Issuu on Google+

th

The 37  Annual Technology Conference of   The National Organization for the Professional  Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

Conference Program Book

Atlanta Marriott Marquis Hotel      

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS   Welcome Letters      Hotel Layout 

iii

xii

  Conference Sponsors   

1

Conference at a Glance   

4

 

NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund    Program Schedule (Detailed)     NOBCChE 2010 Career Fair Exhibitors     Forum and Workshop Abstracts   Conference Speakers    National Conference Planning Committee   National Conference Planning Committee Subcommittees  

10 13

55

59 71 97 98


CITY OF ATLANTA KASIMREED

55 TRINITY AVE, S.W ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30335D300

MAYOR TEL (404) 330.6100

March 29, 2010 Dr. Victor McCrary President NOBCChE P.O. Box 77040

Washington, DC 20013-77480

Greetings: As Mayor of Atlanta, it is my pleasure to welcome the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE), as you celebrate your 37th Annual NOBCChE Conference. Throughout the years, NOBCChE has been committed to preparing a future generation of young minorities for careers in science and technology. This year's event, "NOBCChE 2010 Sustainability" provides a unique occasion for leading members ofNOBCChE to come together, network, and actively exchange ideas in a profound way, focusing on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Your diligence and commitment to promoting excellence in leadership, knowledge and networking awareness enriches the lives of NOBCChE members and ignites their desire to become leaders in the global community. We salute your efforts and endeavors to mold and support our future leaders. While in our city, we encourage first time visitors to explore the many attractions Atlanta has to offer including: the Martin L. King Jr. Center, the Apex Museum, Underground Atlanta, the Georgia Aquarium, the World of Coca-Cola, CNN Center, Centennial Olympic Park, Woodruff Arts Center, Atlanta Botanical Garden, Children's Museum of Atlanta and many more. We invite you to share in our southern hospitality, sample cuisine at our many fme restaurants and enjoy the rich and diverse heritage of our city. On behalf of the people of Atlanta, I extend best wishes to you for a memorable and remarkable event! Sincerely,

Mayor


February 16, 2010

Greetings National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) from the Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau! We are delighted to welcome NOBCChE to Atlanta. I would like to personally wish you and your attendees a successful and enjoyable stay in our great city. Atlanta boasts a variety of new developments aimed at enhancing the experience of our visitors. The Georgia Aquarium opened in late 2005 and is the largest and most elaborate in the nation with more than 100,000 fish and mammals in over 8 million gallons of water. The new World of Coca-Cola relocated and expanded to a new 75,000 sq. ft. attraction adjacent to the Aquarium. Combined, these new facilities have attracted close to 10 million visitors in the past three years. The High Museum of Art also opened a new wing in 2005, doubling its size, and launched an unprecedented partnership with the Louvre Museum in Paris. Looking ahead, Atlanta will open the Civil and Human Rights Museum at Centennial Park in 2012 and the National Health Museum in 2013. These are just a few of the exciting things that are taking place in Atlanta. World-class restaurants, a festive nightlife, four major league sports teams and an abundance of cultural attractions and events make our city the epicenter of entertainment in the South. Our diverse restaurants feature cuisine from around the globe prepared by renowned chefs and served in an endless array of ambience and dĂŠcor. Atlanta is truly an international city! We know that the facilities, accessibility, and an exciting destination are important considerations for the 2010 NOBCChE Annual Conference. Let me assure you that Atlanta offers the best in each of these categories. Once again, we extend a warm southern hospitality welcome to you and your attendees. We wish you a successful conference and hope you will consider returning to Atlanta in the future.

Sincerely,

William Pate President & CEO Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF President Victor McCrary, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Labs Baltimore, MD

Dear NOBCChE 2010 Conferees: I would like to welcome you to Atlanta, Georgia, and the 37th NOBCChE Annual Conference of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, (NOBCChE). This year’s conference promises to be our most exciting and rewarding one yet, and I especially welcome the new student and professional members. For more than 40 years, NOBCChE has been recognized as one of the world’s truly great student and professional organizations. It has drawn men and women from across the country to meet, network, and exchange ideas that have had an important imprint on the growth and development of its members, the academy, and the disciplines of chemistry, chemical engineering, and other STEM fields. Various National Science Foundation reports have documented a decline in the number of BS graduates in STEM fields over the past ten years. During this period, a concerted national effort to improve participation by minorities and other underrepresented groups has shown some progress; however, in most STEM fields, minorities remain underrepresented. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data indicate that the white male population, who has traditionally filled the U.S. employment needs, as a percentage of overall population, is declining and will continue to decline in the future. Therefore, there is a need to increase the available pool of minorities, who will be able to assume positions in the STEM fields. NOBCChE’s mission “to build an eminent cadre of people of color in science and technology” is certainly designed to help address this very important national need. This year’s theme “Sustainability in Science, Engineering and Policy and Next Generation Technologies in Science and Engineering” offers students and other experts the opportunity to make presentations on a variety of germane issues. The conference and its host city promise an engaging and successful experience in Atlanta during the week of the conference. I thank you for your continued support and attendance at NOBCChE’s Annual Technology Conferences

Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, PhD, MBA/HRM The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX Treasurer Dale Mack, BS, RSO Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Dedun Adeyemo, BS Ohio State University Columbus, OH Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Eastman Kodak Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson, BS Merck Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison, BS, MS Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX

Sincerely,

Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chair Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Ella Davis, BS NOBCChE Executive Director Center Square, PA Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA

Bobby L. Wilson, Ph.D., Chairman NOBCChE Executive Board

Bernice Green, BS, Member at Large Spelman College Atlanta, GA Sharon Kennedy, PhD, National Planning Chair Colgate Palmolive Cincinnati, OH Isiah Warner, Ph.D., Member at Large Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA Filomena Califano, PhD., Member at Large St. Francis College New York, NY

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013-77480 800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org


N BCChE

National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF President Victor McCrary, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Physics Labs Baltimore, MD

March 2010 Victor R. McCrary, Ph.D. NOBCChE National President Welcome to Atlanta! The mission of NOBCChE is to build an eminent cadre of people of color in science and technology. The theme for this year’s Annual Meeting is “Sustainability”, and it aligns well with the mission of our organization. According to the Department of Energy, 40% of our Nation’s energy demand is for electrical power, but only 5% comes from renewable energy sources. For the Department of Defense, there is an urgent need to find new battery technologies that offer greater energy densities, performance, and decreased weight over the conventional 5590 lithium battery. Chemists, chemical engineers, and technologists from all disciplines are needed to develop sustainable green energy sources, advanced battery & energy storage platforms, and ecologically-friendly management of the natural resources for our Nation and the world. Therefore the concept of sustainability is also critical in ensuring there is a steady stream of professionals and students in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines to meet these global challenges.   

NOBCChE has programs that sustain the number of underrepresented minority K-12 students interested in science and technology. NOBCChE has programs that sustain the scientific research infrastructure in HBCUs/MIs such that students can go on to graduate school or enter the workforce with the skills and the confidence to bring forth new ideas and innovations. NOBCChE has programs that sustain our recognition of professionals, students, and government and industry leaders who support the mission and vision of NOBCChE by virtue of their technical accomplishments and demonstrated commitment towards helping others pursue successful careers in science and engineering.

We come together in Atlanta as that eminent cadre; a community of distinguished scientists and engineers as well as a future generation of technologists to celebrate the accomplishments of our organization and affirm our sustainable mission and vision. I invite you to attend our Town Hall where we will discuss the State of the Organization and our vision “NOBCChE 2012: Creating the Cadre – Science for All Americans”. We will present a plan for NOBCChE for the next two years; including highlights on our National Headquarters Initiative. Thanks to you all: our attendees, sponsors, members, advocates, and friends for your continued and sustained support of NOBCChE and its mission. Enjoy this year’s Annual Meeting and Atlanta; we look forward to seeing you again in Houston in 2011!!!

Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, PhD, MBA/HRM The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX Treasurer Dale Mack, BS, RSO Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Dedun Adeyemo, BS Ohio State University Columbus, OH Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Eastman Kodak Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson, BS Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison, BS, MS Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chair Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Ella Davis, BS NOBCChE Executive Director Center Square, PA   Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA Bernice Green, BS, Member at Large Spelman College Atlanta, GA Sharon Kennedy, PhD, National Planning Co-Chair Colgate Palmolive Cincinnati, OH Isiah Warner, Ph.D., Member at Large Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

Best Always, Victor R. McCrary

Dr. Filomena Califano, PhD., Member at Large St. Francis College New York, New York

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013-77480 800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org


N BCChE

National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

Sandra K. Parker NOBCChE National Conference Chair It is with great anticipation that I welcome each of you to our 2010 national conference. I can say with confidence that we have something for everyone this year. Whether you’re a high school student or teacher, new graduate or working professional, this annual meeting will meet your expectations. We are excited to be in Atlanta as we celebrate Sustainability. We are introducing many new programs at this year’s conference with new sessions for our Professionals, and featuring a new Winifred Burks-Houck Women's Professional Leadership Symposium, dedicated in memory of a past National President of NOBCChE. We are also making a commitment as we move forward with future conferences to reach out into the Communities in which our conferences are held. This year we will be sending professionals from NOBCChE to targeted Middle and High Schools for presentations. Once again, we will have our Career Expo, where several companies, academic institutions and organizations will be available to discuss career choices and job opportunities. It’s a chance for all attendees to meet future employers and mentors -- undergraduate/graduate students preparing to enter the workforce or seek higher education, professionals who are looking for career changes, and high school students finalizing college choices and validating their educational goals with science or engineering. We exist primarily to support the process of preparing young people to excel academically and to pursue careers in science and technology. So, we thank all the registrants, sponsors and supporters of NOBCChE for making this conference a reality. Atlanta, lovingly known as HOTLANTA, a city where great civil rights activist come from and a state where GEORGIA IS ON MY MIND provides a wonderful backdrop for us to come together to commit to improving the skills we possess and forwarding the chemical profession. On a personal note, I have enjoyed chairing this National Conference for the last 3 years and will be handing over the baton to Sharon Kennedy, PhD with ColgatePalmolive. I’m confident she will take this conference to the next level with her leadership. Enjoy the conference! Sincerely,

President Victor McCrary, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Labs Baltimore, MD Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, PhD, MBA/HRM The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX Treasurer Dale Mack, BS, RSO Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Dedun Adeyemo, BS Ohio State University Columbus, OH Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Eastman Kodak Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson, BS Merck Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison, BS, MS Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chair Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Ella Davis, BS NOBCChE Executive Director Center Square, PA   Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA Bernice Green, BS, Member at Large Spelman College Atlanta, GA Sharon Kennedy, PhD, National Planning Co-Chair Colgate Palmolive Cincinnati, OH Isiah Warner, Ph.D., Member at Large Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

Sandra K. Parker

Filomena Califano, PhD., Member at Large St. Francis College New York, NY

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013-77480 800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org


I think

a totally transformed hotel is a destination in itself.

Rediscover. Atlanta Marriott Marquis The Atlanta Marriott® Marquis welcomes the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers and invites one and all to experience our destination hotel. The Spa and state-of-the-art Fitness Center. Five themed restaurants and lounges. A 50-foot color changing sail. Amazing skyline views. All just minutes from sporting venues and Atlanta attractions. Experience a hotel like you’ve never seen.

For reservations or to book your next event, call 404-521-0000 or visit atlantamarquis.com.

© 2010 Marriott International, Inc.

MHAM-153_resize.indd 1

2/24/10 3:02 PM


HOTEL LAYOUT  

Lobby Level Meeting Rooms  L505  L504 

             


HOTEL LAYOUT  

  M301  M302  M303  M304   

Marquis Level Meeting Rooms  Imperial Ballroom  M101  M103  M102  M104  M107  M105    M106  Marquis Ballroom 


HOTEL LAYOUT  

  International Level Meeting Rooms  Science Bowl  Science Fair 

         


Many backgrounds. Many cultures. Many perspectives.

One World. One Merck.

At Merck we embrace the individual differences each of us bring to the world. We believe that with the collective backgrounds, experiences and talents of our employees, anything can be conquered. It is those unique qualities that give us perspective to spark innovation and address unmet medical needs of people throughout the world. Our professional culture is one of diverse, collaborative and respectful individuals. Together we help deliver Merck medicines to those who need them, impacting lives all around the globe. If you’re ready to find your place in the world of Merck, learn more about us and see employee video profiles at merckcareers.jobs/nobcche.

Merck is an equal opportunity employer— proudly embracing diversity in all of its manifestations.


CONFERENCE SPONSORS  

Our Sponsors Thank You for Contributing to the Overall Success of our conference – we salute you!

********

3M  American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  Agilent Technologies  American Chemical Society  Atlanta Metropolitan Chapter – NOBCChE  Auburn University  Boehringer Ingelheim  Brazoria County Area Chapter – NOBCChE  Centers for Disease Control (CDC)  Cherokee Pharmaceuticals   Colgate‐Palmolive Company  Committee for Action Program Services (CAPS)  Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists (COACh)  Corning Corporation  Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA)  The Dow Chemical Company  Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)  DuPont  Eastman Kodak Company  1


CONFERENCE SPONSORS   Eli Lilly & Company  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)  Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)  Georgia Institut of Technology  GlaxoSmithKline  The Johns Hopkins University – Applied Physics Laboratory  Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories  The Lubrizol Corporation  Merck & Company  MIT Chemistry & Chemical Engineering  Morehouse School of Medicine  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)  Norfolk State University  Northeast Section – American Chemical Society  National institute of Standards & Technologies (NIST)  Office of Naval Research   Procter & Gamble  Roche  University of Maryland College Park  University Pennsylvania –   Executive Masters of Technology Management Program (EMTM) 

University of Washington CENTC, Seattle, WA  Washington University in St. Louis  Xavier University NSF Chemistry Division REU  2


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE   Date 

Description 

Day /Time  Sunday,  March 28 

Room  Event 

Room Location 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

  COACh Workshop: Professional Skills  Training for Minority Graduate Students and  Postdocs (registration required) 

L504  

8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

  COACh Workshop: Making Change: Being  Strategic in Uncertain Waters (registration  required) 

L505 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Conference Registration 

Marquis Level 

 

 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

  Conference Registration   

Marquis Level 

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. 

NOBCChE Executive Board Meeting 

M101 

12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:30 p.m. 

  Henry Hill Luncheon   Dr. Joseph Francisco, President, American  Chemical Society, Guest Speaker (ticketed) 

Imperial 

2:00 p.m. ‐ 3:00 p.m. 

  Plenary 1 Opening Session    

M301 

  Monday,  March 29   

3:30 p.m. ‐‐ 6:00 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m.. 

Georgia Institute of Technology Technical Session 

Technical Session 1: Organic Chemistry   Georgia Institute of Technology Technical Session 

Technical Session 2: Analytical and  Environmental Chemistry 

3

M102 

M105 


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE   4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Award Symposium 1: The Winifred Burks‐ Houck Womenʹs Leadership Symposium:   Women of Color Reshaping our Economy  through Science  

M106 

6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m. 

Opening Reception 

Skyline 

  Tuesday,  March 30    7:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.  8:00 a.m. ‐ 6:30 p.m.  8:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m.  

Teachersʹ Workshop 

M106 & 107 

Conference Registration  Plenary II: Percy Julian Lecture 

Marquis Level  M101 

Corning Technical Session 

9:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

Award Symposium 2: Henry McBay Outstanding  Teacher Award Symposium:  STEM Education 

    M101 

 

Corning Technical Session 

9:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m.  9:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:30 p.m. 

Technical Session 3: Chemical Engineering  Corning Technical Sessions 

Technical Session 4: Physical Chemistry    Percy Julian Symposium & Luncheon (ticketed) 

      M102       M105 

Imperial 

Speaker: Dr. Michael Kassner, Office of Naval Research  

1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m. 

Award Symposium 3: Lloyd Ferguson Young  Scientist Award Symposium:  Materials  Chemistry 

     M101 

1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m. 

 Technical Session 5: Biochemistry 

     M105 

1:45 p.m. ‐ 5:45 p.m. 

1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m. 

 Forensic Workshop:   “The Chemistry of Crime” sponsored by the  DEA, CBP and DHS  Professional Development Workshop:   ʺStand Out at a Professional Conferenceʺ  sponsored by ACS and NOBCChE  4

M103 & M104 

M102 


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE   4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:45 p.m.  Technical Session 6: Next Generation Technologies 

M105 

Professional Development Workshop:  4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:45 p.m.  “Here is What It Takes to Find a Job”   sponsored by Procter & Gamble  Professional Development Workshop:  “Funding Opportunities for Students and  4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:45 p.m.  Professionals“  sponsored by AAAS and NIST 

M102 

M109 

5:00 p.m. ‐‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Exhibitors Meeting 

6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m. 

Exhibitorʹs Welcome Reception 

Wednesday, March 31 

    

7:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Teacherʹs Workshop II

M106 & 107 

7:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

Conference Registration 

Marquis Level

7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.  9:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.   

10:00 a.m. ‐ 12:00 p.m. 

9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. ‐ 10:00 a.m. 

9:00 am. ‐‐ 11:00 a.m. 

M303  M 301 & 302    

Plenary III: NOBCChE Program Initiatives  Breakfast (ticketed)    CAREER FAIR EXPO   

Collegiate Poster Set Up  Chemistry & Chemical Engineering HBCU/MI  Chairs Council Forum

Chemistry at the National Science Foundation:  New Programs, Funding Opportunities and  Outreach    Professional Development Workshop:  ʺAcademia:  What Are Your Optionsʺ 

10:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m. 

Professional Development Workshop: ʺThe Internship:  The Practice Field of  Professional Trainingʺ 

12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:00 p.m. 

LUNCH ON YOUR OWN  5

Imperial  Marquis  Ballroom 

Marquis  Ballroom  M302 

M102 

M105 

M103  Hotel 


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE   Science Competition Registration 

1:00 p.m. ‐‐ ‐‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Marquis Level 

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Professional Development Workshop:  ʺAn Introduction to Project Managementʺ 

M102 

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Professional Development Workshop: ʺHermannʹs Whole Brain Thinking Model ‐  Understand Thinking Styles.ʺ 

M103 

Professional Development Workshop: ʺFinancial Strategies: Your Professional  STEMulus Packageʺ

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.  4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.    6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:30 p.m. 

M105 

  Collegiate Scientific Exchange Poster Session  sponsored by Colgate Palmolive    Science Bowl/Fair Volunteers’  Meeting    Science Competition Opening  Meeting and Dinner 

Marquis  Ballroom  Imperial  Imperial 

 

8:30 p.m. ‐‐ 9:00 p.m. 

Science Fair Poster setup 

International level 

  Thursday,  April 1   

  

  

7:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m. 

Science Fair Judging  

International level 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 1:00 p.m 

Conference Registration    Award Symposium 4: Undergraduate  Research Competition Program    Professional Development Workshop: ʺMaking an Impact on Your Research Project:   Lessons from the Benchʺ 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 10:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 10:00 a.m. 

Meeting with Atlanta Middle and High  School Students  6

Marquis Level  M101 

M102 

International B 


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE   10:00 a.m.‐ 12:30 p.m. 

Georgia Institute of Technology Tour and   Panel Discussion 

(off‐site) 

10:00 a.m. ‐‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Science Fair Public Viewing 

International level 

11:00 a.m. ‐12:00 p.m. 

  Plenary IV: Nigerian Society of Chemical  Engineers Presentation   

M101 

10:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

Science Bowl Competitions: Junior  Division++  sponsored by Agilent Technologies and ACS  Department of Diversity Programs 

International level 

10:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

Science Bowl Competitions: Senior  Division++  sponsored by Agilent Technologies and ACS  Department of Diversity Programs 

International level 

12:00 p.m. ‐‐ 1:00 p.m. 

LUNCH ON YOUR OWN 

1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 

Award Symposium 5: Milligan Competition 

M104 

1:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Technical Session 7: ʺGlobal Sustainability  Symposium in Science, Engineering and  Policyʺ sponsored by NOBCChE, AiChE and  NSChE 

M106 

1:00 p.m. ‐ 3:00 p.m. 

Professional Development Workshop:  ʺHermann’s Whole Brain Thinking Model –  Understand Thinking Stylesʺ 

M103 

Sponsored by Procter & Gamble

1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m.  1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m. 

Southwest Regional Meeting  Southeast Regional Meeting 

M102  M105 

1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m.  1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m. 

Northeast Regional Meeting  Midwest Regional Meeting 

M107  M108 

1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m.     

West Regional Meeting 

M109 

7


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE   3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Award Symposium 6: Graduate Student  Fellowship Sci‐Mix Symposium 

M101 

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Technical Session 8: Inorganic Chemistry 

M102 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Secondary Education Meeting with Student  Chaperones 

7:00 p.m. ‐‐ 10:00 p.m.  

Science Competition Dinner 

7:30 pm. ‐ 10:30 p.m. 

  Plenary V  Awards Ceremony & Gala Dinner (ticketed)  6:30 ‐ 7:00 p.m. Reception  7:00 ‐ 9:30 p.m. Dinner and Awards Program  9:30 ‐ 11:00 p.m. Live Entertainment   

International B  International  Level 

Imperial 

  Friday, April 2 

  

  

8:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m. 

  Science Bowl Finals ‐ Junior/Senior  Division Sponsored by Agilent and  American Chemical Society   

M106 & M107 

11:30 p.m. ‐ 1:45 p.m. 

Science Competition Awards Luncheon  (ticketed),  Guest Speaker ‐  Charles Bolden, Jr.,   NASA Administrator,  

2:00 p.m. ‐ 5:30 p.m. 

