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The official publication of the Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID HARRISBURG PA PERMIT NO 533

September/Ocotober 2013 z Volume 94 z Issue 5

www.papharmacists.com


ent of m e c r s Enfo s Begin e A c t ive l u R ! IPAA New H ber 23, 2013 Septem

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PPA Board of Directors PPA Officers: President: J. Scott Miskovsky, RPh President-Elect: Eric R. Esterbrook, RPh First Vice President: Donna Hazel, RPh Second Vice President: Eric Pusey, RPh, CDE Immediate Past President: Robert B. Frankil, RPh Regional Directors: Central: Janet Getzey Hart, R.Ph. Northeast: Jonathan D. Ference, PharmD, BCPS Northwest: Elliott Cook, PharmD, BCPS Southeast: Nick Leon, PharmD, BCPS, BCACP Southwest: Lauren Simko, PharmD Academy Directors: Academy of Alternative Pharmacy Practice: Jamie McConaha, PharmD Academy of Chain Pharmacists: Stephanie Harriman McGrath, PharmD Academy of Community Pharmacists: Martin J. Kendra, RPh Academy of Health System Pharmacists: Paul T. Kocis, PharmD, FASCP Academy of Long Term Care and Consultant Pharmacists: Brant Gahr, RPh Academy of Pharmacy Industry Association: Todd Eury Academy of Pharmacy Technicians: Patrick Purcell, CPhT Academy of Student Pharmacists: Kyle McCormick PPA Office Staff: CEO: Patricia A. Epple, CAE pepple@papharmacists.com Communications Coordinator: Erica Brandt, ebrandt@papharmacists.com Membership Coordinator: Corey Wenger cwenger@papharmacists.com Program Coordinator: Sara Powers spowers@papharmacists.com Government Relations Manager: Donald L. Smith, III dsmith@papharmacists.com

Our Vision

Pennsylvania pharmacists will be recognized, engaged, and fairly compensated as health-care providers.

Our Mission

The Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association, as the leading voice of pharmacy, promotes the profession through advocacy, education, and communication to enhance patient care and public health.

Pennsylvania MAGAZINE

Departments

Message from the President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Member News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 New Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Ext. 3 Ext. 2 Ext. 1 Ext. 4 Ext. 6

Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association (PPA) 508 North Third Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101 (717) 234-6151 Fax: (717) 236-1618 www.papharmacists.com ppa@papharmacists.com www.facebook.com/PAPharmacy www.twitter.com/papharmacists Pennsylvania Pharmacist (ISSN 0031-4633) is the official publication of the Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical Association d/b/a Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association and is published every other month, six times per year. Annual subscription is $100 for non-members; for members it is included in the annual dues. Editorial information should be addressed to the PPA address listed above. Peer reviewed articles accepted according to the stated guidelines available from PPA. Editorial Board: Tara L. Pummer, PharmD, Chairman Hershey S. Bell, M.D., M.S., FAAFP Stephanie Smith Cooney, PharmD Bernard Graham, PhD Brian S. Plager, RPh, MBA Associate Editor: Erica Brandt Editor/Manager: Pat Epple Published by: Graphtech Sarah DiCello, Publications Manager (717) 238-5751 sarah@thinkgraphtech.com For Advertising Information: Alexis Kierce, Account Manager (717) 238-5751 alexis@thinkgraphtech.com

Features Financial Forum Eight Tips For Planning Your Retirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Pharmacy and the Law No Refills On Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Community Pharmacy Spotlight Altobelli Community Pharmacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 PPA Member Profile Gregg S. Teitel Pharm.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Profiles in Pharmacy Innovation Mary Grisnik-Kaup, PharmD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residency Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Pharmacy Time Capsules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 PPA Educational Foundation Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Association News Where Are They Now Updates From PPA Interns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Pharmacy Technician Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 PPA Welcomes New Communications Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 PPA Member Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Designed by: Graphtech

PharmPAC Quickfacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Pharmacist State Board of Pharmacy Members: Edward J. Bechtel, R.Ph. – Independent Community Gayle A. Cotchen, PharmD., MBA – Institutional Pauline Montgomery, R.Ph. – Independent Community Theresa M. Talbott, R.Ph. – Chain Community Mark J. Zilner, R.Ph. – Chain Community

American Pharmacists Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Student Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association (SPPA) / Student Advisory Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

2013 Board of Pharmacy Meeting Dates: July 16, August 20, September 17, October 15, November 19, December 10

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 3


R.J. Hedges & Associates

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COMPLIANCE PROGRAM Do you have the right steps in place to administer immunizations? Are your Standing Orders and Emergency Protocols signed by a physician? If a patient has an adverse reaction, do you have a policy and procedure manual to provide to your insurance company? Are you and your pharmacy protected with all the licensure, insurance and compliance requirements?

R.J. Hedges & Associates’ Pharmacy Immunization Compliance Policy and Procedure Program includes: • Easy to read and follow policies and procedures with necessary documents needed to implement an immunization program “We are impressed by the unique work • An outline/plan to implement a 10 - 15 minute vaccination process RJ Hedges & Associates is doing to keep • Guidance to help you and your staff perform efficient, compliant pharmacists up to date on the increasingly and professional immunizations complex world of immunization.” • Instructions for properly documenting and recording physicians’ – Deborah L. Wexler, MD, standing orders Executive Director, Immunization Action Coalition • Emergency Protocols for anaphylactic reactions • A Bloodborne Pathogen Plan that meets the 2013 OSHA standards • A Hazard Communication Plan that meets the 2013 OSHA standards • Policies and Procedures meet the 2013 CDC recommendations • Facility Safety Program Order your customized • Computer-Based Training Videos • Workflow management Policy & Procedure

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Departments

J. Scott Miskovsky, RPh PPA President 2013-2014

Article Head Message fromGoes the President Here

I

hope that this message finds everyone enjoying a happy and healthy summer. What a wonderful time of the year to share an outing or vacations with friends and family. For myself, as August approaches I start to think a little less about the state of my golf swing and more about getting into the “swing” of the upcoming pharmacy year. We started the season off with a great Board Leadership Retreat/ Strategic Planning Meeting July 26th at Toftrees Resort in State College, Pa. My special thanks to the PPA staff, Board of Directors, university deans, students, and all who made this event a great success again this year. Some topics addressed at the Strategic Planning meeting include: our Strategic Plan, statewide MTM Network, membership recruitment, PPA magazine, and our website. These topics are diverse and an example of how the Board continues to provide thorough and comprehensive oversight of the management for the organization. Just a reminder: Please don’t forget 2 important events this fall. First is the PPA Convention in Gettysburg Pa Sept 26-29. We

have a well structured program for you, which includes CE’s, networking opportunities, and social events. Call PPA at 717-2346151 or visit www.papharmacists. com/annualconference to register. Please plan to attend and be challenged!! October, of course, is Pharmacists Month. What a wonderful opportunity to highlight our role on the healthcare team and promote the pharmacist as a strong patient advocate. This can be accomplished by a number of means both large and small. Perhaps a brown bag medication day would work, or an immunization clinic or

a presentation to a local civic organization. On a personal note, in the past, I gave out gift bags to local health care providers, business associates, community groups, and assisted living homes. How about placing a newspaper ad or sponsoring a radio spot to raise local awareness? Let today be the day you take action. More information can be found at pharmacist.com I promise to keep you informed and up to date as the year progresses. See you in Gettysburg!

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 5


Departments Thank You to Our Corporate Partners

On Our Cover

These companies support PPA activities throughout the year.

