2011 Conference Program

Page 1

The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers

Annual Technology Conference Hilton – Americas Houston Hotel

Conference Program Book



TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome Letters Hotel Layout

iii

vii

Future National Annual Conferences

xii

Conference Sponsors

1

Conference at a Glance

3

NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund Program Schedule (Detailed) NOBCChE 2011 Career Fair Exhibitors Forum and Workshop Abstracts Conference Speakers National Conference Planning Committee National Conference Planning Committee Subcommittees Index of Technical Presenters

10 13

55

61 73 99 100 103



April 19, 2011

Dear Friends: On behalf of the United States House of Representatives and the constituents of the Eighteenth Congressional District of Texas, I am delighted to express my sincerest greetings to everyone attending the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers’ 38th Annual Technology Conference in Houston, TX. The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) supports local, regional, national and global programs that assist people of color towards fully realizing their potential in academic, professional and entrepreneurial pursuits in chemistry, chemical engineering and related fields. The organization promotes careers in science and technology as an achievable goal for elementary, middle and high school students. In addition, the NOBCChE encourages college students to pursue graduate degrees in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics— (STEM) disciplines. I understand the importance of investing in the STEM disciplines and what these studies mean to our nation’s future. Top priority should be given to identifying and supporting strategies that strengthen American innovation, improve STEM education, promote diversity and ensure we are not only competing in the 21st century, but leading the global community. The NOBCChE is cultivating these successes through their invaluable programs. Once again, I am honored and privileged to have the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers’ 38th Annual Technology Conference in Houston, Texas, and extend best wishes for this extraordinary event. Sincerely,

Sheila Jackson Lee Member of Congress


2002 Wheeler Avenue Houston, Texas 77004

March 29, 2011

Martin Codrington, NOBCChE Public Relations Director PO Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013-77480 Mr. Codrington, It is with great pleasure that we, The NAACP Houston Branch, welcome The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) 38th Annual National Conference to this great state of Texas and the city of Houston. One of the primary committees of the NAACP Houston Branch is the Labor and Industry Committee. This committee always seeks ways to improve the economic status of minority groups. We work to: 1) eliminate discriminatory employment practices in industry and government, wage differentials based on race, unequal opportunities for training, promotion and unfair dismissals; 2) encourage greater participation in the trade union movement; 3) work to end discriminatory practices in labor unions; 4) secure the enactment of state and federal fair employment practices legislation; and 5) work for improved opportunities in vocational and apprenticeship training. The NAACP Houston Branch fully supports the NOBCChE’s mission to build an eminent cadre of people of color in science and technology and its educational initiatives. We trust that the NOBCChE’s 38th Annual National Conference will be a great success and are assured it will continue to be a unique icon among professional organizations. Respectfully,

Dr. D. Z. Cofield, NAACP Houston Branch President


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers Dear NOBCChE 2011 Conferees: I welcome you to Houston, Texas and the 38th NOBCChE Annual Conference of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, (NOBCChE). I welcome you as a long time resident of “H-Town” and as the chair of the NOBCChE Executive Committee. In keeping with the notion that everything is bigger and better in Texas, I promise you that this year’s conference will be our most exciting and rewarding one ever! I especially welcome the new student and professional members. Drawing men and women from across the country to meet, network, and exchange ideas that have had an important imprint on the growth and development of its members, the academy, and the disciplines of chemistry, chemical engineering, and other STEM fields, for more than 40 years, NOBCChE has been recognized as one of the world’s truly great student and professional organizations. Long before President Barak Obama voiced his initiative of having the nation renew its “Sputnik Moment” as a means of “winning the future,” NOBCChE has made a concerted national effort to improve participation by minorities and other underrepresented groups in STEM fields. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data continues to indicate that the white male population, who has traditionally filled the U.S. employment needs, as a percentage of overall population, is declining and will continue to decline in the future. Consequently, there remains a need to increase the available pool of talented minorities, who will be able to assume academic and professional positions in the STEM fields. NOBCChE’s mission “to build an eminent cadre of people of color in science and technology” is certainly designed to help address this very important national need. This year’s theme “Solutions for Global Challenges” offers students and other experts the opportunity to make presentations on a variety of issues that will shape our winning the future. The conference and its host city promise an engaging and successful experience in Houston during the week of the conference. I thank you for your continued support and attendance at NOBCChE’s Annual Technology Conferences Sincerely,

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF President Victor McCrary, Ph.D., FASI Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Labs Laurel, MD Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, PhD., MBA/HRM, FASI The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX Treasurer Dale Mack, BS, RSO Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Dedun Adeyemo, MS, BS Ohio State University Columbus, OH Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair Miquel Antoine, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab Laurel, MD Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson, BS Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison, BS, MS Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chairman Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Ella Davis, MBA NOBCChE Member at Large Center Square, PA Sharon Kennedy, PhD., National Planning Chair Colgate Palmolive Cincinnati, OH Filomena Califano, PhD., Member at Large St. Francis College New York, New York Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA

Bobby L. Wilson, Ph.D., Chairman NOBCChE Executive Board

Bernice Green, BS, Member at Large Spelman College Atlanta, GA Sherine Obare, Ph.D., Member at Large Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013-77480 800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

April 2011

Welcome to Houston! The mission of NOBCChE is to build an eminent cadre of people of color in science and technology. The theme for this year’s Annual Meeting is “Solutions for Global Challenges”, and it aligns well with the mission of our organization. The solutions for global challenges require critical contributions which require critical thinking skills. One element of NOBCChE’s mission is ensuring that there is a steady stream of professionals and students in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines to meet these global challenges.   

NOBCChE programs increase the number of underrepresented minority K-12 students interested in science and technology. NOBCChE forges partnerships with the HBCUs/MIs such that students can go on to graduate school or enter the workforce with the skills and the confidence to bring forth new ideas and innovations. NOBCChE programs recognize professionals, students, and government and industry leaders who support the mission and vision of NOBCChE by virtue of their technical accomplishments and demonstrated commitment towards helping others pursue successful careers in science and engineering. NOBCChE works across and within the diverse, global science and technology community.

We come together in Houston as the eminent cadre; a community of distinguished scientists and engineers as well as a future generation of technologists to celebrate the accomplishments of our organization and affirm our global mission and vision. Thanks to you all: our attendees, sponsors, members, advocates, and friends for your continued support of NOBCChE. Enjoy this year’s Annual Meeting and Houston; we look forward to seeing you again in Washington, DC in the Fall of 2012!!!

President Victor McCrary, Ph.D., FASI Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Labs Laurel, MD Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, PhD., MBA/HRM, FASI The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX Treasurer Dale Mack, BS, RSO Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Dedun Adeyemo, MS, BS Ohio State University Columbus, OH Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair Miquel Antoine, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab Laurel, MD Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson, BS Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison, BS, MS Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chairman Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Ella Davis, MBA NOBCChE Member at Large Center Square, PA Sharon Kennedy, PhD., National Planning Chair Colgate Palmolive Cincinnati, OH

Best Always, Victor R. McCrary, PhD National President NOBCCHE

Filomena Califano, PhD., Member at Large St. Francis College New York, New York Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA Bernice Green, BS, Member at Large Spelman College Atlanta, GA Sherine Obare, Ph.D., Member at Large Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013-77480 800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF President Victor McCrary, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Labs Laurel, MD Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, PhD, MBA/HRM The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX

On behalf of the 2011 NOBCChE National Planning Committee, I welcome you to the 38th annual meeting. What started as a small dedicated group planning and brainstorming to elevate this year’s conference has resulted in what we feel is an outstanding series of activities and sessions that we hope that you will appreciate, enjoy, and continue to relive after leaving the conference. The theme of this year’s conference is “Solutions for Global Challenges”. As an organization, NOBCChE realizes that there are numerous challenges that our world has been faced with over recent years. From the Gulf oil spill to alternative energy and global warming, coupled with a slowly recovering economy, there are many challenges we face and many problems to be solved. We believe that NOBCChE provides an environment to facilitate solutions to these challenges. We implore you to become fully involved in this year’s conference and contribute to the Global Solutions. We have a diverse and full line of technical sessions highlighting the work of top researchers in their professions, comprehensive Professional Development and dedicated Student Development programs and our nationally recognized Secondary Education programs centered on our teacher’s workshops and science fair/science bowl activities. This year, as we have done in the past, we have a one day Career Fair that we hope will result in many future opportunities. Two new program offerings being held this year that I am passionate about, are the “Solutions for Global Challenges” technical session sponsored by the Dow Chemical Company on Thursday afternoon and the 1st NOBCChE Women’s Networking Breakfast on Friday morning. We have something for everyone!! Please enjoy the conference and enjoy Houston!! Sincerely, Sharon L Kennedy, PhD National Planning Chair NOBCCHE

Treasurer Dale Mack, BS, RSO Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Dedun Adeyemo, BS Ohio State University Columbus, OH Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair Miquel Antoine, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab Laurel, MD Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson, BS Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison, BS, MS Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chair Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Filomena Califano, PhD., Membership Chair St. Francis College New York, New York Sharon Kennedy, PhD, National Planning Chair Colgate Palmolive Cincinnati, OH Bernice Green, BS, Information Technology Spelman College Atlanta, GA Ella Davis, MBA NOBCChE Membership Committee Center Square, PA Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA Sherine Obare, Ph.D., Member at Large Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013-77480 800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org




Many backgrounds. Many cultures. Many perspectives.

One World. One Merck.

At Merck we embrace the individual differences each of us bring to the world. We believe that with the collective backgrounds, experiences and talents of our employees, anything can be conquered. It is those unique qualities that give us perspective to spark innovation and address unmet medical needs of people throughout the world. Our professional culture is one of diverse, collaborative and respectful individuals. Together we help deliver Merck medicines to those who need them, impacting lives all around the globe. If you’re ready to find your place in the world of Merck, learn more about us and see employee video profiles at merckcareers.jobs/nobcche.

Merck is an equal opportunity employer— proudly embracing diversity in all of its manifestations.


CONFERENCE SPONSORS

Our Sponsors Thank You for Contributing to the Overall Success of our conference – we salute you!

********

3M American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) American Chemical Society Auburn University Boehringer Ingelheim Brazoria County Area Chapter – NOBCChE Colgate‐Palmolive Company Committee for Action Program Services (CAPS) Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists (COACh) Corning Corporation Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) The Dow Chemical Company DuPont Company Georgia Institute of Technology GlaxoSmithKline

Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences The Johns Hopkins University – Applied Physics Laboratory 1


CONFERENCE SPONSORS The Lubrizol Corporation

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Masters Industrial Internship Program at the University of Oregon Merck & Company Morehouse School of Medicine National institute of Standards & Technologies (NIST) Northeast Section – American Chemical Society Office of Naval Research Procter & Gamble Staples

Texas Southern University United States Customs and Border Protection United States Drug Enforcement Administration University of the District of Columbia University of Maryland, College Park University of Pennsylvania University of Washington CENTC, Seattle, WA Washington University in St. Louis 2


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE Date

Description

Room

Day /Time

Room Location

Event

Monday, April 18

9:00 am – 4:00 pm

NOBCChE Executive Board Meeting

2:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm

Conference Registration

331 4th Floor Foyer (By Grand Ballroom AB)

Tuesday, April 19 8:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm

8:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

4th Floor Foyer (By Grand Conference Registration Ballroom AB) Teachers’ Workshop: Elementary School 335 C Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, ACS, Staples, NOBCChE, and C APS

8:30 am ‐ 11:45 am 8:30 am ‐ 11:45 am 8:30 am ‐ 11:45 am

12:00 pm ‐ 1:30 pm

1:45 pm ‐ 2:45 pm

Technical Session 1: Alternative Energy Solutions Technical Session 2: Analytical Chemistry Corning Technical Session Technical Session 3: Polymer & Materials Science Welcome and Opening Luncheon Sponsored by Corning (ticketed)

336A 337A 337B

Grand Ballroom AB

Henry Hill Lecture 335AB Dr. Warren Washington, 2007 Nobel Laureate and Senior Scientist, National Center for Atmospheric Research Sponsored by MIT and Northeast Section of ACS

3


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE 1:00 pm ‐ 4:00 pm

2:45 pm ‐ 5:45 pm

3:00 pm – 6:00 pm 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm Featured Speaker:

4:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm

Teachers’ Workshop: Middle School Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, ACS, Staples, NOBCChE, and CAPS

335 C

Symposium 1 Environmental Science and Policy Symposium Norris McDonald, President, African American Environmentalist Association Student Development 1 Interactive RÉSUMÉ Writing for Students

Technical Session 4: Organic Chemistry I

337A

4:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm 5:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm

Exhibitors’ Meeting

Wednesday, April 20 8:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm

329 & 330

Symposium 2: Advancing Global Healthcare through STEM 336A Milton Brown, MD, PhD, Director Drug Discovery Program, Georgetown University Medical Center

Award Symposium 1: Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Award Symposium

6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m.

336B

Opening Reception Sponsored by COACh Conference Registration

337B

Grand Ballroom AB 4th Floor Foyer (near Grand Ballroom J) 4th Floor Foyer (By Grand Ballroom AB)

8:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

Teachers’ Workshop: High School Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, ACS, Staples, NOBCChE, and CAPS

335 C

8:30 am ‐ 9:30 am 8:30 am ‐ 9:30 am

Midwest Regional Meeting Southeast Regional Meeting

344 A 344 B

4


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE 9:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm

8:00 am – 8:50 am 9:00 am ‐ 3:00 pm

9:00 am ‐ 11:00 am

CAREER FAIR EXPO

Grand Ballroom G‐L

HBCU/MI Chairs Council Breakfast Sponsored by Office of Naval Research HBCU/MI Chairs Council Forum Sponsored by Office of Naval Research

337 336

Professional Development Workshop MENTORING IN THE STEM DISCIPLINES

338

Howard Kea, PhD, Sr. Organizational Development Consultant NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

9:45 am ‐ 10:45 am

Northeast Regional Meeting

344 A

9:45 am ‐ 10:45 am

Southwest Regional Meeting

344 B

10:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

Collegiate Poster Set‐Up

10:00 am ‐ 5:00 pm

Science Fair/ Science Bowl Check‐in

11:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

West Regional Meeting

12:00 pm ‐ 1:00 pm

NOBCChE Vision Luncheon

1:00 pm ‐ 2:30 pm

Science Fair Setup

3:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm

Collegiate Scientific Exchange Poster Session

Grand Ballroom D‐F 4th Floor Foyer (near Exhibit Hall) 344 A Grand Ballroom AB 4th Floor Foyer (near Exhibit Hall) Grand Ballroom D‐F

Sponsored By Colgate‐Palmolive & the Biophysical Society 4th Floor Foyer (near Exhibit Hall)

3:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm

Science Fair

3:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm

Professional Development Workshop Financial Strategies: Your Solutions To Money Management And Investing Derry Haywood, II, The Peninsula Financial Group 5

338


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE 5:00 pm ‐ 6:30 pm

NOBCChE ConneXions Reception Sponsored by Colgate ‐Palmolive

6:00 pm ‐ 9:00 pm

COACh Alumni Reception and Dinner Invitation Only. Contact Priscilla Lewis

7:00 pm ‐ 9:00 pm

P&G Graduate Student Informational Session and Reception, Invitation Only

7:00 pm ‐ 9:00 pm

Science Bowl/Science Fair Welcome Dinner

Thursday, April 21 8:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm

Conference Registration

Grand Ballroom D‐F

TBA

4th Floor Foyer (By Grand Ballroom AB)

8:30 am ‐ 12:00 pm

9:00 am ‐ 4:30 pm.

Science Bowl Competitions: Junior & Senior Divisions++ sponsored by ACS Department of Diversity Programs

9:00 am ‐ 11:45 am

Grand Ballroom AB

Professional Development Workshop: COACh Workshop Professional Skill S Training For Minoritygraduate Students And Postdocs Pre‐registration is required ‐ Session Filled

9:00 am ‐ 11:45 am

337

343B

327‐330, 332, 335

Award Symposium 2: Undergraduate Research Competition Sponsored by Colgate ‐Palmolive and Lubrizol Student Development 2 Mock Interviews

6

337

331


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE Professional Development Workshop Panel Discussion On Science And Policy Tiffani Bailey Lash, Ph.D., Analyst National Institutes of Health

9:00 am ‐ 10:00 am

338

9:00 am ‐ 11:45 am

Award Symposium 3: Henry McBay Award Symposium

336A

9:00 am ‐ 10:30 am

Technical Session 5: Physical Chemistry

336B

10:30 am ‐ 11:30 am

Professional Development Workshop: Technology Commercialization Renard Green, MBA, CEO, The R2 Consulting Group

12:00 pm ‐ 1:30 pm

Percy Julian Luncheon (ticketed)

1:30 pm ‐ 5:00 pm

COACh Workshop COAChing Strong Women Faculty in the Art of Strategic Persuasion (Pre‐registration is required

343B

1:30 pm ‐ 4:00 pm

Professional Development Workshop: Academic/Professional Transition Panel Victor McCrary, PhD, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

338

1:30 pm ‐ 4:00 pm

338

Grand Ballroom AB

Symposium 3: All About BIO: Innovations in Bioscience, 336A Biochemistry & Bioengineering Featured Speaker: Andre Francis Palmer, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University 7


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE 2:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm

Student Development 3 Mock Interviews

331

2:00 pm ‐ 4:00 pm.

Technical Session 6 Inorganic chemistry

337

4:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm

Symposium 4: Solutions for Global Challenges Sponsored by The Dow Chemical Company

6:00 pm ‐ 7:00 pm

Reception Sponsored by The Dow Chemical Company

Grand Ballroom G

4th Floor Foyer (near Grand Ballroom G)

7:00 pm ‐ 10:00 pm

Science Competitions Dinner and Social

Friday, April 22

7:30 am ‐ 9:30 am

1st Annual Women’s Networking Breakfast: Celebration of IYC Sponsored by ACS, Dow Chemical and Lubrizol

Grand Ballroom AB

7:30 am ‐ 11:30 am

Forensic Workshop: The Chemistry of Crime Sponsored by DEA, CBP, DHS

8:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

9:00 am ‐ 11:00 am

Conference Registration

Grand Ballroom AB

4th Floor Foyer (By Grand Ballroom AB)

Science Bowl Finals ‐ Junior/Senior Division Sponsored by American Chemical Society 8

337 & 338

335C


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE 9:00 am ‐ 10:00 am Repeated at 10:00 am ‐ 11:00 am

9:30 am ‐ 11:30 am

Student Development 4 Technical Writing Publications Dr. Kadir Aslan, Associate Professor Morgan State University

335B

Award Symposium 4

Graduate Student Fellowship Award Sci‐Mix

336A

9:30 am ‐ 11:30 am

Technical Session 7: There’s an App for That: Science & Engineering Applications in CFD & Aerospace

336B

9:30 am ‐ 11:30 am

Technical Session 8: Organic Chemistry II

335A

10:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

Student Development 5 Graduate Recruiters Panel

11:45 am ‐ 1:45 pm

Science Competition Awards Luncheon (ticketed), Sponsored by ACS

Grand Ballroom AB

3:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm

Science Competitions Bowling Trip

Off site

2:00 pm ‐ 4:00 pm

Award Symposium 5: Winifred Burkes ‐Houck Women’s Leadership Award Symposium sponsored by Center for Enabling New Technologies, University of Washington

2:00 pm ‐ 4:00 pm

Symposium 5: NanoVat ion: Innovation in Nanoscience Featured Speaker: Kwame Owusu‐Adom, PhD. 3M Corporate Research Materials Laboratory sponsored by Defense Threat Red uct ion Agency

7:00 pm ‐ 10:00 pm

6:30 pm Reception 7:00 pm Awards Ceremony and Gala Dinner 9

329

335AB

338

Grand Ballroom


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND

We wish to thank members and friends of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers for their support and confidence in the future of NOBCChE by making a $500.00 or more tax deductible contribution to the NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund. William M. Jackson* Madeleine Jacobs* Ella L. Kelly Sharon Kennedy* Christopher Kinard Anita Osborne‐Lee George Lester, Jr. William A Lester, Jr. Mallinkrodt Chemical Inc. Willie May Jefferson McCowan* Victor R. McCrary* Saundra Y. McGuire* Sidney McNairy Lynn Melton Philip Merchant Reginald E. Mitchell William V. Ormond* James A. Porter Cordelia M. Price* Marquita Qualls* Janet B. Reid Leonard E. Small* Florence P. Smith Michael Stallings* Clarence Tucker* Benjamin Wallace* Charles Washington Joseph Watson Billy Williams Keith B. Williams Reginald Willingham Bobby Wilson Andrea Young*

Debbie Allen Mildred Allison Denise Barnes Sharon J. Barnes* Iona Black* Henry T. Brown Winifred Burks‐Houck Virlyn Burse* Joseph N. Cannon Callista Chukwunenye Robert L. Countryman Andrew Crowe* Darrell Davis Anthony L. Dent* Lawrence E. Doolin* Linneaus Dorman* Fannie Posey Eddy James Evans, Sr. Lloyd Ferguson Lonnie Fogel Lloyd Freeman Eddie Gay Joseph Gordon* Bernice Green William Guillory* Jonathan K. Hale James Harris Bruce Harris* Ivory Herbert Kenneth W Hicks Neville Holder* Isaac B. Horton, III Donald A. Hudson Charles R. Hurt * Contributed more than $500.00

10


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND

We wish to thank members and friends of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers for their support and confidence in the future of NOBCChE, and for their tax deductible contribution to the NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund.