Science Competition Educational Trip 

8

Imperial  Courtland Street  Exit to Board  busses 


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND    

We wish to thank members and friends of the National Organization for the  Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers for their  support and confidence in the future of NOBCChE by making a $500.00 or more tax  deductible contribution to the NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund.    Mildred Allison  Denise Barnes  Iona Black*  Henry T. Brown  Winifred Burks‐Houck  Virlyn Burse*  Joseph N. Cannon  Callista Chukwunenye  Robert L. Countryman  Andrew Crowe*  Darrell Davis  Anthony L. Dent*  Lawrence E. Doolin*  Linneaus Dorman*  Fannie Posey Eddy  James Evans, Sr.  Lloyd Ferguson  Lonnie Fogel  Lloyd Freeman  Eddie Gay  Joseph Gordon*  William Guillory*  Jonathan K. Hale  James Harris  Bruce Harris*  Ivory Herbert  Kenneth W Hicks  Neville Holder  Isaac B. Horton, III  Donald A. Hudson  Charles R. Hurt   

  William M. Jackson*  Madeleine Jacobs*  Christopher Kinard  Anita Osborne‐Lee  George Lester, Jr.  William A Lester, Jr.  Mallinkrodt Chemical Inc.  Willie May  Jefferson McCowan*  Victor McCrary  Sidney McNairy  Lynn Melton  Philip Merchant  Reginald E. Mitchell  William V. Ormond*  James A. Porter  Cordelia M. Price*  Marquita Qualls*  Janet B. Reid  Leonard E. Small*  Florence P. Smith  Michael Stallings*  Clarence Tucker*  Benjamin  Wallace*  Charles Washington  Joseph  Watson  Billy  Williams   Keith B. Williams  Reginald  Willingham  Bobby Wilson  Andrea  Young*   

* Contributed more than $500.00 

 

 

9


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND   We wish to thank members and friends of the National Organization for the  Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers for  their support and confidence in the future of NOBCChE, and for their tax  deductible contribution to the NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund.   

 

Adegboye Adeyeno  Keith Alexander  Verlinda Allen  Eugene Alsandor  Roseanne Anderson  Victor Atiemo‐Obeng  Benny Askew, Jr.  Breeana Baker  Joseph Barnes  Sharon Barnes  Tegwyn L. Berry  Alfred Bishop  Jeanette E. Brown  Nora Butler‐Briant  James Burke  Jacqueline Calhoun  Lashanda Carter  Perry Catchings, Jr.  Aldene Chambles  John J. Chapman  Esteban Chornet  Reginald A. Christy  Regina V. Clark  James Clifton  Edward Coleman  George Collins  Carma Cook  James E. Cotton  Garry S. Crosson  Reuben Daniel  Kowetha Davidson  Ella Davis  Thomas Davis  Thomas Dill     

Gerald Ellis  Lisa Batiste‐Evans  Pat Fagbayi  Edward Flabe  Edward E. Flagg  Dawn Fox  Joe Franklin  Russell Franklin  Issac Gamwo  John W. Garner  Cornelia Gilyard  Robert Gooden  Warren E. Gooden  Valerie Goss  Etta Gravely  Bernice Green  Garry Grossman  Keith V. Guinn  Everett B. Guthrie  Micheal Gyamerah  Gene S. Hall  James Hamilton  Kinesha Harris  April Harrison  Isom Harrison  Rogers E. Harry‐Oruru  Lincoln Hawkins  Ronald Haynes  Derry Haywood  Ronald L. Henry  Leonard Holley  Sydana R. Hollins  Smallwood Holoman, Jr.  Brenda S. Holmes      10

Mo Hunsen  Nikisha Hunter  Bernard Jackson  Donald Jackson  Evelyn P. Jackson  Kim Jackson  Kyle Jackson  Raymond James  Allene Johnson  Elijah Johnson   Harry Johnson   Paula Johnson  Saphronia Johnson  Emmett Jones  Evy Jones  Jennifer A. Jones  Jesse Jones  Timothy Jones  Thomas C. Jones  Verlinda Jordan  Jimmie Julian  Ella L. Kelly  Otis Kems  Karen A. Kennedy  Kirby Kirksey  Rachel Law  Mia Laws  Lester A. Lee  Cynthia R. Leslie  Ronald Lewis, II  Norman Loney  Steve Lucas  Alex Maasa  Dale Mack     


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND   George S. Mack  Robert McAllister  Aliecia McClain  Gerald McCloud  Jefferson McCowan  Walter McFall  Saundra Y. McGuire  Dawn McLaurin  Linda Mead‐Tollin  Janice Meeks  Charles W. Merideth  M. P. Moon  Damon Mitchell  Robert Murff  Harvey Myers  Joycelyn Nelson  Tina Newsome  James Nichols  Kenneth Norton  Bunmi Ogunkeye  Steven B Ogunwumi  Mobolaji O. Olwinde  Chinwe Onuorah  Kofi Oppong  Soni Oyekan   Beverly Paul  James Pearce  James Pearson  Tony L. Perry  Howard Peters                       

Mwita V Phelps  Walter G. Phillips   Louis Pierce  Sonya Caston Pierre  Wendell Plain   Charles A. Plinton  Melvin Poulson  Jamacia Prince  Daniel Reuben  Daryl Robinson  Mary Robinson  Press Robinson  Anne Roby   Tommie Royster  Albert E Russell  Franklin Russell  Clark Scales  Billy Scott  Melva Scott  Robert Shepard  James P Shoffner   Keroline M. Simmonds  Tiffany Simpson  Milton Sloan  Karen Speights ‐ Diggs  Oreoluwa Sofekun  Lucius Stephenson  Wilford Stewart  Grant St. Julian  Richard Sullivan                        11

 Donald Taylor  Dameyun Thompson  Albert Thompson  Ezra Totton  Jorge Valdes  Grant Venerable  Cheryl A. Vockins  Benjamin Wallace  Emmanuel Waddell  Samuel von Winbush  Gerald Walker  Leon C. Warner  Michael Washington  Odiest Washington  Ben Watson  Joseph W. Watson  Helen P. White  Ronald H. White  Thomas Whitt  Leonard Wilmen  Harold Lloyd Williams   Laura C. Williams  Joe Williams  Raymond Williams  Jeremy Willis   Sean Wright  Sandra Wyatt                             


Congratulates THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY

OUR PRESIDENT, DR. JOSEPH S. FRANCISCO, FOR BEING CHOSEN BY NOBCChE TO DELIVER THE KEYNOTE ADDRESS AT THE HENRY HILL LUNCHEON.

 Dr. Joseph S. Francisco, President of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is the William E. Moore Distinguished Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Science and Chemistry at Purdue University. He completed his undergraduate studies in Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin and he received his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1983. Dr. Francisco is the second African American to hold the office of ACS President.

Dr. Henry A. Hill Dr. Hill attended Johnson C. Smith University earning his B.A. degree in 1936 and M.I.T. earning his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry in 1942. From early in his career Hill was active in the American Chemical Society—most memorably as the society’s first African American president (1977).


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  DAY OF WEEK 

EVENT 

ROOM 

Sunday , March 28 

 

 

 

 

 

  COACH Workshop ‐ registration required  8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.   “Professional Skills Training for Minority  Graduate Students and Postdocs”    Presented by Jane Tucker and Ernestine  Taylor   

Sunday a.m. 

 

L504 

      COACh Workshop‐ registration required  8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.  Making Change: Being Strategic in Uncertain  L505  Waters   Presented by Sandra Shullman and   Gilda Barabino   

Sunday a.m. 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Conference Registration 

Marquis Level 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

  Conference Registration 

Marquis Level 

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. 

NOBCChE Executive Board Meeting 

M101 

Monday,  March 29 

 Monday, p.m. 

Luncheon Speaker 

  Henry Hill Luncheon 

Imperial.       12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:30 p.m.  (ticketed)  ʺThe Road Ahead:  The Future of the Chemical Sciencesʺ Dr. Joseph Francisco, President,   American Chemical Society   

  13


PROGRAM SCHEDULE     Plenary 1 Opening  Session    2:00 p.m. ‐ 3:00 p.m.    Ms. Sandra Parker, National Conference Chair 

  Monday, p.m. 

        Welcome 

M301…..  

          Greetings   From The City  Atlanta Officials    

Executive Board  Dr. Bobby Wilson, Chairman of National Executive Board     State of the                      .     Dr. Victor R. McCrary, NOBCChE President  Organization      Financial Overview   Mr. Dale Mack, Treasurer      Election Results   Mr.  Perry Catchings, Elections Chair    Closing Remarks &             Ms. Sandra Parker, National Conference Chair  .     Announcements       

      Monday, p.m. 

 

Georgia Institute of Technology Technical Session  Technical Session 1: Organic Chemistry   3:30 p.m. ‐‐ 6:00 p.m.  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)   

    M102 

Session Chair  Sandra Mwakwari, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology   

  3:30 – 3:50 

3:50 – 4:10 

“DESIGN AND SYNTHESES OF NON‐PEPTIDE MACROCYCLIC HISTONE  DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS (HDACI) – DERIVED FROM TRICYCLIC  KETOLIDES – FOR TARGETED LUNG CANCER THERAPY”   Sandra C. Mwakwari*, William Guerrant, and Adegboyega K. Oyelere   School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and  Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA  30332‐0400 USA     “DESIGN, SYNTHESIS, AND APPLICATION OF PEGYLATED PEPTIDES  CONJUGATED TO PORPHYRINS”  Krystal Fontenot*, M. Graça H. Vicente  Louisiana State University A & M College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70803 14


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  4:10 – 4:25 

4:25 – 4:40 

4:40 – 4:50  4:50 – 5:05 

5:05 – 5:20 

5:20 – 5:40 

5:40 – 6:00 

“SYNTHESIS OF NEW PORPHYRIN CONJUGATES WITH AFFINITY FOR   EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR”   Alecia M. McCall,* M. Graca Vicente   Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803     “APPROACHES TOWARD THE SYNTHESIS OF CHIRAL POLYARYLS”   Donovan Thompson, Alan McDonald, Sierra Mitchell, and Dr. Karelle Aiken*   Department of Chemistry, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460     Break  “MATRIX ISOLATION INVESTIGATION OF THE MECHANISM OF  TETRAMETHYLETHYLENE OZONOLYSIS”  Bridgett E. Coleman* and Bruce S. Ault  University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221    “MECHANISM OF PHOTODECOMPOSITION OF TETRAZOLETHIONE”    Olajide Alawode and Sundeep Rayat    Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry , Manhattan, KS 66502    “COMPUTATIONAL INVESTIGATION OF THE CONCERTED DIELS‐ ALDER AND THE STEPWISE DIRADICAL REACTIONS OF  ACRYLONITRILE AND 2,3‐DIMETHY1,3‐BUTADIENE”   Natalie C. James1, Joann M. Um1, H. K. Hall2, K. N. Houk1*   1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los  Angeles, California 90095   2Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721     “NONPEPTIDE MACROCYCLIC HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS  FOR TARGETED CANCER TREATMENT”   Dr. Yomi Oyelere   Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Atlanta,  GA      

                     

15


PROGRAM SCHEDULE   

      Monday, p.m. 

Georgia Institute of Technology Technical Session  Technical Session 2  3:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.  Analytical and Environmental Chemistry  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation) 

    M105   

 

Session Chair  Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Ph.D., Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office  3:30 – 3:50 

3:50 – 4:10 

4:10 – 4:30 

4:30 – 4:40  4:40 – 5:00 

5:00 – 5:20 

“LYSINE‐BASED ZWITTERIONIC MOLECULAR MICELLE FOR  SIMULTANEOUS SEPARATION OF ACIDIC AND BASIC PROTEINS  USING OPEN TUBULAR CAPILLARY ELECTROCHROMATOGRAPHY”   Leonard Moore, Jr.; Candace A. Luces; Arther T. Gates; Min Li; Bilal El‐Zahab;  and Isiah M. Warner*   Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803     “VARIOUS IONIC STRENGTHS OF SUPPORTING ELECTROLYTES  CHANGE THE RESPONSE SIGNALS OF A SPECTROELECTROCHEMICAL  SENSOR”   Eme E. Amba*, Laura K. Morris, Sara E. Andria, Carl J. Seliskar and William R.  Heineman   University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221‐0172     “DEVELOPMENT OF A MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR SELEX ANALYSIS OF  TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS”   Loren Hardeman, Lauren Spivey, Kelly Johanson and Gloria Thomas*   Xavier University of Louisiana, Department of Chemistry, New Orleans, LA  70125     Break  “SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTEIN‐LIGAND  INTERACTIONS:  A COMPARISON OF POLY‐SUS AND SDS”  Monica R. Sylvain1, Susmita Das1, Jack N. Losso2, Bilal El‐Zahab1, and Isiah M.  Warner1*  1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803,  USA  2Department of Food Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803,  USA    “ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL SERUM LECTINS  FROM THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS)”   Lancia N.F. Darville*1, Venkatta Rhams2, Mark E. Merchant2 and Kermit K.  Murray1   1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana  70803, USA   16


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, P. O. Box 90455, Lake  Charles, Louisiana 70609, USA     “IMPACTS OF SURFACE CHEMICAL AGING OF AEROSOLS ON  CHEMISTRY AND CLOUDS OVER THE TROPICAL ATLANTIC OCEAN”   Vernon R. Morris*1, Everette Joseph2, Qilong Min3, and Alison P. Williams4   1NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) Washington, DC 20001   2Howard University, Program in Atmospheric Sciences,Washington, DC 20059   3Department of Atmospheric Sciences, State University of New York at Albany,  Albany, NY 14652   4Princeton University, Department of Chemistry, Princeton, NJ 08544       “DETECTION OF VOLATILES IN TISSUE SAMPLES BY HEADSPACE GAS  CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH MASS SPECTROMETRY”   Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Ph.D.*, Glenna Thomas, Terry Danielson, Ph.D., D‐ABFT,  and Ashraf Mozayani, Ph.D., D‐ABFT   Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office, Houston, TX 77054    2

5:20 – 5:40 

5:40 – 6:00 

 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

  Award Symposium 1: The Winifred Burks‐ Houck Womenʹs Leadership Symposium:   Women of Color Reshaping our Economy  through Science    

M106 

Guest Speaker;  TBA 

6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m. 

Opening Reception 

        Tuesday,  March 30   

17

Skyline 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE    Tuesday, a.m. 

Teachers Workshop I       7:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.  M106 & 107    “Teachersʹ Embracing Science through Education” 

Sponsored by 3M, AAAS,  and Committee for Action Program Services  

Moderator  7:00 a.m. – 7:45 a.m.  7:45 a.m. ‐ 8:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. 

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services   Cedar Hill, TX  Registration  Welcome and Opening Remarks  Mrs. Linda Davis, Director,  Committee Chairperson and  Moderator   Dr. Victor McCrary, President National NOBCChE  “Teach Students How to Learn: Key to Success in Science”  Dr. Saundra McGuire, Professor of Chemistry, and Director of 

9:30 a.m. – 11:55 a.m. 

12:00 N – 1:15p.m.    1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 

the Center for Academic Success at Louisiana State  University, Baton Rouge, LA  “Part 1& II Who Done It? “Using Gel Electrophoresis to Solve a  Crime , and Using Gel Electrophoresis to make a Standard  Curve”     Ms. Sharon Price, Adjunct Professor, Miramar College, San  Diego, CA          Lunch     “The Magic of Science”  Dr. Edward Walton, Professor of Chemistry, Cal Ploy,  Pomona, CA 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 6:30 p.m. 

Conference Registration 

Tuesday p.m. 

  Plenary II: Percy Julian Lecture  8:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m. 

Marquis Level 

“Innovative Solutions Needed For Green Energy Development”                                           Speaker: Dr. Thomas Mensah,  President                                             Georgia Aerospace Corporation, Atlanta, GA    18

M101 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  Award Symposium 2  9:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.  Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher Award Symposium:   STEM Education  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation) 

    Tuesday, a.m. 

    M101   

 

Session Chair  Abby O’Conner, University of Washington  9:45 a.m. –  10:05 a.m. 

Dr. Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher Awardee  Henry McBay Oustanding Teacher Awardee  “STUDENT ENGAGEMENT:  STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS”  Gloria Thomas*  Xavier University of Louisiana, Department of Chemistry, New Orleans, LA  70125  

    10:10 – 10:30 

10:30 – 10:50 

10:50 – 11:10 

11:10 – 11:25 

  “A RESEARCH STUDY TO IDENTIFY FACTORS THAT IMPACT THE  ACADEMIC SUCCESS OF HIGH ACHIEVING AFRICAN AMERICAN  STUDENTS IN STEM DISCIPLINES AT HBCUS”   Felecia M. Nave*1, Sherri Frizell2, Fred Bonner, Chance Lewis, and Mary Alfred3     1 Prairie View A&M University, Department of Chemical Engineering  Prairie  View, TX 77446   2Prairie View A&M University, Department of Computer Science Prairie View,  TX 77446,   3 Texas A&M University, College of Education  and Human Development,  College Station, TX     “STEM EDUCATION IN CENTRAL GEORGIA”   Rosalie A. Richards, Ph.D. *  Science Education Center, Georgia College & State University, Milledgeville, GA  31061     “PREPARING 21ST CENTURY STUDENTS FOR SUCCESS IN SCIENCE AND  ENGINEERING”  Sherine O. Obare*  Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008    “IMPLEMENTATION OF BLOOM’S NOTECARDS TO AID THE  RETENTION OF STEM CONTENT IN A LOW INCOME, MINORITY HIGH  SCHOOL”   Ericka Ford*1, Yvette Gilbert2, Marion Usselman3, Donna C. Llewellyn4   1The School of Polymer, Textiles and Fiber Engineering, Georgia Institute of  Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332‐0295   2Miller Grove High School, 2645 Dekalb Medical Parkway, Lithonia, GA 30058  3Center for Education Integrating Science, Math and Computing, Georgia Institute  19


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

11:25 – 11:45 

of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332‐0282   4Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, Georgia Institute of  Technology, Atlanta, GA  30332‐0383     “PERSPECTIVES ON THE USE OF BIOFUELS AS AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL  SOURCE: A HIGH SCHOOL OUTREACH PROJECT”   Abby R. O’Connor*, Takiya J. Ahmed, Joe Meredith, Rebecca Hayoun, and Eve  Perara   University of Washington, Department of Chemistry, Seattle, WA 98195   Center for Enabling New Technologies Through Catalysis (CENTC)  

      Tuesday, a.m. 

Session Chair  9:45 – 10:05 

Corning Technical Session  Technical Session 3  9:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.  Chemical Engineering  Sponsored by Corning Incoporated  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation) 

    M102   

  Reginald E. Rogers, Jr, Ph.D., Rochester Institute of Technology  “ROLE OF SEDIMENTATION IN THE COLLOIDAL ASSEMBLY OF  OPPOSITELY‐CHARGED PARTICLES”    Reginald E. Rogers, Jr.*+ and Michael J. Solomon    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI  48109   Current address: Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering,  Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623  

+

10:05 – 10:25 

10:25 – 10:45 

   “A NOVEL MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR STUDYING PHASE  SEPARATION KINETICS OF  MEMBRANE DOPES”  Kayode Olanrewaju* & Victor Breedveld  School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Georgia Institute of  Technology    “MICROSCALE PATTERNING OF FIBRIN GELS OVER CELLS”   Arlyne B. Simon*1, Hossein Tavana2, and Shuichi Takayma1,2   1Macromolecular Science and Engineering Department,   University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109   2 Department of Biomedical Engineering,   University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109     20


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  10:45 – 11:05 

11:05 – 11:25 

11:25 – 11:45 

      Tuesday, a.m. 

Session Chair:  9:45 – 10:05 

“USING A NOVEL 3D ANGIOGENESIS TISSUE MODEL TO STUDY THE  EFFECT OF THE FORMATION OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL  GROWTH FACTOR CONCENTRATION GRADIENTS ON  ENDOTHELIAL CELL BEHAVIOR”  Subuola M. Sofolahan*, and Heather Gappa‐Fahlenkamp,    Department of Chemical Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater,  OK 74078    “ANTISENSE RNA MEDIATED REDIRECTION OF GLYCOLYTIC FLUX  FOR HETEROLOGOUS PATHWAY PRODUCTION”   Kevin V Solomon*, Tae Seok Moon, Kristala L Jones Prather   Department of Chemical Engineering, Synthetic Biology Engineering Research  Center (SynBERC), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA  02139, USA     “SOLID PHASE SYNTHESIS OF DENDRITIC POLY(N‐ISOPROPYL  ACRYLAMIDE) FOR TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY”    Kai Chang*, Lindsey A Bergman, and Lakeshia J. Taite   Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemical and Biomolecular  Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332    

  Corning Technical Session  Technical Session 4  9:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.  Physical Chemistry  Sponsored by Corning Incorporated  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation) 

    M105   

  Shawn Abernathy, Ph.D., Howard University  “ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF SULFUR COMPOUNDS: BONDING AND  EXCITED STATES”   John A.W. Harkless*   Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059   Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (Visiting),  Cambridge, MA 02139  

10:05 – 10:25 

“MOLECULAR DYNAMIC STUDY ON THE CONFORMATIONAL  DYNAMICS OF HIV‐1 PROTEASE SUBTYPES B, C, F”   Dwight McGee Jr.1, Jesse Edwards2, Adrian E. Roitberg3   1,3Department of Chemistry and Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida,  Gainesville, FL 32608   2Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, Fl 32307     21


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  10:25 – 10:45 

10:45 – 11:05 

11:05 – 11:25 

11:25 – 11:45 

“PLASMONICS FOR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF INDIVIDUAL YEAST  CELLS “   Marvin A. Malone* and James V. Coe   The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry, Columbus, OH 43210       “CYCLOADDITION FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES: A  DFT STUDY”   Olayinka O. Ogunro_1 and Xiao‐Qian Wang*2   1Department of Chemistry, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314   2Department of Physics, Center for Functional Nanoscale Materials, Clark Atlanta  University Atlanta, GA 30314     “INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SLIP LENGTH AND  INTERFACIAL VISCOSITY ON MICA, DLC  and HOPG”   Deborah J. Ortiz1*, Douglas Chui2 Elisa Riedo2   1School of Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Ave., Atlanta,  GA 30332  2School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St., Atlanta, GA       “DETERMINING THE VAPOR  PRESSURE OF TOLUENE IN PENNZOIL 5W‐ 30 AND MINERAL OIL MIXTURES”   Shawn M. Abernathy*, Ph.D.1, Brian Garrett2, Jockquin Jones1, and Anwar  Jackson1   Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC, 2005911   Morehouse College, Department of Chemistry, Atlanta, GA, 30314 2    

 

   

      Tuesday, p.m. 