Below are descriptions of the photos featured on the cover of this issue:

DIAMOND LEVEL

From Left to Right: University of Pittsburgh Pharmacy Students, PPA President J. Scott Miskovsky’s Red Cross Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh Pharmacy Students at Rite Aid, Pharmacy Students from Wilkes, Pharmacy Student from Rite Aid, Photo from Millennium Pharmacy Systems, University of Pittsburgh Pharmacy Students at Rite Aid, 2013 APhA American Pharmacists Month Logo.

GOLD LEVEL

Save the Date!

SILVER LEVEL

Pennsylvania BRONZE LEVEL

PPA’s 2014 Mid-Year Conference will be held January 23rd-26th at Omni Bedford Springs Resort in Bedford, PA.

MAGAZINE

We will see you there!

Calendar of Events September 22-24 26-29 26 October 1-4 12-13 12-16 16-18 20-27 22 November 20-22 21 December 8-12 January 21 23-26 26 February 5-8 18

ACCP Annual Meeting, Bethesda, MD PPA Annual Conference, Gettysburg, PA PPA Board of Directors American Pharmacists Month ACPE CPE 2013 Conference, Minneapolis, MN NASPA Fall Meeting, Orlando, FL NCPA Annual Conference, Orlando, FL AMCP Educational Conference, San Antonio, TX National Hospital and Health-System Pharmacy Week National Pharmacy Technician Day ASCP Annual Meeting & Exhibition, Seattle, WA PPA Board of Directors ASHP Mid Year Clinical Meeting, Orlando, FL Pennsylvania State Board of Pharmacy Meeting PPA Mid-Year Conference, Bedford, PA PPA Board of Directors IACP Educational Conference, Ft. Lauderdale, FL Pennsylvania State Board of Pharmacy Meeting

For additional events and PPA committee meetings be sure to see our Calendar of Events on the PPA website!

6 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013

Certification Excellence Since 1995, the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) has certified over 400,000 pharmacy technicians nationwide and is the only pharmacy technician certification program endorsed by the American Pharmacist Association, the American Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists, and the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy.

Apply to take the PTCE online at www.ptcb.org.


“QS/1 makes me look like a

hero to my customers.” – Charlie Fanaras, RPh

QS/1 gives us and our customers confidence. We can provide answers to questions quickly and easily with the comprehensive reporting, without making customers wait. New employees learn the systems easily, so they get up and running faster. The integration makes things so much more efficient, and they have enabled us to do a few things no one else in the state is doing. Lastly, their remote backups have saved us on more than one occasion.

Learn how QS/1 products and services can help you be a hero. Call 1.800.231.7776 or visit www.qs1.com today.

©2012, J M SMITH CORPORATION. QS/1, NRx, PrimeCare and SystemOne are registered trademarks of the J M Smith Corporation.


Departments Department

Member News Pharmacist Presents at Immunization Conference June 21, 2013

A

dam C. Welch, PharmD, MBA, BCACP recently presented an update on the role of pharmacists in immunization delivery. The presentation was part of the 19th Annual Pennsylvania Immunization Conference, held at the Crowne Plaza in Wyomissing, PA hosted by the Pennsylvania Immunization Coalition. With nearly 300 nurses, physicians, medical assistants, and pharmacists in attendance, the presentation discussed the education and training needed for pharmacists to be involved with vaccines. Welch also made reference during the presentation to the House Bill [HB 776] that would expand the age range of patients that pharmacists can vaccinate. He cited that pharmacists could fill a need in the community by finishing series or boosters of vaccines such as human papillomavirus and meningococcal that would otherwise be lost to follow-up in the current system. “In Pennsylvania, only 41% of teenage females are completing their 3-dose series of the HPV vaccine,” Welch said, “which provides an opportunity for pharmacists to assist in public health efforts when patients aren’t completing their follow-up appointments with their primary care providers”. Welch also

provided materials and a link to PPA’s Immunization Locator, www.papharmacists.com/ immunize, where patients and providers can search for immunizing pharmacists by county. If you are a pharmacy and would like to be included in the PPA Immunization Locator, please email ppa@papharmacists.com.

Speaking Up for Pharmacist Provided Immunization Age ExpansionChuck Kray, of Hershey Pharmacy, was on WITF’s Smart Talk Radio earlier this week talking about why it makes sense

8 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013

to permit pharmacists to provide immunizations to those younger than 18 years of age. A playback of his discussion can be found on the PPA website under Legislative and Political News Briefs. Dr. Kristin Ball Motley was recently featured in the Franklin Mint Federal Credit Union publication titled Choices. The article discusses her passion for solving the prescription drug problem. As a pharmacist and patient advocate, Kristin is dedicated to helping those without insurance — or without enough insurance — get the medicines they need at affordable costs. z


Departments

New Members P

PA welcomes the following New Members who joined the association June 4, 2013 – July 31, 2013. Please make these new members feel welcome and part of Pennsylvania pharmacy!

Active Pharmacist Chuck D’Ardenne Hatfield Krupa Dave Bensalem Arvilla Enck Wiley’s Pharmacy of Strasburg Strasburg

Ashley Stull LECOM School of Pharmacy Philadelphia Laura Stulmanis Temple University School of Pharmacy Feasterville Mark Zilner Diamond Pharmacy Indiana

Holly Lang Walgreen’s Gilbertsville

Corporate

Zeng Li Wellcare Pharmacy Philadelphia

Paul Levesque Value Drug Company Hollidaysburg

Mitchell Spivack Verree Pharmacy Philadelphia

Walter McCulloch Value Drug Company Altoona

Associate

Student

Mary Oliveira PSECU Harrisburg

Technician Amy Curtis Williams Apothecary Lancaster Jennifer Oster Williams Apothecary Lancaster Derrick Galmore Philadelphia

Cedarville University

Shenandoah University of Pharmacy

University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy

Rebecca Kyper

Sarah Medved

Hunter Busansky

Duquesne University Mylan School of Pharmacy

Temple University School of Pharmacy

Jennifer Fever

Nina Dziopa

Mark Bateman

Theresa Ebinger

Margaret LaBuz Katherine McCaffrey Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at USP

Eri Jibowo

Ho-Sik Kim Valerie Nolt Betsy Smith Georgina Waldman

Ezinne Okwuego Brittany Towler

Mit Patel

Kayla Tran

Anita Pothen

Tung Troung

Annie Tien

We sincerely thank everyone who has helped recruit a member and for helping make PPA stronger!

Avoid diminishing the value of your pharmacy. Don’t leave money on the table when you transition the ownership of your business. CONSIDER THESE IMPORTANT ISSUES...

1. Confidentiality is CRITICAL to maintaining business value. The more people who know about a sale (employees, suppliers, customers), the less value it will ultimately have. Limit your conversations to trusted advisors, associates and family members. 2. Connect to the largest group of QUALIFIED BUYERS to create the highest price, by leveraging the highest level of interest in your business. Limiting your buyer pool (e.g. ONLY your wholesaler's customers), limits your ability to sell and sale price.

Your Local Specialist Jim Beatty, R.Ph. jimb@buy-sellapharmacy.com Tel: 1-(732)-563-0295

3. DO NOT engage in conversations, information sharing or negotiations with ANY buyer without professional representation, particularly if contemplating a sale to a chain. Thirteen years of experience selling pharmacies has shown us time after time that direct engagement rarely—if ever—gets the independent owner the best price or the best deal.

Completely confidential!