Adegboye Adeyeno Keith Alexander Verlinda Allen Eugene Alsandor Roseanne Anderson Victor Atiemo‐Obeng Benny Askew, Jr. Breeana Baker Joseph Barnes Tegwyn L. Berry Alfred Bishop Jeanette E. Brown Nora Butler‐Briant James Burke Jacqueline Calhoun Lashanda Carter Antoine Carty Sonya Caston Perry Catchings, Jr. Aldene Chambles John J. Chapman Esteban Chornet Reginald A. Christy Regina V. Clark James Clifton Edward Coleman George Collins Carma Cook James E. Cotton Garry S. Crosson Reuben Daniel Kowetha Davidson Ella Davis Thomas Davis Thomas Dill

Gerald Ellis Lisa Batiste‐Evans Pat Fagbayi Edward Flabe Edward E. Flagg Dawn Fox Joe Franklin Russell Franklin Issac Gamwo John W. Garner Cornelia Gilyard Murrell Godfrey Robert Gooden Warren E. Gooden Valerie Goss Etta Gravely Bernice Green Garry Grossman Keith V. Guinn Everett B. Guthrie Micheal Gyamerah Gene S. Hall James Hamilton John Harkless Kinesha Harris April Harrison Isom Harrison Rogers E. Harry‐Oruru Lincoln Hawkins Ronald Haynes Derry Haywood Ronald L. Henry Leonard Holley Sydana R. Hollins 11

Smallwood Holoman, Jr. Brenda S. Holmes Mo Hunsen Nikisha Hunter Bernard Jackson Donald Jackson Evelyn P. Jackson Kim Jackson Kyle Jackson Raymond James Allene Johnson Elijah Johnson Harry Johnson Paula Johnson Saphronia Johnson Emmett Jones Evy Jones Jennifer A. Jones Jesse Jones Timothy Jones Thomas C. Jones Verlinda Jordan Jimmie Julian Otis Kems Karen A. Kennedy Kirby Kirksey Rachel Law Mia Laws Lester A. Lee Cynthia R. Leslie Ronald Lewis, II Norman Loney Steve Lucas Alex Maasa


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND Dale H. Mack George S. Mack Robert McAllister Aliecia McClain Gerald McCloud Jefferson McCowan Walter McFall Dawn McLaurin Linda Mead‐Tollin Janice Meeks Charles W. Merideth M. P. Moon Damon Mitchell Robert Murff Harvey Myers Joycelyn Nelson Tina Newsome James Nichols Kenneth Norton Bunmi Ogunkeye Steven B. Ogunwumi Mobolaji O. Olwinde Chinwe Onuorah Kofi Oppong Soni Oyekan Beverly Paul James Pearce James Pearson Tony L. Perry Howard Peters

Mwita V. Phelps Walter G. Phillips Louis Pierce Sonya Caston Pierre Wendell Plain Charles A. Plinton Rachel Poss Melvin Poulson Jamacia Prince Daniel Reuben Daryl Robinson Mary Robinson Press Robinson Anne Roby Tommie Royster Albert E. Russell Franklin Russell Jason Saavedron Tova Samuels Clark Scales Billy Scott Melva Scott Robert Shepard James P Shoffner Keroline M. Simmonds Tiffany Simpson Milton Sloan Karen Speights ‐ Diggs Oreoluwa Sofekun Lucius Stephenson Wilford Stewart

12

Grant St. Julian Richard Sullivan Donald Taylor Dameyun Thompson Albert Thompson Ezra Totton Jorge Valdes Grant Venerable Cheryl A. Vockins Benjamin Wallace Emmanuel Waddell Joseph W. Watson Samuel von Winbush Gerald Walker Leon C. Warner Michael Washington Odiest Washington Ben Watson Joseph W. Watson Helen P. White Ronald H. White Thomas Whitt Leonard Wilmen Harold Lloyd Williams Laura C. Williams Joe Williams Raymond Williams Jeremy Willis Sean Wright Sandra Wyatt


PROGRAM SCHEDULE DAY OF WEEK

EVENT

ROOM

Monday, April 18

9:00 am – 4:00 pm

NOBCChE Executive Board Meeting

2:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm

Conference Registration

4th Floor Foyer (By Grand Ballroom AB)

Conference Registration

4th Floor Foyer (By Grand Ballroom AB)

331

Tuesday, April 19 8:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm

Tuesday, am

Teachers Workshop I: Elementary School 8:00 a.m. ‐ 12:00 pm

335 C

Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, ACS, Staples, NOBCChE, and CAPS (Committee for Action Program Services)

Moderator

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services Cedar Hill, TX Registration and Continental Breakfast Welcome and Opening Remarks Mrs. Linda Davis, Director, Committee Chairperson and Moderator Dr. Victor McCrary, President National NOBCChE

8:00 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. 8:45 am ‐ 9:00 am

9:00 am – 11:45 am

Tuesday, am

“Integrating Tools for Hands‐on Teaching in the Classroom, Grade level: K ‐ 5th ” Mrs. Yolanda S. George, Deputy Director and Program Director, AAAS, Washington, DC Technical Session 1: Alternative Energy Solutions 8:30 am ‐ 11:45 am (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation) 13

336A


“NATURAL GAS: A VERITABLE RESOURCE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT OF NIGERIA.” Nche John D. Erinne, CEO Chex & Associates, Ilupeju, Lagos, Nigeria Nigerian Society of Chemical Engineers, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria “ACETYLENE‐THIOPHENE – DITHIENO PYRROLE COPOLYMERS FOR ORGANIC ELECTRONICS” Racquel Jemison, Sarada P. Mishra, Courtney Balliet, Richard D. McCullough* Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA “PHOTOCATALYTIC EVENTS OF CDSE QUANTUM DOTS IN CONFINED MEDIA. MAPPING ELECTRODIC BEHAVIOR OF COUPLED PLATINUM NANOPARTICLES” Clifton Harris and Prashant V. Kamat* Radiation Laboratory and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN “PRODUCTION OF DIMETHYL CARBONATE VIA REACTIVE DISTILLATION PROCESS” Emmanuel Dada, PhD Process Engineering ChemProcess Technologies (CPT), League City, TX Break “NEW STRUCTURE DESIGN OF IMPROVED ZINC OXIDE NANOWIRE‐ BASED SOLAR CELLS” Mallarie D. McCune School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA “OXYGEN REDUCTION REACTION (ORR) OF PALLADIUM NANODENDRITES FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL‐CELLS (PEM FCs)” Selasi O. Blavo, Maria Sanchez, and John N. Kuhn Chemical & Biomedical Engineering Department University of South Florida, Tamp, Florida

PROGRAM SCHEDULE

8:30 – 8:55

8:55 – 9:15

9:15 – 9:35

9:35 – 10:00

10:00 – 10:10 10:10 – 10:30

10:30 – 10:50

10:50 – 11:15

“SLICE IMAGING STUDIES OF PHOTODISSOCIATION SINGLE VIBRONIC ENERGY LEVELS OF N2 IN THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET REGION” William Jackson, PhD Department of Chemistry University of California, Davis 14


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

11:15‐11:40

“A REVIEW OF CO2 CAPTURE TECHNOLOGIES FROM POWER PLANTS” Steven Ogunwumi Crystalline Materials Research Corning Incorporated, Corning NY

Tuesday, am

Technical Session 2:

Analytical Chemistry 8:30 am ‐ 11:45 am

337A

(ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)

8:30 – 8:55

“COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF WOOD EXTRACTIVES BY GCXGC‐TOFMS AND GC‐MS” Roderquita Moore, PhD Forest Products Laboratory USDA Forest Service, Madison, WI

9:00 – 9:20

9:20 – 9:40

9:40 – 10:00

10:00 – 10:10 10:10 – 10:30

“A RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY STUDY OF 4,5‐DIAZAFLUOREN‐9‐ONE USING FT‐RAMAN AND DFT CALCULATIONS” Rhonda McCoy1, Alberto Vivoni2, Ray J. Butcher1, Charles M. Hosten1 1Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington DC 2Department of Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Sciences “IMMOBILIZATION OF LAMBDA EXONUCLEASE ENZYME IN A SOLID‐ PHASE REACTOR FOR ON‐CHIP DIGESTION OF DNA” Nyote J. Oliver and Steven A. Soper Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA “INTERFACIAL SLIP OF WATER ON SURFACES OF VARYING WETTABILITY” Deborah Ortiz School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Break “QUANTIFICATION OF TOTAL ω‐6, TOTAL ω‐3 AND ω‐6/ω‐3 RATIO IN HUMAN SERUM USING GC/MS” Mary W. Kimani, Gerard G. Dumancas, Neil Purdie, Lisa Reilly Chemistry Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 15


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 10:30 – 10:50

10:50 – 11:10

11:10 – 11:35

“THE EFFECTS OF BOTANICAL EXTRACTS ON ACETYL‐COA CARBOXYLASE ASSAYED USING A CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS‐ BASED ENZYME ASSAY” Sherrisse K. Bryant1, Rachel L. Henken1, Glen Meades, Jr.2, Grover L. Waldrop2, S. Douglass Gilman1 1Department of Chemistry 2Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA “TARGETED PROTEOMIC AND GLYCOMIC APPROACH FOR IDENTIFICATION OF LOW-ABUNDANT GLYCOPROTEINS IN SERUM USING NANO-LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY” Cynthia Williams Department of Chemistry University of California, Davis, CA “MASS-SPECTROMETRY APPROACHES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTITATION OF OXIDIZED PROTEINS” Renã A. S. Robinson, PhD Department of Chemistry University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

Tuesday, am

Corning Technical Session Technical Session 3: Polymer & Materials Science 8:30 am ‐ 11:45 am Sponsored by Corning Incoporated (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)

337B

8:30 – 9:00

9:00 – 9:30

“CRYSTALLINE NANOPORUOS FRAMEWORK MATERIALS AND COMPOSITES FOR PROTECTION AND DECONTAMINATION” Tracee Harris Defense Threat Reduction Agency DTRA‐CB, Physical Science & Technology Division “EVALUATION OF MORPHOLOGY AND SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF NANOMATERIALS DERIVED FROM PSEUDOISOCYANINE‐BASED GUMBOS” Atiya N. Jordan, Susmita Das, and Isiah M. Warner

Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 16


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 9:30 – 10:00

“A SEARCH FOR MATERIAL CAPABLE OF VOC DETECTION: SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GOLD (I) PHOSPHINE COMPLEXESʺ Darkus Jenkins and Zerihun Assefa Department of Chemistry North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC

10:00 – 10:30

10:30 – 10:40 10:40 – 11:10

11:10 – 11:40

Tuesday, pm

“ANALYSIS OF LIQUID FLOW IN TEXTILE MICROCONTACTORS” Tracie Owens Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Break “ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF POTENTIALLY CONDUCTIVE POLYMERS: RELEVANT TO ELECTRICAL STORAGE AND TRANSMISSION?” John A. W. Harkless, PhD Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC “CHARGE TRANSPORT IN REALISTIC ELECTRONIC DEVICES: EFFECTS OF DEFECTS, TRAPS, AND ELECTROSTATICS” Tamika A. Madison, Marcus D. Hanwell, and Geoffrey R. Hutchison Department of Chemistry University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

Welcome and Opening Luncheon 12:00 pm ‐ 1:30 pm

Sponsored by Corning

Grand Ballroom AB

(ticketed)

Tuesday, pm

Teachers Workshop II: Middle School 335 C 1:00 pm ‐ 4:00 pm Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, ACS, Staples, NOBCChE, and CAPS (Committee for Action Program Services)

Moderator

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services Cedar Hill, TX 17


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

4:00 pm

“Engaging Science through Hands‐on Investigations” Grade Level: 6 ‐ 8th Dr. Edward Walton, Professor of Chemistry, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA Closing Remarks Mrs. Linda Davis

Tuesday, pm

Keynote Speaker

Henry Hill Lecture

335AB 1:45 pm ‐ 2:45 pm ”Present and Future Climate Change: Grand Challenges for the Science, Engineering, and Society” Dr. Warren Washington, 2007 Nobel Laureate and Senior Scientist, National Center for Atmospheric Research Sponsored by MIT and Northeast Section of ACS

Symposium 1 Tuesday, pm

2:45 – 3:15

Environmental Science and Policy Symposium 2:45 pm ‐ 5:45 pm

336B

Featured Speaker Norris McDonald, President African American Environmentalist Association

3:15 – 3:35

3:35 – 3:55

“IN‐SITU MEASUREMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AIRBORNE SAHARAN DUST DURING THE AEROSOL AND OCEAN SCIENCE EXPEDITIONS (AEROSE)” Esther Effiong Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC “EVALUATION OF THREE TREATMENT FACTORS USING LIME ON TNT CONTAMINATED SOIL FROM PLUM BROOK ORDNANCE WORKS (PBOW)” Agnes Morrow Environmental Lab USACE‐Engineer Research & Dev. Center , Vicksburg, MS 18


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 3:55 – 4:15

4:15 – 4:25 4:25 – 4:45

4:45 – 5:05

5:05 – 5:25

5:25 – 5:45

ʺCONFRONTING BLACKS SUSTAINABILITY ISSUES: LESSONS FROM HURRICANE KATRINA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO OIL SPILLʺ Asopuru Okemgbo Skills Development Mission, Inc Minority Youth Science Mentoring, Richland, WA Break “PETROCHEMICAL TRANSPORT AND CHEMICAL PRODUCT COMMODITY FLOW IN THE GULF COAST REGION” Robert Ford, PhD Department of Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, TX “EVALUATION OF HEAVY METAL AND DIESEL RANGE ORGANICS IN SOIL AND FOOD AFTER NATURAL AND MAN‐MADE DISASTERS: A COMMUNITY BASED PARTICIPATORY PROJECT” Lovell Agwaramgbo, PhD, Eucharia Agwaramgbo, Sherman Coleman, Atiereya Adley, Chanel Mercadel, and Shelby Edwards Department of Chemistry Dillard University, New Orleans, LA “FOOD ADDITIVES AND SPICES FOR COUNTERACTING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS” Mahmoud Saleh Department of Chemistry Texas Southern University, TX “INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF HMTD EXPLOSIVES” Laurenee London Department of Chemistry Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA

Student Development 1 Interactive RÉSUMÉ Writing for Students

3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

19

329 & 330


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Symposium 2 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Tuesday, pm

3:00 – 3:45

Featured Speaker

“Advancing Global Healthcare through STEM”

336A

Milton Brown, MD, Ph.D., Director Drug Discovery Program Georgetown University Medical Center 3:45 – 4:05

4:05 – 4:25

“DEVELOPMENT OF INHIBITORS OF CARBONIC ANHYDRASE UTILIZING PARALLEL MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY: SAR LEARNINGS FROM THE IMIDAZOPYRIDINE AND IMIDAZOLES SERIES” Martha Ornelas WW Medicinal chemistry Pfizer, La Jolla, CA “ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITIES AND SYNERGY EVALUATION OF CHLORHEXIDINE DIAMPICILLIN GUMBOS AS A COMBINATION DRUG THERAPEUTIC AGENT” Marsha R. Cole1, Min Li1, Bilal El‐Zahab1, Marlene E. Janes2, and Isiah M. Warner1* 1Department of Chemistry 2Department of Food Science, University Agricultural Center

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 4:25 – 4:45

4:45 – 5:05

5:05 – 5:30

“ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTIONS FROM ZANTHOXYLUM SETULOSUM IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL STRUCTURES FOR CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC DRUGS” Tameka, M., Walker and William, N. Setzer University of Alabama in Huntsville, Department of Chemistry, Huntsville, AL “PREVALENCE AND RISK FACTORS OF GESTATIONAL DIABETES AT THE BUEA REGIONAL HOSPITAL” Sandra L.N. Kakambi Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon “INSIGHT INTO THE FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF CANCER VARIANTS IN MUTYH” Shailise Ross Department of Chemistry University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 20


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Tuesday, pm

4:00 – 4:25

4:25 – 4:50

4:50 – 5:15

5:15 – 5:40

5:40 – 6:00

Technical Session 4 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM Organic Chemistry I

337A

“OPTICAL IMAGING PROBE FOR CELL DEATH.” Safiyyah Forbes, Bradley D. Smith Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Walther Cancer Research Institute, University of Notre Dame, North Bend, IN “SYNTHESIS OF NEW PORPHYRIN CONJUGATES WITH AFFINITY FOR EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR.” Alecia M. McCall, M. Graça H. Vicente Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA “TEMPLATE‐ASSISTED FLUORESCENT NANOTUBES AND NANOWIRES FROM A GROUP OF UNIFORM MATERIALS BASED ON ORGANIC SALTS” Sergio de Rooy, Bilal El‐Zahab, Min Li, Susmita Das and Isiah M. Warner Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA “p‐TOLUENESULFONIC ACID AS A CATALYST FOR THE FORMATION OF FURAN DERIVATIVES.” Rayaj A. Ahamed, Laura Gessner, Kristina Deveaux, Karelle Aiken PhD Department of Chemistry Georgia Southern University,Statesboro , GA ʺMODULAR GLYCOCONJUGATE TOOL SET FOR ASSEMBLY AND PRESENTATION OF MULTIVALENT CARBOHYDRATE LIGANDS ON SURFACESʺ Irene E. Abia, Brian Sanders, Michael D. Best, David C. Baker Department of Chemistry University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

21


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Award Symposium 1 4:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Award Symposium (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)

Tuesday, pm

4:00 – 4:35

337B

Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Awardee “INFLAMMATION, BLOOD FLOW DYNAMICS AND THE FABRICATION OF VASCULAR‐TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY VEHICLES” Omolola Eniola‐Adefeso, Ph.D. Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

4:35 – 4:55

4:55 – 5:15

5:15 – 5:35

5:35 – 6:00

“KINETIC EVALUATION OF DUAL BINDING HUMAN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS” Alexander Lodge, Daniel Quinn, PhD Department of Chemistry University of Iowa “DESIGN, SYNTHESIS, AND APPLICATION OF PEGYLATED PEPTIDES CONJUGATED TO PORPHYRINS” Krystal Fontenot, M. Graça H. Vicente Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA “ELECTROLESS DEPOSITION OF NI (CO)‐CU‐MO USING A POLYMER‐ STABILIZED PALLADIUM CATALYST INK ONTO THE SURFACE OF CARBON NANOTUBES” Tiffany Long, Egwu E. Kalu Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL “NON‐INVASIVE GLUCOSE MONITORING AND PROGRESS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN EFFECTIVE ARTIFICIAL PANCREAS” Derrick Rollins, PhD Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering Department of Statistics Iowa State University, Ames, IA

5:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm

Exhibitors’ Meeting

Grand Ballroom AB

6:00 pm ‐ 8:00 pm

Opening Reception Sponsored by COACh

4th Floor Foyer (near Grand Ballroom J)

22


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Wednesday, April 20 8:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm

Wednesday a.m. Moderator 8:00 am ‐ 9:00 am 9:00 am – 11:45 am

11:45 am – 12:00 pm

Conference Registration

4th Floor Foyer (By Grand Ballroom AB)

Teachers Workshop III: High School 335 C 8:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, ACS, Staples, NOBCChE and CAPS (Committee for Action Program Services) Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services Cedar Hill, TX Continental Breakfast “Part 1: “Engaging Students in Authentic Lab Experiences.” Part 2: “Proportional Reasoning and Critical Thinking” Grade Level: 9th‐12th” Dr. Michael Page, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, California State Polytechnic University Closing Remarks Mrs. Linda Davis

8:30 am ‐ 9:30 am 8:30 am ‐ 9:30 am

Midwest Regional Meeting Southeast Regional Meeting

Wednesday, am & pm

CAREER FAIR EXPO 9:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm

HBCU/MI Chairs Council Breakfast Wednesday, am 8:00 am ‐ 9:00 am Sponsored by Office of Naval Research HBCU/MI Chairs Council Forum Wednesday, am & pm 9:00 am ‐ 3:00 pm Sponsored by Office of Naval Research 23

344 A 344 B

Grand Ballroom G‐L

337

336


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Wednesday, am

Presenter:

Professional Development Workshop: 9:00 am ‐ 11:00 am ʺ Mentoring In The STEM Disciplinesʺ Dr. Howard Kea, Sr. Organizational Development Consultant, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

338

9:45 am ‐ 10:45 am

Northeast Regional Meeting

344 A

9:45 am ‐ 10:45 am

Southwest Regional Meeting

344 B

10:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

Collegiate Poster Set‐Up

10:00 am ‐ 5:00 pm 11:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

Science Bowl/Science Fair Check‐In West Regional Meeting

Grand Ballroom D‐F 4th Floor Foyer (Near Exhibit Hall) 344 A

Wednesday, pm

NOBCChE Vision Luncheon 12:00 pm ‐ 1:00 pm

Grand Ballroom AB

1:00 pm ‐ 2:30 pm

Wednesday, p.m.

Presenter:

Science Fair Setup

4th Floor Foyer (Near Grand Ballroom D‐F)

Professional Development Workshop: 3:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm 338 ʺFinancial Strategies: Your Solutions To Money Management And Investing ʺ Derry L. Haywood, II, The Peninsula Financial Group 24


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Wednesday, p.m.

