heated by the power of composting urban waste stream materials. We will go over the methods and results from a 2012–2013 SARE project to study the feasibility and effectiveness of a small-sized compost-heated greenhouse for both winter vegetables and spring seedlings, and to provide tools for an urban farm to be more self-sufficient. We will also address particular urban growing issues for a greenhouse such as utilities access, community participation, vandalism, and transportation of materials. Presenter: Jesica Clark, South Pine Street City Farm Saturday 1:15–2:30pm

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NOFA-NY • 2014 WINTER CONFERENCE

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LOTS OF FOOD: Feeding Folks with Urban Food Forests

EMPOWERING YOUTH IN URBAN FARMING

Got shade? How about urban wildlife? Permaculture, a design science rooted in natural systems, informs us of how to plan productive perennial food forests that will feed sub/urban dwellers in even the most challenging environments. Learn polyculture design basics and advanced problem prevention and solving to increase the biodiversity, health, and productivity of your sub/urban garden or farm while discovering some new foods, regenerating the environment, and reducing your workload. Presenter: Patty Love, Barefoot Edible Landscape and Permaculture, and Lots of Food

A panel of adult and youth leaders from two youth-in-urban-agriculture organizations will present their findings and experiences. We will address core programming details that enable youth leadership, what makes urban farming programs exciting to youth, and through discussion try to tackle some of the biggest challenges to engaging youth in urban farming. Presenters: Maggie Cheney, EcoStation: NY and Bushwick Campus Farm, and Erika Symmonds, Green City Force

Saturday 2:45–4pm

FINANCES OF FARMING, ESPECIALLY IN A CITY In this workshop we will discuss the important financial metrics in farming including startup costs, production, yields, sales, and expenses. From experience in space-limited environments like rooftops and city lots, these lessons can be translated into any space. Learn how to assess a farm’s potential, quantify the value of different crops, set goals, and achieve them. Presenter: Ben Flanner, Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

Sunday 8–9:15am

GROWING URBAN SOIL FOR FOOD PRODUCTION Focus on the soil, and the rest of the urban farm can grow. Buffalo’s Massachusetts Avenue Project’s urban farm has spent 10 years turning vacant, nutrient-dead city land into a farm capable of intensive, healthy organic food production. Learn how MAP has created quality soil to support the farm’s different elements of agriculture. This workshop will explore the urban farm system including home grown compost, worms, chickens, fish farms, crop rotation, youth employees, and volunteers. Presenter: Jesse Meeder, Massachusetts Avenue Project

U R BA N FA R M I N G

U R BA N FA R M I N G TR AC K

Sunday 9:45–11am

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PRESERVING THE PAST, SEEDING THE FUTURE

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V E G E TA B L E T R AC K

V E G ETA B LE S

NO-TILL, NO-HERBICIDE PLANTING OF SPRING VEGETABLES USING WINTER KILLED COVER CROPS

MANAGING INSECTS AND INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE FOR ORGANIC POTATO PRODUCTION

We all know the advantages of no-till for soil health. But organic no-till using cover crops like rye tends to exacerbate problems with cold soils in early spring. Th is workshop will explore recent research in Maryland and Pennsylvania where we have seeded directly into low residue, winter killed cover crops that leave a friable, weedfree seedbed in spring. Th is experimental system will eliminate the need for spring tillage, speed soil warming in spring, and benefit farmers economically while providing the environmental benefits that good cover crops can offer including nutrient capture and cycling, erosion prevention, and soil compaction alleviation. Hear the experiences of farmers from the past two years. Presenters: Tianna DuPont, Penn State Extension, and Nicole Shelly, Gottschell Farm

We will discuss management options for Colorado potato beetle and potato leafhopper in organic potatoes. Pest biology, cultural practices, allowed insecticides, and managing insecticide resistance in Colorado potato beetles will be the primary topics covered. Presenters: Abby Seaman, Cornell IPM, and Mitchell Baker, entomologist

Saturday 8–9:15am

Saturday 2:45–4pm

GROWING BETTER MELONS, SUMMER SQUASH, AND CUCUMBERS Growing organic cucurbits—specifically melons, summer squash, and cucumbers—can be a challenging endeavor. Hear about best management practices for getting your crops through the onslaught of insects and eventual disease that threaten the potential of bountiful and delicious harvests. Results of trials of dozens of different cultivars will help growers select varieties that will fit into their growing and marketing systems. Share your knowledge from your own experiences and help guide future trialing and breeding to meet grower’s needs. Presenter: Michael Glos, Cornell Horticulture Program Saturday 4:15–5:30pm

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NOFA-NY • 2014 WINTER CONFERENCE