       

 

Percy Julian Symposium & Luncheon (ticketed)  12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:30 p.m.  Speaker: Dr. Michael Kassner, Office of Naval Research   Washington, DC             

    Imperial 

 

22


PROGRAM SCHEDULE      Tuesday, p.m. 

Session Chair: 

Award Symposium 3  1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.   Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Award Symposium –  Materials Chemistry   (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation) 

    M101   

  Michelle Gaines, Ph.D., Georgia Tech Research Institute 

1:45 – 2:15 

Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Awardee  “TAILORING NANOMATERIALS FOR ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL  REMEDIATION APPLICATIONS”  Sherine O. Obare, Ph.D*.  Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008   

2:15 – 2:35 

“COMBINATORIAL STUDIES OF SURFACE INTERACTIONS IN BLOCK  COPOLYMER THIN FILMS”   Thomas H. Epps, III*, Julie N. Lawson, Michael J. Baney, Timothy Bogart   University of Delaware, Department of Chemical Engineering, Newark, DE    “SCANNING FORCE MICROSCOPY STUDIES OF AU FILMS VAPOR‐ DEPOSITED ON 3‐AMINOPROPYLTRIETHOXYSILANE/GLASS  SUBSTRATES”   Sonya L. Caston*1 and Robin L. McCarley2   1Dillard University, Chemistry Department, New Orleans, LA  70122   2Louisiana State University, Chemistry Department, Baton Rouge, LA  70803     “INVESTIGATION OF HYDROPHOBICLLY STABILIZED METAL  NANOPARTICLES UNDER ETHANOL ANTI‐SOLVENT CONDITIONS  USING SMALL‐ANGLE NEUTRON SCATTERING”   Gregory V. White II*, Christopher L. Kitchens   Clemson University, Chemical Engineering Department, Clemson, SC 29634     “PORPHYRINS: SYNTHESIS AND SPECTROSCOPY”   Kidus D. Debesai, 1 Tseng Xiong,1 Tiffany Shoham,1 DeAndre Beck, 1 Catrena H.  Lisse Ph.D., 1  and Rosalie A. Richards, Ph.D. 1*   Nick Gober2 and Candace Jordan2, Jah‐Wann Galimore3 and Geovic Jadol3   1Georgia College & State University, Department of Chemistry & Physics,  Milledgeville, GA 31061   2Washington County High School, 201 E Greene St., Milledgeville, GA 31024   3Georgia Military College Preparatory School, Milledgeville, GA 31061            

2:35 – 2:55 

2:55 – 3:15 

3:15 – 3:35 

23


PROGRAM SCHEDULE      Tuesday, p.m. 

Technical Session 5  1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.  Biochemistry  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)   

   

Session Chair: 

  Carma Cook, Ph.D., Auburn University 

1:45 – 2:00 

“METAL ASSISTED ASSEMBLY OF COLLAGEN PEPTIDES” 

M105 

Lyndelle, T, LeBruin, Martin, A, Case*  University of Vermont, Department of Chemistry, Burlington, VT, 05405  2:00 – 2:15 

2:15 – 2:30 

2:30 – 2:45 

2:45 – 3:00 

  “POSSIBLE DRUG TARGETS FOR MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS:  FREE ENERGY CALCULATIONS OF IRON‐DEPENDENT REPRESSOR  (IdeR)”   Joycelynn D. Nelson1,2*, T. Logan1,2, W. Yang1,2   1Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,  Tallahassee FL   2Florida State University, Institute of Molecular Biophysics, Tallahassee FL  “DUAL ACTING HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITOR‐ESTROGEN  MODULATOR CONJUGATES FOR TUMOR‐SPECIFIC DELIVERY”  Kenyetta A. Johnson*, Vishal Patil, Li‐Pan D. Yao, Marcie Rice, Bahareh Azizi,  Donald F. Doyle, and Adegboyega K. Oyelere  School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Parker H. Petit Institute for  Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta,  Georgia, 30332‐0400    “SYNTHESIS OF MODIFIED NUCLEOTIDES AS PROBES AND  INHIBITORS FOR DNA REPAIR ENZYMES”   JohnPatrick Rogers1, Sheng Cao2, and Sheila S. David*1   1University of California‐Davis, Department of Chemistry, Davis, CA 95616          2University of Utah, Department of Chemistry, Salt Lake City, UT     “APPLICATION OF THE GOLGI TWO‐HYBRID ASSAY TO STUDY  PROTEIN INTERACTIONS INVOLVED IN ER ASSOCIATED  DEGRADATION (ERAD)”   Whitney Henry1, Bin Li2, Jennifer Kohler2   1Department of Biology, Grambling State University, Grambling, LA   2Internal Medicine, Division of Translational Research, UT Southwestern  Medical Center, Dallas, TX           24


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  3:00 – 3:20 

3:20 – 3:40 

 

“STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION STUDIES OF STT3P, THE CATALYTIC  DOMAIN OF YEAST OLIGOSACCHARYLTRANSFERASE”  Carma O. Cook*  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn University, Auburn, AL  36849    “STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION STUDIES OF THE C‐TERMINAL  DOMAIN OF STT3P, A SUBUNIT OF YEAST  OLIGOSACCHARYLTRANSFEARSE”  S. Mohanty;  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn University, Auburn, AL,  United States.     

 

     Forensic Workshop:   1:45 p.m. ‐ 5:45 p.m.  “The Chemistry of Crime”   sponsored by the DEA, CBP and DHS   

Tuesday, p.m. 

M103 &  M104 

Instructors:  Darrell Davis, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX  April L. Idleburg, Drug Enforcement Administration, Nashville Sub‐Regional Laboratory  Renee Stevens, Customs and Border Protection Laboratory, Springfield, VA  Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office, Houston, TX  Joe Maberry, Drug Enforcement Agency, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX      

    Professional Development Workshop:  1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m.   ʺStand Out at a Professional Conferenceʺ  sponsored by ACS and NOBCChE    Constance Thompson, ACS and   Erick Ellis, Jackson State University   

Tuesday, p.m. 

Presenters 

   

 

 

M102 

 

  25


PROGRAM SCHEDULE    Professional Development Workshop:  4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:45 p.m.  “So You Think You Can Dance? Here is What It  Takes to Find a Job”  

Tuesday, p.m. 

  Presenter 

M102 

Nick Nikolaides, Ph.D. Manager, Doctoral Recruiting & University Relations,  The Procter & Gamble Company  Sponsored by Procter & Gamble    Professional Outreach Symposium  4:00 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.  Funding Opportunities for Students and Professionals  sponsored by AAAS and NIST  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation) 

    Tuesday, p.m. 

    M109   

 

 

4:00 – 4:45 

“THE TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION PROGRAM”  Marlon L. Walker*  Technology Innovation Program, National Institute of Standards and  Technology  Gaithersburg, MD  20899  Break  “SCIENCE FOR POLICY & POLICY FOR SCIENCE: FELLOWSHIP  OPPORTUNITIES IN WASHINGTON”  Daniel Poux*  American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, D.C.

4:45 – 5:00  5:00 – 5:45 

    Tuesday, p.m. 

  Technical Session 6  4:00 p.m.– 6:00 p.m.  Next Generation Technologies  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation) 

    M105   

 

Session Chair:  4:00 – 4:20 

Issac Gamwo, Ph.D., U.S. Department of Energy  “FILTER CAKE FORMATION ON THE WELLBORE WALL DURING  DRILLING OPERATION”   Isaac K. Gamwo1* and Mohd A. Kabir1,2   1U.S Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory,  Pittsburgh, PA 15236, 2ORISE, U.S Department of Energy, National Energy  Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15236  26


PROGRAM SCHEDULE   

4:20 – 4:40 

4:40 – 5:00 

5:00 – 5:20 

5:20 – 5:40 

5:40 – 6:00 

“A N‐ALKYLDITHIENOPYRROLE AND DIKETOPYRROLOPYRROLE‐ BASED COPOLYMER AS AN ORGANIC SEMICONDUCTOR FOR  ORGANIC FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS”   Toby L. Nelson, Tomasz Young, Junying Liu, Sarada P. Mishra, Tomasz  Kowalewski, Richard D. McCullough*   Carnegie Mellon University, Chemistry Department, Pittsburgh, PA  15213     “GUMBOS: A NEW BREED OF NANOMATERIALS”  Isiah M. Warner*, Bilal El‐Zahab, Min Li, and Susmita Das  Dept. of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803     “FABRICATING MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS USING HIGH SPEED  MULTIPHOTON ABSORPTION POLYMERIZATION”   George Kumi1, Floyd Bates1, Ciceron O. Yanez2, Kevin D. Belfield2,3, John T.  Fourkas*1,4,5,6   1Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College  Park, MD 20742   2Department of Chemistry, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, 32816   3CREOL, The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida,  Orlando, FL 32816   4Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland,  College Park, MD 20742   5Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742   6Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials, University of Maryland,  College Park, MD 20742    “HIGH RESOLUTION SPECROSCOPY OF COMETS WITH LARGE  TELESCOPES”   William M. Jackson*, Anita L. Cochran**, Walt Harris*, Ron Vervack***,  Neil  Dello Russo***, and Hal Weaver***   *    University of California, Davis, CA 95616   **  University of Texas McDonald Observatory, 1 University Station, C1402,  Austin, TX 78712   ***Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel,  MD  20723‐6099     “+JET MEASUREMENTS IN AU+AU COLLISIONS WITH THE  SOLENOIDAL TRACKER AT RHIC (STAR)”   Martin J.M. Codrington1,2 & Saskia Mioduszewski*1,3 (for the STAR  Collaboration)   1The Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843   2The Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX  77843   3The Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843  27


PROGRAM SCHEDULE   

  5:00 p.m. ‐‐ 6:00 p.m.  6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m. 

  Exhibitors Meeting

  M303

Exhibitorʹs Welcome Reception 

M 301 & 302 

   

Wednesday, March 31     7:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.    Wednesday   a.m. 

  

Teacherʹs Workshop II

Teachers Workshop II  7:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.  M106 & 107 “Achieving Science Through Education” Sponsored by 3M, AAAS,   and Committee for Action Program Services  

Moderator  8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. 

9:45 a.m. – 11:55 a.m. 

12:00 N – 12:45 p.m.  1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. 

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services   Cedar Hill, TX  “African Foundations of Western Math, Science & the  Global Context of Five River Civilizations”  Dr. James Grainger, Analytical/Environmental Chemist  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA      “Integrating Tools for Hands‐On Teaching in The  Classroom, Part I”  Ms. Yolanda S. George, Deputy Director and Program  Director, American Association for the Advancement of  Science (AAAS) Washington, DC    Lunch   “Integrating Tools for Hands‐On Teaching in The  Classroom, Part II”  Ms. Yolanda S. George, Deputy Director and Program  Director, American Association for the Advancement of  Science (AAAS) Washington, DC   

28


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  “ʺBringing Nanoscale Science into the Classroomʺ Dr. Sherine Obare, Associate Professor of Inorganic  Chemistry, Western Michigan University                          

1:45 p.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

   

 

 

7:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.  Conference Registration  7:30 a.m. – 8:45  a.m. 

Wednesday, a.m.  & p.m. 

Plenary III:  NOBCChE Program Initiatives Breakfast  (ticketed)      CAREER FAIR EXPO  9:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.       

Marquis Level 

Imperial 

Marquis Ballroom 

10:00 a.m. ‐ 12:00  p.m. 

Collegiate Poster Set Up 

Marquis Ballroom 

9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00  a.m. 

Chemistry & Chemical Engineering  HBCU/MI Chairs Council Forum 

M302 

Wednesday, a.m. 

Presenters: 

 

Professional Development Workshop:  9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 11:00 a.m.  Chemistry at the National Science  M102  Foundation: New Programs, Funding  Opportunities and Outreach    Tyrone D. Mitchell, Charles Pibel, C. Renee Wilkerson,   National Science Foundation            

 

29


PROGRAM SCHEDULE   

Wednesday, a.m. 

Presenter: 

  Professional Development Workshop:  9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 11:00 a.m.  M105  ʺAcademia:  What Are Your Optionsʺ    Isiah Warner, Ph.D. Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University   

Wednesday, a.m.  

  Professional Development Workshop:  10:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  ʺThe Internship:  The Practice Field of  Professional Trainingʺ    Guest Speaker ‐ Ramsey L. Smith, Ph.D.,  NASA   

M103 

12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:00 p.m. 

LUNCH ON YOUR OWN 

Hotel 

 

 

 

1:00 p.m. ‐‐ ‐‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Science Competition Registration 

Marquis Level 

Wednesday, p.m. 

Presenter: 

  Professional Development Workshop:  3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.   ʺAn Introduction to Project Managementʺ    James Hampton,  Hampton Associates & Enterprises   

            30

M102 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE   

  Wednesday , p.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:  3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.  ʺHermannʹs Whole Brain Thinking Model ‐  Understand Thinking Styles.ʺ 

M103 

Sponsored by Procter & Gamble

Presenter: 

Martha White‐Warren,  Procter & Gamble, Associate Director of Human  Resources   

 

   

Wednesday, p.m. 

Presenter: 

Wednesday, p.m. 

  1 

 

 

  Professional Development Workshop:  3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.  ʺFinancial Strategies: Your Professional STEMulus  Packageʺ    Derry L. Haywood, II, The Peninsula Financial Group 

  Collegiate Scientific Exchange Poster Session   3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.  sponsored by Colgate Palmolive   

M105 

Marquis  Ballroom 

Posters (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation    “CACTUS MUCILAGE: TOWARD AN ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY   ALTERNATIVE TO REMOVE ARSENIC FROM DRINKING WATER”  Dawn I. Fox1, Thomas Pichler2, Daniel H. Yeh3, and Norma A. Alcantar1   1Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL  33620  2Geosciences, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany  3Civil and Environmental Engineering,  University of South Florida Tampa, FL 33620    “INCREASED LIGHT EXTRACTION OF INASGASB LIGHT  EMITTING DIODE THROUGH WET CHEMICAL ETCHING”   Deandrea Leigh Watkins1*, Jonathon Olesberg1, Thomas Boggess2, and Mark Arnold1    Departments of Chemistry1 and Physics2, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 52246     31


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  3 

“MICROFLUIDIC DEVICES TO DETERMINE THE EFFICACY OF USING  SURFACE BOUND EARLY TRANSITION METAL COMPLEXES IN THE  SILYLCYANATION OF ALDEHYDES”     DeWayne D. Anderson, Wayne Tikkanen*, Frank A. Gomez    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University‐‐Los Angeles,  5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90032     “TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETRIC FRAGMENTATION OF  SELECTED ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: A STUDY OF  FRAGMENTATION MECHANISMS OF HORMONAL STEROIDS”   Elizabeth I. Adeyemi*, Victor M. Ibeanusi, Yassin A. Jeilani   Spelman College, Environmental Science and Studies Program, Atlanta, GA 30087     “IDENTIFICATION OF 15N ISOTOPE‐ LABELED CARBOXYL CONTAINING  METABOLITES PRESENT IN HUMAN URINE BY TWO DIMENSIONAL  HYDROPHILIC INTERACTION CHROMATOGRAPHY (HILIC) AND NMR  TECHNIQUES”  Emmanuel Appiah‐Amponsah*, Kwadwo Owusu‐Sarfo, Tao Ye, G.A Nagana Gowda  and Daniel Raftery   Purdue University, Department of Chemistry, 560 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907     “RESEARCHING THIN‐FILM ELECTRODE DYNAMICS THROUGH  RUTHERFORD BACKSCATTERING”  Olajide Banks and Kenneth Brown*  Department of Chemistry, Hope College, Holland MI    “SOLID TISSUE PHANTOMS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF INSTRUMENTATION  FOR NONINVASIVE RAMAN TOMOGRAPHIC INVESTIGATION OF BONE  GRAFT OSSEOINTEGRATION IN ANIMAL MODELS”   Paul I. Okagbare*, Francis W. L. Esmonde‐White, Kathryn A.  Dooley and Michael D.  Morris   Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor,  MI 48109     “A COMPARATIVE IN VITRO STUDY OF THE DEHALOGENATION PRODUCTS  OF BROMINATED‐ AND IODATED‐DNA UPON UVA EXPOSURE USING MASS  SPECTROMETRY AND HPLC”     Renee T. Williams and Yinsheng Wang*   University of California, Riverside, Chemistry Department, Riverside, CA 92521‐0403     “WETTING STUDIES FOR ALKYL BONDED PHASES USING CONFOCAL  MICROSCOPY”   Reygan M. Freeney*1, Mark A. Lowry2, and M.Lei Geng1   1University of Iowa, Department of Chemistry and the Nanoscience and  Nanotechnology Institute, Iowa City, IA 52242   32


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803  

2

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

  “ULTRAFAST AND SENSITIVE BIOASSAYS USING METAL‐ENHANCED  LUMINESCENCE, MICROWAVES AND ELECTRICALLY SMALL SPLIT RING  RESONATOR ANTENNAS”   Sarah Addae1, Melissa Pinard1, Humeyra Caglayan2, Deniz Caliskan2,   Ekmel Ozbay, Ph.D.2 and Kadir Aslan, Ph.D.*, 1   1 Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD, 21251, USA.   2 Bilkent University, Nanotechnology Research Center, Ankara, 06680, TURKEY    “INSULIN DETECTION BASED ON TRANSITION METAL COMPLEXES”  Toni K. Thornton and Waldemar Gorski*  The University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of chemistry, San Antonio, TX     “PRINCIPAL COMPONENT DIRECTED PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES ANALYSIS  FOR COMBINING NMR AND MS DATA IN METABOLOMICS: APPLICATION  TO THE DETECTION OF BREAST CANCER”  Haiwei Gu1, Zhengzheng Pan2, Bowei Xi3, Vincent Asiago2, Brian Musselman4, and  Daniel Raftery2*   1Department of Physics, 2Department of Chemistry, and 3Department of Statistics,  Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907   4IonSense Inc., 999 Broadway, Suite 404, Saugus, MA 01906     “EXTRACTION AND CONCENTRATION OF PCBs USING CONDUCTIVE  POLYMERS POST‐MODIFIED WITH PCBs SELECTIVE PENTAPEPTIDES”  Edikan Archibong* and Nelly Mateeva  Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahasse, FL    “METABOLITE  PROFILING  OF  HUMAN  SERUM  USING  HPLC  AND  NMR  SPECTROSCOPY”  Kwadwo  Owusu‐Sarfo*,  Emmanuel  Appiah‐Amponsah,  Tao  Ye,  G.  A.  Nagana  Gowda  and Daniel Raftery  Department of Chemistry, Purdue University,   West Lafayette, IN    “TOWARDS AFM IMAGING OF DNA ORIGAMI ON SILICON IN A FLUID CELL”  Valerie Goss*1, Amro Mentash2, Lesli Mark1, Kyoung Nan Kim1, Koshala Sarveswaran1   and Marya Lieberman1   1The University of Notre Dame, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Notre Dame,  IN, 46556   2Ivy Tech Community College, Department of Biotechnology, South Bend, IN, 46610     “MUTATION ANALYSIS OF VACM‐1/cul5 EXONS IN T47D CANCER CELL LINE”  Angelica Willis*, Steven Lewis*, and Maria Burnatowska‐Hledin,   Departments of Biology and Chemistry, Hope College, Holland MI 49423    33