Collegiate Scientific Exchange Poster Session 3:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm Sponsored by Colgate Palmolive and the Biophysical Society

Grand Ballroom D‐F

Posters (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation ABSTRACT NUMBER

1

ANA 001 EFFECT OF SURFACE MODIFICATION ON TIO2 PHASE TRANSITION TEMPERATURE Clifton Watkins and Prashant V. Kamat Department of Chemistry University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

2

ANA 003 A SPECTROELECTROCHEMICAL STUDY OF AN ANTITUMOR ACTIVE DERIVATIVE OF 1, 4‐NAPHTHOQUINONE Maraizu Ukaegbu, Nkechi Enwerem, Oladapo Bakare, Charles Hosten Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DE

3

ANA 005 OPTICAL SENSING OF MERCURY(II) WITH NEW CONFORMATIONALLY PREORGANIZED FLUOROGENIC CALIX[4]ARENES Pogisego Dinake, Polina E. Prokhorova, Vladimir S. Talanov, Galina G.Talanova Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC

4

ANA 007

ULTRASENSITIVE AND HIGHLY SELECTIVE DETECTION OF TRIVALENT CHROMIUM USING TWO‐PHOTON SCATTERING PROPERTIES OF 5,5’‐DITHIOBIS(2‐ NITROBENZOIC ACID) MODIFIED GOLD NANOPARTICLE Shantelle Hughes, Samuel S. R. Dasary, Anant K. Singh, Paresh C. Ray, and Hongtao Yu Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Jackson State University, Jackson, MS

25


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 5

ANA 009 TAG TEAM REDUCTION OF AMBIGUITY IN THE ASSIGNMENT OF NMR RESONANCES Kevin Roberson, Megan A. Macnaughtan Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

6

ANA 011 USING ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES TO PREDICT GEOMETRY OF QUARTZ NANOPORES Corey Williams1, Jessica Koehne2 1Department of Chemistry, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 2NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California

7

ANA 013 PARTICLE LITHOGRAPHY AND SCANNING PROBE STUDIES OF FERRITIN USING ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY (AFM) AND MAGNETIC SAMPLE MODULATION Stephanie L. Daniels, Jayne Garno Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

8

ANA 015 PROBING CHLOROPHYLL DEGRADATION PRODUCTS IN SENESCENT PLANT TISSUES USING DESI‐IMAGING MASS SPECTROMETRY Sheran Oradu1, Thomas Mueller2, Bernhardt Kreautler2 and R G Cooks1 1Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 2Institute of Organic Chemistry & Centre for Molecular Biosciences, University of Innsbruck Innrain, Innsbruck Austria

9

ANA 017 SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NICKEL‐SILICA AEROGELS USING A SUB‐ CRITICAL DRYING APPROACH Rhonda Jack, Brittany Henderson, Dinah Holland, Jale Akyurtlu Department of Chemical Engineering Hampton University, Hampton, VA

10 ANA 019 NOVEL SENSOR FOR TARTRATE BASED ON NICKEL OXIDE MOIETIES WITH CARBON TRANSDUCER AʹTondra Gilstrap Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

26


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 11 ANA 021 SYNTHESIS AND KINETIC EVALUATION OF SLOW REACTING SUBSTRATES FOR ACETYL CHOLINESTERASE (ACHE) Linda Ehimwenman Department of Chemistry University of Iowa, Iowa city, IA

12 ANA 023 CHARACTERIZED WET CHEMICAL ETCHING OF INASGASB WITH H3CIT: H2O2: HCL ETCHANT FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVED PERFORMANCE OF LIGHT EMITTING DIODES Deandrea Watkins, Jonathon T. Olesberg, Thomas F. Boggess, and Mark A. Arnold Department of Chemistry The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

13 ANA 025 SHELF LIFE OF BASIC YELOW 40 Paige Sims1, Murrell Godfrey1, Erik Frazure2, Shannon Roy2 1Department of Chemistry, University of Mississippi, Aberdeen, MS 2Mississippi State Crime Laboratory, Batesville, MS

14 ANA 027 FORENSIC STABILITY STUDY OF STORED BLOOD ALCOHOL EVIDENCE Anjerlina Dancy1, Murrell Godfrey1, J.C. Smiley2, Teresia Hickmon2 1Department of Chemistry, University of Mississippi, Aberdeen, MS 2Mississippi State Crime Laboratory, Batesville, MS

15 ANA 029 HYDROGEN SULFIDE‐INDUCED RELAXATION OF ISOLATED BOVINE CILIARY ARTERY Kiara Taylor, Ya Fatou Njie‐Mbye, Madhura Kulkarni, Sunny E. Ohia Department of Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

16 BIO 001 LATEX, YEAST AND DUST: PLASMONICS FOR INFRARED MICROSPECTROSCOPY OF INDIVIDUAL 1‐5 ΜM PARTICLES Marvin A. Malone and James V. Coe Department of Chemistry The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

27


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 17 BIO 002 NEW HNO PRECURSORS BASED ON BIS‐ACYLATED HYDROXYLAMINES, N‐ ACYLOXYSULFONAMIDES, AND N‐HYDROXY‐N‐ACYLSULFONAMIDES Art Sutton Department of Chemistry The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

18 BIO 003 LIFE IN A NEAR BOILING HOT SPRING: WHO IS THERE AND HOW DO THEY DO IT? David Taylor and Laurey Steinke Department of Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

19 BIO 004 ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF A MANNOSE‐ BINDING LECTIN FROM THE SERUM OF THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) Lancia Darville1, Mark Merchant2 and Kermit Murray1 1Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 2McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA

20 BIO 005 PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE KAINATE RECEPTOR COMPLEX Jelynn Stinson Department of Chemistry Wright State University, Dayton, OH

21 BIO 006 NOVEL ISLET‐SERTOLI CELL HYBRID CONSTRUCT THAT IS IMMUNOPROTECTED AND SECRETES INSULIN Justin Stewart, Mark Jaroszeski1, Don Cameron2 1Department of Chemistry University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 2 College of Medicine, Department of Pathology & Cell Biology

22 BIO 007 CHROMIUM IS NOT AN ESSENTIAL TRACE ELEMENT FOR MAMMALS: EFFECTS OF A “LOW‐CHROMIUM” DIET Sharifa Love1, John B. Vincent1, Nicholas Rhodes1,a Kristin Di Bona2, DeAna McAdory1, Sarmistha Halder Sinha1, Naomi Kern,a Julia Kent3,Jessyln Strickland2, Austin Wilson2 Janis Beaird2, James Ramage3 and Jane F. Rascob4 1Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 2Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 3Animal Care Facility, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 4Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of West Alabama, Livingston, AL 28


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 23 BIO 008 DESIGN CHANGES IN A MICROFLUIDIC TUMOR‐MIMICKING BIOREACTOR Christian Tormos, Dr. Neil Forbes Department of Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Iowa State University, Ames, IA

24 BIO 009 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR NFKB MEDIATES HIGH ENERGY RADIATION INDUCED ACTIVATION OF COX‐2, MMP‐9 AND IKB Emmanuel Obi, Sarah Munyu, Anita Lewis, and Shishir Shishodia Department of Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

25 BIO 010 A KINETICS STUDY OF CYTOCHROME C AND CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE Maria Williams1 Dr. Francis Millett2, Dr. Lois Geren2, Dr. Jeffrey Havens2, Mrs. Marilyn Davis2 1Department of Chemistry, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 2University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AK

26 BIO 011 IMMOBILIZATION OF PROTEINS ON NANOPOROUS ALUMINA Melody Roberson Department of Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

27 BIO 012 EFFECT OF SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ON THE REPRODUCTION OF CEANORHABDITIS ELEGANS Brandi Wilson, NM Alaniz, Abdel-Rahman, Ph.D. Department of N/A Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

28 BIO 013 SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND BIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF GOLD‐ HOLLOW‐NANOSTRUCTURES Christen Robinson, Dulal Senapati, Tapas Senapati, Anant K. Singh, and Paresh C. Ray Department of Chemistry Jackson State University, Jackson, MS

29


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 29 BIO 014 DETERMINING THE FREQUENCY AND PERFORMANCE OF SEQUENCES IN GENES PREDICTED TO FUNCTION AS RIBOSOME BINDING SITES Rami El‐kweifi

30 BIO 015 APPROACHES TOWARD SYNTHESIS OF THREE‐RING SPIROKETAL UNITS USING GOLD SALTS AS CATALYSTS Laura Gessner Department of Chemistry Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA

31 BIO 016 OPTIMIZING PURIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF O‐GLCNACYLATED CREB1 EXPRESSED IN E. COLI Octavia Goodwin Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

32 BIO 017 SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF SEVERAL NEW PT (II) COMPLEXES CONTAINING PYRIDINE AND BENZIMIDAZOLE FUNCTIONALIZED AMIDE LIGANDS BY SAMUEL ASEM Samuel Asem Department of Chemistry University of Louisville, Durham, NC

33 BIO 018

IN SILICO DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF CARBOXYLESTERASE INHIBITORS Shana Stoddard, Philip M. Potter, Randy M. Wadkins Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi, University, MS

34 BIO 019

LIGHT‐INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY OF PYRENE DERIVATIVES Tracie Perkins, Britney Johnson, and Hongtao Yu Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Jackson State University, Jackson, MS

30


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 35 BIO 020 APPLYING PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS TO IMPROVE GLUCOSE MODELING Lindsey Vance, Lucas P. Beverlin2, Derrick K. Rollins, Sr.1,2, Peggy D. Lee1 1Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering 2Department of Statistics Iowa State University, Ames, IA

36 BIO 021 REACTIVITY OF DISTONIC SPECIES DERIVED FROM OXIDIZED METHIONINE Tyrslai Williams Department of Chemistry Southern University A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA

37 BIO 022 SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND 2‐DIMENSIONAL SEPARATION OF INTEGRAL MEMBRANE PROTEINS Katrina Battle, Maggie Witek, John K. Osiri, and Steven A. Soper Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

38 BIO 023 TIME RESOLVED PHOTOTHERMAL STUDIES OF PROTEIN FOLDING Tarah Word Department of Chemistry University of South Florida, Tampa, FL

39 BIO 024 INVESTIGATING THE PKA OF THE ACTIVE SITE ASPARTATES OF HIV‐1 PROTEASE USING CONSTANT PH MOLECULAR DYNAMICS Dwight McGee Department of Chemsitry University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

40 BIO 025 SITE SPECIFIC ISOTOPICALLY ENRICHED NTPS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF RNA Melantha Jackson and T. Kwaku Dayie Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Maryland, College Park, MD

31


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 41 BIO 026 PROGRESS IN THE SYNTHESIS OF EROGORGIAENE, A POTENT ANTI‐TUBERCULOSIS MARINE DITERPENE Sena Dzakuma, Esdrey Rodriguez, Moises Romero, Horacio Olivo, Ph.D. Department of College of Pharmacy University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

42 BIO 027 IDENTIFICATION OF INHIBITORS OF THE FIMZ GENE OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR TYPHIMURIUM, A GENE THAT REGULATES MOTILITY, ATTACHMENT, AND INVASION Kalyani Eko Department of Department of Microbiology, Carver College of Medicine The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

43 BIO 028 DEVELOPMENT OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS METHODS TO SUPPORT STUDIES OF THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN AQUATIC PLANT MICROCOSMS, TRACE ELEMENTS, AND NANOPARTICLES Monique Johnson, Sergei A Ostroumov2, Julian F Tyson1 Baoshan Xing2 1Department of Chemistry 2Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Sunderland, MA

44 BIO 029 DIRUTHENIUM COMPLEXES AS A POTENTIAL ANITCANCER AGENT Destinee Stroud, Jamie Dooley‐ Renfro, Tuan Phan, and Bobby L. Wilson Department of Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

45 ENERGY 001 VAPOR AND PARTICULATE ANALYSIS ENABLED BY THE USE OF CHARGED MICRODROPLETS AS A CAPTURING TOOL Dahlia Campbell, Keyong Hou, Graham Cooks Department of Chemistry Purdue University, West lafayette, IN

46 ENERGY 002 THE CORRELATION OF VOLTAMMETRIC HALF‐WAVE POTENTIAL AND THE FLUORESCENCE OF PHENOL AND SELECTED CHLOROPHENOLS IN CTAB SURFACTANT SOLUTION Biebele Abel Department of Chemistry Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 32


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

47 ENERGY 003 OPTIMIZING THE PERFORMANCE OF II‐IV‐BASED THIN FILM PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS DURING ELEMENTAL VAPOR TRANSPORT AT ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURES (EVTAP) Trishelle Copeland‐Johnson Department of Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering University of South Florida, Lutz, FL

48 ENERGY 004 SOLAR ENERGY STORAGE AND RELEASE IN THIN FILM MEDIA Melody Kelley, Les Gray, Silas Blackstock Department of Chemistry University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

49 ENERGY 005 BIOMASS BURNING BYPRODUCTS AND THEIR ROLE AS WEATHER MODIFIERS Craig Battle Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC

50 ENERGY 006 LIPOPHILIC SUPER‐ABSORBENT POLYMER GELS AS THE CLEANERS FOR USE ON WEAPONS SYSTEMS AND PLATFORMS Sierra McCray Department of Chemistry University of Illinois, Urbana, IL

51 ENERGY 007 ASSESSMENT OF U.S. COASTAL CARIBBEAN FISH HABITAT PARAMETERS FOR THE NATIONAL FISH HABITAT ACTION PLAN (NFHAP) Jerald Watley Department of Department of Physics Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

52 ENERGY 008 DESIGN AND SYNTHESIS OF COLORIMETRIC SENSORS FOR DETECTION OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS Jully Senteu and Sherine O. Obare, Ph.D. Department of Department of Chemistry Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

33


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 53 ENERGY 009 PTV IN REGIOREGULAR STRUCTURES William Harkins Department of Chemistry Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA

54 ENERGY 010 TOWARDS REDUCTION OF OPTICAL LOSSES IN TRANSITION METALS BASED NANOMATERIALS Casey Gonder Department of Engineering

Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 55 ENVIRO 001 INFLUENCE OF PALLADIUM IN BIMETALLIC CATALYST DEACTIVATION RESISTANCE FOR HYDRODECHLORINATION Shannon Anderson and Egwu E. Kalu Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL

56 ENVIRO 002 ADVANCEMENT OF WATER TREATMENT USING CARBON NANOTUBES Aboaba Adetoun, Bobby Wilson and Renard Thomas Department of N/A

Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 57 ENVIRO 003 BIO‐ASSESSMENT OF HUMAN HEALTH FROM CHRONIC METAL EXPOSURE IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT Terrell Gibson, Alamelu Sundaresan, Bobby Wilson and Renard Thomas Department of Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

58 ENVIRO 004 ASSESMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS IN THE GALVESTON BAY WATERSHED Zuri Dale, Katoria R. Tatum‐Gibbsa, Bobby Wilson and Renard Thomas Department of Chemistry Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

34


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 59 ENVIRO 005 CONCENTRATIONS OF MERCURY AND METHYLMERCURY IN NATURAL WATERS FROM MISSISSIPPI Garry Brown, James Cizdziel Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi, University, MS

60 ENVIRO 006 DIOXIN AND DIOXIN‐LIKE PCBS IN FOOD SAMPLES FROM FARMS IN SLOVAKIA Sharde Hameed, Anton Kočan, Ph.D., Jana Chovancová, Ph.D., Beata Drobná, Ph.D., Milena Dömötörová, Ph.D., Peter Lenčo M.S., Kamil Čonka, M.S., Anna Fabišiková, M.S., Jarmila Salajová, National Reference Centre for Dioxins and Related Compounds, Slovak Medical University, Limbova 12, SK‐833 03 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

61 ENVIRO 007 URINE ANALYSIS OF COMMUTERS’ EXPOSURE TO VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE GREATER HOUSTON AREA USING PURGE AND TRAP FOR GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY Siobhan Tarver, Renard Thomas, Bobby Wilson Environmental Research & Technology Center Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

62 ENVIRO 008 APPLICATIONS OF SELECTIVE PENTAPEPTIDES FOR SEPARATION AND DECONTAMINATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS FROM FOOD AND WATER Edikan Archibong Department of Chemistry Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL

63 INORG 001 THE EFFECT OF [RH(NH3)5CL]+ ADSORPTION AND PARTICLE SIZE ON ANATASE TIO2 AS A FUNCTION OF SUPPORT TREATMENT PROCEDURES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF C2+ OXYGENATES Justin Glasper1, Theresa Feltes2, Randall Meyer2 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora IL Department of Chemical Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago, IL 64 INORG 002 CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STRUCTURAL AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES IN Ba1‐X AXMn0.5 Ru0.5 O3 (A = La AND Sr) PEROVSKITES Jennifer Soliz, Patrick M. Woodward Department of Chemistry The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 35


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 65 NANO 001 CHANTELNICOLAS‐AM38ABSTRACT Chantel Nicolas, Xiao‐Qian Wang Department of Chemistry Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA

66 NANO 002 SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THIOETHER LIGAND STABILIZED RUTHENIUM NANOCUBES Clara Adams and Sherine O. Obare, Ph.D. Department of Chemistry Western Michigan University, Portage, MI

67 NANO 003 SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF METALLIC NANOSHELLS AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON EXTERNAL ELECTRIC FIELDS FOR THERAPEUTIC UPTAKE IN VITRO Alisha Peterson and Vinay K. Gupta Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL

68 NANO 004 DYNAMIC ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY CHARACTERIZATIONS OF METALLOPORPHYRIN NANOCRYSTALS USING CONTACT‐MODE IMAGING WITH MAGNETIC SAMPLE MODULATION Wilson Serem, Hao, E., Vicente, M. G. H., Garno, J. C. Department of Chemisty Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

69 NANO 005 CHROMOPHORE FUNCTIONALIZED TIO2 NANOPARTICLES AS TWO‐PHOTON ABSORBERS: INFLUENCE OF SURFACE MODIFICATION Edwin Mghanga, Thomas Kuchta and Guda Ramakrishna Department of Chemistry Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

70 NANO 006 FACILE SYNTHESIS OF MONODISPERSE METALLIC NANOPARTICLES AND THEIR INTERACTION WITH QUANTUM DOTS Noah Masik and Sherine O. Obare, Ph.D. Department of Western Michigan Chemistry Department Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

36


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 71 NANO 007 SEEDED SYNTHESIS OF MULTIMETAL NANOPARTICLES AS MONODISPERSE SAMPLES Nancy Ortiz and Sara E. Skrabalak Department of Department of Chemistry Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

72 NANO 008 LINEAR AND NONLINEAR OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF ANTHRACENE‐CATECHOL AND COUMARIN‐CATECHOL FUNCTIONALIZED SEMICONDUCTOR NANOPARTICLES Jameel A Hasan, Fasil Abebe, Ekkehard Sinn and Guda Ramakrishna Department of Chemistry Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 73 ORG 001 SYNTHETIC ROUTES TO ORTHOGONALLY PROTECTED Τ‐HISTIDINOALANINE: A CROSSLINKING AMINO ACID Chyree Batton, Samanthi T. De Silva, Carol M. Taylor, Ph.D. Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

74 ORG 002 ROM/RCM (RING OPENING/RING CLOSING METATHESIS) AND DIECKMANN CONDENSATION PROCESSES TO BICYCLO[2.2.2]OCT (‐ENES) AND (‐ANONES) Stefan Cooper Jr Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

75 ORG 003 FUNCTIONALIZATION OF MONOHYDROCARBYL–PD(II) COMPLEXES WITH HOOH ENABLED BY DPK–CARBOXYLIC ACID LIGAND Williamson Oloo and N. Andrei Vedernikov Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Maryland, College Park, MD

76 ORG 004 VERSATILITY OF CALIXARENE REACTIONS WITH 1,3‐DIBROMOPROPANE Shimelis Hailu, Paul F. Hudrlik, Anne M. Hudrlik, and Raymond J. Butcher Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, D. C.