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are more aggressive and more tolerant of summer temperatures . The goal of this workshop is to enable farmers to optimize management of late blight by combining knowledge from research with farmer experience. Following the presentations from a research-extension perspective, farmers will be asked to share their experiences with late blight to start a discussion where attendees will be encouraged to comment about their successes and failures managing late blight with copper, biofungicides, and resistant varieties, and utility of monitoring information on the Decision SupADVANCED SEED SAVING: port System at the USABlight.org Biennials site. Saving seed in the Northeast can Presenters: Meg McGrath, Corbe a challenge, particularly for bi- nell University, and Abby Seaman, ennial crops. Come learn the fun- Cornell IPM damentals of planting, selecting, Sunday 9:45–11am storing, and saving seed of common biennials from onions to cabbage, MAXIMIZE NEW FARM kale to carrots. Expect to come GREENHOUSE SPACE: away with understanding, inspiraTransplants and More tion, and an expanded seed saving Join us for a discussion about all confidence. aspects of getting your greenhouses Presenters: Petra Page-Mann and high tunnels up and going in and Matthew Goldfarb, Fruition the context of larger start-up farm Seeds planning and infrastructure develSunday 8–9:15am opment. This workshop will cover the basics of growing organic transHOW TO SUCCESSFULLY plants, as well as how to best use GROW TOMATOES your greenhouse spaces after the AND POTATOES DESPITE starts get in the ground. THE BLIGHT Presenter: Jamie Edelstein, This devastating disease has been Wyllie Fox Farm, NOFA-NY Board occurring more, especially on toma- of Directors toes, because new pathogen strains Saturday 1:15–2:30pm

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PRESERVING THE PAST, SEEDING THE FUTURE

V E G ETA B LE S

V E G E TA B L E T R AC K

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CHILDREN'S CONFERENCE & CHILDCARE

Each year we encourage attendees to bring their children ages 6–12 to attend our special Children’s Conference. Space is limited, so register early. Sorry, no walk-in registrations. Children’s Conference Coordinator Rebekah Rice will be available throughout the conference to keep things running smoothly. Check out this year’s schedule:

FRIDAY

Friday

C H I LD R E N ’S CO N F E R E N C E 42

SAND PAINTING MANDALAS Who are we? Who do we want to be? We’ll warm up with games and yoga, and get comfortable with each other. We will be led in creating sand painting mandalas as a way to express our hopes and dreams for ourselves. Sarah is a trained yoga teacher and shamanic practitioner in the Jaguar Path tradition. Presenter: Sarah van Leer, home gardener Friday 9:00am–12:15pm

Lunch Parents will need to pick up their children promptly at 12:15pm; no children’s programming or childcare will be offered during lunch.

MINERAL SPRINGS TASTING TOUR We’ll head over to the Saratoga Spa State Park for a guided tour. We’ll taste the mineral springs, learn about geology, discover the folklore of Saratoga Springs, and practice our map reading skills. Please bring a small backpack and come dressed in warm layers and skid-proof boots for this icy outdoors experience. Parents: you’ll need to drop off and pick up your child(ren) at Park headquarters at the State Park (you are also welcome to join us if you wish to). Maps, directions, and carpool arrangements will be available in the morning. Latecomers please check with registration before joining us. Presenter: Alli Schweizer, environmental educator Friday 1:05–4:45pm

NOFA-NY • 2014 WINTER CONFERENCE

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SATURDAY

Saturday

Lunch

MYTHS AND CREATION STORIES Myths and creation stories are an exciting part of our traditions. Join us as we weave together community building games with art and storytelling. You can count on a playful, magical and creative workshop! Presenter: Jillian Hirsch, artist, educator, gardener

Parents will need to pick up their children promptly at 11:15am; no children’s programming or childcare will be offered during lunch.

HERBALISM 101

Herbalism is the study of the medicinal properties of plants, and has been widely practiced across cultures and throughout history. Join us for this fascinating introduction to herbalism where we will learn Saturday 7:55–9:30am how to make traditional salves, tinctures and teas. YOUNG FARMER’S CIRCUS Presenter: Jenn Baumstein, Participants will learn acrobat- community engagement organizer, ics, dance, creative movement, and herbalist, writer songs related to themes of land Saturday 1:10–2:30pm and food. There will be something for everyone! We will decorate ourselves and perform for each other. Presenters: Leah Penniman and Jonah Vitale-Wolff, organic farmers, educators, parents, activists

C H I LD R E N ’S CO N F E R E N C E

CHILDREN'S CONFERENCE & CHILDCARE

Saturday 9:45–11:15am www.nofanyconference.org

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CHILDREN'S CONFERENCE & CHILDCARE

C H I LD R E N ’S CO N F E R E N C E

FOOD SCULPTURE Make and photograph a food sculpture with multimedia storyteller and food artist Ellie Markovitz. We’ll make delicious smoothies, too! Ellie created Troy’s StoryHarvest and StoryCooking.com in order to work with food literacy, which is her true passion. Presenter: Ellie Markovitz, multimedia storyteller, food artist Saturday 2:30–4pm

SUNDAY

Sunday

SEED PACKET ART Have you ever looked at how differently seeds are packaged in nature? We’ll look at lots of seed heads and pods, clean up the ones we want to save, and create our own seed packet art using collage and paints. Presenter: Rebekah Rice, Nine Mile Farm, artist Sunday 7:45–9:30am