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

“SYNTHESIS OF GLYCOSYLATED GRANULATIMIDE ANALOGS MEDIATED BY  A “CLICK” REACTION FOLLOWED BY DIRECT ARYLATION”   Crystal L. O’Neil*, Jie Shen, Peng George Wang   The Ohio State University,  Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Columbus, OH    “DO MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS CONTRIBUTE TO SKELETAL MUSCLE  THROUGH SATELLITE CELL DEPENDENT OR INDEPENDENT PATHWAY“  Denis O. Madende1, Jeremy Traas2, Ted Hofmann2, Archana Bora2, and Tim Brazelton2  1Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, 1837 University Circle, Cheyney, PA 19319  2Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania,34th Street  Civic center Boulevard, Philadelphia,  PA 19104    “RATIONAL VS. RANDOM MUTAGENIC APPROACHES IN ENGINEERING THE  HUMAN VITAMIN D RECEPTOR”  Hilda Castillo, Donald F. Doyle, Bahareh Azizi  Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332   “PROBING STRUCTURAL BEHAVIOR OF THE N‐TERMINAL DOMAINS OF THE  HUMAN WILSON PROTEIN”   Joshua M. Muia*, David L. Huffman   Western Michigan University, Department of Chemistry, Kalamazoo, MI 49008     “CANINE MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS CAN DIFFERENTIATE INTO  MULTIPLE CELL TYPES AND EXPRESS COMMON MSC SURFACE MARKERS”  Paul Gwengi, Ted Hofmman, PhD  1Cheyney University of Pennsylvania   1837 University Circle, Cheyney, PA 19319  2Department of Surgery, Center for Fetal Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,  Philadelphia, PA    “SYNTHESIS OF NITRIC OXIDE DONORS FOR TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY  AND TREATMENT OF GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME”   Shahana Safdar*, Lakeshia J. Taite,   Georgia Institute of Technology,   School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Atlanta, GA 30332   “SYNTHYESIS OF FLUOROGENIC CYANINE DYES”   Stanley Oyaghire*, Dr. Angela Winstead1, Dr. Bruce Armitage2  1Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore MD 21251  2 Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Chemistry, Pittsburgh PA 73110    “THE EFFECTS OF GROUND  CLOVES ON OXIDATIVE STRESS, DYSLIPIDEMIA,  AND ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN AZOXYMETHANE INDUCED COLORECTAL  CANCER IN MALE WISTAR RATS”  Tamina L Johnson*, Dr. Ngozi Ugochukwu  Florida A&M University, Tallahasse, FL   

34


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  26 

27 

28 

“DETERMINING THE DNA BINDING ACTIVITY OF NEURAL ZINC FINGER  FACTOR 1E BY FLUORESCENCE ANISOTROPY”   Tiffany Strickland*, Dr. Holly Cymet   Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore MD 21251     “LENTIVIRAL GENE DELIVERY TO FETAL MOUSE RESULT IN BROAD  TRANSDUCTION OF TISSUES”  Tolani Adebanjo,  David Stitelman MD , Philip Zoltick MD, Alan W Flake MD, Tim  Brazelton MD PhD  1Cheyney University of Pennsylvania   1837 University Circle, Cheyney, PA 19319  2Department of Surgery, Center for Fetal Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,  Philadelphia, PA    “ANTIOXIDANT EFFECTS OF BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS IN PEANUT SKINS” Lisa O Dean , Wanida E. Lewis* , Leon C Boyd2 North Carolina State University, USDA-ARS Market Quality and Handling Research Unit, Raleigh, NC 27695 North Carolina State University, Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science, Raleigh, NC 27695   “CHARACTERIZATION OF THE N‐TERMINAL WILSON DISEASE PROTEIN  DOMAIN 4”   Wilson Okumu* and David. L. Huffman    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008  1

1

1

2

29 

 

30 

“HIGH RESOLUTION MELTING ANALYSIS OF MISCANTHUS X SINENSIS  ORNAMENTAL VARIETIES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH‐DENSITY  GENETIC MAP”  Adebosola Oladeinde* and Stephen Long  Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois Urbana‐Champagne     

31 

32 

33 

“MECHANISM AND INHIBITION OF PROTEIN ARGININE  METHYLTRANSFERASE 1”  Obiamaka Obianyo, Corey P. Causey, Tanesha C. Osborne and Paul R. Thompson  Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29209    “A NOVEL ELASTIN MIMETIC PEPTIDE FOR TISSUE ENGINEERED VASCULAR  GRAFTS”    Dhaval Patel*, Lakeshia J. Taite   Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering  Atlanta, GA 30332     “THE FABRICATION OF ZINC OXIDE NANOWIRES AND ITS SOLAR CELL  APPLICATIONS”   Mallarie D. McCune1*, Yulin Deng1†   1Georgia Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular  35


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332     “SUSTAINABILITY EVALUATOR: AN EXCEL BASED TOOL FOR EVALUATING  PROCESS SUSTAINABILITY”   Olamide O. Shadiya, and Karen A. High*   Oklahoma State University, School of Chemical Engineering, Stillwater, OK 74075     “EFFECT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT ON AQUEOUS CORROSION  OF LOW‐CARBON STEEL BY ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDANCE  SPECTROSCOPY”   Samuel J. Gana1, Nosa O. Egiebor*2, Ramble Ankumah3    1Tuskegee University Materials Science and Engineering, Tuskegee, AL 36088   2Tuskegee University Department of Chemical Engineering, Tuskegee, AL 36088   3Tuskegee University, Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences,  Tuskegee, AL 36088     “DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TRANSPORT IN OPEN‐CELL  MESOPHASE PITCH DERIVED CARBON FOAMS”  Shawn Austina, E. E. Kalua, C. A. Mooreb, G. D. Wessona,*, D. Stephensd  a Department of Chemical Engineering, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL. 32310,  b Department of Mechanical Engineering, Florida A&M Univeristy, Tallahassee, FL.  32310, d Department of Mathematics, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL. 32307, *  Research & Economic Development, South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, SC    “FISCHER TROPSCH PLATFORM ENHANCED BY HIGH THERMAL  CONDUCTIVITY CATALYSTS”  Tunde Dokun1*, Don Cahela1, Symon Sheng1, Hongyun Yang2and *Dr. Bruce J.  Tatarchuk,  1Chemical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL  2Intramicron Inc. Industry Drive. Auburn Al    “DESORPTION AND SURFACE CHEMICAL REACTIONS OF AROMATIC  SULFUR HETEROCYCLES FROM SILVER BASED SORBENTS”    Zenda D. Davis*, Sachin A. Nair, Alexander Samokhvalov and Bruce J. Tatarchuk   Auburn University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Auburn, AL 36849    “EFFECTS OF VISCOSITY ON PHASE SEPARATION OF LIQUID MIXTURES  WITH A CRITICAL POINT OF MISCIBILITY”   Filomena Califano*   Chemistry and Physics Department, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY, 11201     “OZONATION OF PRODUCED WATER”  Johnathan k. Vann*1, Shawn k. Kuriakose1,   Dr. Jorge Gabitto1, Joanna McFarlane2 and Dr. Costas Tsouris2  1Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX 77446  36


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  Nuclear Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge,  TN 37831    “DETECTION OF REDUCED PHOSPHORUS OXYANIONS IN GEOTHERMAL  WATER VIA ION CHROMATOGRAPHY”   Amanda Henry1, Herbe Pech1, Krishna L. Foster*1   1California State University ‐ Los Angeles,   Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA  90032     “REACTIONS OF SINGLET OXYGEN WITH A FURAN‐CONTAINING DRUG,  FUROSEMIDE: ATTEMPTS TO GENERATE A SECONDARY OZONIDE”  B.M. King, R.M. Uppu, and M.O. Fletcher Claville.  Department of Environmental  Toxicology, College of Sciences, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge,  LA    IMPACT OF TI02 METALLIZED CARBON NANOTUBES (TI02‐CNT) ON  REGENERATIVE BONE GROWTH  Edidiong C. Obot*1, Renard L. Thomas1  Environmental Toxicology Program, Department of Chemistry, Texas Southern  University, Houston, TX 77004    “DISTRIBUTION AND CYCLNG OF MERCURY SPECIES IN THE YOCONA  RIVER AND ENID RESIVIOR IN NORTHWEST MISSISSIPPI”  Garry Brown, Jr., James Cizdziel*   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi      “FUNCTIONALIZED NANOPARTICLES FOR REMEDIATION OF ORGANIC  POLLUTANTS”    Jully S. Senteu* and Sherine O. Obare   Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008       “A KINETIC STUDY OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS”   Karma James*  Grambling State University, Grambling, Louisiana     “EFFECT OF PH AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE LEVELS ON THE INITIAL  CORROSION OF COPPER SURFACES IN DRINKING WATER INVESTIGATED  WITH ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY”   Stephanie L. Daniels,1 Darren A. Lytle2* and Jayne C. Garno1   1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA   2National Risk Management Research Laboratory, WSWRD, U.S. Environmental  Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268     “CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE EFFLUENT WASTE  2

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

37


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

49 

50 

51 

52 

53 

54 

WATER TREATMENT PLANTS”   Zuri Dale*1, Anthony Maye2, Renard L. Thomas3, and Bobby Wilson2   1Space, Engineering & Science Internship Program., Texas Southern University,  Houston, TX 77004   2 Environmental Research Technology Transfer Center, (ERT2C),   Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004   3Department of Health Sciences, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004     “HPLC METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC  HYDROCARBONS (PAH) ANALYSIS”   Benji Macaulay1, Miheer Shah1, Ruth Montes2, Krishna L. Foster*2   1Pasadena City College, Department of Natural Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91106   2California State University – Los Angeles,   Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90032     “TRACE METAL ANALYSIS OF PRIMARY TEETH AS AN ENVIRONMENTAL  INDICATOR USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS  SPECTROMETRY”   Terrell Gibson1*, Renard L. Thomas2, Bobby Wilson3   1Graduate Student, Environmental Toxicology Program, Texas Southern University,  Houston, Texas 77004   2Assistant Professor of Health Science, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas 77004  3Professor of Chemistry, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas 77004     “SELECTIVE AEROBIC OXIDATIONS CATALYZED BY MANGANESE (III)  COMPLEXES CONTAINING REDOX ACTIVE LIGANDS”  Clarence Rolle, Jake Soper*  Georgia Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Atlanta, GA, 30332    “ELECTROPHILIC OXIDATION USING COORDINATIVELY UNSATURATED IR  III COMPLEXES”   Michael D. Heinekey1, Katherine Schultz2, and Cristina Thomas*3   1,2,3The University of Washington Department of Chemistry, Seattle Washington, 98195       “SYNTHESIS OF DR1‐ICPTEOS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF 3‐DIMENSIONAL  DATA STORING DEVICES”   Jason E. Davis, L. Zane Miller, and Dr. Carole E. Brown   Department of Chemistry, North Georgia College and State University     “SYNTHESIS OF HIGH FREE VOLUME ACID FOR PROTON CONDUCTING  ELECTROLYTES”  LaRico Treadwell and Dr. Jason Ritchie  Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, Ms 38677‐1848  38


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  55 

56 

57 

58 

59 

60 

61 

  “SYNTHESIS OF NEW INORGANIC CLUSTERS: TRIDECAMERIC  GROUP 13 HYDROXIDES AS INKS FOR MATERIALS”   Maisha K. Kamunde‐Devonish1, Zachary L. Mensinger1, Sharon A. Betterton2,  Lev N. Zakharov1, Douglas A. Keszler2, and Darren W. Johnson*1   1Department of Chemistry and the Oregon Nanoscience and  Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI), University of Oregon, Eugene, OR  97403‐1253.   2Department of Chemistry and ONAMI, 153 Gilbert Hall, Oregon State University,  Corvallis, OR 97331‐4003.     “SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF BIMETALLIC ZINTL CLUSTERS”  Domonique O. Downing and Bryan W. Eichhorn*  University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College Park, MD  20742    “DIELECTRIC MONITORING OF EPOXY POLYMERIZATION”                                    Abdul‐Rahman Raji*, Alvin P. Kennedy, and Solomon Tadesse   Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251     “SURFACE FUNCTIONALIZATION OF GOLD NANOPARTICLES FOR DUAL  OPTICAL AND ELECTROCHEMICAL DETECTION OF PATHOGENS”   Clara P. Adams1, Motez Mejri2, Hamdi Baccar2, Adnane Abdelghani2 and Sherine O.  Obare1*    1Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008   2University of 7 November, Carthage, Tunisia     “ULTRAFAST BAND EDGE LUMINESCENCE DYNAMICS OF QUANTUM SIZED  ZNO NANOPARTICLES”  Jameel A. Hasan, Shankar Varaganti, and Guda Ramakrishna   Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo MI 49008           “ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY ENHANCEMENT WITH ORGANOMETALLIC  COMPOUND”  Joel S. N. Tietsia*  Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, University Institute of Technology Fotso  Victor , Bandjoun, Cameroon    “UHMWPE/NANODIAMOND NANOCOMPOSITES: STRUCTURE, PROPERTY,  AND PROCESSING RELATIONSHIPS”   Dr. Derrick Dean and John Tipton*   University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Department of Materials Science and  39


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  62 

63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

Engineering, Birmingham, AL 35205     “SYNTHESIS AND SINGLE MOLECULE CHARGING OF ARYLAMINE REDOX  NETWORKS”   Melody Kelley 1,2, Grace Chotsuwan 1,2, Silas Blackstock*1,2   1University of Alabama, Department of Chemistry, Tuscaloosa, AL 35404   2University of Alabama, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT),  Tuscaloosa, AL 35404     “HYDROXYCRUCIFORMS: AMINE‐RESPONSIVE FLUOROPHORES”    Psaras L. McGrier*, Kyril M. Solntsev, Shaobin Miao, Laren M. Tolbert, Oscar R.  Miranda, Vincent M. Rotello, and Uwe H. F. Bunz   Department of Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia     “ACETYLENE SUBSTITUED POLYTHIOPHENES FOR USE IN MOLECULAR  ELECTRONICS”   Racquel C. Jemison, Toby L. Nelson, Sarada P. Mishra, Richard D. McCullough*   Carnegie Mellon University, Chemistry Department, Pittsburgh, PA  15206     “THE USE OF SERS CHIPS FOR THE TRACE DETECTION OF HAZARDOUS  CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS”  Tolecia S. Clark*, Sehoon Chang, Srikanth Singamaneni,   Zachary Combs, and Vladimir V. Tsukruk  Georgia Institute of Technology, Materials Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332    “MULTIFUNCTIONAL ELECTROSPUN  POLYCAPROLACTONE/NANODIAMOND COMPOSITE SCAFFOLDS FOR  DELIVERY OF THERAPUETICS”  Amanee D. Salaam*1, Derrick Dean2 and Elijah Nyairo3   1University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Biomedical Engineering,  Birmingham, AL 35294   2 University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Materials Science and  Engineering, Birmingham, AL 35294   3 Alabama state Unversity, Department of Physical Sciences, Montgomery, AL 36101     “ELECTRON MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDIES ON NANOWIRE AND  NANOPARTICLE ARRAYS”  O. K. Amponsah*1, R. R. Rakhimov1, Yu Barnakov1, R. A. Lukaszew 2, J. C. Owrutsky3,  M. Pomfret3 and N. Noginova1  1Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA  2College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA  3Naval Research Lab, Washington DC    “CHARACTERIZATION AND OPTOMIZATION OF THE VISCOSITY OF  SURFACTANT MODIFIED BIOACTIVE GLASS”   40


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  Reginna E. Scarber*, Derrick R. Dean,   and Gregg M. Janowski1   University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Materials Science and   Engineering, Birmingham, AL 35294   69 

70 

71 

“BIOINFORMATIC ELUCIDATION OF CONSENSUS PHOSPHORYLATION  MOTIFS UTILIZING INTER‐SPECIES FUNCTIONAL DATA”   Leethaniel Brumfield1*, Joshua K. Sailsbery1, Douglas E. Brown1, Dr. Ralph A. Dean1   1Center for Integrated Fungal Research, North Carolina State University, CB 7244,  Raleigh, NC 27695‐7244, USA     “SYNTHESIS AND ANTIBACTERIAL POTENTIATION OF β‐LACTAM  ANTIBIOTIC‐BASED IONIC LIQUIDS”   Marsha R. Cole1, Min Li1, Bilal El‐Zahab1, Marlene E. Janes2, Daniel Hayes3, and Isiah M.  Warner*1   1 Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803,  USA   2 Department of Food Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton  Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA   3 Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Louisiana State University,  Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70803, USA     “SCOPE AND MECHANISM OF GOLD(I)‐CATALYZED INTERMOLECULAR  HYDROAMINATION AND OF ALLENES WITH ARYLAMINES”  Alethea N. Duncan* & Ross A. Widenhoefer   Duke University, Chemistry Department, Durham, NC 27708    

72 

“GUEST CATALYZED MOLECULAR ROTOR”  Brent E. Dial1, Roger D. Rasberry1, Ken D. Shimizu*1   1University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia,  SC 29208    

73 

74 

75 

“PROGRESS TOWARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF POTENTIAL PATHOGEN  BIOSENSORS”   Charlee K. McLean1*, Dr. Angela Winstead2, Dr. Richard Williams3   Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251   “THE TOTAL SYNTHESIS OF N‐METHYLWELWITINDOLINONE C  ISOTHIOCYANATE”   Dave A. Jenkins1, Kenneth J. Shea*2, John Brailsford3, and Siu‐Ling Sit4   University of California, Irvine, Department of Chemistry, Irvine, CA 92697     “SYNTHESES OF ORGANOMETALLIC COMPLEXES THAT MODEL THE  SEMICONDUCTOR INTERFACE OF TiO2 BASED DYE SENSITIZED SOLAR  CELLS”  Dayne D. Fraser and Kevin H. Shaughnessy*   Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Box 870336, Tuscaloosa, AL  41


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  76 

77 

79 

80 

81 

  “PROGRESS TOWARD THE SYNTHESIS OF CYANO CYANINE DYES “  Deveine Toney*, Dr. Angela Winstead   Morgan State University Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251    “DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC GLYCANS TO CAPTURE SHIGA TOXIN  VARIANTS”  Hailemichael Yosief and Suri S. Iyer*   Center for Chemical Sensors and Biosensors, Department of Chemistry, University of  Cincinnati   Cincinnati, Ohio 45221    “OPTIMIZATION OF A WATER ELECTROLYSIS CELL AS AN ALTERNATIVE  FUEL SOURCE”   Michael B. Miller1, Patrice Bell*1   1Georgia Gwinnett College, School of Science and Technology, Lawrenceville, GA 30043     “SYNTHESIS OF SPIROKETALS VIA GOLD CATALYSIS OF HYDROXY KETO‐ COMPOUNDS: A CURRENT APPROACH”   Morgan Hudson‐Davis, John Oxford, Ebonni Fischer, Kyle Manning and Dr. Karelle  Aiken*   Georgia Southern University, Department of Chemistry, Statesboro, GA 30460     “A CONVENIENT MICROWAVE SYNTHESIS OF QUINOLINE DERIVATIVES AS  POTENTIAL ANTI‐CANCER DRUGS”  Morgan Price and Nripendra Bose, Ph.D.*  Department of Chemistry, Spelman University, Atlanta, GA 

82 

83 

84 

85 

  “SYNTHESIS OF NOVEL EPOXY GEMINI SURFACTANTS FROM VERNONIA  OIL”   Nikki S. Johnson*, Folahan O. Ayorinde   Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC, 20059       “MICROWAVE ASSISTED NITRILE SYNTHESIS”   Ofuje Daniyan and Yousef Hijji*  Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University     “GOLD CATALYSES OF α‐PROPARGYLATED KETO SUBSTRATES TO FORM  FURAN DERIVATIVES”   Rayaj Ahamed and Dr. Karelle Aiken*   Georgia Southern University, Department of Chemistry, Statesboro, GA 30460     “APPROACHES TOWARD THE SYNTHESIS OF POLYARYLS USING THE  42


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

86 

LACTONE CONCEPT”  Sierra Mitchell, Donovan Thompson, W. Alan McDonald, Dr. Karen Welch and Dr.  Karelle Aiken*  Chemistry, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460    “EFFORTS TOWARD THE DESIGN AND EFFICIENT SYNTHESIS OF THE  ZOANTHAMINE ALKALOIDS”   Stefan France*   Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA    

87 

“ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTIONS FROM  ZANTHOXYLUM SETULOSUM IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL  STRUCTURES FOR CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC DRUGS”   Tameka, M., Walker*, William, N. Setzer   University of Alabama in Huntsville,  Department of Chemistry, Huntsville, AL, 35899    

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

“PURIFICATION OF BACTERIAL APOA‐1 AND CHARACTERIZATION OF  NOVEL NANOPARTICAL ANTICANCER DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM”   Thurman M. Young* Nirupama Sabnis and. Andras G. Lacko   University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Fort  Worth, TX 76107     “REACTIVITY OF DISTONIC SPECIES DERIVED FROM OXIDIZED  METHIONINE”  Tyrslai M. Williams*, Ashley Wallace, Michelle O. Claville Ph. D  Southern University & A&M College,  Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA     “ACCESSING SKELETAL DIVERSITY USING CATALYTIC CONTROL:  SYNTHESIS OF A MACROCYCLIC TRIAZOLE LIBRARY”  Esther O. Uduehi*, Ann R. Kelly, Lisa Marcaurelle   Broad Institute, Diversity‐Oriented Synthesis, Cambridge, MA 02142    “KINETIC EVALUATION OF DUAL BINDING HUMAN  ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS”  Alexander Lodge*1, Manza Atkinson2, Elizabeth Elacqua3, and Daniel Quinn4   University of Iowa, Department of Chemistry, Iowa City, IA 52242     EQUILLIBRIUM CONCENTRATION OF AMMONIA DISSOCIATION PRODUCTS  UNDER HIGH TEMPERATURES AND PRESSURES; A THEORETICAL STUDY   Asia S. Jackson*₁, and Dr. Beatriz Cardelino₂   ₁ Undergraduate Student, Spelman College, Chemistry Department, Atlanta, GA 30314   ₂ Professor of Chemistry, Spelman College, Chemistry Department, Atlanta, GA 30314     “DETERMINING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN EMULSIONS  DURING MICROWAVE HEATING BY STUDYING UNDERLYING HEATING  MECHANISMS OF TWO LAYERED SYSTEMS”   Daryl Cunningham, Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy   43


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, MD, 21251     “SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION STUDIES OF TUNGSTEN DOPED  TITANIUM DIOXIDE”   Faith Dukes*  Department of Chemistry, Tufts University     “MRMP2 ACTIVE SPACE COMPARISON OF THE CIS TO TRANS  ISOMERIZATION OF CYCLOHEXENE AND SUBSTITUTED CYCLOHEXENE  STRUCTURES”   Jeffrey D. Veals* and Dr. Steven R. Davis   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University, MS    “COLORIMETRIC HOST/GUEST INTERACTIONS OF  CYCLODEXTRIN/SPIROPYRAN MOLECULES”   Kamia Smith* and Thandi Buthelezi  Wheaton College, Department of Chemistry, Norton, MA, 02766    “FORMATION OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN AQUEOUS POLYMERIC  SOLUTIONS OF SULFONATED POLY ETHER‐ETHER KETONE (SPEEK)/POLY  VINYL ALCOHOL (PVA)”   PaviElle Lockhart1, Brian Little*1, German Mills1, Lewis Slaten2   1Auburn University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn, AL 36832   2Auburn University, Department of Consumer Affairs, Auburn, AL 36832     “THE EFFECT OF NANOCLAY PERCENT LOADINGS ON POLYMERIZATION  AND THERMAL PROPERTIES”   Brittany Fisher*, Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy,   Chemistry Department, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251     “THREE‐DIMENSIONAL STUDY OF SOLID HYDROGEN FLUORIDE ENERGIES  AND STRUCTURES USING MANY‐BODY PERTURBATION METHODS”   Olaseni Sode and So Hirata*   Quantum Theory Project and The Center for Macromolecular Science and Engineering,  Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611‐8435    “SENDING MIXED MESSAGES: INSTRUCTORS WHO ASK STUDENTS TO  SHOW THEIR WORK BUT PENALIZE THEM WHEN THEY DO”   Jacinta M. Mutambuki1, Herb Fynewever*2   1Western Michigan University,  Department of Chemistry, Kalamazoo, MI 49008   2Calvin College,  Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Grand Rapids, MI 49546     “FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY AS A MECHANISM FOR ENHANCING STUDENT  LEARNING”   Odell Glenn Jr.*, Derrick Huggins and Mike Matthews   44


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

102 

103 

Department of Chemical Engineering and Vehicle Management and Parking Services   The University of South Carolina     “ANALYSIS OF CHEMISTRY ATTITUDES AND EXPERIENCES QUESTIONNAIRE  (CAEQ)I AND RESEARCH EXPERIENCE SURVEYS AT A NEW FOUR YEAR  INSTITUTION. PHASE TWO FINDINGS”   Patrice Bell*1, Deborah Sauder1   1Georgia Gwinnett College, School of Science and Technology, Lawrenceville, GA 30043     “SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF “CLICKABLE” AND ION  EXCHANGED ZEOLITE Y FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS”  Nicholas Ndiege, Renugan Raidoo, Michael K. Schultz, Sarah Larsen*  University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242   

  4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.   