37


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 77 ORG 005 1,5,9‐TRIMESITYLDIPYRROMETHENE MAGNESIUM AND ZINC COMPLEXES FOR USE IN RING OPENING POLYMERIZATION OF LACTIDE AND CAPROLACTONE Pasco Wambua and Malcolm Chisholm Department of Chemistry The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

78 ORG 006 PROGRESS TOWARDS THE SYNTHESIS OF CYANINE DYES Deveine Toney, Tsehai Grell, Dr. Angela Winstead, Dr. Kadir Aslan Department of Chemistry Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD

79 ORG 007 TOTAL SYNTHESIS OF CARBOXYPHENYL‐SUBSTITUTED PORPHYRINS ShanʹTerika Remo, Alecia McCall and M. Graca H. Vicente Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

80 ORG 008 CHIRAL SEPARATIONS USING MANNOSE MODIFIED Α‐HELICAL POLYPEPTIDES IN ELECTROKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY Leonard Moore Jr., Haoyu Tang, Donghui Zhang, and Isiah Warner Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

81 ORG 010 CALIBRATING MM FORCE FIELDS AND QM METHODS FOR SUPRAMOLECULAR COMPLEXES Tomekia Simeon, I. Franco, M. Ratner and G. C. Schatz Department of Chemistry Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

82 ORG 011 SYNTHETIC APPROACHES TOWARD THE AMINOQUINONE NATURAL PRODUCT STREPTONIGRIN: KEY C‐RING FUNCTIONALIZATIONS Frederick Nytko and Philip DeShong Department of Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry The University of Maryland, College Park, MD

38


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 83 ORG 012 MOLECULAR RECOGNITION ELEMENT (MRE) USING PORPHYRINS FOR DETECTION OF NITROAROMATIC EXPLOSIVES SUCH AS TRINITROTOLUENE (TNT) Matthew Bryant

84 ORG 013 LEWIS ACID MEDICATED SYNTHESIS OF PHENANTHRIDIUM N‐FUSED QUINAZOLINIUM VIA INTRAMOLECULAR CYCLIZATION OF CYANO‐ CARBODIIMIDE Olajide Alawode, and Sundeep Rayat Department of Chemistry Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

85 PHARMA 001 THE ABSORPTION OF CARBOHYDRATES, PROTEINS, AND FATS IN GLUCOSE MONITORING Ryan Hall and Dr. Derrick Rollins Department of Chemical Engineering Iowa State University, Ames, IA

86 PolyMat 001 THE FORMATION OF SELF‐HEALING CARBON NANOTUBE NETWORKS VIA IN SITU POLYMERIZATION Artrease Spann, Steve Acquah, Harold Kroto Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL

87 PolyMat 002

BIODEGRADATION OF Γ –STERILIZED POLYPROPYLENE NONWOVENS Brandi Keene Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science North Carolina State University, Greensboro, NC

88 PolyMat 003

PHOTOCHEMICAL H2O2 FORMATION INDUCED BY SPEEK/PVA SYSTEMS PaviElle Lockhart, B. K. Little, B. L. Slaten and G. Mills Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Auburn University, Auburn, AL

39


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 89 PolyMat 004 METAL ASSISTED AND MICROWAVE ACCELERATED EVAPORATIVE CRYSTALLIZATION: 2. THE EFFECT OF SURFACE FUNCTIONALITY AND SAMPLE VOLUME Tsheai Grell, Melissa A. Pinard and Kadir Aslan, Ph.D. Department of Chemistry Morgan State, Baltimore, MD

90 PolyMat 005 LIQUID CRYSTALLINE TETRABENZO[18]CYCLYNES Ashley Scioneaux and C. Scott Hartley Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Department Miami University, Oxford, OH

91 PolyMat 006 MOLECULAR ENGINEERING OF HIGHLY DIPOLAR NONLINEAR OPTICAL CHROMOPHORES Caryn Peeples, Brianna Peeples, Dr. Cheng Zhang Department of Center for Materials Research Norfolk State University, Virginia Beach, VA

92 PolyMat 007 MODELING POLY 4H‐CYCLOPENTA[2,1‐B;3,4‐Bʹ]DITHIOPHEN‐4‐ONE Carla Mckinney, A.V. Gavrilenko, C.Zhang, V.I. Gavrilenko Department of Chemistry/Materials Science Norfolk State University, Virginia Beach, VA

93 PolyMat 010 AU METAL NANO‐MATERIALS John Livenere Department of Engineering Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA

3:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm

4th Floor Foyer (Near Grand Ballroom D‐F)

Science Fair

40


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 5:00 pm ‐ 6:30 pm

NOBCChE ConneXions Reception Sponsored by Colgate ‐Palmolive

6:00 pm ‐ 9:00 pm

COACh Alumni Reception and Dinner Invitation Only. Contact Priscilla Lewis

Grand Ballroom D‐F 337

7:00 pm ‐ 9:00 pm

7:00 pm ‐ 9:00 pm

P&G Graduate Student Informational Session and Reception, Invitation Only

TBA Grand Ballroom AB

Science Bowl/Science Fair Welcome Dinner

Thursday, April 21 8:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm

Conference Registration

4th Floor Foyer (By Grand Ballroom AB)

Thursday, am

COACh Workshop 8:30 am ‐ 12:00 pm Professional Skills Training For Minority Graduate Students And Postdocs Pre‐registration is required ‐ Session Filled

9:00 am ‐ 4:30 pm.

Science Bowl Competitions: Junior Division and Senior Division sponsored by American Chemical Society

Thursday, am

Professional Development Workshop 9:00 am – 10:00 am Panel Discussion on Science and Policy Dr. Tiffani Bailey Lash, National Institues of Health

41

343B

327‐330, 332, 335

338


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Award Symposium 2 9:00 am ‐ 11:45 am

Thursday, am

Undergraduate Research Competition Sponsored by Colgate ‐Palmolive and Lubrizol Corporation

337

9:00 – 9:20

9:20 – 9:40

9:40 – 10:00

10:00 – 11:20

11:20 – 11:40

Lurbrizol Corporation Undergraduate Awardee “FABRICATION OF PLASTIC‐BASED BIOSENSOR TUBING USING NANOREPLICA MOLDING AND HORIZONTAL DIPPING TECHNIQUES” Veniece Kirksey1, Brian Cunningham, PhD2, Yafang Tan2 1 Prairie View Agricultural & Mechanical University, Prairie View, Texas 2 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Colgate‐Palmolive Company Undergraduate Awardee “A FULLY HYDROPHILLIC HYDROGEL: THE CHARACTERISTICS OF A HYDROGEL THAT IS CHEMICALLY CROSS‐LINKED WITH A NEW WATER‐SOLUBLE AGENT, DIISOSORBIDE BISEPOXIDE” Eleanor U Ojinnaka, George Collins, PhD Winifred Burks‐Houck Undergraduate Awardee “ELECTROLESS NICKEL BASED CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION BY HYDROLYSIS OF NABH4” Kaetochi Okemgbo Chemical Engineering Yale University, New Haven, CT Lubrizol Corporation Undergraduate Awardee “FORMATION OF GAS AND PARTICULATE POLLUTANTS FROM OZONE REACTIONS IN VENTILATION SYSTEMS” Regina Williams1, Lara Gundel2, Meera Sidheswaran2 1Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University, Normal, AL 2Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA AP Kennedy Awardee “EXPLORING MUTANT E. COLI STRAINS FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF SITE‐SPECIFIC LABELS TO STUDY RNA STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS BY NMR” Jacob N. Sama, Chandar S. Thakur and T. Kwaku Dayie Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Maryland, College Park, MD

42


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 9:00 am ‐ 11:45 am

Student Development 2 Mock Interviews Award Symposium 3

Thursday, am

9:00 am ‐ 11:45 am Henry McBay Award Symposium

331

336A

(ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)

9:00 – 9:30

Dr. Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher Awardee “INTEGRATION OF CRITICAL THINKING COMPONENTS INTO A GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY COURSE” Angela Winstead, PhD Department of Chemistry Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD

9:30‐9:55

“MEMS EDUCATION PROJECT” Maru Colbert, PhD Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

9:55‐10:20

“INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH EXPERIENCES‐SMALL MOLECULES AS MODULATORS OF BACTERIAL CROSSTALK AND THE IDENTIFICATION OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA WITH JUNCTION PROBES.” Herman O. Sintim, PhD Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Maryland, College Park, MD

10:20 – 10:30 10:30 – 10:55

Break “HEARTS FOR THE ARTS ‐ LINKING THE ARTS WITH STEM” Delmetria Millener, Regional Director African American Environmentalist Association, Dallas, TX

10:55 – 11:20

“WHAT MUST AN INVENTOR KNOW ABOUT RECORD‐KEEPING TO PROTECT HIS INVENTION: ATTRIBUTES OF CREDIBLE INVENTION RECORDS” Marvin Powell, Attorney at Law Powell Law Associates, LLC, Avondale, PA

11:20 – 11:40

“GETTING STUDENTS EXCITED ABOUT THE CHEMICAL BIOPHYSICS OF RNAS: RNA IS AT THE CENTER OF A NEW SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION” Kwaku Dayie, PhD Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Maryland, College Park, MD

43


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Thursday, am

9:00 – 9:25

“THE EXPLORATION OF SEVERAL POTENTIAL ENERGY SURFACES USING MRMP2 AND CCSD(T)” Jeffrey D. Veals, Dr. Steven R. Davis Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi, University, MS “SELECTED DIRECTIONS IN QUANTUM MONTE CARLO” William A. Lester, Jr., PhD Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory “CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SELF‐ASEMBLY OF MESO‐TETRA(4‐ SULFONATOPHENYL)PORPHYRIN (H2TPPS4‐) IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS“ Javoris V. Hollingsworth, Paul S. Russo, Allison J. Richard and M. Graça H. Vicente Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA “EXAMINING THE INFLUENCE OF VISCOSITY ON THE HEAT OF VAPORIZATION OF TOLUENE IN 5W‐30 MOTOR OIL AND MINERAL OIL” Shawn M. Abernathy, Ph.D.1, Brian Garrett2, Jockquin Jones1, and Anwar Jackson1 1Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 2Morehouse College, Department of Chemistry, Atlanta, GA

9:25 – 9:50

9:50 – 10:15

10:15 – 10:40

Technical Session 5 9:00 am – 11:30 am Physical Chemistry (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐ Author(s), Affiliation)

336B

10:40‐11:00

CHARACTERIZATION OF AG/TIO2 SORBENTS FOR LIQUID‐PHASE ADSORPTIVE DESULFURIZATION OF LOGISTIC FUELS Zenda D. Davis and Bruce J. Tatarchuk Department of Chemical Engineering Auburn University, Auburn, AL

11:00‐11:20

SEPARATION OF BUTANE ISOMER MIXTURES USING DENSE 6FDA‐ DAM MEMBRANES Omoyemen Esekhile Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 44


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Thursday, am

Professional Development Workshop: 10:30 am ‐ 11:30 am “Technology Commercialization” Renard Green, MBA, CEO, Richard Glendon Thomas, MBA The R2 Consulting Group

338

Thursday, pm

Percy Julian Luncheon (ticketed) 12:00 pm ‐ 1:30 pm

Grand Ballroom AB

Thursday, pm

COACh Workshop 1:30 pm ‐ 5:00 pm COAChing Strong Women Faculty in the Art of Strategic Persuasion (Pre‐registration is required

Thursday, pm

Professional Development Workshop: 1:30 pm ‐ 4:00 pm Academic/Professional Transition Panel Dr. Victor McCrary, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

343B

338

Symposium 3

Thursday, pm

1:30 pm ‐ 4:00 pm All About BIO: Innovations in Bioscience, Biochemistry & Bioengineering

336A

1:30 – 2:00

Featured Speaker: Dr. Andre Francis Palmer, Associate Professor, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University

2:00 – 2:25

“USE OF MOLECULAR MICELLES IN SDS‐PAGE FOR PROTEIN SEPARATIONS” Vivian Fernand 45


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA “USE OF PEPTIDE‐AMPHIPHILE IN DEVELOPMENT OF MELANOMA TARGET SPECIFIC DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS.” Margaret Ndinguri, Janelle L. Lauer, and Gregg B. Fields Department of Biochemistry University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX “CHARACTERIZATION OF AN INHIBITORY CELLULAR DEFENSE AGAINST HIV‐1” DeMario Butts Department of Immunology The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA “RADICAL‐DEPENDENT MECHANISMS OF POST‐ TRANSCRIPTIONAL MODIFICATION” Squire Booker, PhD Department of Chemistry Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2:25 – 2:50

2:50 – 3:15

3:15 – 3:35

2:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm

Student Development 3 Mock Interviews

331

Thursday, pm

Technical Session 6 2:00 pm ‐ 4:00 pm Inorganic chemistry

337

2:00 ‐ 2:20

“GOLD COATED NANOPARTICLES INCORPORATING A GROUP OF UNIFORM MATERIALS BASED ON ORGANIC SALTS” Ashleigh R. Wright, Min Li, Bilal El‐Zahab, Isiah M. Warner Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

2:20 – 2:40

“RUTHENIUM (II) COMPLEXES AS POTENTIAL DUAL ACTION PDT AGENTS” Robert N. Garner and Claudia Turro Department of Chemistry The Ohio State University

46


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

2:40 – 3:00

3:00 – 3:20

3:20 – 3:45

“DYNAMICS AND TWO‐PHOTON ABSORPTION PROPERTIES OF NOVEL COUMARIN DERIVATIVES: TOWARDS MULTIPHOTON SENSING” Semere Bairu, Fasil Abebe, Ekkehard Sinn, Guda Ramakrishna Department of Chemistry Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI “SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ZN BIS ‐DIFUNCTIONAL COMPLEXES FOR THE FABRICATION OF ZNO2 VIA METAL ORGANIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION FOR APPLICATIONS IN MICROELECTRONICS.” Keneshia O. Johnson, Bo Zhang, Howard E. Katz and Jason S. Matthews Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC “MULTIPLE EMISSIONS FROM INTRA‐ AND INTER‐MOLECULAR EXCIMERS AND EXCIPLEXES OF BIMETALLIC LANTHANIDE‐ TRANSITION METAL COMPLEXES.” Zerihun Assefa, PhD, 1Carlos Crawford1, and Richard Sykora2 Department of Chemistry 1North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC 2Department of Chemistry, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, Symposium 4

Thursday, pm

4:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm Solutions for Global Challenges Sponsored by The Dow Chemical Company

Grand Ballroom G

4:00 – 4:30

4:30 – 5:00

5:00 – 5:30

ʺDELIVERING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE THROUGH INNOVATIONʺ Theresa Kotanchek, Ph.D. R&D Vice President, Sustainable Technologies and Innovation Sourcing, Midland, MI ʺPOWERING YOUR HOME WITH YOUR HOME, BUT HOW? ʺ Kirk Thompson, Ph.D. Associate R&D Director, Dow Solar Solutions, Midland, MI OPPORTUNITIES AT THE ENERGY‐WATER NEXUS: LEVERAGING WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENCY, ECONOMIC ST

PROSPERITY AND SUSTAINABILITY IN THE 21 CENTURY David Klanecky Global R&D Director, Dow Water & Process Solutions, Edina, MN 47


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 5:30 – 6:00

MEETING THE GLOBAL CHALLENGE FOR SUSTAINABLE CROP PRODUCTION B. Clifford Gerwick, Ph.D. Leader, Dow AgChem Discovery Research, Indianapolis, IN

6:00 pm ‐ 7:00 pm

7:00 pm ‐ 10:00 pm

Reception Sponsored by The Dow Chemical Company Science Competitions Dinner and Social

4th Floor Foyer (near Grand Ballroom G) Grand Ballroom AB

Friday, April 22

7:30 am ‐ 9:30 am

1st Annual Women’s Networking Breakfast: Celebration of IYC Sponsored by ACS, Dow Chemical and Lubrizol

Grand Ballroom AB

Forensic Workshop: 7:30 am ‐ 11:30 am “The Chemistry of Crime” sponsored by the DEA, CBP and DHS

337 & 338

Friday, am

Instructors: Darrell Davis, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX Quintet Bryant, Customs and Border Protection, Southwest Science Center, Houston, TX Marie Prince, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX Dr. Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences, Houston, TX 8:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

Conference Registration

48

4th Floor Foyer (Near Grand Ballroom AB)


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Friday, am

Science Bowl Finals 9:00 am ‐ 11:00 am Junior/Senior Division Sponsored by American Chemical Society

335C

Award Symposium 4

Friday, am

9:30 am ‐ 11:30 am Graduate Student Fellowship Award Sci‐Mix

336A

9:30 – 9:35

9:35 – 9:55

10:00 – 10:20

10:25 – 10:45

Dow Chemical Company Fellowship Awardee ʺ BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN MOLECULES & NANOPARTICLES: THE FACILE FABRICATION OF PtSn4 AND Ir3Sn7 INTERMETALLIC NANOPARTICLES FROM BIMETALLIC ZINTL CLUSTERSʺ Domonique O. Downing, Zhufang Liu, and Bryan W. Eichhorn Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Maryland, College Park, MD Winifred Burks‐Houck Graduate Awardee “A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF SILVER, GOLD, AND SILVER‐GOLD ALLOY NANOPARTICLES TOWARD DEACTIVATION OF MICROBIAL PATHOGENS” Tova Samuels and Dr. Sherine Obare Department of Chemistry Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI DuPont Fellowship Awardee “ACCELERATED HYDROLYSIS OF STARCH FOR THE PRODUCTION OF BIOFUEL” Kendra Maxwell and Sujit Banerjee School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Lendon N. Pridgen, GlaxoSmithKline ‐ NOBCChE Fellowship Awardee LIGHT INDUCED ENANTIOSPECIFIC 6‐PHOTOCYCLIZATION OF AXIALLY CHIRAL ACRYLANILIDES IN THE SOLID STATE Anoklase J.‐L. Ayitou and J. Sivaguru Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND

49


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Student Development 4 9:00 am ‐ 10:00 am and repeated 10:00 am ‐ 11:00 am Technical Writing Publications Dr. Kadir Aslan, Associate Professor Morgan State University

Friday, am

Technical Session 7 9:30 am ‐ 11:30 am There’s an App for That: Science & Engineering Applications in CFD & Aerospace

Friday, am

335B

336B

9:30 – 9:55

9:55 – 10:15

10:15 – 10:35

“THE THERMAL INFRARED SENSOR: THE NEXT GENERATION THERMAL INFRARED INSTRUMENT ON LANDSAT DATA CONTINUITY MISSION” Ramsey Smith, PhD Code 693, Planetary Systems NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD “CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF LUNAR DUST WITH SELECTED COMMON TERRESTRIAL GASES” Stephanie Miller Astrochemistry NASA Ames Research Center “SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL METAL COMPLEXES AND NANOPARTICLE PRECURSORS FOR PROBING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY AND AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS” Jennifer Williams1, Stan Duraj, Ph.D1, Aloysius Hepp, PhD2, Alan Riga, PhD1 1Department of Chemistry, Cleveland State University 2National Center for Space Exploration and Research, NASA GRC

10:35 – 10:55

“MULTISCALE MODELING OF FUNCTIONAL PERFLUOROPOLYETHER LUBRICANTS” Robert Smith Department of Chemical Engineering Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA

10:55 – 11:20

“NUMERICAL MODELING OF ROCK CUTTING PROCESS” Isaac K. Gamwo1, Mohd A. Kabir1, Jamie L. Brown1, M. C. Jaime2 and J. S. Lin1,2 1U.S Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA 2Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA

50


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 11:20‐11:40

GENERATING PERIODIC SOLUTIONS OF HIGHER ORDER DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS VIA SOLUTIONS OF A FIRST ORDER EQUATION Ruqiah Muhammad and Aqeeb Sabree Department of Mathematics Texas Southern University, Houston, TX

Friday, am

Technical Session 8 9:30 am ‐ 11:30 am Organic Chemistry II

335 A

9:30‐9:50

“SELECTIVE AEROBIC OXIDATIONS CATALYZED BY MANGANESE (III) COMPLEXES CONTAINING REDOX−ACTIVE LIGANDS.” Clarence Rolle Department of Chemistry Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

9:50‐10:10

“TOWARDS ENANTIOSELECTIVE OLEFINATION.” Natalee Smith Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Delaware, Newark, DE

10:10 – 10:35

“ZIRCONIUM‐CATALYZED PHOSPHINE DEHYDROCOUPLING REACTION.” Michael Ghebreab, R. Waterman Department of Chemistry University of Vermont, Burlington, VT

10:35 – 10:55

“NEW FLUORESCENT CHEMOSENSORS BASED ON COUMARIN AND FLUORESCEIN DERIVATIVES FOR THE DETECTION OF METAL IONS AND NERVE GAS AGENTS.” Fasil Abebe, Carla Sue Eribal, Ekkehard Sinn Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

10:55 – 11:15

“STUDIES OF ISOTOPIC OXYGEN EXCHANGE IN DIFFERENT SETS OF POLYOXONIOBATES.” Rene Johnson, Department of Chemistry University of California, Davis , Davis, CA

11:15 – 11:35

“SYNTHESIS AND MALDI‐TOF MASS SPECTROMETRY OF NOVEL EPOXY GEMINI SURFACTANTS” Nikki Johnson and Folahan O. Ayorinde Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC 51


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Student Development 5 Graduate Recruiters Panel

10:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm

329

Friday, pm

Science Competition Awards Luncheon 11:45 am ‐ 1:45 pm Sponsored by ACS

Featured Speaker:

Dr. Thomas H. Lane, Vice President Iinstruction & Learning Services ,Delta College

3:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm

Grand Ballroom AB

Science Competitions Bowling Trip

Friday, pm

Featured Speaker:

Symposium 5 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm NanoVation: Innovation in Nanoscience sponsored by Defense Threat Reduction Agency Kwame Owusu‐Adom, PhD, 3M Corporate Research Materials Laboratory

Off site

338

2:00 – 2:30

2:30 – 2:50

2:50 – 3:10

“ENHANCED REACTIVITY OF RADIATION‐CURED NANOCOMPOSITES THROUGH TEMPLATED NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES.” Kwame Owusu‐Adom1, Allan Guymon2 13M Corporate Materials Research Laboratory, 3M Center, St. Paul, MN 2Department of Chemical & Biochemical Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA “IMPACT OF T102 METALIZED CARBON NANONTUBES (T102‐CNT) ON REGENERATIVE BONE GROWTH.” Edidiong C. Obot1, Renard L. Thomas2, Bobby L. Wilson3, Alamelu Sundaresan4 1Environmental Toxicology Program, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004 2Department of Health Sciences, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004 3Department of Chemistry, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004 4Department of Biology, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004 “NANOGUMBOS: A NOVEL GROUP OF DESIGNER NANOMATERIALS.” Isiah M. Warner, Susmita Das, Min Li, Bilal El‐Zahab, Sergio de Rooy, and Bishnu Regmi Department of Chemistry Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

3:10 – 3:20

Break 52


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 3:20 – 3:40

“EXAMINING THE PROPERTIES OF SUSPENSIONS AND SELF SUSPENDED FLUIDS BASED ON.” Wanda D. Jones, PhD1, Tamara Floyd‐Smith2, and Lynden A. Archer1 1School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 2Department of Chemical Engineering Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL

3:40 – 4:00

SIMULATIONS OF NANOCYLINDERS SELF‐ASSEMBLED FROM CYCLIC β‐ TRIPEPTIDES Michael A. Cato Jr.,1 Noam Bernstein, John L. Kulp III2 and Thomas D. Clark2 1Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 2Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC

Award Symposium 5

Friday, pm

2:00 pm ‐ 4:00 pm Winifred Burkes ‐Houck Women’s Leadership Award Symposium sponsored by Center for Enabling New Technologies, University of Washington