1-(877)-360-0095 www.buy-sellapharmacy.com Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 9


Come join us for our Value Drug Get Togethers

Value Drug Company, a regional wholesaler based in Altoona PA, operates as a cooperative of Independent Pharmacists to consolidate their purchasing power. Rated as one of the top independent wholesale drug distributors in the United States, we regularly administer LTC and other GPO contracts for our class of trade members.

Join us...

for dinner and learn how we can help you become more profitable.

• Wednesday, September 11

Value Drug New Distribution Center Tours Duncansville, PA 4pm-6pm Tours The Blairmont Club Hollidaysburg, PA 6pm

• Wednesday, September 25 Wyndham Gettysburg, PA

6pm

• Wednesday, October 9

Hilton Scranton & Conference Center Scranton, PA 6pm

• Wednesday, November 6 Omni Hotel - William Penn Pittsburgh, PA 6pm

Register online at http://vdcevents.valuedrugco.com

5 Reasons You Should Attend! • Aggressive Generic Source Program Bringing You Lower Pricing and Profitability • Specialty Pharmacy Services • Immunization Program with Protocol Physician • 340B Program • LTC eMAR Program We are confident Value Drug Company We are confident Value Drug Company will be “Your Solution for Profitability.” will be “Your Solution for Profitability.”

contact: Karla Moschella at 800-252-3786 ext. 126 for more information


Features

Financial Forum This series, Financial Forum, is presented by Pro Advantage Services, Inc., a subsidiary of Pharmacists Mutual Insurance Company, and your State Pharmacy Association through Pharmacy Marketing Group, Inc., a company dedicated to providing quality products and services to the pharmacy community.

Eight Tips For Planning Your Retirement

A few simple steps to help you get started on the right foot

P

lanning financially for retirement may feel overwhelming. For some, that feeling is what keeps them from really focusing on and implementing a plan. If you haven’t started planning for your retirement – do yourself a favor and make TODAY the day you begin. 1. The earlier the better. Time is definitely one of your greatest allies. A person who begins contributing a modest amount to a retirement plan in their early twenties could end up on par with someone who contributes much more aggressively but does not start until their mid-thirties. Even if you have to start small, start now. Whatever amount you can afford to set aside for later, do it – and let it grow. If you don’t have the luxury of starting young, don’t waste time worrying about it. Start now. You’ll never again be younger than you are today.

2. Be smart about what you’ll need. Yes, it’s true – the senior discount is alive and well, and the general cost of living may be less for those who have retired. But don’t forget, there are other costs to consider. Your healthcare costs, for example, may be greater in retirement simply because you’re

not as healthy as you were in your youth. Additionally, you’ll want to take inflation into account. If you plan your retirement based on the cost of living and income of your 30’s, by the time you hit your retirement years, you may find you greatly underestimated your needs. Continued on page 14

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 11


Features

and the Law By Don. R. McGuire Jr., R.Ph., J.D. This series, Pharmacy and the Law, is presented by Pharmacists Mutual Insurance Company and your State Pharmacy Association through Pharmacy Marketing Group, Inc., a company dedicated to providing quality products and services to the pharmacy community.

No Refills On Saturday

P

at was working a long shift on Saturday at the Anytown Pharmacy. He was hoping for an uneventful day. Sometime after lunch, Mrs. Jones came in for a refill of her Keppra. When Pat looked at Mrs. Jones’ profile, he saw that there weren’t any refills remaining. To make matters worse, Mrs. Jones’ physician, Dr. Brown, had just recently retired and closed his practice. With no refills left and no one to call, Pat’s afternoon just got longer. The solution to Pat’s dilemma depends on his state’s pharmacy laws. Many states have regulations that deal with situations where no additional refills are authorized. In the old days, many pharmacists would give the patient enough medication to get them through until Monday when the physician’s office opened. However, there was no legal authority for doing this. That is not always true today. Consider this excerpt from a statute from Ohio that allows a pharmacist to dispense medication when a prescription is out of refills; (3) In the exercise of the pharmacist’s professional judgment:

(a) The drug is essential to sustain the life of the patient or continue therapy for a chronic condition of the patient. (b) Failure to dispense or sell the drug to the patient could result in harm to the health of the patient. (4) The amount of the drug that is dispensed or sold under this section does not exceed a seventy-two hour supply as provided in the prescription. If Pat was practicing in Ohio and believed that the Keppra was needed to continue therapy for Mrs. Jones’ chronic condition, then Pat could dispense a 72 hour supply. If Pat was practicing in Iowa, then a similar law would apply. The relevant parts are;

12 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013

2. A pharmacist may exercise professional judgment by refilling a prescription without prescriber authorization if all of the following are true: a. The pharmacist is unable to contact the prescriber after reasonable effort. b. Failure to refill the prescription might result in an interruption of therapeutic regimen or create patient suffering. c. The pharmacist informs the patient or the patient’s representative at the time of dispensing, and the practitioner at the earliest convenience that prescriber reauthorization is required. The major difference is that the quantity is not limited to a


Features 72 hour supply. The limitation is for a period of time reasonably necessary to secure an authorization. In contrast, Alaska doesn’t have a similar provision. In fact, their regulation says; If there are no refill instructions on the prescription drug order, or if all refills authorized on the original prescription drug order have been dispensed, a pharmacist shall obtain authorization from the prescribing practitioner before dispensing a refill. But remember, Pat’s dilemma is a little more complicated than these laws address. Pat has no one to call on Monday morning; Dr. Brown has retired. Again, depending on state law, Pat may have his answer. Iowa has a regulation that provides; Prescription drug orders and medication orders shall be valid as long as a prescriber/ patient relationship exists. Once the prescriber/patient relationship is broken and the prescriber is no longer available to treat the patient or oversee the patient’s use of a prescription drug, the order loses its validity and the pharmacist, on becoming aware of the situation, shall cancel the order and any remaining refills. The pharmacist shall, however, exercise prudent judgment based upon individual circumstances to ensure that the patient is able to obtain a sufficient amount of the prescribed drug to continue treatment until the patient can reasonably obtain the service of another prescriber and a new order can be issued. In this situation, Pat has little anxiety taking care of Mrs. Jones

until she can make an appointment with her new physician. The first lesson we can learn from Pat’s dilemma is to make sure that we are familiar with our own state’s laws and regulations and to know where to look for these answers. What if we aren’t lucky enough to practice in a state where laws have been passed to address these situations? We, as well as Pat, are then faced with a legal and ethical dilemma. We are forced to use our professional judgment. Any further dispensing, which is a violation, must be weighed against the potential harm to Mrs. Jones. Is the medication essential to Mrs. Jones’ health? Is she likely to suffer harm if she goes without her Keppra? Essentially, this is performing the triage required in Ohio and Iowa. What is the correct answer? That will depend on the circumstances presented. A pharmacist can’t be forced to break the law, that is, to dispense a prescription drug without a valid prescription . But there could be circumstances where the pharmacist might want to put the patient’s welfare ahead of their own. That is the exercise of one’s professional judgment. That exercise will be easier and less stressful

to perform if the pharmacist is prepared with a knowledge of their own state’s laws and regulations. z © Don R. McGuire Jr., R.Ph., J.D., is General Counsel, Senior Vice President, Risk Management & Compliance at Pharmacists Mutual Insurance Company. This article discusses general principles of law and risk management. It is not intended as legal advice. Pharmacists should consult their own attorneys and insurance companies for specific advice. Pharmacists should be familiar with policies and procedures of their employers and insurance companies, and act accordingly.