  Science Bowl/Fair Volunteers’  Meeting  

6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:30 p.m. 

Science Competition Opening Dinner 

  8:30 p.m. ‐‐ 9:00 p.m.  Science Fair Poster setup   

Imperial  Imperial  International  level 

    Thursday,  April 1   

 

 

  

  

7:15 a.m. ‐ 7:45 a.m. 

NPC Committee Meeting 

7:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m. 

Science Fair Judging  

TBA  International  level 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 1:00 p.m   

Conference Registration 

    Thursday, a.m. 

Award Symposium 4  NOBCChE Undergraduate Award Competition  8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.    (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation) 

Session Chair:  8:00 – 8:20 

Marquis Level      M101   

  Calvin James, Ph.D., The Lubrizol Corporation  Lurbrizol Corporation Undergraduate Awardee  “EXPANDING THE PROCESSING WINDOW OF NANOPARTICLE THIN  FILMS”  45


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

8:20 – 8:40 

8:40 – 9:00 

9:00 – 9:20 

9:20 – 9:40 

Earnest F. Long, Jr. and Dr. Daeyeon Lee*  University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA    Colgate‐Palmolive Company Undergraduate Awardee  “SYNTHYESIS OF FLUOROGENIC CYANINE DYES”   Stanley Oyaghire*, Dr. Angela Winstead1, Dr. Bruce Armitage2  1Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore MD 21251  2 Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Chemistry, Pittsburgh PA 73110    Winifred Burks‐Houck Undergraduate Awardee  “ELECTROLESS NICKEL BASED CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGEN  GENERATION BY HYDROLYSIS OF NABH4”  Shannon P. Anderson, Egwu Eric Kalu  Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering, FAMU‐FSU College of  Engineering, Tallahassee, FL    Lubrizol Corporation Undergraduate Awardee  “ARTIFICAL KIDNEY RESEARCH”  Yazmin Feliz, Edward Leonard*, Michael Hill* and Joe Woo*                            1Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY  2Columbia University, New York, NY                                            Colgate‐Palmolive Company Undergraduate Awardee  “OCEAN ACIDIFICATION IMPACTS ON LARVAL SHELL FORMATION  BY ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS (BAY SCALLOP) OF NEW ENGLAND”  Melissa A Pinard*1, Dr Daniel McCorkle2, Dr Anne Cohen3  Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore MD, 21251(1)  Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole MA, 02543(2,3)   

 

   

Thursday, a.m. 

 

 

  Professional Development Workshop:  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  ʺMaking an Impact on Your Research Project:   Lessons from the Benchʺ 

M102 

 

Presenters: 

Lamont Terrell, PhD, GlaxoSmithKline;   James Tarver, PhD, Lexicon Pharmaceuticals;  Ronald Lewis, II, PhD, Pfizer, Inc   

 

 

 

46


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 10:00 a.m. 

Meeting with Atlanta Middle and High  School Students 

10:00 a.m.‐ 12:30 p.m. 

Georgia Institute of Technology Tour and   Panel Discussion 

10:00 a.m. ‐‐ 5:00 p.m.  Science Fair Public Viewing   

(off‐site) 

International  level 

 

Thursday, a.m. 

   

International B 

  Science Bowl Competitions: Junior Division++  10:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.  International  level  sponsored by Agilent Technologies and ACS  Department of Diversity Programs   

 

Thursday, a.m. 

  Science Bowl Competitions: Senior  Division++  10:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.  sponsored by Agilent Technologies and ACS  Department of Diversity Programs         

 

Thursday, a.m. 

International  level 

 

  Plenary IV:   11:00 a.m. ‐12:00 p.m.  Nigerian Society of Chemical Engineers  Presentation   

M101 

“Development Of Relevant Skills Required For Industry In Young Chemical Engineers Trained  From Universities In Nigeria For Optimum Performance In Indurstry”   

Prof Francis O. Olatunji, President, NSChE  Infinite Grace House, Plot 9, Oyetubo Street, Off Obafemi Awolowo Way, Ikeja Lagos. Nigeria. 

      47


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  12:00 p.m. ‐‐ 1:00 p.m.  LUNCH ON YOUR OWN      Award Symposium 5  1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.  Milligan Symposium  Sponsored by NIST and the University of Maryland  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)     

  Thursday, p.m.   

  M104 

  A Graduate Fellowship Award, focused on increasing the number of African‐Americans in the  chemical sciences, is being offered in memory of Dolphus E. Milligan, a preeminent scientist at the  National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Dr. Milligan was instrumental in the  formation of The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and  Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE). The Milligan Graduate Fellowship has been made possible through  support from the Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory (CSTL) at NIST and the Department of  Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park.  The Fellowship winner will  be chosen through this award symposium and announced at the Annual NOBCChE Awards Banquet.        Thursday, p.m. 

Session Chair: 

Technical Session 7  1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Global Sustainability in Science,   Engineering and Policy  Sponsored by NOBCChE, AiChE and NSChE  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)    Darlene Schuster, AIChE‐Institute for Sustainability 

  M106   

1:00 – 1:30 

Invited Speaker  CREDENTIALING – MAKING SUSTAINABILITY SUSTAINABLE   Deborah Grubbe*  AIChE‐Institute for Sustainability 

 

   

1:30 – 1:50 

“KINETICS OF BIO‐CATALYZED PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL FROM  RENEWABLE FEEDSTOCKS”  Michael Gyamerah*  Department of Chemical Engineering, Roy G. Perry College of Engineering,   Prairie View A & M University, Prairie View, TX 77446  48


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  1:50 – 2:10 

2:10 – 2:20  2:20 – 2:35 

2:35 – 2:50 

2:50 – 3:05 

3:05 – 3:25 

3:25 – 3:45 

3:45 – 3:55  3:55 – 4:15 

“CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF GLYCEROL INTO HIGHER VALUE  MIXED ALCOHOLS”                                       Roderick McDowell1, Rukiya Umoja, George Armstrong1, 39174 Mouzhgun  Anjom2, and Devinder Mahajan*2   1Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174, 2Brookhaven National Laboratory,  Upton, NY 11973    Break    “REACTION KINETICS OF CELLLULOSE HYDROLYSIS IN  SUBCRITICAL AND SUPERCRITICAL WATER”   Kazeem B. Olanrewaju, Taiying Zhang, and Gary A. Aurand*   The University of Iowa, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering,  Iowa City, IA, 52242     “UNCATALYZED ESTERIFICATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS WITH  SUPERCRITICAL ETHANOL”   Kehinde S. Bankole and Gary A. Aurand*   The University of Iowa, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering,  Iowa City, IA, 52242     “KINETIC STUDY OF ALCOHOLYSIS OF BROWN GREASE CATALYZED  BY ALUMINUM CHLORIDE”   Solomon Simiyu, John B. Miller and Steven B. Bertman*   Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan  “A GENERAL APPROACH TO MULTICOMPONENT DISTILLATION  COLUMN DESIGN”  T.J. Afolabi1 and A. O. Denloye2  1Department of Chemical Engineering,  Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria  2Department of Chemical Engineering,  University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba. Lagos, Nigeria    “SELF‐ASSEMBLED POLYMERIC MATERIALS FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC  APPLICATIONS”   Dahlia Haynes*, Courtney Balliet, Tomask Young, Richard McCullough   Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213     Break    “TECHNOPRENEUSHIP CONSIDERATIONS IN ENHANCING  CAPACITY BUILDING FOR DEVELOPING NATIONS”  Engr. Enefiok E. Ubom*  Infinite Grace House, Plot 9, Oyetubo street, Off Obafemi Awolowo Way, Ikeja  Lagos, Nigeria  49


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  4:15 – 4:35 

4:35 – 4:55 

  “THE NEED FOR THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES TO DEVELOP A MIX OF  ALTERNATI.VE ENERGY SOURCES FOR INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT  AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS: THE CHALLENGE FOR  NIGERIA”                        Prof. Francis O. Olatunji*  Infinite Grace House, Plot 9, Oyetubo Street  Off Obafemi Awolowo Way, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria    “CHEMICAL ENGINEERING: A CRITICAL TOOL FOR ECONOMIC  ADVANCEMENT OF NIGERIA”  Nche John D. Erinne*   Chex & Associates (Consultants & Engineers)  3 Wilmer Street, Ilupeju, Lagos, Nigeria

 

    Professional Development Workshop:  1:00 p.m. ‐ 3:00 p.m.  M103   ʺHermann’s Whole Brain Thinking Model  – Understand Thinking Stylesʺ    Martha White‐Warren,  Procter & Gamble, Associate Director of Human Resources 

Thursday, p.m. 

Presenter: 

1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m.  1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m. 

Southwest Regional Meeting  Southeast Regional Meeting 

M102  M105 

1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m.  1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m. 

Northeast Regional Meeting  Midwest Regional Meeting 

M107  M108 

1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m.         

West Regional Meeting 

M109 

  Thursday, p.m. 

Session Chair: 

  Award Symposium 6  3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Graduate Student Fellowship Sci‐Mix  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)    Daphne N. Robinson, The Lubrizol Corporation  50

  M101   


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  3:00 – 3:20 

Procter & Gamble Fellowship Awardee  “CELL‐RESPONSIVE PEPTIDE NUCLEIC ACID SIRNA  NANOCONJUGATES FOR GENE DELIVERY”   Abbygail A. Palmer*, Millicent O. Sullivan   University of Delaware, Department of Chemical Engineering, Newark, DE  

3:20 – 3:40 

3:40 – 4:00 

4:00 – 4:20 

4:20 – 4:40 

 

  Winifred Burks‐Houck Graduate Awardee  “INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF ELECTRON DELOCALIZATION  ON INTERACTIONS BETWEEN WATER AND HYDROCARBONS”   Kari L. Copeland* and Gregory S. Tschumper   University of Mississippi, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,   University, MS 38677    Dow Chemical Company Fellowship Awardee  “SELF‐ASSEMBLED MONOLAYER DIRECTED GROWTH OF  PLATINUM NANOPARTICLES BY ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION”  Marja Mullings*,1 Xirong  Jiang2 and Stacey Bent1  1Department of Chemical Engineering, 2Department of Physics, Stauffer III,  Chemical Engineering  381 North‐South, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA    Lendon N. Pridgen, GlaxoSmithKline ‐ NOBCChE Fellowship Awardee  “A DIASTEREOSELECTIVE FISCHER INDOLIZATION APPROACH  TOWARD FUSED INDOLINE‐CONTAINING NATURAL PRODUCTS”  Tehetena Mesganaw*  University of California, Los Angeles    E.I. Dupont Graduate Fellowship Awardee  “THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE PARKINSON’S DISEASE‐ RELATED MUTANT I93M OF THE DEUBIQUITINATING ENZYME  UCHL1”  Christopher W. Davies, Tushar K. Maiti, Chittaranjan Das*  Purdue University, Department of Chemistry, West Lafayette, IN 47905   

  Thursday, p.m. 

  Technical Session 8    3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.    Inorganic Chemistry  (ʺTITLE,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)   

Session Chair: 

Murphy Keller, Ph.D., US Dept of Energy  51

M102 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  3:00 – 3:20 

“EFFECT OF ANCILLARY LIGANDS AND SOLVENTS ON H/D  EXCHANGE REACTIONS CATALYZED BY CP*IR COMPLEXES”   Yuee Feng*, Bi Jiang, Paul Boyle, Elon A. Ison   Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC,  27695‐8204  

3:20 – 3:35   

3:35 – 3:50   

3:50 – 4:05 

4:05 – 4:20 

4:20 – 4:35 

  “MOLECULAR BASED SYNTHESIS OF SOLID STATE HIGH  NUCLEARITY LANTHANIDE CHALCOGENIDE CLUSTERS FOR  OPTOELECTRONIC AND SCINTILLATION APPLICATIONS”   Brian F. Moore1 , Thomas Emge1 ,Ajith Kumar2 , Richard Riman2 , John G.  Brennan1   (1)       Department of Chemisty & Chemical Biology, Rutgers, The State  University of New Jersey, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854   (2)        Department of Ceramics and Materials Engineering, Rutgers, The State  University of New Jersey, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854     “ANISOTROPIC MAGNETISM IN LnNiGa4 (Ln = Y, Gd – Yb)”   Kandace R. Thomas*1, Richard D. Hembree1, Amar B. Karki2, Yi Li2,   Jiandi Zhang2, David P. Young2, John Ditusa2 and Julia Chan1   1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana  70803   2Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton  Rouge, Louisiana 70803     “DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL PHARMACEUTICAL COCRYSTALS: THE  USE OF NUTRACEUTICALS AS GENERAL PURPOSE COCRYSTAL  FORMERS”   Heather D. Clarke, Michael J. Zaworotko*   University of South Florida, Department of Chemistry, Tampa, FL 33620     “THE ELECTRON TRANSFER CHEMISTRY OF REVERSIBLE TWO  ELECTRON PLATINUM REAGENTS”   Ronnie Muvirimi*, Jeanette A. Krause, William B. Connick   University Of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221     “PREPARATION AND VOLTAMMETRIC STUDY OF DIRUTHENIUM  PADDLEWHEEL COMPLEXES BEARING EQUATORIAL FERROCENE  SUBSTITUENT”   Darryl A. Boyd*1, Phillip E. Fanwick1, Robert J. Crutchley2, Tong Ren*1   1Purdue University, Department of Chemistry, West Lafayette, IN 47907   Carleton University, Department of Chemistry, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6,  CANADA    

2

52


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  4:35 – 4:55 

“COMBINING INDUSTRIAL AND ACADEMIC RESEARCH  STRENGTHS TO TACKLE GRAND CHALLENGES”   Takiya J. Ahmed,* Karen I. Goldberg, D. Michael Heinekey    University of Washington, Department of Chemistry, Seattle, WA 98105    

4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Secondary Education Meeting with Student  Chaperones 

International B  International  Level 

7:00 p.m. ‐‐10:00 p.m.   Science Competition Dinner 

Thursday, p.m. 

  Plenary V  7:30 pm. ‐ 10:30 p.m.  Awards Ceremony & Gala Dinner (ticketed)  6:30 ‐ 7:00 p.m. Reception  7:00 ‐ 9:30 p.m. Dinner and Awards Program  9:30 ‐ 11:00 p.m. Live Entertainment       

 

Imperial 

 

   

Friday, April 2   

  

  

Friday, a.m. 

  Science Bowl Finals   8:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  Championship Rounds  Junior/Senior Division Sponsored by Agilent  and American Chemical Society 

M106 & M107 

                     

 

 

 

53


PROGRAM SCHEDULE   

Friday, a.m. 

2:30 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

 

Science Competition Awards Luncheon  (ticketed), 11:30 p.m. ‐ 1:45 p.m.  Guest Speaker ‐  Charles Bolden, Jr.,   NASA Administrator, Houston, TX    Science Competition Educational Trip         

54

Imperial 

Courtland St. Exit  to Board busses   


NOBCChE 2010 EXHIBITORS 

2010 Exhibitors 3M  St. Paul, MN   

AAAS  Washington, DC   

American Chemical Society  Washington, DC   

Auburn University  Auburn, AL   

Carnegie Mellon University  Pittsburgh, PA   

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   Atlanta, GA   

Colgate‐Palmolive  Piscataway, NJ   

Cornell University  Ithaca, NY   

Corning Inc.  Corning, NY   

Defense Threat Reduction Agency  Alexandria, VA   

Drug Enforcement Administration  Arlington, VA 

  55


NOBCChE 2010 EXHIBITORS  The Dow Chemical Company  Midland, MI    

Dow Corning Corporation  Midland, MI    

DuPont  Pawtucket, RI   

Eli Lilly and Company   Indianapolis, IN   

Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University/  NOAA Environmental Cooperative Center   Tallahassee, FL   

Georgia Institute of Technology  Atlanta, GA   

HJ Heinz Company  Pittsburgh, PA   

Hunter College, Gene Center  New York, NY   

Indiana University  Bloomington, IN   

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory  Laurel, MD   

Los Alamos National Laboratory  Los Alamos, NM  

Lubrizol  Wickliffe, OH    56

 


NOBCChE 2010 EXHIBITORS  Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Cambridge, MA   

Merck & Company, Inc.  West Point, PA   

National Institute of Standards and Technology  Gaithersburg, MD   

National Organization of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers  Washington, DC   

Norfolk State University  Norfolk, VA   

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education   Oak Ridge, TN   

The Ohio State University  Columbus, OH   

Procter & Gamble  Cincinnati, OH   

Purdue University, Graduate School  West Lafayette, IN   

Roche  Nutley, NJ   

Texas Southern University  Houston, TX   

University of Alabama at Birmingham  Birmingham, AL   

57


NOBCChE 2010 EXHIBITORS  University of California – Davis   Davis, CA   

University of Maryland  College Park, MD   

University of Massachusetts Amherst  Amherst, MA   

University of Notre Dame, Graduate School  Notre Dame, IN   

University of Washington, CENTC   Seattle, WA 

  Washington University in St. Louis  St. Louis, MO   

Western Michigan University  Kalamazoo, MI   

United States Environmental Protection Agency  Washington, DC   

United States Customs and Border Patrol Washington, DC   

Xavier University/NSF Chemistry Division REU Leadership Group New Orleans, LA The above lists of sponsors and exhibitors are complete as of March 3, 2010. Any additional sponsors and/or exhibitors will be listed on the communications board at the conference site.

58


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS  

Sunday a.m. 

  COACH Workshop ‐ registration required  8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.   “Professional Skills Training for Minority  Graduate Students and Postdocs”    Presented by Jane Tucker and Ernestine  Taylor   

L504 

 

This workshop is designed to introduce negotiations or solution findings to graduate students and  postdocs.  Participants  will  learn  to  develop  their  “best  alternative  to  a  negotiated  agreement”  and  finding their own personal negotiation styles. Attendees will practice through a selection from case  studies  including  developing  a  strong  advocate,  credit  for  research  and  publications,  developing  connectedness,  obtaining  resources  that  enable  productivity,  opportunity  to  demonstrate  strong  performance,  the  “all  important”  reference  letter  and  contracting  for  that  first  or  new  position.  Discussions will focus on issues relevant to minority women.     

Sunday a.m. 

 

  COACh Workshop‐ registration required  8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.  I  ‐ “Making Change: Being Strategic in  Uncertain Waters”  and    II ‐ “COAChing Strong Women in the Art of  Strategic Persuasion”     Presented by Sandra Shullman and   Gilda Barabino   

L505 

 

I‐  In  this  workshop  participants  assimilate  fundamentals  of  responsible  negotiations  and  conflict  resolution;  they  learn  to  be  curious  about  points  of  view,  data,  and  aspirations  of  all  parties  involved. Attendees examine the importance of developing alternatives to agreement that build self‐ confidence  and  enhance  preparation.  They  use  self‐examination  to  discover  personal  negotiating  styles  and  in  prepared  case  studies  covering  current  challenges,  practice  skills  to  reach  highly  successful outcomes.        II  ‐  In  this  workshop  participants  assimilate  fundamentals  of  responsible  negotiations  and  conflict  resolution;  they  learn  to  be  curious  about  points  of  view,  data,  and  aspirations  of  all  parties  involved.  Attendees  examine  the  importance  of  developing  alternatives  to  agreement  that  build  selfconfidence and enhance preparation. They use self‐examination to discover personal negotiating  styles  and  in  prepared  case  studies  covering  current  challenges,  practice  skills  to  reach  highly  successful outcomes  59


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS     Monday, p.m.  