335AB

The Winifred Burks‐Houck Professional Leadership Award is the first NOBCChE award inspired by and created to honor the contributions of African American Women in science and technology. The Winifred Burks‐Houck Professional Leadership Symposium aims to honor Winifred A. Burks‐Houck, the first female president of NOBCChE, by highlighting the scientific achievements, creativity, leadership, and community service of a NOBCChE‐affiliated professional woman and a NOBCChE undergraduate and graduate student working towards a degree in chemistry, chemical engineering, or a related field

Opening Remarks Dr. Gloria Thomas 2011 WBH Symposium Chair Department of Chemistry, Xavier University NOBCChE Executive Board Member (2005‐2009) Welcome Dr. Victor McCrary Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory NOBCChE National President NOBCChE Womenʹs Leadership & the Legacy of Winifred Burks‐Houck Ella Davis, MBA NOBCChE, Executive Board Member NOBCChE National President (2003‐2005) 53


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Highlighted Talk

Dr. Mae C. Jemison CEO and Founder, The Jemison Group, Inc. NASA Astronaut and First Woman of Color in Space Presentation of Awards Winifred Burks‐Houck Leadership Awardees Professional Awardee: Dr. Christine Grant Graduate Awardee: Tova Samuels, Western Michigan University, Undergraduate Awardee: Kaetochi Okemgbo, Yale University Closing Remarks Winifred Burks‐Houck Symposium Committee

Friday, pm

6:30 pm Reception 7:00 pm ‐ 10:00 pm Dinner and Pprogram

Awards Ceremony and Gala Dinner

54

Grand Ballroom


NOBCChE 2011 EXHIBITORS

2011 Exhibitors 3M St. Paul, MN

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Washington, DC

American Chemical Society Washington, DC

Auburn University Auburn, AL

Bayer Pittsburgh, PA

Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA

Cornell University Ithaca, NY

Corning Incorporated Corning, NY

Defense Threat Reduction Agency Alexandria, VA

The Dow Chemical Company Midland, MI 55


NOBCChE 2011 EXHIBITORS

DuPont Wilmington, DE

ExxonMobil Annandale, NJ

Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University Tallahassee, FL

Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA

GlaxoSmithKline King of Prussia, PA

HJ Heinz Company Pittsburgh, PA

The Johns Hopkins University – Applied Physics Laboratory Laurel, MD

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA

Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

The Lubrizol Corporation Wickliffe, OH

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 56


NOBCChE 2011 EXHIBITORS MassNanoTech Institute, University of Massachusetts Amherst Amherst, MA

Masters Industrial Internship Program, University of Oregon Eugene, OR

Merck & Company, Inc. West Point, PA

National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD

National Organization of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers Washington, DC

Norfolk State University Norfolk, VA

North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC

National Science Foundation Centers for Chemical Innovation Arlington, VA

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, TN

Occidental Petroleum Houston, TX

Prairie View A&M University Prairie View, TX

57


NOBCChE 2011 EXHIBITORS Procter & Gamble Cincinnati, OH

Purdue University, Graduate School West Lafayette, IN

Rice University Houston, TX

The Scripps Research Institute La Jolla, CA

Texas A&M University College Station, TX

Texas Southern University Houston, TX

United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA

United States Customs and Border Patrol Washington, DC

United States Drug Enforcement Administration Arlington, VA

United States Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC

58


NOBCChE 2011 EXHIBITORS University of California, Davis Davis, CA

University of the District of Columbia Washington, DC

University of Maryland, College Park College Park, MD

University of Notre Dame Notre Dame, IN

University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA

University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA

University of South Florida Tampa, FL

University of Washington CENTC Seattle, WA

University of Wisconsin‐Madison Madison, WI

Washington University in St. Louis St. Louis, MO

Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI The above lists of sponsors and exhibitors are complete as of March 18, 2011. Any additional sponsors and/or exhibitors will be listed on the communications board at the conference site. 59


“Best of the big oils… Growth, resource upside, returns, cash flow…” Arjun Murthi, Goldman Sachs

Growth and financial stability are at the core of our company. We’ll promise you the same focus – opportunities for growth, development and success throughout your career.

May 19, 2010

Make Your Mark. www.oxy.com/careers

11OCCP22_TalentAcquisitionAd_R1.indd 1

2/15/11 1:29 PM


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS

Tuesday, am/pm Wednesday, am

Teachers Workshop 7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. “Teachersʹ Embracing Science through Education”

335 C

Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, ACS, Staples, and NOBCChE This year’s science teachers’ workshop will assist science educators at the elementary, secondary, and high school levels using various teaching strategies and techniques. The 2009 workshop will also provide resources and materials that will assist in enhancing your curriculum. In addition, educators will have an opportunity to discuss issues and various challenges that face science educators. The objective for this 2 day workshop is to assist educators in improving test scores among minority and underrepresented students. This will further assist students to pursue careers in science and technology.

Henry Hill Lecture

Tuesday, pm

1:45 pm ‐ 2:45 pm

335AB

Sponsored by MIT and the American Chemistry Society Northeast Section

Dr. Henry A. Hill 1977 ACS President Dr. Henry Aaron Hill (1915 – 1979), the renowned African ‐ American chemist in whose memory this award was established, was a former Chairman of the ACS Northeastern Section (1963) and President of the American Chemical Society in 1977. Dr. Hill’s outstanding contributions to chemistry, particularly industrial chemistry, and to the professional welfare of chemists are legion. Dr. Hill’s first concern and interest was in his fellow humans, and this was the driving force behind all that he did both in the chemical community and the world at large. Henry Hill was a native of St. Joseph, Missouri. He was a graduate of Johnson C. Smith University in North Carolina and received the doctorate degree from M.I.T. in 1942, after getting the highest grades in his class. He began a professional career in industrial chemistry in that year, with North Atlantic Research Corporation of Newtonville, Massachusetts. He eventually rose to be vice president while doing research on and development of water‐based paints, fire‐fighting foam, and several types of synthetic rubber. After leaving North Atlantic Research, he worked as a group leader in the research laboratories of Dewey and Almy Chemical Company before starting his own entrepreneurial venture—National Polychemicals in 1952. Ten years later he founded Riverside Research Laboratories in Cambridge, Mass. The firm offered research, development and consulting services in resins, rubbers, textiles and in polymer production. Riverside Research Laboratory 61


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS introduced four successful commercial enterprises, including its own manufacturing affiliate. Dr. Hill, particularly after having been appointed by President Lyndon Johnson to the National Commission on Product Safety, became active in research and testing programs in the field of product flammability and product safety. The American Chemical Society was always very close to Henry Hill’s heart. His active career with the ACS began in the middle 1950s in the Northeastern Section. Dr. Hill served on Northeastern Section committees, became a councilor in 1961 and was Chairman of the Section in 1963. He served the ACS in important National positions including secretary and chairman of the Professional Relations Committee, the ACS Council; Policy Committee, the Board of Directors, and ultimately president in 1977. He made an especially significant impact in professionalism by pioneering establishment of a set of guidelines defining acceptable behavior for employers in their professional relations with chemists and chemical engineers. This effort resulted in the ACS landmark document entitled ʺProfessional Employment Guidelines.ʺ Dr. Henry Hill was the first African American to become President of the American Chemical Society. In recognition of his many outstanding achievements, NOBCChE identifies an outstanding African – American chemist or chemical engineer to be designated as that year’s Henry A. Hill Lecturer. Dr. Joseph Francisco, Professor of Chemistry, Purdue University, and current President of the American Chemical Society, is this year’s honoree. Our award is sponsored by the ACS Northeast Section and the MIT Chemistry Department.

Tuesday, pm

Henry Hill Lecture

335 AB 1:45 pm ‐ 2:45 pm ”Present and Future Climate Change: Grand Challenges for the Science, Engineering, and Society” Dr. Warren Washington, 2007 Nobel Laureate and Senior Scientist, Keynote Speaker National Center for Atmospheric Research Sponsored by MIT and Northeast Section of ACS

The climate has always changed. The most recent assessments have convinced most climate scientists that humankind is changing the earth’s climate and that significant global warming is taking place. Some scientists are skeptical of this view and think the observed changes result from natural climate variability or other causes. A brief review of recently observed 20th century climate change will be presented and compared with climate model simulations. I will show computer simulations of future climate change from a low carbon emission scenario where the world decides to shift from a fossil fuel based energy strategy to increased conservation, renewables, and possibly nuclear. There will also be a discussion of the scientific uncertainties and societal impacts along with an analysis of policy options including possible geoengineering of the climate system. The broader social science issue of environmental justice will be discussed. 62


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS Along with scientific discussion, I will discuss my career path and my interactions with Percy Julian.

Symposium 1 Tuesday, pm

2:45 pm ‐ 5:45 pm Environmental Science and Policy Symposium Norris McDonald, President, African American Environmentalist Association

336B

The issues of global sustainability have moved steadily from the back burner to the heart of political and economic life in the United States and around the world. There is a need to influence the political process by lobbying, activism, and education in order to protect and sustain our natural resources and ecosystems. This symposium will serve as a platform to stimulate innovative and bold thinking, and foster discussions, about critical topics and approaches to protecting our natural resources and providing “Solutions to Global Challenges.” Tuesday, pm

Symposium 2 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

“Advancing Global Healthcare through STEM”

336A

Featured Speaker Milton Brown, MD, Ph.D., Director

Drug Discovery Program Georgetown University Medical Center

Healthcare remains one of the most pressing challenges facing our nation and the world in the 21st century. NOBCChE presents a technical symposium that will feature discussions and presentations that are helping to provide solutions to these challenges using science, technology, engineering and math.

Tuesday, pm

Award Symposium 1 4:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Awardee Omolola Eniola‐Adefeso, Ph.D. Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

337B

“INFLAMMATION, BLOOD FLOW DYNAMICS AND THE FABRICATION OF VASCULAR‐ TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY VEHICLES” Interactions between blood leukocytes and the endothelial cells lining the blood vessel lumen are the hallmark of inflammation response. However, the lack of a proper shut‐off mechanism for inflammation can lead to chronic inflammation that is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including arthritis, cancer and atherosclerosis. Thus, inflammation and its associated processes are attractive for targeting therapeutic agents in these diseases. This talk will summarize our efforts to design leukocyte mimetic drug carriers for targeting therapeutics to the 63


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS vascular wall in cardiovascular diseases. The presented data will highlight the critical role of blood flow dynamics and carrier physical geometry in prescribing carriers localization to the wall and highlight new data on endothelium response to cytokine and shear stimulation.

Wednesday, am

Presenter:

Professional Development Workshop: 9:00 am ‐ 11:00 am ʺ Mentoring In The STEM Disciplinesʺ Dr. Howard Kea, Sr. Organizational Development Consultant, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

338

In the ever‐changing world of science and technology, it has become increasingly important to ensure that young scientists have all the tools they need for successful careers in the STEM fields. As scientists progress and develop, the need for mentors is vital. This workshop will serve as a guide to mentoring in the STEM fields. We encourage all mentors, mentees, and protégés to attend this workshop to unlock the untapped potential in your mentor/mentee relationship.

Wednesday, pm

Presenter:

Professional Development Workshop: 3:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm ʺFinancial Strategies: Your Solutions To Money Management And Investing ʺ Derry L. Haywood, II, The Peninsula Financial Group

338

During these rough economic times, it is critical to take the right steps towards a solid financial action plan. Understanding the many variables that play a role in money management are key to obtaining financial goals. The Financial Strategies workshop serves as an outlet for NOBCChE members to ask questions related to money market accounts, checking accounts, savings accounts and much more.

Thursday, am

Presenters:

COACH Workshop ‐ registration required 8:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm “Professional Skills Training for Minority Graduate Students and Postdocs” Dr. Jane Tucker, Jane Tucker & Associates and Ernestine Taylor, ETConsulting 64

343B


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS

This workshop is designed to introduce negotiations or solution findings to graduate students and postdocs. Participants will learn to develop their “best alternative to a negotiated agreement” and finding their own personal negotiation styles. Attendees will practice through a selection from case studies including developing a strong advocate, credit for research and publications, developing connectedness, obtaining resources that enable productivity, opportunity to demonstrate strong performance, the “all important” reference letter and contracting for that first or new position. Discussions will focus on issues relevant to minority women.

Thursday, am

Panelists:

Professional Development Workshop 9:00 am ‐ 10:00 am 338 Panel Discussion On Science And Policy Dr. Tiffani Bailey Lash, Analyst National Institutes of Health Dr. Kristen Kulinowski, Faculty Fellow in the Department of Chemistry and Director for External Affairs for the Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology (CBEN), Rice University Cynthia Robinson, Director of Science & Technology Policy Fellowships, American Association for the Advancement of Science Dr. Isai Urasa, Chairman and Professor of Chemistry, Hampton University

This panel discussion will explore how science policy affects medical research, new research policy and science education programs. Science policy deals with the various sub‐ categories of scientific research: basic research, applied research and development. Panelists will help you understand how these sub‐categories have impacted technological innovation and the relationships between science and politics. Shift your paradigm and explore another dimension of science by attending this panel discussion!

Thursday, am

Professional Development Workshop: 10:30 am ‐ 11:30 am “Technology Commercialization” Renard Green, MBA, CEO, Richard Glendon Thomas, MBA The R2 Consulting Group

338

From a university laboratory to the market place; find innovative solutions to address the social, health and economic challenges of today through the Technology Commercialization workshop. This workshop will give research professionals and students insight into a new 65


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS way of creating financial capital while simultaneously promoting their scientific accomplishments.

Thursday, pm

Presenters:

COACh Workshop 1:30 pm ‐ 5:00 pm COAChing Strong Women Faculty in the Art of Strategic Persuasion (Pre‐registration is required Dr. Jane Tucker, Jane Tucker & Associates and Ernestine Taylor, ETConsulting

343B

This workshop will help professional women be more effective when leading or participating in discussions, meetings, or individual negotiations. It will examine professional negotiation skills, pragmatic learning content, and case studies. The workshop incorporates the real issues facing those attending the sessions through attendee participation and role playing. The workshop will discuss issues relevant to minority women that will assist in assuring a successful scientific career and a chosen leadership role.

Thursday, pm

Professional Development Workshop: 1:30 pm ‐ 4:00 pm Academic/Professional Transition Panel Dr. Victor McCrary, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

338

Whether you are going from a Ph.D. to a post‐doctoral fellowship, a post‐doctoral fellowship to academia or industry, or making a mid‐career transition, you have to be pro‐ active and savvy. A transition requires setting goals, planning early, maintaining a solid network base, adapting, and obtaining additional training in some cases. This panel will discuss and give you the tools to make that transition. Are you prepared? Attending this workshop will supply you with the activation energy needed to help you transition to the next phase of your career. 66


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS

Percy L. Julian Luncheon 12:00 Noon ‐ 1:30 pm

Thursday, pm

Grand Ballroom AB

Dr. Percy L. Julian (1899 – 1975) National Academy of Sciences (Elected 1973)

The Percy L. Julian Award for significant contributions in pure and/or applied research in science or engineering is our most prestigious award. Dr. Julian was an African‐American who obtained his BS in Chemistry from DePauw University in 1920. Although he entered DePauw as a “substandard freshman,” he graduated as the class valedictorian with Phi Beta Kappa honors. His first job was as an instructor at Fisk University. Julian left Fisk and obtained a masterʹs degree in chemistry from Harvard in 1928, and his Ph.D. in 1931 from the University of Vienna, Austria. It was after his return to DePauw in 1933 that Julian conducted the research that led to the synthesis of physostigmine, a drug used in the treatment of glaucoma2. Julian left DePauw in 1936 to become director of research of the Soya Products Division of the Glidden Company in Chicago. This position at Glidden made Julian the world’s first African – American to lead a research group in a major corporation. Dr. Julian rewarded Gliden’s faith in him by producing many new commercial products from soy beans. An entrepreneur as well as a scientist, in 1953 he founded Julian Laboratories and later Julian Associates, Inc. and the Julian Research Institute. Over the course of his career he acquired over 115 patents, including one for a fire‐extinguishing foam that was used on oil and gasoline fires during World War II2. Though he had over 100 patents and 200 scientific publications, his most notable contribution was in the synthesis of steroids from soy and sweet potato products. Dr. Julian’s life and contributions were the subject of a recent biopic by NOVA/PBS entitled, “Forgotten Genius.”3 The film was broadcast nationally on February 6, 2007 on PBS TV stations. The table below summarizes the winners of the NOBCChE Percy L Julian Award: Year

Award Recipients

1975

Dr. Arnold Stancel (1) Mobil Oil Company

1977 1979

Dr. W. Lincoln Hawkins, Bell Laboratories Dr. William Lester, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

1981

Dr. James Mitchell (2), Bell Laboratories

1982

Dr. K.M. Maloney, Allied Corporation

1983

Dr. B.W. Turnquest, ARCO Petroleum

Year Award Recipients 1995 Dr. Joseph Francisco, Purdue University Dr. Edward Gay, Argonne National 1996 Laboratory 1997 Dr. James H. Porter , UV Technologies 1998 Dr. William A. Guillory, Innovations Consulting 1999 Dr. Linneaus Dorman, Dow Chemical Company 2001 John E. Hodge (5) (1914–96), U.S. Department 67


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS of Agriculture, Peoria, IL 1985 1986

2001 James A. Harris (5) (1932–2000), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 2002 Dr. Victor McCrary, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory 2003 Dr. Victor Atiemo‐Obeng, Dow Chemical Company

Dr. William Jackson, (3) Howard University Dr. George Reed, Argonne National Laboratory

1987

Dr. Reginald Mitchell, Stanford University

1988 1989

Dr. Isiah Warner (4), Emory University Dr. James C. Letton, Procter & Gamble Company Dr. Theodore Williams, College of Wooster (Ohio)

2004 Dr. Gregory Robinson, University of Georgia

1991

Dr. Bertrand Frazier‐Reed, Duke University

2007 Dr. Kenneth Carter, UMass

1992

Dr. Willie May, NIST

2008 Dr. Sharon Haynie, DuPont

1993

Dr. Joseph Gordon, IBM

1994

Dr. Dotsevi Y. Sogah, Cornell University

2009 Dr. Soni Olufemi Oyekan, Marathon Oil 2010 Dr. Thomas Menash, GA Aerospace Systems

1990

2005 Dr. James H. Wyche, University of Miami 2006 Dr. Jimmie L. Williams, Corning Incorporated

References and recommended reading 1 2 3

NOBCChE’s Percy L Julian Award, http://www.nobcche.org/index.cfm?PageID=50174597-757C-432EBA8C253625586175&PageObjectID=37 Percy Julian, Wikipedia Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Julian Julian – Trail Blazer, Peter Tyson, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/julian/civil.html

Thursday, pm

Plenary II – Percy L. Julian Lecture 12:00 Noon ‐ 1:30 pm

Grand Ballroom AB

“Useful Optical Properties of Multi‐Chromophore Materials” Presenter:

Theodore Goodson III Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI

Organic conjugated macromolecules have received great attention due to their use in optical and electronic applications. Certain molecular assemblies have shown enhanced light harvesting properties by virtue of strong excitonic coupling in the multi‐chromophore system. Organic dendrimers, two‐dimensional networks, and circular macromolecular aggregates have shown properties of strong intra‐molecular interactions which have been utilized in light harvesting processes, photovoltaic (solar) devices, dielectric effects, as well as for enhanced nonlinear optical effects. This talk will discuss our basic results and conclusions over the past years utilizing these systems. The excitation mechanism in these systems depends on the nature of the branching center, the geometrical orientation of covalently attached chromophores, and the extent of delocalization. Through steady‐state and time‐resolved spectroscopy, we have characterized the mechanism of energy transport and the relative strength of intra‐molecular interactions. In this presentation the photo‐physical properties and applications in optical and electronic devices will be described. For particular assemblies the processes of efficient energy transfer, fast energy redistribution, and 68


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS enhanced two‐photon absorption cross‐sections will be discussed. The talk will also discuss new initiatives for mentoring graduate students. Representative Publications Varnavski, O.; Yan, X.; Mongin, O.; Blanchard‐Desce, M.; Goodson, T., III, J. Phys. Chem. C.; 2007;111 (1):149‐162 Williams, M.; Bhaskar, A.; Guda, R.,Imamura, M.; Mawatari, A.; Nakao, K.; Enozawa, H.; Niishinaga, T.; Iyoda, M.; Goodson, T., III, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 2008 , 130, 3252 Raymond, JE.; Bhaskar, A.;Goodson, T. III ; Makiuchi N.; Ogawa, K.; Kobuke, Y.; J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 2008 130, 17212‐3. Guo, M.; Yan, X.; Goodson, T., III, Advance Materials, 2008 , 20, 4167 Harpham, M.R.; Suzer, O.; Ma, Ch.Q.; Bauerle, P.; Goodson, T. III; J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 2009; 131, 973‐79 Varnavski, O.; Lee, D.I.; Ramakrishna, G.; Goodson, T.; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2010, 132 (1), pp 16–17. Daniel C. Flynn, Guda Ramakrishna, Hai‐Bo Yang, Brian H. Northrop, Peter J. Stang and Theodore Goodson, III J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2010, 132 (4), pp 1348– 1358

Symposium 4

Thursday, pm

Pressenters:

4:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm Solutions for Global Challenges Sponsored by The Dow Chemical Company

Grand Ballroom G

Theresa Kotanchek, Ph.D., R&D Vice President Sustainable Technologies and Innovation Sourcing, Midland, MI Kirk Thompson, Ph.D. Associate R&D Director Dow Solar Solutions, Midland, MI David Klanecky, Global R&D Director Dow Water & Process Solutions, Edina, MN B. Clifford Gerwick, Ph.D., Leader Dow Agrosciences, Indianapolis, IN

Our world is presented with many challenges such as climate change, energy efficiency, availability of safe and clean drinking water, and food production. What can we do to innovate and ensure a sustainable future? Join NOBCChE and The Dow Chemical Company for a symposium on innovation in subjects related to solar energy, water purification, and crop production.