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 13


Features Financial Forum

Continued from page 11

3. Be smart about how long you’ll need it. When Social Security was being developed, in the 1930’s, a male retiring in the United States was really only expected to live about 12 years past his date of retirement.1 However, the average life expectancy of a United States citizen has risen fairly steadily throughout the last fifty years.2 Depending on when you retire, you may need to plan for 20 or more years of income. 4. Take advantage of taxdeferred contributions. It sounds like a no-brainer, but sometimes people determine how much they can afford to contribute to a retirement account based on their net income, rather than their gross income. You may decide you can only afford $50 less per paycheck, net. But remember that some contributions, like those to your 401(k) for example, may be made with pre-tax dollars. That means you can afford to contribute a bit more from your gross income and still only “miss” $50 from your net income. This is an important consideration. 5. Take advantage of matching contributions. If your employer offers a 401(k) match – consider scrimping here and there in order to take maximum advantage of it. It’s a very positive domino effect. The more you contribute, the more

you earn in matching contributions (up to the maximum allowable amount). Think of it this way – if your employer offers a 50% match, then for every $100 you don’t contribute, you’re missing out on $50 in “free money”. You’re also missing out on the growth potential of that money as well. 6. Do the math. This might be the most important retirement tip of all. Block off some time to sit down and do some calculations. Consider the different levels of contributions you could make and calculate how far those could take you by the time you reach retirement. Once you see what you COULD achieve, you may be more motivated to increase your contributions. 7. Trim the fat. Keep careful track of your spending for one month (if you bank online, you may have access to tools that help you do this). After one full month, sit down and take a careful look at what you spent money on. Did it all make sense? Was some of it frivolous? Any regrets? Taking a close look at exactly where your money is going is often the best way to discover areas that need improvement, and ways you could adjust your spending habits. Add up all the money you feel you spent unnecessarily, then add that amount to the contribution math you did previously … how much further might that extra monthly contribution have taken you?

14 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013

8. Get help. These retirement tips are intended to help you get started down a path toward, potentially, a more successful retirement. But they’re just that – a starting point. While it’s definitely important to educate yourself and understand your finances, seeking the assistance of a financial professional may be one of the best moves you could make. z Provided by courtesy of Pat Reding, CFP™ of Pro Advantage Services Inc., in Algona, Iowa. For more information, please call Pat Reding at 1-800-288-6669. Registered representative of and securities offered through Berthel Fisher & Company Financial Services, Inc. Member NASD & SIPC Pro Advantage Services, Inc./ Pharmacists Mutual is independent of Berthel Fisher & Company Financial Services Inc. Berthel Fisher & Company Financial Services, Inc. does not provide legal or tax advice. Before taking any action that would have tax consequences, consult with your tax and legal professionals. This article is for informational purposes only. It is not meant to be a recommendation or solicitation of any securities or market strategy. 1 - google.com/publicdata?ds=wbwdi&met=sp_dyn_le00_in&idim=countr y:USA&dl=en&hl=en&q=life+expectan cy [10/29/10] 2 - http://www.newretirement.com/ Planning101/Retiring_Too_Soon.aspx [10/25/10]


Features Community Pharmacy Spotlight

Altobelli Community Pharmacy

S

ince 1979, Choice Health Services has been centered on one thing: Family. “Caring For You Like Family” has been Choice’s motto since its beginning days in 1979, when Andrew Altobelli, R.Ph., his wife Susan and children Jennifer and Matthew, bought East Berlin Pharmacy on West King Street in East Berlin. In those days, and for six years after, Andrew was the only pharmacist on staff. His family lived above the pharmacy while he worked 68 hours a week. “We are a servant to the public,” Andrew said. “We provide what is needed to be helpful.” Living upstairs and working in the pharmacy since she was old enough to “wipe a shelf” inspired Andrew’s daughter, Jennifer DeRienzo, to become a pharmacist as well. Today Jennifer is part owner and works at the family’s fourth pharmacy, Choice Family Pharmacy in McSherrystown. Sitting in with Jennifer and Andrew at the interview is Andrew’s youngest grandson Mario. Jennifer works part time at Choice Family Pharmacy. Jennifer along with her husband Phil, also a full time pharmacist at East Berlin Pharmacy, are carrying on a family tradition by balancing work and raising 6 children. Upon graduating from Duquesne Mylan School of Pharmacy in 2001 Jennifer left for a year residency in Tennessee.

Andrew Altobelli, R.Ph. (far right) with his staff.

“At that time Tennessee Pharmacies were able to provide services such as Immunizations, which could not be done in Pennsylvania because of state law.” Jennifer said. After coming back to Pennsylvania, Jennifer brought new ideas to her family’s pharmacy. Today Jennifer and her staff have developed unique services to meet the needs of their community.

When East Berlin Pharmacy first opened it was a struggling pharmacy. “We tried to give it our best efforts,” Andrew said. “We hated to turn someone away.” Today, East Berlin Pharmacy and the rest of Choice Health Services still focus on providing everything they can for their customers. Andrew likes to call his pharmacies the ‘one stop shop’. Continued on page 16

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 15


Features Community Pharmacy Spotlight

Continued from page 15

“One call does it all,” Andrew said. “We provide whatever doctors, nursing facilities, and patients need—whether it is oxygen, compounding, or IV therapy.” In the 1990s Andrew got a “surge of energy” as he likes to call it and took on the tasks of opening two more pharmacies, Choice Apothecary and Choice Family Pharmacy. Choice Apothecary opened in 1996, located less than a mile away from East Berlin Pharmacy, and is a smaller pharmacy that focuses on prescription and nonprescription medicine. The Manager of Choice Apothecary, Tina Hausner, PharmD., who Andrew still describes as the 13 year old who asked questions after a 4H group presentation on pharmacy. As a result Tina has worked for Andrew for 17 years. Tina, like Andrew, believes in the family aspect of the business, emphasizing that her customers come first. “It is a family atmosphere, we see generations of families that come through these doors,” Hausner said. Choice Family Pharmacy opened in 1998. Similar to Tina, Amber Rupp, Assistant Manager of Choice Family Pharmacy, has been working for Andrew for 15 years. Amber, a Hospice Consultant, was instrumental in developing programs for immunizations and blood pressure screenings. In addition to their traditional community roles as pharmacists,

Phil DeRienzo, Jennifer DeRienzo, Andrew Altobelli, R.Ph.

Tina Hausner, Tanya Myers

Amber and Jennifer continue to develop new programs for the Choice Family Pharmacy community. Choice Family Pharmacy also specializes in compounding. Aided by the Professional Compounding Center of America (PCCA), Choice Family Pharmacy can make specialty medications, not offered commercially, that benefit the special needs of their patients. In 1997, Andrew made the executive decision to combine Choice Health Care and Choice Critical Care, along with Choice Family Pharmacy into one location. Choice Critical Care opened in 1992 and is a closed shop pharmacy, where staff custom package medication to help long-term care facilities provide medication to their residents in a customized dispensing system. “We try to match the dispensing system with what the facility needs or desires,” Andrew said. Choice Critical Care also provides infusion therapy to meet patient needs in a long-term care facility or at home Choice Health Care opened in 1993; Andrew’s wife Susan Altobelli manages Choice Health Care with her Durable Medical Equipment

trained staff. Recognizing that their patients want to stay in their homes as they grow older, Choice Health Care provides patients a complete network of highly trained and experienced personnel, ready to coordinate Respiratory Therapy, medical equipment and surgical supplies. For 34 years Andrew has made it his life’s mission to do whatever he can for his patients and their families. From working 68 hours a week to sharing the reigns with his daughter, Andrew enjoys the business, professional, and teaching aspect of the pharmacy world. In 2009, Andrew received PPA’s first Preceptor of the Year Award. “I try to set a good example for students,” Andrew said. “When they do a rotation with us they go to every site. I try to show them every aspect of the profession, so they can find out what they are passionate about.” Get to know Andrew and it is clear that he is passionate about his pharmacies, his patients, and his family. Andrew and his passions are the very reason why Choice Health Services is an expert at “caring for you like family”. z