Henry A. Hill Luncheon Lecture 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. 

  Imperial   Sponsored by the American Chemistry Society Northeast Section      Dr. Henry A. Hill  1977 ACS President 

       Dr. Henry Aaron Hill (1915 – 1979), the renowned African ‐ American chemist in whose memory  this  award  was  established,  was  a  former  Chairman  of  the  ACS  Northeastern  Section  (1963)  and  President  of  the  American  Chemical  Society  in  1977.  Dr.  Hill’s  outstanding  contributions  to  chemistry, particularly industrial chemistry, and to the professional welfare of chemists are legion.  Dr. Hill’s first concern and interest was in his fellow humans, and this was the driving force behind  all that he did both in the chemical community and the world at large.       Henry  Hill  was  a  native  of  St.  Joseph,  Missouri.  He  was  a  graduate  of  Johnson  C.  Smith  University in North Carolina and received the doctorate degree from M.I.T. in 1942, after getting the  highest grades in his class. He began a professional career in industrial chemistry in that year, with  North Atlantic Research Corporation of Newtonville, Massachusetts. He eventually rose to be vice  president while doing research on and development of water‐based paints, fire‐fighting foam, and  several  types  of  synthetic  rubber.  After  leaving  North  Atlantic  Research,  he  worked  as  a  group  leader in the research laboratories of Dewey and Almy Chemical Company before starting his own  entrepreneurial  venture—National  Polychemicals  in  1952.  Ten  years  later  he  founded  Riverside  Research Laboratories in Cambridge, Mass. The firm offered research, development and consulting  services  in  resins,  rubbers,  textiles  and  in  polymer  production.  Riverside  Research  Laboratory  introduced  four  successful  commercial  enterprises,  including  its  own  manufacturing  affiliate.  Dr.  Hill,  particularly  after  having  been  appointed  by  President  Lyndon  Johnson  to  the  National  Commission  on  Product  Safety,  became  active  in  research  and  testing  programs  in  the  field  of  product flammability and product safety.       The  American  Chemical  Society  was  always  very  close  to  Henry  Hill’s  heart.  His  active  career  with  the  ACS  began  in  the  middle  1950s  in  the  Northeastern  Section.  Dr.  Hill  served  on  Northeastern  Section  committees,  became  a  councilor  in  1961  and  was  Chairman  of  the  Section  in  1963.  He  served  the  ACS  in  important  National  positions  including  secretary  and  chairman  of  the  Professional Relations Committee, the ACS Council; Policy Committee, the Board of Directors, and  ultimately  president  in  1977.  He  made  an  especially  significant  impact  in  professionalism  by  pioneering establishment of a set of guidelines defining acceptable behavior for employers in their  professional  relations  with  chemists  and  chemical  engineers.  This  effort  resulted  in  the  ACS  landmark document entitled ʺProfessional Employment Guidelines.ʺ       Dr.  Henry  Hill  was  the  first  African  American  to  become  President  of  the  American  Chemical  Society.  In recognition of his many outstanding achievements, NOBCChE identifies an outstanding  African  –  American  chemist  or  chemical  engineer  to  be  designated  as  that  year’s  Henry  A.  Hill  Lecturer. Dr. Joseph Francisco, Professor of Chemistry, Purdue University, and current President of  the  American  Chemical  Society,  is  this  year’s  honoree.  Our  award  is  sponsored  by  the  ACS  Northeast Section and the MIT Chemistry Department.  60


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS  

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

  Award Symposium 1: The Winifred Burks‐ Houck Womenʹs Leadership Symposium:   Women of Color Reshaping our Economy  through Science     Speaker: Gwendolyn Boyd,

M106 

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

    The Winifred Burks‐Houck Professional Leadership Award is the first NOBCChE award inspired by  and created to honor the contributions of African American Women in science and technology. The  Winifred  Burks‐Houck  Professional  Leadership  Symposium  aims  to  honor  Winifred  A.  Burks‐ Houck,  the  first  female  president  of  NOBCChE,  by  highlighting  the  scientific  achievements,  creativity, leadership, and community service of two NOBCChE‐affiliated professional women and  a NOBCChE undergraduate and graduate student working towards a degree in chemistry, chemical  engineering, or a related field.     

    Teachers Workshop  M106 & M107        7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.    “Teachersʹ Embracing Science through Education” 

Tuesday, a.m./p.m.  Wednesday, a.m./p.m.   

Sponsored by 3M,  AAAS,   Abbott Laboratories, ACS, NASA/UCLA,  and NOBCChE         This  year’s  science  teachers’  workshop  will  assist  science  educators  at  the  elementary,  secondary,  and  high  school  levels  using  various  teaching  strategies  and  techniques.    The  2009  workshop  will  also  provide  resources  and  materials  that  will  assist  in  enhancing  your  curriculum.  In  addition,  educators  will  have  an  opportunity  to  discuss  issues  and  various  challenges  that  face  science  educators.      The  objective  for  this  2  day  workshop  is  to  assist  educators  in  improving  test  scores  among minority and underrepresented students.  This will further assist students to pursue careers  in science and technology.                     61


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   PercyL Julian Lecture &   PercyL Julian Luncheon Lecture  8:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m. &  12:00 ‐ 1:30 p.m. 

  Tuesday, p.m. 

M101 

  Imperial 

    Dr. Percy L. Julian (1899 – 1975)  National Academy of Sciences (Elected 1973) 

    The Percy L. Julian Award for significant contributions in pure and/or applied research in science or  engineering is our most prestigious award. Dr. Julian was an African‐American who obtained his BS  in  Chemistry  from  DePauw  University  in  1920.  Although  he  entered  DePauw  as  a  “substandard  freshman,” he graduated as the class valedictorian with Phi Beta Kappa honors. His first job was as  an  instructor  at  Fisk  University.  Julian  left  Fisk  and  obtained  a  masterʹs  degree  in  chemistry  from  Harvard in 1928, and his Ph.D. in 1931 from the University of Vienna, Austria. It was after his return  to DePauw in 1933 that Julian conducted the research that led to the synthesis of physostigmine, a  drug used in the treatment of glaucoma2. Julian left DePauw in 1936 to become director of research  of the Soya Products Division of the Glidden Company in Chicago. This position at Glidden made  Julian  the  world’s  first  African  –  American  to  lead  a  research  group  in  a  major  corporation.  Dr.  Julian  rewarded  Gliden’s  faith  in  him  by  producing  many  new  commercial  products  from  soy  beans. An entrepreneur as well as a scientist, in 1953 he founded Julian Laboratories and later Julian  Associates, Inc. and the Julian Research Institute. Over the course of his career he acquired over 115  patents, including one for a fire‐extinguishing foam that was used on oil and gasoline fires during  World  War  II2.  Though  he  had  over  100  patents  and  200  scientific  publications,  his  most  notable  contribution was in the synthesis of steroids from soy and sweet potato products.  Dr. Julian’s life  and  contributions  were  the  subject  of  a  recent  biopic  by  NOVA/PBS  entitled,  “Forgotten  Genius.”3  The film was broadcast nationally on February 6, 2007 on PBS TV stations.    The table below summarizes the winners of the NOBCChE Percy L Julian Award:  Year 

  Award Recipients 

1975 

Dr. Arnold Stancel (1) Mobil Oil Company 

1977  1979 

Dr. W. Lincoln Hawkins, Bell Laboratories   Dr. William Lester, Lawrence Berkeley  Laboratory  

1981 

Dr. James Mitchell (2), Bell Laboratories 

1982 

Dr. K.M. Maloney, Allied Corporation 

Year  Award Recipients  1995  Dr. Joseph Francisco, Purdue University   Dr. Edward Gay, Argonne National  1996  Laboratory   1997  Dr. James H. Porter , UV Technologies  1998  Dr. William A. Guillory, Innovations   Consulting  1999  Dr. Linneaus Dorman,  Dow Chemical  62


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS    Company  2001  John E. Hodge (5) (1914–96), U.S. Department     of Agriculture, Peoria, IL   2001  James A. Harris (5) (1932–2000), Lawrence  Berkeley Laboratory   2002  Dr. Victor McCrary, Johns Hopkins Applied  Physics Laboratory  2003  Dr. Victor Atiemo‐Obeng, Dow Chemical  Company 

1983 

Dr. B.W. Turnquest, ARCO Petroleum  

1985  1986 

Dr. William Jackson, (3) Howard University   Dr. George Reed,  Argonne National  Laboratory 

1987 

Dr. Reginald Mitchell, Stanford University 

1988  1989 

Dr. Isiah Warner (4), Emory University   Dr. James C. Letton, Procter & Gamble  Company  Dr. Theodore Williams, College of Wooster  (Ohio) 

2004  Dr. Gregory Robinson, University of Georgia 

1991 

Dr. Bertrand Frazier‐Reed, Duke University  

2007  Dr. Kenneth Carter, UMass 

1992 

Dr. Willie May, NIST  

2008  Dr. Sharon Haynie, DuPont 

1993 

Dr. Joseph Gordon, IBM  

1994 

Dr. Dotsevi Y. Sogah, Cornell University  

2009  Dr. Soni Olufemi Oyekan, Marathon Oil  2010  Dr. Thomas Menash, GA Aerospace Systems 

1990 

2005  Dr. James H. Wyche, University of Miami  2006  Dr. Jimmie L. Williams, Corning Incorporated  

  References and recommended reading 1 2 3

NOBCChE’s Percy L Julian Award, http://www.nobcche.org/index.cfm?PageID=50174597-757C-432EBA8C253625586175&PageObjectID=37 Percy Julian, Wikipedia Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Julian Julian – Trail Blazer, Peter Tyson, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/julian/civil.html

 

 

   Tuesday, a.m. 

  Plenary II – Percy L Julian Lecture   8:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m.  

  M101 

 

“Innovative Solutions Needed For Green Energy Development”    Presenter: 

Thomas Menash, Ph.D.  President, Georgia Aerospace Systems   

There  is  the  need  to  develop  future  Green  Energy  Industries  to  maintain  the  global  economic  leadership  of  the  United  States.  This  lecture  will  examine  major  hurdles  faced  by  engineers  and  scientists  as  they  develop  technical  solutions  to  the  challenges  in  Green  Energy  development.  Carbon capture is a key challenge in clean coal technology development, while the lack of enzymes  to  break  down  cellulose  on  large  scale  is  a  critical  barrier  in  converting  waste  sawdust  to  clean  energy.  The  presentation  will  also  focus  on  generation  of  energy  by  wind  mill  systems  as  well  as  solar  techniques  and  the  challenges  of  the  transmission  grid  design  as  they  exist  today  in  the  country.   

63


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   The development of 21 st century Transportation system proposed to the Obama Administration in  January  2009  by  the  author  will  also  be  discussed.  This  proposal  has  been  adopted  and  is  being  implemented in different states.   

  Professional Development Workshop:  1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m.  Tuesday, p.m.   ʺStand Out at a Professional Conferenceʺ  M102  sponsored by ACS and NOBCChE      Instructors: Constance Thompson, ACS and Erick Ellis, Jackson State University    Have  you  ever  wandered  aimlessly  around  a  career  fair  or  conference  waiting  for  someone  to  approach you with the career opportunity of a lifetime? Are you unsure of how to get the most out  of  your  time  spent  at  a  career  fair  or  professional  conference?  If  so,  this  workshop  was  designed  with you in mind!    

By the end of this session, you will:  1.) Know  the  purpose  of  career  fairs  and  professional  conferences  and  how  to  best  navigate  them.   2.) Stand  out  from  other  participants  by  leveraging  “insider  tips”  on  resumes,  cover  letters,  approaching employers and acing the “two minute interview”.   3.) Learn the biggest mistake people make at Career Fairs and how to avoid them.   4.) Hear  first  hand  from  participating  employers  the  types  of  opportunities  and  skills  sets  needed for their opportunities.   5.) Be better prepared to snag the career opportunity of lifetime! 

  Tuesday, p.m.  

The Chemistry of Crime 1:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m   Sponsored by DEA, CBP, and DHS 

  M103 &  M104 

Instructors:  Darrell Davis, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX  April L. Idleburg, Drug Enforcement Administration, Nashville Sub‐Regional Laboratory Renee Stevens, Customs and Border Protection Laboratory, Springfield, VA  Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office, Houston, TX  Joe Maberry, Drug Enforcement Agency, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX  Who did it? How? and Where? are commonly‐asked questions in the game of Clue and in many of our  favorite  television  shows.  Episodes  of  Law  &  Order,  CSI,  NCIS,  and  Snapped  may  depict  crime  scene  investigations,  but  they  often  fall  short  of  realistically  portraying  the  complexities  and  64


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   challenges  associated  with  collecting  viable  evidence.  In  the  dramas  and  reenactments,  the  non‐ scientific  audience  rarely  sees  the  real  science  behind  crime  solving.In  reality,  crime  scene  investigations are most successful when the facts are revealed through the complex union of sharp  detective  work  and  targeted  forensic  analysis  of  the  evidence.  This  workshop  will  focus  on  the  integral role of science in crime scene investigations.    This workshop will also explore the multifaceted occupations of several different types of Forensic  Scientists  (i.e.,  Forensic  Chemists,  Latent  Fingerprint  Examiners,  Digital  Evidence  Examiners,  etc.).  Participants  will  learn  about  crime  scenes,  evidence,  and  evidence  integrity  from  a  scientific  perspective.  Hands‐on  experience  in  standard  forensic  procedures  typically  performed  at  a  crime  scene will be offered. Demonstrations on the collection and documentation of evidence and on the  use of scientific instrumentation (i.e., Ion Mobility Spectrometry) will be given.       

 

Tuesday, p.m.  

  Presenter 

    “So You Think You Can Dance? What It  M102  Takes To Find A Job”  4:00 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.    Nick Nikolaides, Ph.D.  Manager, Doctoral Recruiting & University Relations  The Procter & Gamble Company  Sponsored by Procter & Gamble   

 

In today’s competitive environment, looking for a job is quite often a full time job itself. Along with  solid  technical  skills,  employers  are  requiring  that  top  candidates  must  also  master  many  of  the  “soft” skills including leadership, collaboration, and communication. Attentive preparation of one’s  resume,  cover  letters,  and  technical  presentations  is  absolutely  essential.  This  presentation  offers  useful tips and suggestions to enhance your chances of “landing” that perfect job, whether right out  of school or looking for a new career after being downsized or laid off.      

              65


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS     Professional Development Workshop:  “Academia:  What Are Your Options”  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.   Wednesday, a.m. 

 

Isiah Warner, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry  Louisiana State University   

M105 

 

This  workshop  is  designed  to  explore  the  various  options  for  graduate  students  considering  an  academic  career  and  faculty  already  in  the  early  stages  of  an  academic  career.      We  will  explore  various  job  opportunities  in  academia,  including  tenure‐track  and  non  tenure‐track  academic  positions.  In addition, we will discuss the “do’s and don’t’s” of working toward tenure in a tenure‐ track  position  in  small,  medium,  and  large  academic  institutions.    A  question  and  answer  session  will follow the presentations at this workshop.       

Wednesday, a.m. 

Presenters: 

  Professional Development Workshop:  9:00 am. ‐‐ 10:00 a.m.  Chemistry at the National Science  M102  Foundation: New Programs, Funding  Opportunities and Outreach    Tyrone D. Mitchell, Charles Pibel, C. Renee Wilkerson, National Science Foundation   

This  presentation  will  highlight  new  programs  and  some  of  the  many  funding  opportunities  available  from  the  National  Science  Foundation  (NSF)  for  activities  in  science  research,  education,  and  outreach.  Program  directors  from  NSF  will  discuss  funding  opportunities  spanning  all  career  stages  in  the  chemical  sciences  from  undergraduate  students  to  senior  investigators  (e.g.  REU,  GRFP,  ACC‐F,  CAREER,  CRIF,  MRI,  individual  investigator  awards,  etc.).  Presenters  will  share  helpful  hints  about  proposal  preparation,  the  proposal  review  process,  and  becoming  a  reviewer  and panelist for NSF proposals. 

            66


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS  

   Wednesday, a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:   ʺThe Internship:  The Practice Field of  Professional Trainingʺ  10:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  Guest Speaker ‐ Ramsey L. Smith, Ph.D.,  NASA   

M103 

The internship process can be difficult to navigate. If the student starts an internship with an open  mind  and  also  prepared  to  conquer  the  academic  challenges  they  will  face,  it  will  result  in  a  wonderful professional development experience. From the application process to best practices once  you get the job, most students are left to fend for themselves when they face these situations. This  presentation will help you avoid some pitfalls and assist in maximizing your internship experience. 

            Wednesday, p.m.  Thursday, a.m.    Presenter 

  Professional Development Workshop  ʺHermannʹs Whole Brain Thinking Model ‐  Understand Thinking Styles.ʺ  3:00 p.m.  – 5:00 p.m.  1:00 p.m.  – 3:00 p.m.  Sponsored by Procter & Gamble 

        M103 

 

Martha White‐Warren,   Procter & Gamble, Associate Director of Human Resources   

The  highly  validated  Whole  Brain  Model®  is  scientifically  designed  to  help  people  learn  to  think  better.  This  professional  development  workshop  will  show  people  how  to  use  their  whole  brain  –  not  just  the  parts  with  which  they  feel  most  comfortable.  Research  has  shown  that  everyone  is  capable of flexing to less preferred thinking styles and learning the necessary skills to diagnose and  adapt  to  the  thinking  preferences  of  others.  Presenting  information  in  a  way  that  recognizes,  respects, and is compatible with different preferences is crucial to meeting coworker, management,  customer,  and  client  needs  and  expectations.  As  the  work  environment  becomes  more  complex,  understanding the thinking styles beyond your “regular” preferences has become a necessity to stay  competitive. Procter & Gamble is proud to present the Whole Brain Model® at the 2010 NOBCChE  National Meeting.        67


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS    

  Wednesday, p.m.  

Presenter: 

  “Professional Development Workshop:   “Introduction to Project Management”  3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.    James Hampton,  Hampton Associates & Enterprises   

  M102 

  Project  Management  has  become  a  key  process  for  accomplishing  work  within  organizations.  Project  Management  is  the  planning,  organizing,  and  managing  of  resources  to  successfully  accomplish  a  set  of  specific  goals  and  objectives.  The  topics  included  in  this  program  are  listed  below.  Upon  completion  of  this  2  hour  workshop,  participants  will  have  knowledge  of  developing, initiating and implementing a project plan. 

  1.

Characteristics of Projects 

2.

Getting Started‐Project Initiation   Project Charter   Stakeholders & Customers Risks &  Opportunities   Budget   

3. Leading Projects‐Skills, Knowledge         & Behaviors   Teams   Communications 

 

  4.

Planning the Project‐Tools & Templates    Work Breakdown Structure   Tasks & Dependencies   Schedule 

 

Resource Allocation 

5. Implementing the Project Plan   Focus on Deliverables  6. Monitoring and Controlling Progress   Critical Success Factors  7. Completing the Project    Final Project Report   Lessons Learned   Celebration               

 

 

        68


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS  

Thursday, a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  ʺMaking an Impact on Your Research Project:   Lessons from the Benchʺ 

M102 

 

Presenters: 

Lamont Terrell, PhD, GlaxoSmithKline;   James Tarver, PhD, Lexicon Pharmaceuticals;  Ronald Lewis, II, PhD, Pfizer, Inc 

  This professional development workshop will present case studies from their careers with a  focus on experiences and lessoned learned during graduate school and as junior scientists  within  the  pharmaceutical/biotech  industry.  Workshop  participants  will  come  to  identify  research pitfalls, key lessons learned and obtain “Best Practices” ready to be implemented  with the ultimate goal of positively impacting your research projects whether in academia  or  industry.  This  two  hour  workshop  is  specifically  geared  toward  graduate  students  and  junior level scientists within the pharmaceutical industry.      Thursday, AM  

Presenters: 

 

Plenary IV  11:00 A.M. – 12:00 N               M101  Nigerian Society of Chemical  Engineers Plenary  “Development Of Relevant Skills Required For Industry In Young  Chemical Engineers Trained From Universities In Nigeria For  Optimum Performance In Indurstry”    Prof Francis O. Olatunji  President, NSChE  Lagos. Nigeria.   

 

This paper takes a look at the present need for developing relevant skills required for industry in our  newly‐trained,  young  Chemical  Engineers.  Nigeria  gained  independence  in  October,  1960  and  established  its  first  University  department  of  Chemical  Engineering  in  1968  at  the  University  of  Ife  (now  Obafemi  Awolowd  University,  Ile‐Ife).  We  now  have  over  fifteen  (15)  Universities  offering  degrees in Chemical Engineering.    A review is undertaken of our Chemical Engineering curriculum since the establishment of Chemical  Engineering departments in our Universities starting with a 3‐year programme from “A” level entry  to the present 5‐year programme from “O” level entry and with a sandwich industrial training. The  minimum academic standard for Engineering & Technology education set up by a regulatory body in  Nigeria, the National Universities Commission (NUC) are reported especially to achieve sustainable  69


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   industrial development.    The  present  widespread  assessment  of  our  young  Chemical  Engineering  graduates  is  that  they  are  lacking in the required skills to be productive in the industrial and business world and are therefore  largely unemployable. This paper takes a look at the skill gap that exists in our present graduates and  offers suggestions as to how to bridge the gap in order to improve the quality of our human capital.    Finally,  suggestion  is  made  about  a  possible  establishment  of  a  specialized  skill  training  center  in  Nigeria  for  training  young  Chemical  Engineers  in  appropriate  skills  for  industry,  with  technical  support from NOBCChE and challenges in such establishment are discussed. 