69


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS

Friday, am

Forensic Workshop: 7:30 am ‐ 11:30 am “The Chemistry of Crime” sponsored by the DEA, CBP and DHS

337 & 338

Instructors: Darrell Davis, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX Quintet Bryant, Customs and Border Protection, Southwest Science Center, Houston, TX Marie Prince, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX Dr. Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences, Houston, TX Who is the perpetrator? How was the crime committed? Where did the crime occur? These are commonly‐asked questions in the game of Clue and in many of our favorite television shows. Episodes of Law & Order, CSI, NCIS, and Snapped may depict crime scene investigations, but they often fall short of realistic portrayal of the complexities and challenges associated with collecting viable evidence. In dramas and re‐enactments, the non‐scientific audience rarely sees the real science behind criminal investigations. In reality, crime scene investigations are most successful when the facts are revealed through the complex union of sharp detective work and targeted forensic analysis of the evidence. This workshop will focus on the integral role of science in crime scene investigations. This workshop also will explore the multifaceted occupations of several different types of Forensic Scientists (i.e., Forensic Chemists, Latent Fingerprint Examiners, Digital Evidence Examiners, etc.). Participants will learn about crime scenes, evidence, and evidence integrity from a scientific perspective. Hands‐on experience in standard forensic procedures typically performed at a crime scene will be offered. Demonstrations on the collection and documentation of evidence and on the use of scientific instrumentation (i.e., Ion Mobility Spectrometry) will be given.

70


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS

Friday, pm

Award Symposium 5 2:00 pm ‐ 4:00 pm Winifred Burkes ‐Houck Women’s Leadership Symposium sponsored by Center for Enabling New Technologies, University of Washington

335AB

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Mae Jemison The Winifred Burks-Houck Professional Leadership Award is the first NOBCChE award inspired by and created to honor the contributions of African American Women in science and technology. The Winifred Burks-Houck Professional Leadership Symposium aims to honor Winifred A. BurksHouck, the first female president of NOBCChE, by highlighting the scientific achievements, creativity, leadership, and community service of two NOBCChE-affiliated professional women and a NOBCChE undergraduate and graduate student working towards a degree in chemistry, chemical engineering, or a related field.

Friday, pm

Symposium 5 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm NanoVation: Innovation in Nanoscience sponsored by Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Featured Speaker:

Dr. Kwame Owusu‐Adom

338

Nanotechnology deals with atomic and molecular structures (1‐100nm) and involves developing materials or devices within that size. Innovation in nanotechnology is helping to create materials and devices with a vast range of applications, such as in medicine, electronics, biomaterials and energy production. It is estimated that over 800 manufacturer‐identified nanotech products are publicly available, with new ones hitting the market at a pace of 3–4 per week. This session features discussion on cutting edge research occurring in nanotechnology. NOBCChE invites you to learn about and discuss current research advances in subjects related to nano‐materials, high‐temperature materials, polymers, thin films, and other areas in materials research during this technical symposium.

71



CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Tuesday, am & pm Wednesday, a.m.

Teachers Workshop 8:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm

335C

“Teachersʹ Embracing Science through Education” Sponsored by 3M AAAS, Roche Pharmaceuticals, and Committee for Action Program Services Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services Linda L. Davis is founder and executive director of the Committee for Action Program Services (CAPS). CAPS is a non‐profit organization specializing in teacher’s professional development in science and technology. In addition, she provides science enrichment program for students in grades 4 through 12, such as field trips to Johnson Space Center ‐ Houston; facilitate overnight camps to Science Place, Fair Park in Dallas, Texas. CAPS has collaborated with the Luna Planetary and Institute (LPI) and the Genesis Mission Program, a space science educational program through NASA on professional development workshops for science educators in Dallas, Texas . Mrs. Davis is the Administrator at Inspired Vision Academy I in Dallas, Texas. Her responsibilities include special program coordinator for science curriculum and enrichment programs; elementary advisor for test required programs; grant writer for the science department and community outreach programs, and coordinator/facilitator for staff development. Mrs. Davis holds a Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management from Paul Quinn College in Dallas, Texas.

Ms. Yolanda George, American Association for the Advancement of Science Washington, DC

Yolanda S. George is Deputy Director and Program Director for the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs (EHR) at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Her responsibilities include conceptualizing, developing, implementing, planning, and directing multi‐year intervention and research projects related to increasing the participation of minorities, women, and disabled persons in science and engineering. Her recent K‐12 mathematics and science reform work includes contributing to the development of materials for infusing equity into systemic reforms and conducting research on how state departments of education and school districts are aligning equity and science and math initiatives. Also, she has conducted equity reviews for textbooks and software publishers and test developers, including New Standards Science. She serves as a consultant to numerous federal and state agencies, foundations and 73


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS corporations, and colleges and universities including the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the New Jersey State Department of Education, and the Louisiana State Department of Education, and serves on several advisory boards including the National Academy of Engineering Committee on Women in Engineering, California State University, Los Angeles Access Project, and WGBH Instructional Television Science Project and others. Dr. Edward D. Walton, Professor of Chemistry, California State Polytechnic University, Pamona, CA Dr. Edward D. Walton has been professor of chemistry here at “Cal Poly” for twenty years having come from teaching as a civilian professor at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. He spent a year as Research and Science Education Fellow for the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences at Univ of Colorado, Boulder. Dr.Walton also spent a year at the Lawrence Hall of Science, at University of California, Berkeley, working as statewide pre‐college program coordinator for the MESA (Math Engineering, Science Achievement) Program. At Cal Poly he teaches general college chemistry, senior (advanced) inorganic chemistry, Consumer chemistry and the chemical science course. In addition, Dr. Walton has taught the “methods for teaching science” in the teacher education program. During summers he has taught the science‐teaching course for the Claremont Graduate University’s teacher Program. Dr. Walton has served on national science education committees... the National Academy of Sciences’ working group to develop the National Science Education Standards, a review committee for the National Assessment for EducationalProgress (NAEP) in Science, and the Educational Testing Service’s Committee for the SAT II Chemistry Examination. He has directed summer institutes for elementary school teachers, middle school science teachers, and area high school chemistry teachers. Dr. Walton has served as Commander, US. Navy, and taught in an ROTC preparation program in San Diego, and has done training in Japan and Italy. 74


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Dr. Michael F. Z. Page is a native of Columbus, Ohio. Michael began his undergraduate studies at Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH. He then spent the next 5 years at UCLA earning his Ph.D. in chemistry. While at UCLA, he synthesized novel bioinorganic materials in the development of a new class of blood coagulation inhibitors. While earning his graduate degree, Michael was also a National Science Foundation GK‐12 scholar and developed lively‐hands on lab activities for middle school and high school science classes in Los Angeles. In 2006, Michael spent 18 months in a NIH funded postdoctoral position in the research lab of Dr. Robert H. Grubbs at Caltech. Grubbs was the recipient of the 2006 Nobel Prize in chemistry, the highest international honor that can be bestowed on a scientist. In his postdoc, Michael contributed to work to detect cancerous cells using targeted nanoparticles. As a tenure track faculty at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, since January 2008, Dr. Page has focused on science education, the professional development of secondary educators, and the science motivation of students choosing to pursue a career in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) disciplines. Since 2007, Michael has hosted several teacher workshops at Cal Poly Pomona. The most recent in summer 2010, was funded by the U.S. Department of Education. He has received several awards including the 2008 College of Science Distinguished Faculty Award, 2008 Cal Poly Pomona Teacher‐Scholar Award, and the 2008 City of Pomona Community Service Award. Currently he mentors lab students on how to synthesize alternative fuels including Biodiesel and the synthesis of “Green” eco‐friendly rubbers and paints.

Tuesday, pm

Welcome and Opening Luncheon 12:00 pm ‐ 1:30 pm

Grand Ballroom AB

Cynthia B. Giroux Corning Corporation Division Vice President & Research Director Optics and Surface Technologies Science & Technology Cynthia B. Giroux joined the Manufacturing and Engineering division of Corning in 1980 as a metallurgical engineer. Ms. Giroux has held a variety of technical and project management roles in research, development, quality and product engineering. Specifically, she spent over 14 years in the telecommunications sector supporting quality systems at Siecor GmbH, product engineering and quality for Multi-clad Coupler manufacturing and project leader for core process development for the 7th generation of optical fiber manufacturing equipment in Wilmington, N.C. In 1998, Giroux transferred to Corning, N.Y. where she continued working on Corning Optical Fiber product development resulting in technology transfer and launch of SMF-28e™ and MetroCor™ products. In 2001, Giroux assumed the role of photonic fiber development manager. In 2002, she was named Thin Films and Surfaces research director, and in 2009 she was named research director, Optics and Surface 75


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Technologies. In January 2010, she was appointed to her current position. Giroux is active in the Technology Community Women’s Network at Sullivan Park, co-leads corporate fundraising for the Girl Scouts NY/PENN Council. Ms. Giroux holds both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in metallurgical engineering and materials science from Carnegie-Mellon University.

Tuesday, pm

Henry Hill Lecture 1:45 pm ‐ 2:45 pm

335AB

Dr. Warren Washington 2007 Nobel Laureate, National Medal of Science recipient and Senior Scientist, National Center for Atmospheric Research Dr. Warren M. Washington is an internationally recognized expert on atmospheric science and climate research. He specializes in computer modeling of Earthʹs climate. Currently, he is a senior scientist and Chief Scientist of the DOE/UCAR Cooperative Agreement at National Center for Atmospheric Research in the Climate Change Research Section of the centerʹs Climate and Global Dynamics Division. Over the years, Washington has published almost 200 papers in professional journals, garnered dozens of national and international awards, and served as a science advisor to former presidents Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. Dr. Washington became one of the first developers of groundbreaking atmospheric computer models in collaboration with Akira Kasahara when he came to NCAR in the early 1960s. These models, which use fundamental laws of physics to predict future states of the atmosphere, have helped scientists understand climate change. As his research developed, Washington worked to incorporate the oceans and sea ice into climate models. Such models now include components that depict surface hydrology and vegetation as well as the atmosphere, oceans, and sea ice. An Introduction to Three‐Dimensional Climate Modeling, written by Washington and Claire Parkinson in 1986 and updated in 2005, is a standard reference in the field. Washingtonʹs past research involved using the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). His current research involves using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) to study the impacts of climate change in the 21st century Both models were used extensively in the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment, for which NCAR scientists, including Washington, and colleagues around the world shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. Washington was born and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He became interested in science in grade school, going on to earn a bachelorʹs degree in physics and masterʹs degree in meteorology from Oregon State University. His next step was to Pennsylvania State University for a doctorate in meteorology. In 1963, he joined NCAR as a research scientist. 76


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS As the second African‐American to earn a doctorate in the atmospheric sciences, Washington has served as a role model for generations of young researchers from many backgrounds. He has mentored dozens of graduate students, as well as undergraduates in the UCAR‐based SOARS program (Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science). In 1999, Washington won the Dr. Charles Anderson Award from the American Meteorological Society ʺfor pioneering efforts as a mentor and passionate support of individuals, educational programs, and outreach initiatives designed to foster a diverse population of atmospheric scientists.ʺ In 2010, President Obama named Warren Washington as one of 10 eminent researchers to be awarded the National Medal of Science. This award is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on scientists, engineers, and inventors.

Tuesday, pm

Symposium 1 Environmental Science and Policy Symposium 2:45 pm ‐ 5:45 pm

336B

Norris McDonald, President, African American Environmentalist Association Norris McDonald was born and raised in a conservative suburban North Carolina home. He earned his bachelor’s degree in education from Wake Forest University in 1977. However, it was neither his hometown nor university training that stimulated his interest in environmental issues. Rather, it was the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident in 1979. Six months after the accident at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, McDonald joined an environmental group. He worked as the director of an energy conservation project with Friends of the Earth (FOE). His primary work included research, media relations, public education, lobbying, and fundraising efforts. McDonald’s work with FOE helped to further his interest in the environmental issues. It was also during this time that McDonald discovered the lack of minority involvement within the environmental field. As an example, McDonald notes that in 1979 there were no black professionals in environmental groups in the Washington, D.C area Determined to change that, in 1985 McDonald founded the African American Environmentalist Association (AAEA). The AAEA was founded on the premise that the lack of diversity in the traditional environmental movement translated into a lack of black and minority perspective on environmental issues. Thus, the primary goal of AAEA is to address issues that are important to minority communities. Their work includes teaming up with local, state and national leaders on issues like clean air and clean water – particularly in Washington, D.C. It also includes collaborating with traditional environmental groups that have a presence in the nation’s capital. Collaborations have included the establishment of a water resources program, internships, research projects, publications, and even shared office space. These collaborative efforts as well as work on other environmental issues have 77


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS allowed McDonald’s perspective on environmental and energy policy to grow significantly. They have also allowed him to meet many people, including important actors in the environmental movement. McDonald believes that a major part of his job is to increase black participation within the environmental movement. The AAEA had an active internship program throughout the 1980s and 90s. A total of 50 interns have worked with the organization. Some of these interns have gone on to work as environmental lawyers while others are working with national environmental organizations and federal and agencies like the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Tuesday, pm

Symposium 2 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

336A

“Advancing Global Healthcare through STEM” Milton Brown, MD, Ph.D., Director Drug Discovery Program Georgetown University Medical Center

Dr. Milton Brown, Director, Drug Discovery Program, is the inaugural recipient of the Edwin H. Richard and Elisabeth Richard von Matsch Endowed Chair in Experimental Therapeutics at the Georgetown University Medical Center, which supports more than 20 investigators in drug discovery and development. Dr. Brown has a very unique educational background. In 1987, he received a B. S. degree in Biology at

Oakwood University Next, he earned his PhD in synthetic organic chemistry from University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1995, and his medical degree (M.D.) at the University of Virginia in 1999. Brown received postdoctoral training in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Virginia, and in 2000 became an assistant professor of chemistry in that department. As an experienced leader in establishing academic drug discovery centers, he has more than 15 years of experience in developing new drugs in the fields of cancer and neuroscience. Dr. Brown served as a member of both the Experimental Therapeutics and the Drug Discovery and Molecular Pharmacology study sections at NIH (2001‐2006) and in the 2006 Breast Cancer Experimental Therapeutics study section at the Department of Defense (DOD). He also served for two years as an elected member of the medicinal chemistry long‐range planning committee for the American Chemical Society. He is a reviewer

for the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry and the European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. He has given more than 80 invited lectures in the United States, Europe and China on drug discovery and development topics. Brown is presently a consultant with several biotech companies and one major pharmaceutical company in the area of medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. 78


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Tuesday, pm

Award Symposium 1 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Award Symposium

337B

Dr. Omolola Eniola Adefeso Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering Department, University of Michigan Dr. Eniola‐Adefeso is currently an Assistant Professor in the Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. She was previously at Baylor College of Medicine (Houston, TX) in their Pediatrics/Leukocyte Biology Department from 2004‐2006. She received a B.S. E. degree in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in 1999 from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She earned a masters degree and a doctorate in the same field at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research is focused on cell adhesion and drug delivery; specifically, the groupʹs overall objective is to use knowledge of the cellular inflammatory response and blood flow hemodynamics to design bio‐functionalized particles for targeted drug delivery and imaging. . Her strategy relies on an understanding of white blood cells, one of the bodyʹs first lines of defense against illness and infection. She is trying to create artificial white blood cells to deliver medicines. In theory, these drug‐filled carriers would navigate through the bloodstream and move into diseased tissues just like white cells do. Then theyʹd slowly release their drugs. Her list of many honors includes the Meyerhoff Scholarship at UMBC; NASA Graduate Research Fellowship and the 2003 Janice Lumpkin Awards for Excellence in Arts & Sciences at UPenn. At the University of Michigan, Dr. Adefeso has received a Rackham Faculty Development Grant, American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant, and the American Heart Association Innovative Award. In 2011, she was received an NSF CAREER Award. Dr. Eniola‐Adefeso got hooked on research when she was a junior in college. She was a member of the first class of students at UMBC to participate in the Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) program. Research had an instant appeal.

79


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Wednesday, am

Professional Development Workshop: 9:00 am ‐ 11:00 am ʺ Mentoring In The STEM Disciplinesʺ Dr. Howard E. Kea, Sr. Organizational Development Consultant, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

338

Dr. Howard Kea currently works as a Sr. Organization Development Specialist in the Office of Human Capitol Management, Organizational Leadership & Culture Office (Code 111) at NASA Goddard. Dr. Kea has provided consultation and facilitation serves to a broad spectrum of organizations across Goddard to improve their performance in meeting their mission goals. Previously Dr. Kea worked as a Supervisor and Sr. Computer Systems Engineer in the Information Systems Division, SIE Branch, Code 581 at NASA Goddard. Dr. Kea served in the Mission Design Lab (MDL) where he conducted pre‐Phase A parametric studies designing mission operations concepts for science teams and served as Assistant Team Leader in the MDL coordinating the efforts of 14 engineers from all disciplines with the science team. Dr. Kea has presented a paper at the International Leadership Association (ILA) in 2003, on managing tragedy in the workplace using the Challenger and Columbia disasters as a case study, and was a member on the organizing committee for the Women in Astronomy Conference in 2009. Dr. Kea is currently a member of the, American Psychological Association, Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychologists. Dr. Kea has certifications in Organizational Behavioral Analysis and Organizational Development. Dr. Kea has a BS in Electronics Engineering and Technology from the University of Akron, Masters Degree in Engineering Administration from George Washington University and a Ph.D. in Leadership and Organizational Change at Antioch University.

Wednesday, pm

Professional Development Workshop: 3:00 pm ‐ 5:00 pm ʺFinancial Strategies: Your Solutions To Money Management And Investing ʺ

338

Derry Haywood, II The Peninsula Financial Group Mr. Derry L. Haywood, II is the owner and founder of The Peninsula Financial Group, a full service financial services firm. Since 1995 PFG has been providing financial services to the community at large for 24 years. PFG currently operates in Virginia, North Carolina, Maryland, Texas, and Indiana. The Peninsula Financial Group has developed extensive experience in providing 80


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS insurance and financial services. The companies PFG represent provide financial and benefit services to businesses, churches, non‐profit organizations, individuals and families. Among those services are deferred compensation plans, pension and profit sharing individual life, health, and disability insurance. The Peninsula Financial has provided invaluable investment counseling to a spectrum of business and community organizations – including professional and student groups at NOBCChE national and regional meetings for the past 10 years.

Thursday, am

Thursday, pm

COACh Workshops 8:30 am ‐ 12:00 pm “Professional Skills Training for Minority Graduate Students and Postdocs”

COAChing Strong Women Faculty in the Art of Strategic Persuasion 1:30 – 5:00 pm

343B

343B

JANE W. TUCKER, Ph.D. Jane Tucker has over twenty‐five years of experience in higher education in both the administrative and teaching areas. She has taught negotiation skills in the Fuqua School of Business at Duke and is currently a consultant educator for COACh through the National Science Foundation. She has also taught ADVANCE program seminars in negotiations and is adjunct faculty for the Center for Creative Leadership, where she works with leaders from both non‐profit organizations and corporations. Dr. Tucker holds a Ph.D. in Organizational Development from the University of North Carolina and is an alumna of Wellesley College. She has published papers on learning strategies and organizational development. Her current research interest is focused on early adopters in change processes. Ernestine T. Taylor Ernestine T. Taylor worked more than 20 years at the executive level in human resources and organizational development with fortune 500 companies such as Ortho‐McNeil Pharmaceutical (Johnson & Johnson), Avon Products Company, Inc. Continental Can and Ford Foundation. She has taught management and business communications courses at Elon University, Bennett College for Women and several community colleges in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut. In 2002, Taylor established ETConsulting with a focus on executive coaching, leadership development and team building As an 81


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS independent consultant, she is a facilitator and executive coach for healthcare organizations, aerospace, energy, telecommunications, educational institutions and governmental agencies. Featured in Ebony Magazine(1990), as one of Best and Brightest Black Women in Corporate America.