16 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013


Features

PPA Member Profile: Gregg S. Teitel Pharm.D. Practice Site: Burns Pharmacy PPA Member Since: 2009 Education: Pre pharmacy years:

Muhlenberg College; Bachelor’s of Science: Temple University; Doctorate of Pharmacy: University of Sciences What made you choose the profession of pharmacy: “It goes back to my

How has PPA helped you professionally:

“I was the Southeast Membership Coordinator from 2009-2011. I am also on the Membership Committee. PPA has also helped me establish and maintain relationships with pharmacists and people in the pharmacy world. It has also allowed me to understand the political side of pharmacy in the state of Pennsylvania.”

childhood—I was exposed to hospitals and physicians because I What was the most memorable had asthma. I then worked in retail experience of your career: “Helping pharmacy before going to college. patients—reaching out to those At Muhlenberg I considered who did have resources but the medical field because of needed my help anyway. A few my interests in chemistry so I years ago I was helping a patient decided to pursue pharmacy. I in his early 20s had always been who had a chronic attracted to pharmacy I’m a big proponent illness. His insurance because I had a of being involved ran out and wasn’t good experience at in the profession. going to be back Thomas Jefferson When I worked in until the end of the University Hospital. different settings week, but he needed I also had a variety I would join his medications. of pharmaceutical organizations that I took a risk and jobs which allowed applied to the job I lent them money me to have more in order for him to opportunities and I was working in. get his medications. had more of a choice At the end of the week when of the type of practice I went into.” What made you decide to join PPA: his insurance was reinstated he “I’m a big proponent of being returned the money to me.” involved in the profession. When I worked in different settings I would join organizations that applied to the job I was working in. I also always enjoyed PPA meetings and talking to the leaders about current issues that were going on in the pharmacy world.”

Whom do you consider a mentor and why: “Robert Schreiber —he is a

long time practicing pharmacist who is respected for his knowledge of the profession and for caring for his patients unselfishly. Bob is very straightforward, he provides you with the coaching and knowledge you will need in this profession.” What is something most people don’t know about you: “I consider myself

mechanically inclined. In high school I worked as an electrician’s apprentice, and learned the trade. Because of this I can wire an entire house.” z

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 17


Features

Profiles in Pharmacy Innovation: Mary Grisnik-Kaup, PharmD Education: Duquesne Mylan

School of Pharmacy Name of Practice Site and Location:

RxXpress Grove City, PA Site Description: Retail pharmacy owned by Grisnik’s family Innovative Service Provided: “We find that medication management and adherence is crucial for optimal patient health outcomes. By enrolling patients into our medication management program, the patient and/or caregiver know that the patient is receiving the right medication and the right dose at the correct time. Medication is dispensed in easy open strip packaging, allotting up to six medications per pack in a morning, lunch, evening, or bedtime package. We also make sure that all medications are compatible with one another before we allow them to be taken at the same time. In addition to medication therapy management RxXpress is also a compounding pharmacy that can provide medication for both humans and animals. We do custom hormone replacement therapy, wound care, pain management, as well as facial skin care analysis.” Why they chose to advance their practice: “We are very technologically advanced in dispensing, which allows our pharmacists to have more time to spend counseling patients and identify their healthcare needs. As

pharmacists we are the most easily accessible healthcare provider in the community, by having our automation it allows us more time to be available to our patients.” Advice for others: “You need to find something you are passionate about. The profession will change and it requires a lot more skill. Once you find your passion you need to make that service available in your pharmacy and store. Also, it is important to develop relationships with other healthcare providers in order to offer optimal care for the patient. The patient,

Tony Hayslip, ABR/AREP 713-829-7570 Tony@RxBrokerage.com

18 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013

physician and pharmacist team is crucial and I believe this is where our healthcare system is moving as a whole for patient care.” z

Ernie Zost, RPH 727-415-3659 Ernie@RxBrokerage.com


Features

Residency Profiles PPA had an overwhelming response this year from residents wishing to be featured in our Pennsylvania Residency Profile. Thank you to everyone who made a submission. Our residents are achieving great things and we are proud to feature them in our publication. Full profile listings can be found at www.papharmacists.com/residencies.

No Photo Available

Sara Ahmed, PharmD., Philadelphia VA Medical Center, PGY1

Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy2013 Year: 2013 Jenny T. Au, PharmD., Temple University Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Shenandoah University School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Maleeha Bader, PharmD., Critical Care Systems Inc, PGY1 Graduate of: Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Sarian A. Bangura, PharmD., Duquesne University/The Center for Pharmacy Services, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Maryland Eastern Shore Year: 2013 Tom Bateman, PharmD., Duquesne University & Giant Eagle Pharmacy, PGY1 Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Yongjie Chen PharmD., PerformRx, PGY1

Derek Bremmer, PharmD., UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside, PGY1

Graduate of: Rutgers University Year: 2013

Graduate of: South Carolina College of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Teresa Breslin PharmD., UPMC St. Margaret, PGY1 Graduate of: Wayne State University Year: 2013 Sarah Brinley PharmD., Geisinger Health System, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Sean Chitwood PharmD., UPMC Health, PGY1 Graduate of: Mercer University (PharmD & MBA) Year: 2013 Hailey (Ji Hyui) Choi PharmD., Center for Pharmacy Care, Duquesne University, PGY1 Graduate of: Duquesne University Year: 2013

Deanna Buehrle PharmD., UPMC Mercy Hospital, PGY1

Christo Cimino PharmD., Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, PGY1

Graduate of: Duquesne University Year: 2012

Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Claire Caracciolo PharmD., Acme Sav-on Pharmacy, PGY1 Graduate of: University of the Sciences in Philadelphia Year: 2013

Cari Cline PharmD., Penn State Hershey Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh Year: 2013

Gregory Castelli PharmD., UPMC St. Margaret, PGY2

Natasha Conley PharmD., Wilkes-Barre VA Medical Center, PGY1

Graduate of: Wilkes University Year: 2012

Graduate of: University of Kentucky Year: 2013 Continued on page 20

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 19


Features Residency Profile

Sarah Dombrowski PharmD., UPMC St. Margaret, PGY2

Continued from page 19

Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Year: 2012

Jessica Cprek PharmD.,Temple University Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Temple University School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Marie Davies, PharmD., MS, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PGY2 Graduate of: Campbell University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences Year: 2012 Michael C. Dejos PharmD., Saint Joseph Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Bradley Dudeck, PharmD., Moses Taylor Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Wilkes University Nesbitt School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Gregory Fakelmann PharmD., Allegheny Health Network, PGY1 Graduate of: Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University Year: 2013

No Photo Available

Armisha Desai PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY2

Joseph Favatella PharmD., Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, PGY1

Graduate of: University of Michigan College of Pharmacy Year: 2011 Sarah Deutsch PharmD., Walgreens Specialty Pharmacy and Duquesne University, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh Year: 2013 Cassandra Dolecki PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY2

Lauren Finoli, PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY1

Graduate of: Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University Year: 2013