               

 

  Insert ad here 70


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   Sunday, a.m./p.m.  

COACh Workshop II

 

8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  L504    “Professional Skills Training for Minority Graduate Students and Postdocs”   Presented by Jane Tucker and Ernestine Taylor 

JANE W. TUCKER, Ph.D.   

Jane  Tucker  has  over  twenty‐five  years  of  experience  in  higher  education  in  both  the  administrative  and  teaching  areas.    She  has  taught  negotiation  skills  in  the  Fuqua  School  of  Business  at  Duke  and  is  currently  a  consultant  educator  for  COACh  through  the  National  Science  Foundation.    She  has  also  taught  ADVANCE  program  seminars  in  negotiations  and  is  adjunct  faculty  for  the  Center for Creative Leadership, where she works with leaders from  both non‐profit organizations and corporations.    Dr.  Tucker  holds  a  Ph.D.  in  Organizational  Development  from  the  University  of  North  Carolina  and  is  an  alumna  of  Wellesley  College.    She  has  published  papers  on  learning  strategies  and  organizational  development.    Her  current  research  interest  is  focused  on  early adopters in change processes.    Ernestine T. Taylor      

Ernestine  T.  Taylor    worked  more  than  20  years  at  the  executive  level  in  human  resources  and  organizational  development  with  fortune  500  companies  such  as  Ortho‐McNeil  Pharmaceutical  (Johnson  &  Johnson),  Avon  Products  Company,  Inc.  Continental  Can  and  Ford  Foundation.      She  has  taught  management  and  business  communications  courses  at  Elon  University,  Bennett  College  for  Women  and  several  community  colleges  in  New  Jersey, New York and Connecticut.    In  2002,  Taylor  established  ETConsulting  with  a  focus  on  executive  coaching,    leadership  development  and  team  building    As  an  independent  consultant,  she  is  a  facilitator  and  executive  coach  for  healthcare  organizations,  aerospace,  energy,  telecommunications,  educational institutions and governmental agencies.     Featured in Ebony Magazine(1990), as one of Best and Brightest Black Women in Corporate  America.      71


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS     8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  L505    “The Chemistry of Leadership”  Presented by Sandra Shullman  SANDRA L. SHULLMAN, Ph.D.  S      Dr.  Shullman  is  Managing  Partner,  Columbus  Office  of  the  Executive  Development  Group,  an  international  leadership  development  and  consulting  firm.    She  received  her  Ph.D.  in  counseling  psychology  from  The  Ohio  State  University.    During  that  same  time,  Sandy  was  a  co‐founder  of  the  Women’s  Studies  Program at Ohio State.     Dr.  Shullman  is  a  nationally  known  organizational  consultant  and  has  written  and  presented  extensively  on  the  topics  of  performance  appraisal,  performance  management,  strategic  succession  planning,  career  development,  management  of  self‐esteem  and  motivation,  team  building,  diversity  management,  and  the  management  of  individual,  organizational  and  systems  change  strategies.    She  is  well  known  for  her  work  related  to  executive assessment and development and co‐authored Performance Appraisal on the Line.   COACh Workshop

Sunday p.m.  

     

Gilda Barabino, Ph.D.  Professor of Biomedical Engineering  Georgia Institute of Technology     

Gilda Barabino is the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Professor  in  the  Department  of  Biomedical  Engineering  at  Georgia  Institute  of  Technology  and  Emory  University.  She  received  her  B.S.  degree  in  Chemistry from Xavier University of Louisiana and her Ph.D. in Chemical  Engineering from Rice University    Dr.  Barabino  has  an  extensive  record  of  leadership  and  service  in  the  engineering  and  medical  communities.    She  is  a  member  of  the  NIH  National  Advisory  Dental  and  Craniofacial  Research  Council, Treasurer and member of the Board of Directors of the Biomedical Engineering Society and  member  of  the  Advisory  Board  of  the  Committee  on  the  Advancement  of  Women  Chemists.  She  recently  served  as  a  member  of  the  congressionally  appointed  NIH  Sickle  Cell  Disease  Advisory  Committee. Dr. Barabino has led numerous educational projects and initiatives designed to enhance  faculty development and student success and to increase opportunities in science and engineering  for members of underrepresented groups.    

72


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS       Monday, a.m. 

 Henry Hill Luncheon Lecture         12:00 N ‐ 1:30 p.m. 

  Imperial 

       Dr. Joseph S (Joe) Francisco, President,  

     American Chemical Society, and      William E. Moore Distinguished Professor of        Earth & Atmospheric Science & Chemistry        Purdue Univesity,     Joseph  S.  Francisco  completed  his  undergraduate  studies  in  Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin with honors, and  he received his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics at the Massachusetts  Institute of Technology  in 1983. Francisco spent 1983‐1985 as a  Research  Fellow  at  Cambridge  University  in  England,  and  following  that  he  returned  to  MIT  as  a  Provost  Postdoctoral  Fellow.  In  1986  he  was  appointed  Assistant  Professor  at  Wayne  State  University.  In  1991  he  was  a  Visiting  Associate  in  Planetary  Science at California Institute of Technology. He accepted an appointment as Professor of Chemistry  and  Earth  &  Atmospheric  Sciences  at  Purdue  University  in  January,  1995.  In  2006  Francisco  was  appointed as the William E. Moore Distinguished Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Science and  Chemistry  at  Purdue  University.    He  served  as  President  for  the  National  Organization  for  the  Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) from 2005‐2007.  In 2008 he was elected to the Presidential succession of the American Chemical Society. He served as  President‐Elect for 2009, President for 2010, and Immediate Past President for 2011.    He has also published over 400 peer‐reviewed publications in the fields of atmospheric chemistry,  chemical  kinetics,  quantum  chemistry,  laser  photochemistry  and  spectroscopy.    He  was  been  a  member of the Naval Research Advisory Committee for the Department of Navy (appointed by the  Secretary of the Navy, 1994‐1996). He has served as a member of the Editorial Advisory Boards of  Spectrochimica  Acta  Part  A,  Advances  in  Environmental  Research,  Journal  of  Molecular  Structure  Theochem, and the Journal of Physical Chemistry. He is a co‐author of the textbook Chemical Kinetics  and Dynamics, published by Prentice‐Hall.     Professor  Francisco  has  received  numerous  national  and  international  honors  for  his  academic  accomplishments.  Among these, the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator  Award;    Alfred  P.  Sloan  Fellowship;    Camille  and  Henry  Dreyfus  Foundation  Teacher‐Scholar  Award;  and  the  National  Organization  for  the  Professional  Advancement  of  Black  Chemists  and  Chemical Engineers Outstanding Teacher Award.  He received John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship  in 1993 which he spent at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology.  He  received an American Association for the Advancement of Science Mentor Award in 1994.  In 1995,  he received a Percy L. Julian Award for Pure and Applied Research from the National Organization  for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers. From 1995 to 1997, he  was a Sigma Xi  National Lecturer.   In 2007, he was the recipient of the Purdue  University  McCoy  73


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   Award;  this  is  the  highest  research  award  given  to  a  faculty  member  for  significant  research  contributions.  He  was  elected  a  Fellow  of  the  American  Physical  Society  and  a  Fellow  of  the  American Association for the Advancement of Science.  He was recently awarded an Alexander von  Humboldt  U.S.  Senior  Scientist  Award  by  the  German  government,  as  well  as  being  appointed  a  Senior  Visiting  Fellow  at  the  Institute  of  Advanced  Studies  at  the  University  of  Bologna,  Italy.  He  has  been  appointed  to  and  served  on  committees  for  the  National  Research  Council,  National  Science  Foundation,  American  Chemical  Society,  and  the  National  Aeronautics  and  Space  Administration.     In  2010,  he  was  awarded  an  honorary  degree  of  Doctor  of  Science,  honoris  causa,  from  Tuskegee  University.     

 Monday, p.m. 

  Award Symposium 1: The Winifred Burks‐Houck  Womenʹs Leadership Symposium:  Women of  M106  Color Reshaping our Economy through Science   4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. 

   

  

 

 

 

  Tuesday, a.m.  Wednesday, a.m. 

Teachers Workshop       7:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

  M106 & M107 

“Teachersʹ Embracing Science through Education”  Sponsored by 3M AAAS,  Roche Pharmaceuticals, and Committee for Action Program Services  Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services  Linda  L.  Davis  is  founder  and  executive  director  of  the  Committee  for  Action  Program  Services  (CAPS).    CAPS  is  a  non‐profit  organization  specializing  in  teacher’s  professional  development  in  science  and  technology.  In  addition,  she  provides  science  enrichment  program  for  students in grades 4 through 12, such as field trips to Johnson Space Center  ‐ Houston; facilitate overnight camps to Science Place, Fair Park in Dallas,  Texas.  CAPS  has  collaborated  with  the Luna  Planetary  and  Institute  (LPI)  and  the  Genesis  Mission  Program,  a  space  science  educational  program  through  NASA on professional development workshops for science educators in Dallas, Texas .  Mrs. Davis  is  the  Administrator  at  Inspired  Vision  Academy  I  in  Dallas,  Texas.  Her  responsibilities  include  special program coordinator for science curriculum and enrichment programs; elementary advisor  for  test  required  programs;  grant  writer  for  the  science  department  and  community  outreach  74


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   programs, and coordinator/facilitator for staff development.  Mrs. Davis holds a Bachelor of Science  in Organizational Management from Paul Quinn College in Dallas, Texas.        DR. SAUNDRA YANCY McGUIRE  Dr.  Saundra  Yancy  McGuire  is  the  Director  of  the  Center  for  Academic  Success,  and  Professor  of  Chemistry  at  Louisiana  State  University  in  Baton  Rouge,  Louisiana.    She  received  her  B.S.  degree,  magna  cum  laude,  from  Southern  University,  Baton  Rouge,  LA;  her  M.A.  from  Cornell  University,  Ithaca,  NY;  and  her  Ph.D.  in  Chemical  Education  from  the  University  of  Tennessee  at  Knoxville,  where  she  received  the  Chancellor’s  Citation  for  Exceptional Professional Promise.  Prior to joining   LSU   in   August  1999,   she  spent  eleven  years at  Cornell University, where she served as Director  of  the  Center  for  Learning  and  Teaching  and  Senior  Lecturer  in  the  Department  of  Chemistry,  and  received  the  coveted  Clark  Distinguished  Teaching  Award.      Dr.  McGuire  is  the  author  of  numerous  publications,  including  the  Problem  Solving  Guide  and  Workbook,  Study  Guide,  and  Instructorʹs  Teaching  Guide  for  Russo/Silverʹs  Introductory  Chemistry,  Third  Edition.  She  is  the  recipient  of  numerous  awards.    Her  most  awards  include  the  2007  Diversity  Award  from  the  Council  on  Chemical  Research;  the  2006  Presidential  Award  for  Excellence  in  Science,  Mathematics,  and  Engineering  Mentoring,  awarded  by  President  Bush  in  an  Oval  Office  Ceremony;  the  2005  National  Service  Award  and  the  2002  Dr.  Henry  C.  McBay Outstanding Chemistry Teacher Award, both presented by the National Organization for the  Professional  Advancement  of  Black  Chemists  and  Chemical  Engineers  (NOBCChE);  and  the  2003,  2004,  2005,  and  2007  Teaching  in  Higher  Education  Conference  Outstanding  Presentation  Award.  Additionally, she was designated a 2003 YWCA Woman of Achievement in the City of Baton Rouge,  Louisiana.  She is married to Dr. Stephen C. McGuire, and they are the parents of Dr. Carla Abena  McGuire Davis and Dr. Stephanie Niyonu McGuire, and the grandparents of Joshua Bolurin, Ruth  Anaya, Daniel Tabansi, and Joseph Olufemi Davis.   

      Ms. Yolanda George,   American Association for the Advancement of Science  Washington, DC 

Yolanda S. George is Deputy Director and Program Director for the Directorate for Education and  Human  Resources  Programs  (EHR)  at  the  American  Association  for  the  Advancement  of  Science  (AAAS).    Her  responsibilities  include  conceptualizing,  developing,  implementing,  planning,  and  directing  multi‐year  intervention  and  research  projects  related  to  increasing  the  participation  of  minorities, women, and disabled persons in science and engineering.  Her recent K‐12 mathematics  and science reform work includes contributing to the development of materials for infusing equity  75


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   into systemic reforms and conducting research on how state departments of education and school  districts  are  aligning  equity  and  science  and  math  initiatives.    Also,  she  has  conducted  equity  reviews  for  textbooks  and  software  publishers  and  test  developers,  including  New  Standards  Science.    She  serves  as  a  consultant  to  numerous  federal  and  state  agencies,  foundations  and  corporations,  and  colleges  and  universities  including  the  National  Science  Foundation,  the  U.S.  Department of Education, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the New Jersey State Department of  Education,   and   the   Louisiana   State   Department  of Education, and serves on several advisory  boards  including  the  National  Academy  of  Engineering  Committee  on  Women  in  Engineering,  California State University, Los Angeles Access Project, and WGBH Instructional Television Science  Project and others.         Dr. Edward D. Walton,   Professor of Chemistry,   California State Polytechnic University,   Pamona, CA  Dr.  Edward  D.  Walton  has  been  professor  of  chemistry  here  at  “Cal  Poly”  for  twenty  years  having  come  from  teaching  as  a  civilian  professor at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. He spent a  year  as  Research  and  Science  Education  Fellow  for  the  Cooperative  Institute  for  Research  in  the  Environmental  Sciences  at  Univ  of  Colorado, Boulder.   Dr.Walton  also  spent  a  year  at  the  Lawrence  Hall  of  Science,  at  University  of  California,  Berkeley,  working  as  statewide  pre‐college  program coordinator for the MESA (Math Engineering, Science Achievement) Program. At Cal Poly  he  teaches  general  college  chemistry,  senior  (advanced)  inorganic  chemistry,  Consumer  chemistry  and  the  chemical  science  course.  In  addition,  Dr.  Walton  has  taught  the  “methods  for  teaching  science” in the teacher education program.   During summers he has taught the science‐teaching course for the Claremont Graduate University’s  teacher Program.   Dr.  Walton  has  served  on  national  science  education  committees...  the  National  Academy  of  Sciences’  working  group  to  develop  the  National  Science  Education  Standards,  a  review  committee  for  the  National  Assessment  for  EducationalProgress  (NAEP)  in  Science,  and  the  Educational  Testing  Service’s  Committee  for  the  SAT  II  Chemistry  Examination.  He  has  directed summer institutes for elementary school teachers, middle school science teachers, and area  high school chemistry teachers.   Dr. Walton has served as Commander, US. Navy, and taught in an ROTC preparation program in  San Diego, and has done training in Japan and Italy.        76


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   JAMES GRAINGER, PhD, Analytical/Environmental Chemist, Center for  Disease Control and Preventive  Dr  James  Grainger  is  an  analytical/environmental  chemist  at  the  Centers  for  Disease  Control  and  Prevention  in  Atlanta,  currently  responsible  for  the PAH Adducts Group in the National Center for Environmental Health.   Primary  projects  include  development  of  new  analytical  methods  for  extending  analytical  exposure  windows  for  organic  environmental  toxicants  through  human  exposure  profiles  of  DNA,  serum  albumin  and  hemoglobin  adducts.    Born  in  South  Carolina,  he  received  a  BS  in  chemistry  from  South  Carolina  State  College,  a  MS  degree  in  physical/organic  chemistry  from  Atlanta  University,  and  a  PhD  in  polymer/organic  chemistry  from  Atlanta  University.    Dr  Grainger  has  developed  and  presented  a  variety  of  talks  on  African  origins  of  mathematics,  science  and  technology,  developing  a  multidisciplinary  course  on  a  chemistry  platform  entitled  Prehistoric  Future  Chemistry  I.    The  course  examines  the  development  of  art,  mathematics,  science  and  technology  in  five  river  civilizations from the Stone Age to the Iron Age and was taught for two years at Spelman College.   Dr  Grainger  currently  serves  as  NOBCChE  Southeast  Regional  Chair.    Central  to  his  variety  of  interests  are  family  interactions  with  wife,  Barbara,  daughter  Adrienne,  son  Daren  and  grandchildren AJ and Ari. 

 

  Tuesday, a.m.    

Percy L. Julian Lecture 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. 

M101 

                      Award Winner  

 

Dr. Thomas Mensah,   Georgia Aerospace Corporation,   Atlanta, GA    Dr. Thomas Mensah is one of the four inventors of Fiber Optics Technology  in  the  US.  His  pioneering  Inventions  helped  moved  fiber  optics  from  the  laboratories  at  Corning  Glass  Works  into  large  scale  manufacturing  environment  needed  to  produce  optical  fiber  at  low  cost  so  that  copper  cables could be replaced throughout the country. This development helped  launch the Broadband networks required to support the Internet technology  as we know it today. Pictures and videos can be transmitted at the speed of  light  through  this  fiber  optic  media,  leading  to  the  birth  of  companies  like  Google, YouTube, Yahoo. The average person can now access information from libraries all over the  world by typing a few strokes on the personal computer because of this fiber optics innovation.  Dr.  Mensah is also co –inventor of the Fiber Optics Missile technology, one of his key innovations when  he  moved  from  Corning  Inc  to  AT&T  Bell  Laboratories.  This  development  helped  launched  his  company, Georgia Aerospace Corporation where he and his team manufacture advanced composite  77


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   structures for stealth aircraftand satellite systems. Dr. Mensah is also leading an effort to integrate  carbon  nanotubes  into  composite  structures.    Carbon  Nanotubes  will  revolutionalize  everything  from windmill blades, to advanced batteries that will power future electric cars.     

  Tuesday, a.m. 

Award Symposium 2  9:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.  Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher Award Symposium:   STEM Education    Award Winner 

  M101     

  Dr. Gloria T. MaGee,   Assistant Professor of Chemistry  Xavier University, New Orleans, LA    Dr.  Gloria  Thomas  MaGee  received  a  bachelorʹs  degree  in  chemistry  in  1996  from  Southern  University  and  A&M  College  in  Baton  Rouge,  LA,  where  she  was  both  Timbuktu  Academy  and  Packard  Foundation  Scholars.    During  her  undergraduate  years,  she  participated  in  several  internships  at  The  Upjohn  Company  (Kalamazoo,  MI)  and  Albemarle  Corp. (Baton Rouge, LA). MaGee also worked in the chemical industry for  a  brief  period  before  earning  a  doctorate  in  chemistry  at  Louisiana  State  University  in  2002  as  a  Louisiana Board of Regents and American Association of University Women Fellow.  MaGee was a  National  Research  Council  Postdoctoral  Fellow  at  the  National  Institute  of  Standards  and  Technology  (2002  –  2003)  and  an  Assistant  Professor  at  Mississippi  State  University  (2003  –  2007).   She is now an Assistant Professor at Xavier University in New Orleans.    Dr.  MaGee  is  the  2007  Chair  of  the  National  Science  Foundation  Chemistry  Division  Leadership  Group  for  the  Research  Experiences  for  Undergraduates  (REU)  Program,  is  a  member  of  the  Executive  Board  of  the  National  Organization  of  Black  Chemists  and  Chemical  Engineers  (NOBCChE),  and  is  actively  involved  in  the  American  Chemical  Society  (ACS)  as  the  National  Meeting Activities Sub‐committee Chair of the Younger Chemists Committee.  In each of these roles,  Dr.  MaGee  is  passionate  about  broadening  the  participation  of  underrepresented  groups  in  the  chemical  sciences  and  sharing  her  personal  experiences.    She  has  also  worked  with  at‐risk  youth  through  groups  such  as  the  Research  and  Engineering  Apprenticeship  Program,  Court  Appointed  Special Advocates (for foster children), the Girl Scouts of America and Masonic organizations.  Her  experiences  have  been  honored  as  2007  recipient  of  the  Stanley  C.  Israel  Award  for  Advancing  Diversity in the Chemical Sciences.    Dr.  MaGee’s  professional  interests  include  bioanalytical  applications  of  electrophoresis  and  microdevice technology, and new technologies and strategies in chemical education.  She also enjoys  photography and iEverything.       78


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS    

  Tuesday, pm.  

Percy L. Julian Luncheon Lecture 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. 

Imperial 

Michael E. Kassner, Ph.D.  Director, Office of Research (Discovery & Invention)  Dr. Michael E. Kassner, is the newly appointed Director for the Office  of  Research  (Discovery  Division)  of  the  Office  of  Naval  Research.  He  started  at  the  Office  of  Naval  Research  in  October  2009.  Dr.  Kassner  came to ONR from the University of Southern California (USC), where  he  was  a  professor  and  chair  of  the  Department  of  Aerospace  and  Mechanical Engineering and professor of materials science.  The director of research is responsible to the chief of naval research for  the overall integration of the discovery and invention (D&I) science and  technology portfolio in support of naval needs.  Before  USC,  Kassner  served  in  two  high‐level  roles  at  Oregon  State  University  as  the  Northwest  Aluminum  professor  of  mechanical  engineering  and  director,  graduate  program  in  materials  science.  Kassner  has  also  held  positions  at  the  University  of  California,  San  Diego;  Naval  Postgraduate  School;  Department  of  Energy;  and  Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which are all relevant to his new role at ONR.  Dr. Kassner is a Fellow of the ASM and Fellow of ASME, and a Fulbright Senior Scholar; and served  as  a  member  of  the  editorial  board  for  the  International  Journal  of  Plasticity,  Metallurgical  and  Materials Transactions, Materials Letters and the Journal of Metallurgy.  He  has  more  than  37  years  of  experience  in  research  and  higher  education.  His  more  than  200  published works are recognized nationally by his peers. He holds a doctorate and master of science  degree  in  materials  science  and  engineering  from  Stanford  University,  and  a  bachelor´s  degree  in  Science‐Engineering from Northwestern University.   