Thursday, am

Award Symposium 3 9:00 am – 11:30 am Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher Award Symposium

336A

Dr. Angela Winstead Associate Professor of Chemistry Morgan State University Dr. Angela Winstead is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Morgan State University. She has an active research group with a focus on the microwave synthesis of cyanine dyes and their application to biosensor development and cell imaging. She has mentored 23 undergraduate research students and 4 high school students. She has directly supervised over 90 undergraduate research presentations, 25 undergraduate research presentation awards (including 11 NOBCChE undergraduate research presentation awards), and 6 publications with undergraduate coauthors. She was recently awarded Department of Defense funding for her biosensor research. She has served as Conference Chair of the ACS for Undergraduate Program (Anaheim), program developer and facilitator of Morgan’s Continuous Undergraduate Research Experience, NOBCChE Student Development Program Chair, Director of the HBCU‐UP Research Summer Program, American Chemical Society Task Force for Undergraduate Programming member, and research mentor for ACS Project Seed, NIH‐MARC U*STAR, NIH‐MBRS‐RISE, and HBCU‐UP. She earned her B.S. from Spelman College in 1995 and received a Ph.D. from UNC‐Chapel Hill in 2000 with a concentration in Synthetic Organic Chemistry. Dr. Winstead conducted postdoctoral work in the Chemistry Department at The Ohio State University before joining the faculty at Morgan State University in 2002. She was born and raised in Staunton , VA. 82


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Thursday, am

Professional Development Workshop 9:00 am ‐ 10:00 am Panel Discussion On Science And Policy Dr. Tiffani Bailey Lash, Analyst National Institutes of Health

338

Dr. Bailey Lash is an analyst in the Office of the Director at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. She earned her Ph.D. in Chemistry from North Carolina State University. Her interdisciplinary research focus was on modifying chemical and physical properties at the liquid/solid interface to address optimizing surface chemistry applications. This research was a collaborative effort in both chemistry and chemical engineering departments. Her undergraduate studies were conducted at Hampton University, where she earned her BS in chemistry. Dr. Lash was a recipient of both the NOBCChE Undergraduate and Graduate awards. Prior to her current position,Dr. Lash was selected as a policy fellow with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), where she gained insight on evaluating grants/funds disseminated for research and development. Dr. Lash was also selected as a policy fellow at the National Academies. There she enhanced her knowledge on the impact of science and technology policy in higher education by working with the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP) and the Center for the Advancement of Scholarship on Engineering Education (CASEE). In 2009, Dr. Lash was recognized with a Black Engineer of The Year Modern Technology Leader Award. Dr. Lash is currently engaged in bio‐medical scientific workforce training and career development policies. She is also a Certified Project Management Institute (PMI) Project Management Professional (PMP). Dr. Kristen Kulinowski, Faculty Fellow in the Department of Chemistry and Director for External Affairs for the Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology (CBEN), Rice University Dr. Kulinowski is a Faculty Fellow in the Department of Chemistry at Rice University and Director for External Affairs for the Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology (CBEN). She currently serves as the Director of the International Council on Nanotechnology (ICON), an international, multi‐stakeholder organization whose mission is to develop and communicate information regarding potential environmental and health risks of nanotechnology thereby fostering risk reduction while maximizing societal benefit. She has experience as a chemical researcher, educator, curriculum developer, administrator, outreach coordinator and policy fellow. Since 2004, Dr. Kulinowski has been actively engaged in developing and promoting the International Council on Nanotechnology (ICON) which provides a neutral forum in which experts from academia, governments, industry and nonprofit organizations can explore questions of nanotechnology¿s 83


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS impact on environment, health and safety (EHS). She directed an effort that resulted in the web publication of the first publicly available database of citations to peer‐reviewed papers on nano EHS. Other activities of ICON include a survey of best practices for nanomaterial handling in the workplace and a public portal of information on nanotechnology EHS. Dr. Kulinowski has extensive experience in science education, particularly in developing innovative curricula at the undergraduate level, and developed Rice¿s first introductory undergraduate course on nanotechnology. From 2002‐2004 Dr. Kulinowski served as CBEN Executive Director for Education, developing and managing an educational outreach portfolio of programs for audiences that range from middle school children to adults. During this time the center established itself as a national leader in nanotechnology educational outreach. Prior to joining CBEN, she was a lecturer in chemistry at Cal Poly (San Luis Obispo) for three years and came to Rice as an instructor in chemistry in 1998. In 2001 she was selected by the Optical Society of America and SPIE‐The International Society for Optical Engineering as their Congressional Science Fellow and worked in the D.C. office of a member of the U.S. House of Representatives on issues including weapons of mass destruction, anti‐terrorism legislation and domestic nuclear power security. She was instrumental in shepherding through new legislation on the stockpiling of potassium iodide near nuclear power plants. As a longtime volunteer with American Red Cross Disaster Relief Services, Dr. Kulinowski brought food and water to rescue workers at the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. Dr. Kulinowski is highly sought after as a speaker and has given invited talks on issues of nanotechnology environmental health and safety and science policy throughout the US, Europe and the Middle East. She has consulted with governments and governmental advisory bodies regarding responsible nanotechnology, and serves as chair of the ASTM International Subcommittee E56.03 on Environment, Health and Safety. Dr. Kulinowski earned a B.S. in chemistry at Canisius College and her M.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Rochester. Cynthia Robinson, Director, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Science & Technology Policy Fellowships. Cynthia Robinson directs the AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowships department, administering programs and activities for yearly cohorts of 200 Congressional and Executive Branch Fellows, with a team of 14 full‐time staff and an annual budget of more than $10 million. She oversees strategic planning and policy; program development and evaluation; stakeholder relations and communications; professional development and education activities. Prior to joining AAAS in 2004, Cynthia worked for seven years directing fellowships for scientists and engineers focusing on the environment and conservation, with the Pew Fellows Program in Marine Conservation, and the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program. She has more than 20 years of experience in program management, communications, and non‐profit administration. Her early career was in public relations and marketing in the fields of community development, financial services, and healthcare. She also has worked in the education for sustainability realm, and spent three years in international development with the Peace Corps in Thailand and The Gambia, focusing on environmental 84


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS education and youth enrichment programs. Cynthia holds a bachelorʹs degree in journalism from Boston University, and a masterʹs degree in urban and environmental policy from Tufts University, with a concentration in international environmental policy and sustainable development. She is a recipient of a UNEP Fellowship in International Environmental Management, and a Switzer Foundation Environmental Fellowship. Cynthia has held numerous volunteer leadership positions. She was a trustee of the Robert and Patricia Switzer Foundation from 1999 to 2007, including three years as board chair; and from 1994 to 2005 she served in various governance positions with the Sea Education Association, including six years as a trustee. Currently she is on the Green Infrastructure Plan Steering Committee for the town of Cheverly, MD, overseeing education and outreach initiatives; and she is a member of the Association for Women in Science, and the International Leadership Association. Dr. Isai Urasa, Chairman and Professor of Chemistry, Hampton University Dr. Isai Urasa, is Chairman and Professor of Chemistry at Hampton University. He earned a BA in Chemistry and Mathematics in 1970 from Hampton Institute. In 1972, he earned an M.A. in Analytical Chemistry at the State University of New York, Buffalo, and his Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry in 1977 from Colorado State University. He returned to Hampton in 1980 as an assistant professor of chemistry. He was promoted to associate professor in 1983 and also became the department chairman at that time. He has held that position since then. His interests include Analytical Chemistry; Environmental Chemistry; Trace element speciation in aqueous media; analytical methods development with atomic spectroscopy; Ion Chromatography and High Performance Liquid Chromatography; Solid phase extraction applied in metal speciation. Dr. Urasa holds membership in the American Chemical Society, the Tanzania Chemical Society, National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, and Beta Kappa Chi Honor Society. He has served on many committees including Advisory Committee, National Science Foundation Center for Workshops in the Chemical Sciences; Project Advisory Committee, American Water Works Association Research Foundation; Advisory Board, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and Hampton University Research and Training Partnership (an NIH supported program); Editorial Board, Tanzania Journal of Science.

85


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Thursday, am

Professional Development Workshop: 10:30 am ‐ 11:30 am “Technology Commercialization” Renard Green, MBA, CEO, Richard Glendon Thomas, MBA The R2 Consulting Group

338

Renard Green, MBA, CEO, The R2 Consulting Group A native of Florida, Renard Antonio Green received his Bachelors of Science Degree in Chemistry from Florida A&M University. After receiving this degree, Renard moved to Indianapolis, Indiana where he worked for Dow AgroSciences as a Discovery Research Chemist for six years. Mr. Green decided to return to academia which fueled his pursuit of a Masters of Business Administration. While attending The Ohio State University’s Max M. Fisher College of Business, Renard took on a variety of leadership positions and consulted with several major for‐profit and not‐for‐profit companies. He was also awarded with the highest honor given to Fisher graduates; the Pacesetter award. This award is given to the top 2% of the Fisher graduating class. Renard graduated from Fisher with a double major in Strategy and Marketing. Upon graduation, Mr. Green was employed by KBK Enterprises as a Project Manager. As Project Manager, Renard was responsible for over $20 million worth of real estate projects. He was also the team leader for new business ventures in several niche industries and had direct report responsibilities. An active member of the Columbus community, Renard is a board member and former treasurer for After‐School All‐Stars, a former marketing and branding chair for 100 Black Men of Columbus and Advisory Council member for the Fisher College of Business Center for Real Estate Education & Research. Moreover, he also contributes to the Atlanta and San Francisco community as a member of the Advisory Board for Science, Engineering, Mathematics Link (SEM Link), a science and math youth exposure program. Richard Glendon Thomas, MBA The R2 Consulting Group A native of Spanish Town Jamaica, Richard Glendon Thomas’s intrigue for business was sparked at an early age through his family’s grocery store where he worked and provided leadership. He had both the privilege and the honor of representing his country as a member of the Jamaica National under‐22 volleyball team. Always understanding the value of academia, Richard took the Cambridge University’s General Certificate Advanced Level Examinations in Mathematics, 86


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Economics and Accounting and received stellar results in all categories. Feeling the need to further develop his analytical skill‐set, Mr. Thomas attended Benedict College in Columbia, SC where he received his Bachelors of Science Degree in Physics with summa cum laude honors. The summer after his graduation, Richard worked for Fermi National Accelerator Lab in Batavia, IL as a summer Research Associate with the D‐Zero experiment. Wanting to understand the intricacies of developing larger scale successful businesses, Mr. Thomas decided to attend Max M. Fisher College of Business at The Ohio State University. While pursuing his Master of Business Administration, he developed a passion for the consulting profession. While pursuing his education, Richard served several major for‐profit companies as well as obtained a coveted summer internship with The Boston Consulting Group. At the completion of his business school tenure, he was presented with the Pacesetter award. This award is given to the top 2% of the graduating class. Mr. Thomas graduated from Fisher College of Business with an MBA in Strategy and Finance. Upon graduation, Richard worked for three years as a management consultant for McKinsey & Company. While at McKinsey, Mr. Thomas was on a team that created an improvement strategy for $5 Billion worth of raw milk purchases for Dean Food’s. Delighted with his work and professionalism, Dean Food’s created a new supply chain department and asked Richard to head the business analytics team. Intrigued with the possibility of seeing an idea from inception to commercialization, Richard accepted the offer and is now serving as the Senior Manager of Business Analytics & Reporting for Dean Food’s Dairy Direct group. Throughout his career Mr. Thomas has held numerous leadership roles and continues to strive for excellence in every endeavor.

Thursday, pm

Percy L. Julian Luncheon 1200 – 1:30 pm

Grand Ballroom AB

Theodore Goodson, III Richard Barry Bernstein Professor of Chemistry University of Michigan

2011 NOBCChE Percy Julian Award Winner Theodore Goodson III received his B. A. in 1991 from Wabash College and earned his Ph.D. in Chemistry at the University of Nebraska‐Lincoln in 1996. After postdoctoral positions at the University of Chicago and at the University of Oxford, he accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Wayne State University in 1998. In 2004 he moved to the University of Michigan as Professor of Chemistry and Professor in the College of Engineering and in Applied Physics. In 2008 he was appointed as the Richard Barry Bernstein Professor of Chemistry at the University of Michigan. Dr. Goodson’s research centers on the investigation of nonlinear optical and energy transfer in organic multi‐chromophore systems for particular optical and electronic applications. His 87


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS research has been translated in to technology in the areas of two‐photon organic materials for eye and sensor protection, large dielectric and energy storage effects in organic macromolecular materials, and the detection of energetic (explosive) devices by nonlinear optical methods. He has investigated new quantum optical effects in organic systems which have applications in discrete communication systems and sensing. Goodson’s lab was also the first to investigate the fundamental excitations in small metal topologies which are now candidates for tissue and other biological imaging. In 2009 he founded Wolverine Energy Solutions and Technologies Inc. a start‐up company with contracts to produce high energy density capacitors for military, automotive, and medical devices. The company also developed a new system for the detection of IED’s remotely which stems from one of Professor Goodson’s patents at the U of Michigan. Dr. Goodson’s awards include the National Science Foundation American Innovation Fellowship, Army Research Young Investigator Award, National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, Camille Dreyfus Teacher‐Scholar Award, Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Award, Burroughs Welcome Fund Award, American Chemical Society Minority Mentorship Award, University Faculty Recognition Award, College of Science Teaching Award, and a National Academy of Sciences Ford Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr. Goodson has been a Senior Editor for The Journal of Physical Chemistry since 2007. He is also serves on the executive committee for the American Chemical Society Physical Division. Professor Goodson has been an active member of both the undergraduate admissions committee and recruiting committees for the University of Michigan and also serves with the college to enhance efforts of mentoring through‐out the university in particular for mentoring students of diverse backgrounds. He has served on the Committee of Institutional Cooperation and the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Dr. Goodson has published over 110 scientific publications and presented more than 140 invited talks.

Thursday, pm

Professional Development Workshop: 1:30 pm ‐ 4:00 pm Academic/Professional Transition Panel

338

Victor McCrary, Ph.D. President, NOBCChE Victor R. McCrary is currently the Business Executive for Science and Technology at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), where he manages the long‐term research and development investments for APL’s Science and Technology Business Area. His duties include developing the overall business and technology strategy and business development activities leading to external research and development funding. The research projects he supports include research in sensor networks, autonomous systems, cognitive engineering, advance materials and nanostructures, and concepts for natural systems exploitation. Previously, he was the Chief of the Convergent Information Systems Division at the National Institute of Standards & Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland. His division conducted research into convergent information systems emphasizing standards and interoperability protocols for the exchange, storage, and manifestation of digital content. Topical areas include digital data preservation and 88


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS optical storage, biometric systems, electronic books, quantum communications, digital rights management, digital image quality, and digital cinema. Dr. McCrary organized the world’s first conference on electronic books in October 1998, and subsequent conferences in 1999, and 2000. His research group has developed a prototype of the electronic book reader, and a low‐cost Braille reader for electronic books which recently received a 2001 R&D 100 Award. His former group at NIST is currently leading the efforts that Dr. McCrary initiated in the evaluation of CD & DVD media lifetimes, and the care and handling of CDs & DVDs. Most importantly, Dr. McCrary credits the string of innovations from his division through his student program at NIST where his division employed and mentored over 40 students ranging from 14 years old to 22 years old; many have earned graduate degrees in science, engineering, and law. In 2000, he was the co‐recipient of the Gold Medal from the Department of Commerce, for his leadership in catalyzing the electronic book industry, facilitating standards for the e‐book industry, and the development of a Braille reader for e‐books. The NIST Braille reader was featured in the September 2000 issue of Wired Magazine. He is currently a member of the Library of Congress’ National Digital Strategy Advisory Board. He also served as the chair and past‐president for the newly formed Open Electronic Book Forum, an industry group dedicated to the development and promotion of standards for electronic books. In March 2002, Dr. McCrary received the Percy Julian Award from the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCCHE), the organization’s highest honor, for lifetime achievement in research in science and engineering. In 2004, he was selected the Emerald Honors Conference Award for Research Science, for Career Achievement in Academia for his exemplary performance in the management of research science and technology. He was recently selected as one of the 2005 Science Spectrum Magazine as Top 50 Minorities in Science. Dr. McCrary was recently recognized as the “2011 Scientist of the Year” by the Black Engineer of the Year Awards committee. He was elected to the 2007 DVD Hall of Fame by the DVD Association for his leadership as executive director of the organization and his leadership in research for the preservation of optical discs. In July 2007, he was elected the National President of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE). Victor is also an adjunct lecturer in the Executive Masters of Technology Management Program at the University of Pennsylvania. The program is jointly administered by the Graduate School of Engineering and the Wharton School of Business. He received his doctoral degree in 1985 from Howard University in physical chemistry. From 1985 to 1995, he was a Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, where he conducted research in crystal growth for semiconductor lasers. He received an Executive Masters of Science & Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in May 1995. Victor has authored or co‐authored over 60 technical papers in refereed journals and co‐edited two books. His view on life is simple, “concentrate more on doing the right things than on doing things right!”

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CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Thursday, pm

Symposium 3 1:30 pm ‐ 4:00 pm All About BIO: Innovations in Bioscience, Biochemistry & Bioengineering

336A

Andre F. Palmer is currently Associate Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The Ohio State University. Prior to this appointment, Prof. Palmer served as Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, and Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Howard University. Prof. Palmer received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from The Johns Hopkins University in 1998. His research interests encompass the development of novel hemoglobin‐based oxygen carriers for a variety of transfusion applications and the use of these oxygen carriers to enhance and target oxygen delivery to mammalian cell cultures. He is author of more than 37 peer reviewed publications. Among others, he received the National Science Foundation Career Award in 2001, and two National Institutes of Health R01 grants in 2006. Prof. Palmer previously served on the editorial board of the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs Journal, and is currently an editorial board member for the Journal of Artificial Cells, Blood Substitutes and Biotechnology. Prof. Palmer also serves on the International Scientific Advisory Committee on Blood Substitutes, and is a member of the Academic Advisory board for the Department of Chemical Engineering at Howard University. Prof. Palmer is the 2008 recipient of NOBCChE’s Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Award. Prof. Palmer is married to attorney Allison Lowery Palmer. They have a son, Alexander, and a daughter, Alyssia. Symposium 4

Thursday, pm

4:00 pm ‐ 6:00 pm Solutions for Global Challenges Sponsored by The Dow Chemical Company

Grand Ballroom G

Theresa Kotanchek, PhD R&D Vice President, Sustainable Technologies and Innovation Sourcing, Midland, MI

Theresa Kotanchek is the Vice President for Sustainable Technologies and Innovation Sourcing at Dow Chemical. In this role, Theresa leads the strategic integration of sustainability into Dowʹs business portfolio and R&D function including establishment of corporate wide metrics and 90


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS delivery of three breakthroughs to world challenges In addition, she also leads innovation sourcing, serving as Dowʹs global leader for external technology, with the responsibility to coordinate Dowʹs corporate wide interactions with external bodies, including universities, national laboratories, government agencies and development partners, to accelerate commercial delivery of Dowʹs innovation pipeline. Prior to assuming her current role, Theresa was the Chief Technology Officer of Dow Chemical China Company Limited where she led Asia Pacific R&D, including the development and staffing of Dowʹs new state‐of‐the‐art R&D center in Shanghai. China. In addition to establishing world class R&D capabilities in our emerging geographies, she was responsible for achieving the companyʹs Asia Pacific growth strategy through market‐driven scientific and technological innovations, enhancing current products as well as creating new business and technology platforms. Kotanchek joined Dow in 1990 with extensive experience in engineering and materials science. She served as research leader in Corporate Research from 1990 to 1995 and Product Manager in Advanced Electronic Materials from 1996 to 1998. From 1998 to 2000, Kotanchek was the Materials Science Technology Leader in Corporate R&D, where she led a diverse group of materials scientists, chemists, engineers and biologists to invent and develop new materials solutions for Dow. In 2000, Kotanchek was appointed senior R&D director for INSITE™ technology and New Business Development for Dow Plastics. There she led the global Polyolefins & Elastomers R&D organization responsible for new technology including, Catalysis. Functional Chemistry, Advanced Process Research and Materials Science laboratories, and new application development including Dow fiber Solutions, Hygiene & Medical and New Business Growth. In 2003, she was named Senior Director of Technology for Dowʹs Growth Center. In 2004, Kotanchek became Global R&D Director for Dow Ventures. In addition to providing global technical leadership for Dowpharrna and Advanced Electronic Materials businesses, she was accountable for the identification, evaluation and implementation of strategic technologies, capabilities and business options enabling rapid commercialization of new business platforms. Theresa also served as a member of the Biotechnology portfolio Team and the Biotechnology R&D Leadership Team. Kotanchek holds a Doctor of Philosophy in Materials Science, a Masters of Science in Ceramic Science, and a Bachelor of Science in Ceramic Science & Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University. She is an active member of the American Chemical Society, Society of Women Engineers, Council of Industrial Research and has served on the Shanghai American Chamber of Congress‐ Science & Technology Subcommittee. She also serves on the External Advisory Board of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering for Penn State and was awarded the 2006 Penn State Earth & Mineral Sciences Alumni Achievement Award for exemplifying the ideals of the College. She was recently honored as a 2009 Penn State Alumni Fellow. 91


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Kirk Thompson, Ph.D. Associate R&D Director, Dow Solar Solutions, Midland, MI Kirk Thompson is the Sr. R&D Leader for Photovoltaics, Solar Solutions R&D, where he is responsible for defining Dow’s PV strategy leading a team of researchers in the development of CIGS PV material. Kirk joined Dow in 1999 as an engineer in Ethylene Dichloride/Vinyl Chloride Monomer (EDC/VCM) R&D. In this position, Kirk was responsible for oxychlorination catalyst development. Prior to his current position, Kirk was the R&D leader for Chemicals and Basestocks in Specialty Chemicals leading a group where he was responsible for the development and commercialization of several novel, patent‐protected molecules and formulations for the Polyglycols and Surfactants business. He has also held positions in Specialty Chemicals TS&D, where he identified opportunities for value creation using Six Sigma and received the 2004 Tech Center Award, and in Surfactants R&D where he led a number of projects resulting in new commercial product launches. Kirk holds a B.A. in chemistry from St. Olaf College, an executive MBA from Northwood University, as well as a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Iowa State University. Kirk received the Professional Progress in Engineering Award from Iowa State University in 2010, along with several other internal awards. Kirk has authored 12 external publications/presentations and is the owner of one patent with several patents in progress. B. Clifford Gerwick, Ph.D. Leader, Dow AgChem Discovery Research, Indianapolis, IN Cliff Gerwick is currently the Leader of AgChem Discovery Research for Dow AgroSciences and based in Indianapolis, IN. He received a B.A. degree in Biology from Alaska Pacific University (1974), a Ph.D. in Plant Physiology from Washington State University (1978), and was a NSF Postdoctoral Fellow in Plant Biochemistry at the University of Georgia (1978‐79). During his 30 year career at Dow he has worked in herbicide discovery, natural products discovery, and gene discovery. He holds 21issued U.S. patents, is the author of 37 referred journal articles and book chapters, and recently became the first H. H. Dow Medalist from Dow AgroSciences for his career contributions. In his current position he leads our research program on new fungicides, herbicides, and insecticides.