TELLING OUR STORIES IN SONG AND MOVEMENT We’ll wrap up the day by telling our stories through song and movement and by creating a song together in this songwriting workshop. Cathy is a long-time singer songwriter who does workshops in camps, libraries, and schools. P r e s e nt e r : C a t h y W i n t e r, songwriter Saturday 4–5:30pm

PANCAKES FOR BRUNCH! We’ll use a bicycle mill to grind locally grown grains, mix up some batter, heat up the griddle, and have a feast. Amy loves and writes about grains of all sorts, and Howard grows grain in Troy and enjoys inventing new equipment for community use. Presenters: Amy Halloran, writer, and Howard Stoner, urban farmer Sunday 9:30–11am

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CHILDREN'S CONFERENCE & CHILDCARE

Child care will be available for youth ages 3–5 and includes many activities to keep your young ones engaged and inspired. The childcare program will be led by Linda Stallard, an experienced teacher and afterschool leader at the Saratoga Waldorf Schools since 1987. Each day will include a walk outside and fun inside crafts and activities. Children must bring warm outside clothes (boots, snow pants, jackets, hats, mittens, etc., and an extra change of clothes). Pre-registration is required, and no childcare services will be offered during lunch. Parents should plan to pick up their children promptly after the morning sessions end, and then again following the afternoon’s last workshop. Friday: 8:45am–12:15pm and 1:10–4:35pm Saturday: 7:50–11:50am and 1:10–5:40pm Sunday: 7:50–11:15am

WORKING WITH TRADITIONAL MATERIALS Using lumber milled on his farm from different types of trees, architect John Inman will show us how to work with traditional materials in this hands-on workshop. We’ll experiment with pine, oak, and black locust planks and find out for ourselves how the strengths of these various materials are different. Presenter: John Inman, Nine Mile Farm Sunday 11am–12:15pm

C H I LD R E N ’S CO N F E R E N C E

CHILDCARE

Lunch Parents will need to pick up their children promptly at 12:15pm; no children’s programming or childcare will be offered during lunch.

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HOW TO GET THERE The Saratoga Hilton 534 Broadway, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 888-866-3591 • 518-584-4000 • www.thesaratogahotel.com

DRIVING From the South: Take NYS Thruway (I-87N) to exit 24. Take Adirondack Northway (I-87) to exit 15. Turn left off exit. At the 5th traffic light, turn left onto Rock Street. At stop sign turn right onto Maple Ave. The Saratoga parking lot is on your right. From the East: Take Mass. Turnpike-West to NY Thruway, take exit B-1 (I-90 Bypass) to I-787N for approximately 6 miles to Route 7-W for approximately 2 miles to Adirondack Northway (I-87) for approximately 22 miles to exit 15. Turn left off exit. At the 5th traffic light, turn left onto Rock Street. At stop sign turn right onto Maple Ave. The Saratoga parking lot is on your right. From the West: Take NYS Thruway (I-90 East to exit 24). Take Adirondack Northway (I-87N) to exit 15. Take left at exit. At the 5th traffic light turn left onto Rock Street. At stop sign, turn right onto Maple Ave. The Saratoga parking lot is on your right. From the North: Take Adirondack Northway (I-87S) to exit 15. Take right at exit. At the 4th traffic light turn left onto Rock Street. At stop sign, turn right onto Maple Ave. The Saratoga parking lot is on your right.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Air: Albany International Airport (ALB) Train: Amtrak offers direct service to Saratoga Springs. Use discount code X74Q-980 when you call Amtrak at (800) 872-7245 or use www.amtrak.com. Discount is valid for travel 1/21/14–1/29/14. Bus: Greyhound, Adirondack Trailways and Pine Hill Trailways service Saratoga Springs. Taxi: Saratoga Central Dispatch (518) 584-2700.

Hotel Accommodations Hotel rooms at the Saratoga Hilton are available at a rate of $100/night, based on double occupancy. To receive this discounted rate, you must identify yourself as a NOFA-NY Conference Attendee. To make a reservation, please visit the Winter Conference Hotel Reservation site at www.nofany.org/hotel and use the

promotional code AKEL or call the Hilton Reservations Department at (888) 866-3596. Rooms go quickly! Interested in arranging to share a room? We have set up a page on RideBuzz.org so that you can arrange your own room shares. Go to http:// tinyurl.com/WC2014rideshare.

SAVE GAS & MONEY Share a Ride!

Are you concerned about carbon emissions and/or interested in saving a few bucks? Share a ride! We have set up a page on RideBuzz.org so that you can arrange your own ride shares. Go to http://tinyurl.com/WC2014rideshare to arrange your own ride. 46

NOFA-NY • 2014 WINTER CONFERENCE

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THANKS TO OUR 2014 WINTER CONFERENCE SPONSORS PATRON OF ORGANICS Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program

United States Department of Agriculture

Risk Management Agency This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

PLATINUM

An employee-owned company

GOLD

SILVER

Down to Earth FARMERS MARKETS

Deep Grass Nursery

- formerly Community Markets

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Receive a $10 discount if you register by December 13th Visit www.nofanyconference.org to register online

Pre-Registration closes January 15th

PERMIT NO. 1396 Rochester, NY

PAID

NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

2014 Winter Conference Brochure  
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