No Photo Available

Graduate of: LECOM School of Pharmacy Year: 2012

Chelsea Fitzgerald PharmD., Geisinger Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh Year: 2013 Kristin Franks, PharmD., Second Year Academic and Research Fellowship Graduate of: Duquesne University Year: 2012

20 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013

Justina O. Frimpong, PharmD., Saint Joseph Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy University of the Sciences Year: 2013 Paul Furler PharmD., Lancaster General Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Temple University School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Michael Geishauser PharmD., Conemaugh Health System, PGY1 Graduate of: Duquesne University – Mylan School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Danielle Haas PharmD., Moses Taylor Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Rita Habib PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University Year: 2013 Genevieve M. Hale PharmD., UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside, PGY1 Graduate of: Nova Southeastern University Year: 2013


Features Justin Harris PharmD., University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PGY2

Jordan Hill PharmD., VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PGY1

Melissa Jankoviak PharmD., Einstein Medical Center, PGY1

Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2012

Graduate of: West Virginia University Year: 2013

Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Chelsea Harrison PharmD., UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside, PGY1

Lucas Hill PharmD., UPMC Saint Margaret, PGY1

Amanda S. Johnson PharmD., University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PGY2

Graduate of: Duquesne University Mylan School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Lindsay Harter PharmD., Abington Memorial Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Thomas Jefferson University – Jefferson School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Amy Haver PharmD., UPMC St. Margaret, PGY2 Graduate of: Duquesne University Year: 2013 Ashley Hedges PharmD., UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside, PGY1 Graduate of: UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Graduate of: University of Missouri – Kansas City Year: 2013 Ashleigh Hogue, PharmD., UPMC Presbyterian, PGY2 Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Year: 2012 Krisoula Horiates PharmD., Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: Rutgers University Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Nicholas J. Hurrey PharmD., Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: University of the Sciences Year: 2013

Brandon Herk PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY1

Michael Jaecks PharmD., Einstein Medical Center, PGY1

Graduate of: Duquesne University Year: 2013

Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Ashley Higbea PharmD., University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PGY1

Ashley Janis PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY2

Graduate of: Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Graduate of: The James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy, University of Cincinnati Year: 2012

Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Year: 2012 Priscilla Ko PharmD., UPMC St. Margaret, Aspinwall/Pittsburgh, PGY1 Graduate of: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Year: 2013 Nicole Kovacic PharmD., Temple University Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Nadia Kudla PharmD., UPMC St. Margaret, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh Year: 2014 Margaret LaBuz PharmD., Hartzell’s Pharmacy, PGY1 Graduate of: Wilkes University Nesbit School of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Continued on page 22

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 21


Features Residency Profile

Lindsay McCartney PharmD., VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PGY1

Continued from page 21

Christine Lam PharmD., Lehigh Valley Health Network, PGY1

Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh Year: 2013

Graduate of: Temple University School of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Sean McGonigle PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY1

Victoria Lippert PharmD., Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center, PGY1

Graduate of: Temple University School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Candis McGraw PharmD., Einstein Medical Center, PGY1

Graduate of: LECOM School of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Graduate of: Temple University School of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Lauren Long PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Temple University School of Pharmacy Year: 2010 Adam MacLasco PharmD., UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside, PGY1 Graduate of: Northeastern University Year: 2013 Kasey Malotte PharmD., Duquesne University, PGY1

No Photo Available

No Photo Available

Arpit Mehta PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY2

Evdokia Metaxas PharmD., Philadelphia VA Medical Center, PGY1

Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Kimberly Miller PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY2

Graduate of: University of Maryland Year: 2013  

Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Year: 2012

Vanessa Markle PharmD., Geisinger Health System, PGY1

Laura Modafferi PharmD., Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, PGY1

Graduate of: Wilkes University Year: 2013 

Graduate of: Temple University School of Pharmacy Year: 2010

22 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013

Jennifer Niccolai PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY2 Graduated: 2012

Robert Nietupski PharmD., Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, PGY1 Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Casmir Ogbonna, Pharm.D, MBA. Philadelphia VA Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: Temple University Year: 2007 Kristine Ossman PharmD., University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy and Rite Aid, PGY1 Graduate of: St. John Fisher College Wegmans School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Diwura Owolabi PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Maryland Year: 2013 Jasmine Patel PharmD., Einstein Medical Center, PGY-1 Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Megha Patel PharmD., Temple University Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Temple University School of Pharmacy Year: 2011


Features Sheetal Patil PharmD., Lancaster General Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Maryland Year: 2013 Aaron J. Pickering PharmD., UPMC PresbyterianShadyside, PGY2 Graduate of: Duquesne University Year: 2012 Josh Prichard PharmD., Philadelphia VA Medical Center Graduate of: Thomas Jefferson School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Braden P. Rall PharmD., Abington Memorial Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Mass. College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Year: 2013 Zineb Rhim PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Cincinnati Year: 2013 Mary Riedy PharmD., Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, PGY1 Graduate of: Duquesne University Year: 2013 Sarah L. Rindfuss PharmD., UPMC St. Margaret, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Laura Samide PharmD., Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: University of the Sciences in Philadelphia Year: 2011 Nicholas C. Schwier PharmD., University of Pittsburgh Medical Center/School of Pharmacy, PGY2 Graduate of: St. John Fisher College – Wegmans School of Pharmacy Year: 2012 Evan Slagle PharmD., York Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Jefferson School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Katie Stegura PharmD., Reading Health System Reading Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Sharnae Stevens PharmD., The Reading Hospital and Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: Mass. College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Year: 2013 Meghan N. Tauber PharmD., CVS Caremark ], PGY1

Gary Tedesco PharmD., Preferred Primary Care Physicians, Academic and Research Fellowship Graduate of: Duquesne University Year: 2012 Stephanie Thomas PharmD., Erie VA Medical Center, PGY1 Graduate of: University at Buffalo Year: 2013 Kim P. To PharmD., Temple University Hospital PGY1 Graduate of: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Year: 2012 Robert Tunney PharmD., UPMC Mercy Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: Duquesne University Mylan School of Pharmacy Year: 2013 Elyse Weitzman PharmD., Allegheny General Hospital, PGY1 Graduate of: University of Pittsburgh Year: 2013 Arin Whitman PharmD., UPMC Mercy, PGY1 Graduate of: Duquesne University Year: 2013

Graduate of: University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Continued on page 24

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 23


Features Residency Profile

Nicole Willis PharmD., Wilkes-Barre VA Medical Center, PGY1

Continued from page 23

G. Lucy Wilkening PharmD., Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC, PGY1 Graduate of: Southwestern Oklahoma State University College of Pharmacy Year: 2012

Adrian Wong PharmD., UPMC Presbyterian, PGY2

Graduate of: Wilkes University Nesbitt School of Pharmacy Year: 2013

Graduate of: Northeastern University Year: 2012

Amanda P. Wojtusik PharmD., UPMC St. Margaret, PGY2 Graduate of: University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy Year: 2012

Pharmacy Time Capsules 2013 (Third Quarter) By: Dennis B. Worthen, PhD, Cincinnati, OH

1988—Twenty-five years ago: American College of Physicians called for enhanced education in rational therapeutics including “increased communication with pharmacists, as health care professionals with particular knowledge in this area.” RU-486 (mifepristone) first marketed in France as a safe and effective method of early abortion

1963—Fifty Years Ago: Oncovin (vincristine), an alkaloid derived from rosy periwinkle, was used as a folk medicine for diabetes. Eli Lilly & Co discovered it to be an effective treatment for several forms of leukemia. 1938—Seventy-five Years Ago: OAPhA undertook a national campaign to work with dental associations and dentists to increase appropriate prescribing.