92


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Friday, am

Forensic Workshop: 730 am ‐ 1130 am “The Chemistry of Crime” sponsored by the DEA, CBP and DHS

337 & 338

Instructors: Darrell Davis, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX

Quintet Bryant, Customs and Border Protection, Southwest Science Center, Houston, TX Marie Prince, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX Dr. Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences, Houston, TX Mr. Darrell L. Davis, South Central Laboratory Director US Drug Enforcement Administration Dallas, TX Mr. Darrell L. Davis is the Laboratory Director of The Drug Enforcement Administration’s, (DEA) South Central Laboratory. Mr. Davis career began in 1979, as a graduate from Prairie View A & M University where he received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemistry. He accepted a position as a forensic chemist with DEA’s Southwest Laboratory in San Diego, California. As a forensic chemist, Davis was responsible for analyzing seized evidence for the presence of controlled substances. Mr. Davis was also qualified as an expert witness in over 10 states. After leaving the Southwest Laboratory in 1988, Mr. Davis transferred to the South Central Laboratory in Dallas, Texas where he was promoted to Senior Forensic Chemist. Davis was a leader in the laboratory as an expert in the seizure of clandestine laboratories. Additionally, he trained law enforcement personnel and state and local chemists in the manufacture of control substances. After two years in Dallas, Mr. Davis was promoted to Supervisory Chemist at the Northeast Laboratory in New York City, New York. There he was responsible for supervising over 10 employees. He later transferred to the Office of Forensic Sciences in Arlington, Virginia, and served as a Program Manager until he accepted his current position. Mr. Davis has received numerous awards which includes; 2 Outstanding Contributions, 3 Sustained Superior Performance, 2 Special Act or Service, 1 Outstanding performance, and a host of other recognition awards from DEA and other organizations. Mr. Davis was recently honored by the Black Engineers of the Year for Professional Achievement. The DEA’s laboratory system is recognized worldwide as the premier forensic drug laboratory. Mr. Davis takes great pride in being Laboratory Director of the DEA’s South Central Laboratory.

93


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Quintet Bryant, Customs and Border Protection, Southwest Science Center, Houston, TX Mrs. Bryant is currently a Forensic Scientist for the Customs and Border Protection’s Southwest Regional Science Center, located in Houston, TX. She has been with the laboratory since 2008, where she serves as their primary controlled substances analyst. Prior to that, she held a position as a Forensic Chemist with DEA’s Mid‐Atlantic Laboratory, located in Largo, MD. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry/Biochemistry from Tennessee State University, Nashville, Tennessee. Quintet also received her Master of Science degree in Forensic Toxicology from The University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Her interests include mentoring young females and all things Forensic.

Marie Prince, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX An alumna of Tennessee State University, Mrs. Prince has earned my Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry with a minor in Business. She has worked within the Nutriceutical and Pharmaceutical industries within a quality assurance and quality control environment as a chemist. There, she had obtained experience within analytical chemistry and hands on application with instrumentation such as High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Dissolution testing of pharmaceutical tablets. Thereafter, Mrs. Prince had taken on the interest in utilizing her education, experience, and skills obtained for the benefit of serving our communities. She is currently a Forensic Chemist for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) South Central Laboratory in Dallas, Texas. She performs qualitative and quantitative analysis for the presence of controlled substances by analytical and instrumental techniques and testifies in state and federal courts to such findings. Furthermore, she provides field assistance to law enforcement by conducting field testing with clandestine laboratories and Trace Evidence Collection. Mrs. Prince currently serves as primary Coordinator for the South Central Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program in assuring the upmost quality within evidence analysis within our laboratory system.

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CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office, Houston, TX Dr. Charlotte Smith‐Baker is a Toxicologist for the Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office. Dr. Baker received her Ph.D. degree in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Southern University. She also holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from Sam Houston State University and a Master of Science degree in Chemistry from Texas Southern University. Her love is forensic science. Her love for forensics took form when she completed an internship with the Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office in the Toxicology laboratory. The internship facilitated her ability to collaborate with the Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office for her dissertation entitled “Hair as an Indicator of Exposure to Pesticides”. Dr. Baker has won numerous honors and awards such as the Procter and Gamble Fellowship Award, and the Agilent Technologies Graduate Development Fellowship. She has also received the Research Centers Minority Institutes Graduate Research Assistantship and Ph.D. Environmental Toxicology Fellowship. Dr. Baker was an Environmental Medicine Rotation Program Fellow for CDC/ATSDR through the Association of Minority Health Professions Schools. She has also been an invited speaker for the Young Forensic Science Forum/American Academy of Forensic Science for the past three years.

Friday, pm

Science Competition Awards Luncheon 11:45 am ‐ 1:45 pm Sponsored by ACS

Featured Speaker:

Dr. Thomas H. Lane, Vice President Iinstruction & Learning Services ,Delta College

Grand Ballroom AB

Dr. Thomas H. Lane is currently the Vice President of Instruction & Learning Services at Delta College. Dr. Lane is the former Chairman of the Board and served as member of the Delta College Board of Trustees. Prior to his current position, Dr. Lane worked for Dow Corning Corporation and retired after 35 years with his final role being, Director of Global Science and Technology Outreach and Senior Research Scientist. He is currently Scientist Emeritus for the company. Dr. Lane has over thirty‐three years of research experience in the field of organosilicon chemistry. He received his undergraduate chemistry education at Purdue University, a master’s degree from Central Michigan University and his Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from the Open University in England. Tom’s work has allowed him to make significant contributions to the field in the areas of interfacial science, scientific computing, and most recently in the biology and biotechnology of silicon. He holds academic 95


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS positions in both the US and abroad. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and served as President of the American Chemical Society, the largest scientific society in the world, in 2008. Today, Dr. Lane’s primary focus is education and putting a human face to chemistry.

Friday, pm

Award Symposium 5 The Winifred Burks‐Houck Womenʹs Leadership Symposium 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

335AB

Dr. Mae C. Jemison blasted into orbit aboard the space shuttle Endeavour, September 12, 1992, the worldʹs first woman of color to go into space and the city of Chicagoʹs first astronaut in U.S. history. Mae Jemison attended Stanford University and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering, and fulfilled the requirements for an A.B.in African and Afro‐American studies. She completed her medical doctorate at Cornell University. Dr. Jemison was a General Practitioner in Los Angeles with the INA/Ross Loos Medical Group, and then spent 2 ½ years as Area Peace Corps medical officer for Sierra Leone and Liberia in West Africa. Jemison formed The Jemison Group, Inc., a technology design and consulting company. Dr. Jemison joined NASA in 1987. As an astronaut, Jemison had assignments as a liaison between the astronaut corps and launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, served on the human research protocol board, tested the software that operates the shuttle and flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour Spacelab Japan mission—the first joint mission with the Japanese Space Agency. After six years, she resigned from NASA in in 1993 and founded The Jemison Group, Inc. Honors and awards include induction into the National Womenʹs Hall of Fame; selection as one of the People magazinesʹ 1993 ʺWorldʹs 50 Most Beautiful Peopleʺ; Johnson Publications Black Achievement Trailblazers Award; the Kilby Science Award; National Medical Association Hall of Fame; selection as a Montgomery Fellow, Dartmouth College; and numerous honorary doctorates.

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CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Symposium 3

Friday, pm

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm 338 NanoVation: Innovation in Nanoscience sponsored by Defense Threat Reduction Agency Kwame Owusu‐Adom, Ph.D., 3M Corporate Research Materials Laboratory

Kwame Owusu‐Adom was born in Ghana and emigrated to the United States as a High School student. He received his BS degree in Chemical Engineering from Oregon State University in June, 2003. In December 2008, he completed his doctoral degree in Chemical Engineering with a focus on photopolymerizable polymer nanocomposites from the University of Iowa. Kwame joined 3M Company in January 2009 as a Senior Research Engineer in the Corporate Research Materials Laboratory. His current research is focused on developing new chemistries and products that a derived from bio‐renewable resources. Kwame joined NOBCChE in 2005 as a graduate student at the University of Iowa, where he was one of the founding members of that chapter. He is also a member of the American Chemical Society.

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Meet the 2011 NATIONAL PLANNING COMMITTEE

Sharon L. Kennedy, PhD Conference Chair

Dedun Adeyemo

Student Development

Henry Beard

Felicia Beard

Registration Chair

Career Fair

Cassandra Broadus Career Fair

Michael Cato Workshops

Martin Codrington

Darrell L. Davis

Linda Davis

Anthony Dent, PhD

Derry Haywood

Communications Chair

New Business Development

New Business Development

Secondary Education Chair

Talitha Hampton‐Mayo

William Jackson, ,PhD

Alvin Kennedy Sr,PhD

Dale Mack

Tech. Program Chair

Speakers

HBCU/MI Chair

New Bus. Devel. & Career Fair Chair

Communications‐PR

Victor McCrary, PhD New Business Development‐Chair

Dale G. Wesson,PhD HBCU/MI

Sherine Obare, PhD Science Fair/Science Bowl Chair

Angela Winstead, PhD Student Development Chair

Ramsey Smith, PhD

Olamide Shadiya

Workshops Chair

Student Development

Arthur Martin, PhD Awards Chair

Subuola Sofolahan HBCU/MI


NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEES Committee

Committee Chair

Committee Members

Awards

Arthur Martin, PhD

Calvin James, PhD

Corning Inc

Lubrizol

Tyrone Mitchell, PhD National Science Foundation

Jimmy Williams, PhD Corning Incorporated

Communications

Anthony Dent, PhD

Martin Codrington-Lead for PR

Retired, PQ Corporation

Graduate Student-University of Texas

Sandra Mitchell Retired

Career Fair

Dale Mack

Cassandra Broadus

Morehouse School of Medicine

Morehouse School of Medicine

Henry Beard Temple University

Keith Oden, PhD Georgia Institute of Technology

HBCU/MI Forum

Alvin Kennedy, PhD

G. Dale Wesson PhD, PE

Morgan State University

SC State University

Subuola Sofolahan Graduate Student

Meeting Planning & Logistics

Tim O’Neill (Meeting Planner) Leading Edge Marketing and Planning, Inc.

Patty Blanchard, Onsite Staff Leading Edge Marketing and Planning, Inc

Pattie O’Neill, Onsite Staff Leading Edge Marketing and Planning, Inc

New Business Development

Victor McCrary, PhD

Cassandra Broadus

Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory

Morehouse School of Medicine

Darrell Davis Committee for Program Action Services (CAPS)

Derry Haywood The Peninsula Financial Group

Dale Mack Morehouse School of Medicine

100


NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEES Committee

Committee Chair

Committee Members

Registration

Felicia Beard

Montez Bell

Dow Chemical Company

Spellman College

Brenda Brown-Onsite San Diego Unified School District

Bernice Green, Lead for Internet Spellman College

Shirley Hall-Onsite Retiree, San Diego City Government

Dorothy Haynes -Onsite Retiree, Rohm and Haas Chemical Company

Celeste Tidwell -Onsite San Diego Unified School District

Renee Williams -Onsite Graduate Student-University of California, Davis

Secondary Education

Linda Davis

Sheila Turner

Committee for Program Action Services (CAPS)

Marine Corp Recruit Depot

Science Fair/ Science Bowl

Sherine Obare, PhD

Ronald Lewis, II, PhD

Western Michigan University

Pfizer Global Research and Development

Richelle Beverly, PhD Kellogg Company

Jill Henderson Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools

Steven Thomas Michigan State University

Fletcher Daniels Michigan State University

Special Programs

Student Support

Rebecca Tinsley, PhD

Williams Jackson, PhD

Colgate Palmolive

University of California, Davis

Angela Winstead, PhD

Adedunni Adeyemo

Morgan State University

Graduate Student – The Ohio State University

Olamide Shadiya, PhD Graduate Student

Technical Program Professional Development Workshops

Talitha Hampton

Kwame Owusu-Adom, PhD

Merck & Co, Inc

3M Corporation

Ramsey Smith, PhD

Michael Cato

NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center

Graduate Student – Jackson State University

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NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEES

102


INDEX OF TECHNICAL PRESENTERS D

A Abebe, Fasil Abernathy, Shawn M.; Abia, Irene E. Adley, Atiereya Agwaramgbo, Eucharia Agwaramgbo, Lovell Ahamed, Rayaj A. Aiken, Karelle Archer, Lynden A Assefa, Zerihun Ayitou, Anoklase J. Ayorinde, Folahan O

48, 53 46 23 20 20 20 22 22 55 18, 49 51 53

Dada, Emmanuel Das, Susmita Davis , Steven R Davis, Ella Davis, Zenda D. Dayie, Kwaku Dayie, T. Kwaku de Rooy, Sergio Deveaux, Kristina Downing, Domonique O Dumancas, Gerard G. Duraj, Stan E

B Bairu, Semere Baker, David C Balliet, Courtney Banerjee, Sujit Bernstein, Noam Best, Michael D. Blavo, Selasi O. Booker, Squire Brown, Jamie L. Brown, Milton Bryant, Sherrisse K. Butcher, Ray J Butts, DeMario

48 23 15 51 55 23 15 48 52 21 17 16 47

Edwards, Shelby Effiong, Esther Eichhorn, Bryan W El‐Zahab, Bilal El‐Zahab, Bilal; Eniola‐Adefeso, Omolola Eribal, Carla Sue Erinne, John D. Esekhile, Omoyemen

20 19 51 22, 48, 55 21 23 53 15 46

F Fernand , Vivian Fields, Gregg B Floyd‐Smith Fontenot, Krystal Forbes, Safiyyah Ford, Robert

C Cato Jr., Michael A. Clark, Thomas D. Colbert, Maru Cole, Marsha R. Coleman, Sherman Collins, George Crawford, Carlos Cunningham, Brian

15 17, 22, 55 45 56 46 45 44 22, 55 22 51 16 52

55 55 44 21 20 43 49 43

47 47 55 23 22 20

G Gamwo, Isaac K. Garner, Robert N. Garrett, Brian Gerwick, B. Clifford 103

52 48 46 49


INDEX OF TECHNICAL PRESENTERS Gessner, Laura Ghebreab, Michael Gilman, S. Douglass Gundel, Lara Guymon, Allan

22 53 17 44 54

L Lauer, Janelle L. Lester, Jr., William A. Li, Min Lin, J. S. Liu, Zhufang Lodge, Alexander London, Laurenee Long, Tiffany

H Hanwell, Marcus D. Harkless, John A. W. Harris, Clifton; Harris, Tracee Henken, Rachel L Hepp, Aloysius Hollingsworth, Javoris V. Hosten, Charles M Hutchison, Geoffrey R

18 18 15 17 17 52 46 16 18

M Madison, Tamika A Matthews, Jason S Maxwell, Kendra McCall, Alecia M McCoy, Rhonda McCrary, Victor McCullough, Richard D McCune, Mallarie D. McDonald, Norris Meades, Jr., Glen; Mercadel, Chanel Millener, Delmetria Miller, Stephanie Mishra, Sarada P. Moore, Roderquita Morrow, Agnes Muhammad, Ruqiah

J Jackson, William Janes, Marlene E Jemison, Racquel ; Jemison, Mae C. Jenkins, Darkus Johnson, Nikki Johnson, Rene Jones, Jockquin Jones, Wanda D. Jordan, Atiya N.

15 21 15 56 18 53 53 46 55 17

18 48 51 22 16 56 15 15 19 17 20 45 52 15 16 19 53

N

K Kabir, Mohd A Kakambi, Sandra L.N. Kalu, Egwu E Kamat, Prashant V Katz, Howard E. Kimani, Mary W. Kirksey, Veniece Klanecky, David Kotanchek, Theresa Kuhn, John N. Kulp III, John L

47 45 21, 22, 48, 55 52 51 23 20 23

Ndinguri, Margaret

52 21 23 15 48 16 43 49 49 15 55

47

O Obare, Sherine Obot, Edidiong C. Ogunwumi, Steven Ojinnaka, Eleanor Okemgbo , Asopuru Okemgbo, Kaetochi Oliver, Nyote J. 104

51 54 16 43 20 44 16


INDEX OF TECHNICAL PRESENTERS Ornelas, Martha Ortiz, Deborah Owens, Tracie Owusu‐Adom, Kwame

Smith, Bradley D Smith, Natalee Smith, Ramsey Smith, Robert Soper, Steven A Sundaresan, Alamelu Sykora, Richard

21 16 18 54

P Palmer, Andre F Powell, Marvin Purdie, Neil

47 45 16

T

23

Tan, Yafang Tatarchuk, Bruce J Thakur, Chandar S Thomas, Gloria Thomas, Renard L. Thompson, Kirk Turro, Claudia

Q Quinn, Daniel R Ramakrishna, Guda Regmi, Bishnu Reilly, Lisa Richard, Allison J. Riga, Alan Robinson, Renã A. S. Rolle, Clarence Rollins, Derrick Ross, Shailise Russo, Paul S.

48 55 16 46 52 17 53 24 22 46

43 46 44 56 54 49 48

V Veals, Jeffrey D Vicente, M. Graça H Vivoni, Alberto

45 22, 23, 46 16

W Waldrop, Grover L. Walker , Tameka, M., Warner, Isiah M. Waterman, R Williams, Cynthia Williams, Jennifer Williams, Regina Wilson, Bobby L Winstead, Angela Wright, Ashleigh R.

S Sabree, Aqeeb Saleh, Mahmoud Sama, Jacob N. Samuels, Tova Sanchez, Maria; Sanders, Brian Setzer, William Sidheswaran, Meera Sinn, Ekkehard Sintim, Herman O. Sivaguru, J

22 53 52 52 16 54 49

53 20 44 51 15 23 21 44 48, 53 45 51

17 21 17, 21, 22, 48, 55 53 17 52 44 54 44 48

Z Zhang, Bo

105

48


About NOBCChE

The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) resulted from an April 1972 Ad Hoc Committee for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers. The committee was assisted financially by a grant of $850 provided by the Haas Community Fund, and a $400 grant administered through Drexel University. NOBCChE was incorporated in 1975 under the laws of the State of Georgia and has tax-exempt status (501(c )(3)) as a non-profit professional society. Since its inception, NOBCChE has grown in size to approximately 4,000 members, who are distributed over five regions – Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest, and West – that contain both professional and student chapters. NOBCChE’s first national meeting was held in March 1974 in New Orleans. Dr. William Guillory, one of NOBCChE’s seven founders, was elected the first President at that meeting. The organization has held national meetings every year since then. The national meetings provide opportunities for Black chemists and chemical engineers to discuss issues of significance to their careers, to present technical papers, to mentor high school students, undergraduates and graduate students in the areas of science and technology, and to present several fellowships to deserving graduate students. The first graduate fellowship was established by the Proctor & Gamble Company in 1976. This was followed in 1980 by the Kodak Fellowship Award and in 1990 by the DuPont Company Fellowship Award. In recent years additional graduate fellowships have been established by GlaxoSmithKline, and the Dow Chemical Company. A new joint National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) - University of Maryland – NOBCChE fellowship began in 2007. To date, more than one million dollars have been distributed through these fellowships. In addition, national meetings serve as occasions to recognize professional members through the Percy L. Julian Professional Achievement Award and the Dr. Henry C. McBay Outstanding Teacher Award. Professor McBay, who was one of NOBCChE’s seven founders, taught chemistry at Morehouse College until his death at the age of 80. NOBCChE also administers the Henry A. Hill Lectureship sponsored by the Northeast Section of the American Chemical Society. NOBCChE is committed to the discovery, transmittal, and application of knowledge in the fields of science and engineering. The mission of NOBCChE therefore is to build an eminent community of scientists and engineers by increasing the number of minorities in these fields. NOBCChE attempts to achieve its mission through diverse programs designed to foster professional development and encourage students to pursue careers in science and technical fields. To this end, NOBCChE has established educational partnerships with school districts, municipalities, businesses, industries, other institutions and organizations in the public and private sectors. For more information, visit the NOBCChE website at www.nobcche.org.


Future National Annual Conferences

2012 Washington, DC September 25 – 28, 2012 Washington ‐ Marriott Wardman Park 2660 Woodley Road NW ∙ Washington, District Of Columbia 20008

This downtown Washington, DC resortʹs accommodations include 1,189 guest rooms and 125 suites. 195,000 sq ft of Flexible meeting space makes this Washington, DC resort ideal for metro‐area meetings. This family friendly resort features a great place to unwind with beautiful gardens, outdoor heated swimming pool and sundeck.

2013 Indianapolis, Indiana October 1‐4, 2013 JW Marriott Indianapolis 10 S West Street Indianapolis, Indiana 46204 Considered the crown jewel of the $450 million Marriott Place, the JW Marriott Indianapolis Downtown is a landmark amid the development of five Marriott hotels connected to the Indiana Convention Center. The JW Marriott Indianapolis features and 104,000 square feet of meeting, banquet and exhibit space, 1,005 modern guest rooms on 33 floors making us the tallest hotel in the state.

Please note the seasonal change from Spring to Fall for National Annual Conferences will start with the 2012 meeting in Washington, DC.


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