1913—One hundred Years Ago: University of Puerto Rico formed One of a series contributed by the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy, a unique non-profit society dedicated to assuring that the contributions of your profession endure as a part of America’s history. Membership offers the satisfaction of helping continue this work on behalf of pharmacy, and brings five or more historical publications to your door each year. To learn more, check out: www.aihp.org

PPA Educational Foundation Grants The PPA Educational Foundation will award up to four grants in 2014, with a maximum amount of $1,000 per awarded grant. Grants may be used for projects targeted toward patient care by pharmacists and innovative activity around pharmacy practice. The purpose of the grants is to encourage exploration of innovative and best pharmacy practices, especially those which focus on patient-centered services or which offer some patient benefit. The Foundation will hold a pre-submission, optional webinar for interested applicants on Tuesday, October 1, 2013, at 1:00 p.m. The webinar will be a 20 to 25 minute presentation on the Foundation, the grant program, its goals and objectives, and the application and decision process. There will also be an opportunity for questions. If you are interested in participating in this webinar, please send an email to Pat Epple so access instructions can be sent to you. The pre-submission webinar is optional but many applicants find it very helpful. If you are interested you must register in advance by sending an email to Foundation@papharmacists.com. We encourage residents, new practitioners, seasoned practitioners, students, and academia members to apply! It can be a simple, easy way to support a new or ongoing venture of provision of patient care! Information about Grant Opportunities, the 2013 Grant Announcement, and the Grant Application can be found on the PPA website under Foundation, Grant Programs.

24 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013


Association News

Updates From PPA InternsWhere Are They Now? P PA enjoyed having Keith Miller, Molly McBryan, Andrew Santeusanio, and Abbie Morgan intern with us during the 2012-2013 academic year. We thank them for their time and assistance. Please read below for updates on these interns and how they are embarking on their pharmacy careers! Congratulations on graduation! Keith Miller, PharmD Duquesne University Mylan School of Pharmacy 2013 Future plans: Clinical Pharmacist at BeneCard PBF in Mechanicsburg, PA Current City: New Cumberland, PA Other Plans: Adjusting to life after college and continuing to stay active in PPA Reflections/Advice For Students: Keep working hard through school but also remember to enjoy yourself. This is one of the best

times of your life and everything regarding your career will work out as you hope, if not better. Trust in your networking and diligence and opportunities will find you. Molly McBryan, PharmD Wilkes University Nesbitt College of Pharmacy Class of 2013

Andrew David Santeusanio, PharmD University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Class of 2013 Future plans: PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Resident at the Lebanon VA Medical Center

Future: plans: Walgreens Pharmacist in Worcester/Springfield Massachusetts (District 308-Boston West) Current City: Holden, MA Other Plans: I plan to explore the Massachusetts area and I am getting married to my fiancĂŠ, Christopher Nemeth. Reflections/Advice For Students: Be involved in pharmacy school and to give different areas of pharmacy a try. It is important to keep your mind open to the many opportunities that may arise.

Current City: Hershey, PA Other Plans: To obtain a clinical position or work in an ambulatory care setting Reflections/Advice For Students: Diversify your rotation experiences so that you get a more complete overview of pharmacy practice and all of the opportunities available to you. We have not heard from Abbie Morgan at this time. We hope to bring you her details in the near future! z

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 25


Š 2011 Cardinal Health. All rights reserved. KINRAY and the KINRAY logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cardinal Health. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Lit. No. 1R16734 (11/2011)


Association News

Pharmacy Technician Corner Pharmacy Technician Certification QuickStudy Guide

T

he American Pharmacists Association (APhA) recently published a comprehensive overhaul of the Pharmacy Technician Certification QuickStudy Guide. The completely revised 4th edition thoroughly covers all Pharmacy Technician Certification Examination (PTCE) content domains and conveys what exam candidates need to know in a concise outline format. The changes were prompted by the 2012 update to the blueprint that shapes the PTCE. Pharmacy Technician Certification Quick-Study Guide,

4th edition (ISBN 978-1-58212-1888; softbound; 229 pages; $32.95 [$26.50 for APhA members]), by Kristin W. Weitzel, PharmD, and William A. Hopkins Jr., PharmD, contains 13 new chapters that review important medical terminology, commonly used medications, herbals and dietary supplements, laws and regulations, compounding, and the medication order entry and fill process. An additional six chapters contain simple, tried-and-true explanations of mathematical concepts, pharmaceutical systems of measurement, dosage calculations, concentrations and pharmacy business calculations. Sample questions at the end of each chapter reinforce

important concepts and knowledge, and a test of 125 practice questions on PTCE content and pharmaceutical calculations concludes the book. The multiplechoice questions are presented in the same format as PTCE questions. The answer key includes step-bystep instructions for mathematical calculations. The book may be ordered online, www.pharmacist.com/shop, or by phone, 1-800-878-0729. It will also be available in September as an eBook, ready for download to readers’ preferred device through leading vendors, such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Sony and Kobo. z

PPA Welcomes Erica Brandt as Communications Coordinator Erica Brandt, the Communications Coordinator at the Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association, just started employment in late July. Erica is a graduate of Penn State University where she earned a Bachelor of Arts in Advertising and Public Relations. During her time at Penn State she served on the Public Relations Student Society of America Event Planning Committee. In addition to this, Erica’s work experience includes public relations, advertising and digital media. Outside of work she enjoys spending time with her friends and family, watching college football, reading and walking.

Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 27


Association News

Member Services SnapRetail  provides  a  web-­‐based  solution  that  makes  it  easy  for  local  retailers  to  engage  with  customers  through  email,   Facebook,  Pinterest,  and  Twitter.  Unique  product  features  such  as  an  interactive  planning  calendar,  monthly  promotion   kits,  hundreds  of  pre-­‐written  and  professionally  designed  templates  and  social  media  posts,  and  an  exclusive  offers   program  make  SnapRetail  the  choice  for  thousands  of  retailers  looking  for  a  one-­‐stop-­‐shop  for  their  marketing  needs.   Retailers  can  purchase  a  subscription  to  gain  access  to  all  of  these  features.  Learn  more  at  www.snapretail.com.       As  a  PPA  Member,  Snap  Retail  offers:   • Free  educational  webinars   • $899/yearly  subscription  fee   • $199/first  quarter  subscription  fee   • Educational  marketing  materials   • One  on  one  demos/consultations  to  PPA  members   • Joint  events   • Special  offers/promotions  to  PPA  members   • Dedicated  Marketing  Consultant        

www.snapretail.com  

Join  the  Mobile  Pharmacy  Refill  Revolution  

  The  Pennsylvania  Pharmacists  Association  now  offers  PocketRx.  PocketRx  is  available  from  Praeses,  a   leader  in  mobile  applications  for  the  pharmacy  industry.  With  PocketRx,  you  are  able  to  offer  your   pharmacy  customers  the  ability  to  refill  their  prescriptions  directly  from  their  smartphone.  All  they  need   is  the  RX  number  and  they  can  place  their  order  while  on  the  move  —  directly  and   securely.     Features:   • Individually  branded  for  your  pharmacy   • Free  to  your  customers   • User  prescription  profiles  for  customers   • Integrates  to  your  pharmacy  management  system     Find  out  more  about  this  exciting  new  product.   Join  our  mailing  list!  Learn  more  about  PocketRx  and  stay  updated  on  future  development.     Or  contact  us  today  by  calling  (877)  246-­‐8155  and  speaking  to  one  of  our  mobile  specialists.   www.pocket-­‐rx.com  

28 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013


POLITICAL ACTION COMMITTEE (PAC) QUICK FACTS!  2012 Pennsylvania PAC Expenditures: o PA Insurance Federation: $341,889 o PA Medical Society: $200,746 o PA Hospital & Health System Assn: $154,614 o PA Independence Blue Cross: $124,425 o PA Optometric Assn: $109,550 o PA Dental Assn: $ 77,415 o PA Psychological Assn: $ 55,825 o PA Pharmacists Assn: $ 34,960 o PA Physical Therapy Assn: $ 28,110 The above figures only represent those dollars expended to political candidates and NOT what was contributed by all members to these organizations.

 PPA membership is approximately 2,300.  If each member would make a single contribution equal to the cost of an average dinner out ($25), PPA’s PAC would be at $57,500!  If every one of PPA’s 900 independent owner members made a $100 contribution, PPA’s PAC would be at $90,000! This is a small amount to contribute to protect your interests and livelihood!  A strong PAC is essential to advance our advocacy goals. PPA’s PAC is currently being outspent by over 3-1.  Advocacy is an integral part of PPA’s mission. Your PharmPAC contributions are more important now than ever!


Get Connected with Your Peers During Your Month.

American Pharmacists Month

October 2013

In honor of October and American Pharmacists Month, PPA is asking members to share their testimonials and celebrate the profession of pharmacy. Now is a time to recognize your pharmacy staff and engage your patients. Share your plans for celebrating and pictures with PPA and we will include them in our bulletins, social media and on our website! We want to hear from you in October!

In the Community Pharmacy Setting Use a special answering message promoting American Pharmacists Month when you answer your phone, “Thank you for calling. We are celebrating American Pharmacists Month. How can I help you?” Conduct an Immunization Day, hold a flu clinic, blood pressure clinic or osteoporosis screening. Create a patient care center in your pharmacy. Hold a week long event of brown bag medication reviews in your pharmacy. Decorate your pharmacy for the month of October with banners and posters highlighting American Pharmacists Month. Hold an educational session with snacks at a convenient time, call it “Education & Cookies” and invite the public. Hold an “open house” at your pharmacy and hand out goody bags with an informational brochure inside.

Hospitals, Institutions, Managed Care & Long Term Care Settings Place information in your facility’s newsletter about American Pharmacists Month.

Decorate the hospital or institution lobby with posters or displays. Create a lunch tray tent card explaining the goals of the pharmacy and services you offer. Hold an “open house” for all employees to visit the pharmacy. Host a visit for your senator or representative and provide him/her with a view of the role of the pharmacist.

Student Pharmacists/Colleges of Pharmacy

Create a plan and be prepared to help your part-time employer or rotation site hold activities and events for the month of October. Create a banner and ask your school to display the banner to promote American Pharmacists Month. Hold a T-shirt fundraiser at your school in honor of American Pharmacists Month.

Give an OTC tour to your patients on how to select the best OTC products for their individual condition.

Talk to high school students about pharmacy careers.

Invite local students to visit your pharmacy for a class trip and give them a tour of the pharmacy.

Write an article for your college newspaper & encourage your fellow student pharmacists to get involved in their state association.

30 I Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013


Get Connected with Your Peers During Your Month.

American Pharmacists Month

October 2013

Get out into the Community

Senior Citizen Centers are always looking for new, exciting educational events. Set up a brown bag medication review event at a local Senior Citizen Center. Hold a healthcare event in your community or get involved in your local health fair. Present information on pharmacy to people in the community. Promote the event in advance and invite the public. Speak with the local school nurse on educating high school teachers about pharmacy. Ask the guidance counselor if you can set up a presentation on careers in pharmacy for career day. Contact the media in your area, write a news release and talk with the media about American Pharmacists Month.

Make sure to Recognize & Honor your Pharmacy Staff during American Pharmacists Month!

October is the perfect time for managers and supervisors to show their appreciation for the great work the pharmacy staff does throughout the year. Make an extra effort to recognize pharmacy technicians on National Pharmacy Technician Day, October 22. Thank them for their support and the invaluable contributions they make to the profession.

Resources *APhA also has a webpage of patient outreach tools: Visit http://www.pharmacist.com/tools-patient-outreach for more information Pennsylvania pharmacists will be recognized, engaged, and fairly compensated as health-care providers. The Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association, as the leading voice of pharmacy, promotes the profession through advocacy, education, and communication to enhance patient care and public health.

Please send PPA information on your plans for celebrating American Pharmacists Month. Send us an email at ppa@papharmacists.com, post on Facebook and share information on Twitter! Make sure to include names of those who are participating and send photos, if available. This is a celebration of pharmacists and pharmacy. Show us that Pennsylvania is celebrating! Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 31


Student Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association (SPPA)

Student Director

Student Chair

Who they are…

Kyle McCormick Pittsburgh

The Student Advisory Board is made up of four officers who are elected each year. The officers include the Student Director, Chair, Corresponding Secretary, and Recording Secretary. In addition to the officers, each school of pharmacy has a director and alternate who serve on the board.

Corresponding Secretary

Sarah Maheady Wilkes

Ben Andrick, Director, Duquesne Robert Gwin, Alternate, Duquesne Sergio Vernovsky, Director, Jefferson TBD, Alternate, Jefferson Beth Miller, Director, LECOM TBD, Alternate, LECOM Nissa Tasnim, Director, Temple Chris To, Alternate, Temple Kyle McGrath, Director, Pittsburgh Amanda Jaber, Alternate, Pittsburgh Antinello Frattarelli, Director, PCP Jonathan Feathers, Alternate, PCP Alysha Lopez, Director, Wilkes Trina Patel, Alternate, Wilkes

Eliza Daubert Wilkes

Recording Secretary

Courtney Graham Wilkes

"PPA is an organization which provides opportunities for involvement to all student pharmacists across the Commonwealth and works to represent the interests of our profession. I appreciate the chance to give back to the Association by serving as your Student Advisory Board Chair and look forward to working to increase student awareness of key legislative issues. It is my goal in the coming year to strengthen the voice of students as advocates for pharmacy." -Eliza Daubert, Chair

What they do…

The Student Advisory Board or SAB regularly holds business meetings at each of PPA’s two conferences and provides students with a manner in which to have a voice in PPA policy and activities. The Board also met for a fun weekend of orientation and learning this summer in State College, PA. The board will participate in Student Programming at the Mid-Year and Annual Conference including Know Pain Know Gain, the OTC Competition, Achieving Independence, and poster displays. They also: Promote PPA and PPA activities on their campus Organize regular PPA student membership drives Coordinate visits to the campus for PPA Staff Promote key legislative endeavors Organize and encourage student participation in PPA meetings and Legislative Day Report campus activities to PPA for inclusion in the Student Voice, an electronic student newsletter, and the PPA magazine.

How you can get involved… This year the Director and Alternate from each school of pharmacy are looking to expand their team. A Membership Ambassador, Government Relations Ambassador, and Communications Ambassador will work closely with the members of the Student Advisory Board in order to assist with promotion and planning events for each specific focus. Please contact your SPPA director or Corey Wenger, PPA Membership Coordinator if you are interested in one of these positions.

Check out our website at www.papharmacists.com under the student tab! Pennsylvania Pharmacist I September/October 2013 I 33


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Pennsylvania Pharmacist September/October 2013