    Tuesday, p.m. 

Award Symposium 3  1:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.   Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Award Symposium –  Materials Chemistry  

Award Winner   

         M101   

SHERINE O. OBARE  Dr.  Sherine  Obare  is  currently  an  Associate  Professor  of  Inorganic  Chemistry  at  Western  Michigan  University.  She  received  a  B.S.  in  Chemistry from West Virginia State University in 1998. She then obtained a  Ph.D.  in  Chemistry  from  the  University  of  South  Carolina  in  2002  with  Professor  Catherine  J.  Murphy.  Thereafter,  she  joined  Professor  Gerald  J.  Meyer’s research laboratory at The Johns Hopkins University as a Dreyfus  Postdoctoral  Fellow.  In  2004,  Dr.  Obare  joined  Western  Michigan  79


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   University.  Her  research  interests  lie  in  the  area  of  designing  nanoscale  materials  with  controlled  size and shape to gain a fundamental understanding of their chemical and physical properties. She  studies the optical, catalytic, magnetic and electrochemical properties of these materials and works  toward  exploiting  their  use  toward  environmental  remediation,  sensor  development,  biomass  conversion,  and  alternative  energy.  Her  work  has  been  featured  in  several  publications,  review  articles  and  book  chapters.  Her  research  program  is  currently  funded  by  the  National  Science  Foundation,  the  Department  of  Defense,  the  Army  Research  Office  and  the  Michigan  Economic  Development  Corporation.  She  is  the  Director  of  the  NIH‐sponsored  Bridges  to  the  Baccalaureate  Program  at  Western  Michigan  University,  a  program  that  recruits  underrepresented  minority  students from community colleges in Michigan and supports them to pursue advanced degrees in  biomedical  and  behavioral  sciences.  Dr.  Obare    is  the  recipient  of  the  2009  George  Washington  Carver  Teaching  Excellence  Award,  the  2009  International  Union  of  Pure  and  Applied  Chemistry  (IUPAC)  Young  Observer  Award,  the  National  Science  Foundation  CAREER  award,  the  ACS  PROGRESS/Dreyfus  Lectureship  Award,  the  American  Chemical  Society  Younger  Chemists  Committee  Leadership  Development  Award  and  the  Carl  Storm  Fellowship.  Dr.  Obare  is  an  Associate Editor for the Journal of Nanomaterials. She is also a member of the NOBCChE Secondary  Education Committee and is currently serving as Chair of the Science Fair.   

Tuesday, p.m. 

   Forensic Workshop:   1:45 p.m. ‐ 5:45 p.m.  “The Chemistry of Crime” sponsored by the DEA,  CBP and DHS   

M103 &  M104 

Instructors:  Darrell Davis, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX  April L. Idleburg, Drug Enforcement Administration, Nashville Sub‐Regional Laboratory  Renee Stevens, Customs and Border Protection Laboratory, Springfield, VA  Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office, Houston, TX  Joe Maberry, Drug Enforcement Agency, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX        Mr. Darrell L. Davis,   South Central Laboratory Director  US  Drug Enforcement Administration  Dallas, TX      Mr.  Darrell  L.  Davis  is  the  Laboratory  Director  of  The  Drug  Enforcement  Administration’s, (DEA) South Central Laboratory.  Mr. Davis career began  in  1979,  as  a  graduate  from  Prairie  View  A  &  M  University  where  he  received  a  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  in  Chemistry.    He  accepted  a  position  as  a  forensic  chemist  with DEA’s Southwest Laboratory in San Diego, California.  As a forensic   chemist,   Davis   was    responsible   for  analyzing   seized  evidence  for  the  presence of  controlled substances.  Mr. Davis  80


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   was also qualified as an expert witness in over 10 states.     After leaving the Southwest Laboratory  in  1988,  Mr.  Davis  transferred  to  the  South  Central  Laboratory  in  Dallas,  Texas  where  he  was  promoted  to  Senior  Forensic  Chemist.    Davis  was  a  leader  in  the  laboratory  as  an  expert  in  the  seizure  of  clandestine  laboratories.    Additionally,  he  trained  law  enforcement  personnel  and  state  and local chemists in the manufacture of control substances.       After  two  years  in  Dallas,  Mr.  Davis  was  promoted  to  Supervisory  Chemist  at  the  Northeast  Laboratory  in  New  York  City,  New  York.    There  he  was  responsible  for  supervising  over  10  employees.  He later transferred to the Office of Forensic Sciences in Arlington, Virginia, and served  as a Program Manager until he accepted his current position.  Mr. Davis has received numerous awards which includes; 2 Outstanding Contributions, 3 Sustained  Superior  Performance,  2  Special  Act  or  Service,  1  Outstanding  performance,  and  a  host  of  other  recognition  awards  from  DEA  and  other  organizations.    Mr.  Davis  was  recently  honored  by  the  Black Engineers of the Year for Professional Achievement.        The DEA’s laboratory system is recognized worldwide as the premier forensic drug laboratory.  Mr. Davis takes great pride in being Laboratory Director of the DEA’s South Central Laboratory.    April L. Idleburg,   Drug Enforcement Administration,   Nashville Sub‐Regional Laboratory    April  L.  Idleburg  is  the  Supervisory  Chemist  at  the  Drug  Enforcement  Administrationʹs  (DEA)  Nashville  Sub‐Regional  Laboratory  (NSRL)  in  Nashville, TN.  She began her government career as a Forensic Chemist at  the  South  Central  Laboratory  in  Dallas,  Texas  in  1992.    In  her  current  position  she  is  responsible  for  the  management  and  oversight  of  all  laboratory operations for NSRL.  She is formerly the Associate Laboratory  Director  of  the  Mid‐Atlantic  Laboratory  in  Largo,  MD  where  she  served  the  laboratory’s  Quality  Assurance Manager for more than four years.     

From May 2003 to October 2004, Mrs. Idleburg was assigned to the DEA, Office of Training, where  she provided training for State and Local Police Officers.  More than 500 officers from throughout  the  continental  United  States,  Hawaii,  and  Canada  attended  her  sessions  in  the  manufacturing  process  and  synthesis  of  Methamphetamine.    Her  teaching  included  a  both  lecture  and  hands‐on  synthesis of several clandestinely manufactured drugs.  Most importantly she provided instruction  on how to safely dismantle clandestine laboratories and collect the necessary evidence for successful  prosecution in the courts of law.  During this time period Mrs. Idleburg was spotlighted by several  news  programs  and  news  papers.  She  has  published  two  scientific  papers:  ʺPi  donating  Ability  of  Oxygen‐17ʺ and ʺProblems with the Detection of Marijuana Traces using IMS Instrumentationʺ.   

Mrs. Idleburg was born in LaGrange, Georgia.  She received her Masters in Public Administration at  American University in Washington, DC. in May 2006.  She earned her Bachelor of Science Degree in  Chemistry from Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi.     

She  is  an  active  lifetime  member  of  Delta  Sigma  Theta  Sorority,  Inc.,  Jackson  State  University  National  Alumni,  and  the  National  Association  for  the  Advancement  of  Black  Chemists  and  Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE).  She served for three years as the Vice President of the DC Metro  81


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   Chapter of NOBCChE.  Mrs. Idleburg is also very active in her church and the Christian community.   She is a Life Coach and Inspirational Advisor, and serves as Founder and Director of Ready for the  World, LLC, an empowerment organization purposed to assist others in living out their purpose in  life with passion and intent.   

Mrs. Idleburg resides in the Nashville, TN area with her husband James W. Idleburg; she strongly  believes that ʺif I can help somebody…then my living will not be in vain!ʺ    Charlotte Smith‐Baker,   Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office,   Houston, TX    Dr.  Charlotte  Smith‐Baker  is  a  Toxicologist  for  the  Harris  County  Medical  Examiner’s  Office.    Dr.  Baker  received  her  Ph.D.  degree  in  Environmental  Toxicology  from  Texas  Southern  University.    She  also  holds  a  Bachelor  of  Science  degree  in  Chemistry  from  Sam  Houston  State  University  and  a  Master  of  Science  degree  in  Chemistry  from  Texas  Southern  University.    Her  love  is  forensic  science.    Her  love  for  forensics  took  form  when  she  completed  an  internship with the Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office in the  Toxicology  laboratory.    The  internship  facilitated  her  ability  to  collaborate  with  the  Harris  County  Medical  Examiner’s  Office  for  her  dissertation  entitled  “Hair  as  an  Indicator  of  Exposure  to  Pesticides”.    Dr.  Baker  has  won  numerous  honors  and  awards  such  as  the  Procter  and  Gamble  Fellowship Award, and the Agilent Technologies Graduate Development Fellowship.  She has also  received  the  Research  Centers  Minority  Institutes  Graduate  Research  Assistantship  and  Ph.D.  Environmental  Toxicology  Fellowship.    Dr.  Baker  was  an  Environmental  Medicine  Rotation  Program  Fellow  for  CDC/ATSDR  through  the Association  of  Minority  Health  Professions  Schools.   She has also been an invited speaker for the Young Forensic Science Forum/American Academy of  Forensic Science for the past three years.         Joe M. Maberry   Senior Fingerprint Specialist   Drug Enforcement Administration    Joe  has  worked  for  the  Drug  Enforcement  Administration  as  a  fingerprint specialist for over 17 years. He retired from the Dallas Police  Department  where  he  was  a  Detective  with  the  Identification  Division  and  conducted  crime  scene  searches,  developed  and  compared  latent  prints,  and  served  as  the  Division  Training  Officer.  He  is  also  Past  President  of  the  International  Association  for  Identification  (IAI),  a  professional organization with over 6,000 members from around the world and is a Certified Latent  82


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   Print  Examiner  and  a  Certified  Senior  Crime  Scene  Analyst  with  the  IAI.  Joe  graduated  from  the  University of Texas at Arlington with a degree in Criminal Justice.   

Tuesday, p.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:  1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m.   ʺStand Out at a Professional Conferenceʺ  sponsored by ACS and NOBCChE   

M102 

 

Erick Ellis,   Jackson State University    Erick  Ellis  is  a  graduate  student  at  Jackson  State  University  in  the  Chemistry  Department.    He  received  his  B.S.  degree  in  2002  and  M.S.  degree in 2006 in Chemistry from Jackson State University.  His graduate  work  is  in  the  area  of  Synthetic  Organic  Chemistry  of  natural  products  such  as,  11‐Deoxyfistularin‐3,  which  was  shown  to  have  anti‐cancer  properties.  He is a specialist in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and  Electron  Paramagnetic  Resonance  (EPR)/Electron  Spin  Resonance  (ESR).   NMR  is  the  chemical  analysis  to  determine  the  structures  of  complicated  organic molecules.  It is used to study a wide variety of nuclei, including  1H,  13C,  14N,  19F, and  31P.   Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR)/Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), measures the absorption of  microwave radiation corresponding to the energy splitting of an unpaired electron when it is placed  in a strong magnetic field.  It is a spectroscopic technique that detects the presence of these unpaired  electrons in a chemical system.  Erick has been the NMR and EPR/ESR Technician at Jackson State  University for the past 3 years.  His interests include mentoring and helping with the development  of young males and females of the urban community in all fields.   He is an active member in his  community and Jackson State University in mentoring young males.  He will complete his Ph.D. in  Synthetic Organic Chemistry from Jackson State University in May 2010. Upon finishing his degree,  Erick will become a Chemistry faculty member at a Historically Black College/University and help  motivate  and  promote  the  importance  of  education  to  young  males  and  females  in  his  classroom  and beyond.                        83


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS      

Tuesday, p.m.  

 

  “So You Think You Can Dance,  What It   Takes To Find A Job”  4:00 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.   

  M102 

 

  Nick Nikolaides, Ph.D.  Manager, Doctoral Recruiting and University  Relations  The Procter and Gamble Company    Dr.  Nikolaides  received  his  Ph.D.  in  Synthetic  Organic  Chemistry  in  1989  from  Cornell  University  under  the  direction of Professor Bruce Ganem.  After a Postdoctoral  Fellowship  with  Professor  Gary  H.  Posner  at  The  Johns  Hopkins  University,  Dr.  Nikolaides  accepted  employment  at  3M  Pharmaceuticals  in  their  Drug  Discovery  group.   While  at  3M,  he  contributed  towards  the  design  and  synthesis  of  immune  response  modifiers  as  antiviral  agents.   He  then  moved  to  Procter  &  Gamble  Pharmaceuticals  in  1994,  where  he  spent  the  better  part  of  14  years  in  drug  discovery  targeting  cardiovascular  indications,  creating  and  leading  a  late  discovery/early  development  custom  chemistry  &  scale‐up  group,  and  more  recently  establishing  a  Competitive  &  Technical  Intelligence  function  for  P&G  Global  Health  Care.   He  currently  manages  Procter  &  Gamble’s  Doctoral  Recruiting  &  University  Relations  efforts  and  is  a  key  player  in  expanding  P&G’s  open  innovation  “Connect  +  Develop”  business model.    

                                                                                       

84


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS  

Wednesday, a.m. 

  “Academia:  What Are Your Options”  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.     Isiah Warner, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry  Louisiana State University   

M105 

Isiah  M.  Warner  was  born  in  DeQuincy,  Louisiana  on  July  20,  1946.   He  graduated as Valedictorian of his high school class in 1964. He graduated  Cum  Laude  from  Southern  University  with  a  B.S.  Degree  in  1968.  After  working for Battelle Northwest in Richland, Washington for five years, he  attended  graduate  school  in  chemistry  at  the  University  of  Washington,  receiving  his  PhD  in  analytical  chemistry  in  June  1977.   He  was  an  assistant  professor  of  chemistry  at  Texas  A&M  University  from  1977  to  1982.   He  was  awarded  tenure  and  promotion  to  associate  professor  in  1982.   However,  he  elected  to  join  the  faculty  of  Emory  University  as  associate  professor  and  was  promoted  to  full  professor  in  1986.   Dr.  Warner was named to an endowed chair at Emory University in 1987, and  was  the  Samuel  Candler  Dobbs  Professor  of  Chemistry  until  he  left  in  1992.  During the 1988/89 academic year, he was on leave to the National Science Foundation (NSF)  as  Program  Officer  for  Analytical  and  Surface  Chemistry.   In  August  1992,  Dr.  Warner  joined  Louisiana  State  University  as  Philip  W.  West  Professor  of  Analytical  and  Environmental  Chemistry.  He  was  Chair  of  the  Chemistry  Department  from  July  1994‐97,  and  was  appointed  Boyd Professor of the LSU System in July 2000. In April 2001, Dr. Warner was appointed the Vice  Chancellor for Strategic Initiatives.  The primary research emphasis of Dr. Warnerʹs research group is the development and application  of  improved  methodology  (chemical,  mathematical,  and  instrumental)  for  studies  of  complex  chemical  systems.   His  research  interests  include  (1)  fluorescence  spectroscopy,  (2)  guest/host  interactions, (3) studies in organized media, (4) spectroscopic applications of multichannel detectors,  (5) chromatography, (6) environmental analyses and (7) mathematical analyses and interpretation of  chemical data using chemometrics (chemical data analysis techniques).    Dr. Warner has more than 230 published or in‐press articles in refereed journals since 1975.  He has  given more than 400 invited talks since 1979.  He also has 5 US patents, and he has one other patent  pending.  He has chaired thirty‐one doctoral theses since 1982 and is currently supervising thirteen  Ph.D. theses.  Over the years, he has received many awards recognizing his scientific and mentoring  efforts,  including  the  NOBCChE  Percy  L.  Julian  Award  in  1988,  NOBCChE  Outstanding  Teacher  Award  in  1993,  and  the  ACS  Award  for  Encouraging  Disadvantaged  Student  into  the  Sciences  in  2003.      85


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS  

Wednesday, a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:  9:00 am. ‐‐ 10:00 a.m.  Chemistry at the National Science  Foundation: New Programs, Funding  Opportunities and Outreach          Tyrone D. Mitchell,  National Science Foundation 

M102 

Dr.  Mitchell  received  a  M.S.  degree  in  Organic  Chemistry  from  the  University  of  Pittsburgh  and  a  Ph.D.  degree  in  Polymer  Chemistry from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY. He  worked 25 years at General Electric Co. where he co‐authored 16  technical publications and holds more than 25 US patents in the  areas  of  organosilicon  chemistry,  polymer  chemistry,  and  the  synthesis of adhesion promoters for use in silicone sealants.  He  has served on the Board of Directors of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement  of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers and he has served on the Chemistry Section Committee  of  the  American  Association  for  the  Advancement  of  Science.    Dr.  Mitchell  retired  from  Corning  Incorporated  in  2001  and  is  now  a  Program  Director  in  the  Chemistry  Division  at  the  National  Science Foundation in Arlington VA.  Dr. Mitchell manages chemical research and education grants  to numerous colleges and universities throughout the United States.   

Charles Pibel,  National Science Foundation  Dr.  Pibel  received  a  B.S.  degree  in  chemistry  from  Harvey  Mudd  College  and  a  Ph.D.  degree  in  Physical  Chemistry  from  the  University  of  California  at  Berkeley.    Prior  to  coming  to  NSF,  he  was  an  Associate  Professor  at  American  University.    For  over  ten  years,  he  has  enjoyed  a  fruitful  collaboration  with  Prof.  Joshua  B.  Halpern  (Howard  University)  studying  the  spectroscopy  and  dynamics  of  molecular  species  in  the  gas  phase.    Dr.  Pibel  is  currently  a  Program  Director  in  the  Integrative  Chemistry  Activities  Program  in  the  Chemistry  Division  at  the  National  Science Foundation in Arlington VA.  Dr. Pibel participates in the  CRIF  and  MRI  (instrumentation)  Programs  as  well  as  the  Division’s REU and ACC‐F Postdoctoral Fellows Programs.        86


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS     “Professional Development Workshop:   “Introduction to Project Management”  3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.   

  Wednesday, p.m.    

  M102 

 

James Hampton,   Hampton Associates & Enterprises  James  S.  Hampton  is  Executive  Director  of  Hampton  Associates  and  Enterprises,  a  Human  Resources  and  youth  development  organization.    He  has more than 20 years experience in the design and delivery of development  programs  in  human  resources  management,  diversity,  project  management,  leadership,  individual  coaching  and  performance  management.  He  is  experienced  in  effectively  working  in  technical,  global  and  multicultural  organizations. Current client industries include Health Care, Pharmaceuticals,  Food  Service  and  Non‐Profit  organizations.    In  addition  to  US  based  clients,  Hampton  Associates  has served clients in Mexico, Sweden, the UK, Canada China, and South Africa.   

James holds a Masters Degree in Organizational Dynamics from the University of Pennsylvania, a  Certificate  in  Employee  Development  from  the  University  of  Delaware  and  a  B.S  Degree  in  Chemistry from Philadelphia University.  He has also studied extensively with the NTL Institute for  Behavioral Science and is certified in various developmental instruments and programs.           

Wednesday, a.m.  

  Professional Development Workshop:  10:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  ʺThe Internship:  The Practice Field of Professional  Trainingʺ    Ramsey L. Smith, Ph.D.,   NASA  

M103 

  Ramsey  L.  Smith  is  a  Research  Space  Scientist,  NASA  Goddard  Space Flight Center (GSFC). His currently on the instrument science  team  for  the  Thermal  Infrared  Sensor  (TIRS)  on  the  Landsat  Data  Continuity  Mission  (LDCM)  and  working  with  the  infrared  hetereodyne  spectroscopy  (IRHS)  group  to  investigate  various  molecular  species  in  planetary  atmospheres.  His  research  areas  include  instrument  development  for  remote  sensing  spacecraft,  87


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   planetary  atmospheric  chemistry,  flight  instrument  calibration  and  infrared  spectroscopy  of  chemical species relevant to planetary atmospheres.   A native of Detroit, Michigan, Ramsey attended Morehouse College where he earned a Bachelors of  Science  degree  in  Chemistry.  As  an  undergraduate,  his  research  experience  began  when  he  was  awarded  a  Clark  Atlanta  University/NASA‐Partnership  in  Integration  of  Research  in  Education  in  Earth  System  Science  scholarship,  which  gave  him  the  opportunity  to  participate  in  atmospheric  chemistry research.  Ramsey earned his Ph.D. from Howard University where his dissertation advisor  was Dr. Vernon  Morris.  During  his  tenure  in  graduate  school  his  research  focused  on  planetary  atmospheric  chemistry  and  centered  around  vacuum‐UV  dissociative  photoionization  and  FTIR  spectroscopy.   His dissertation was entitled: An Evaluation of the Fate of Octafluorocyclobutane and Hexafluoroethane In  the Atmospheres of Terrestrial Planets.   During  his  tenure  in  graduate  school,  he  was  awarded  the  NASA/United  Negro  College  Fund  Special Programs Harriett G. Jenkins Pre‐doctoral fellowship and Howard University/NASA Center  for  the  Study  of  Terrestrial  and  Extraterrestrial  Atmospheres  Graduate  Fellowship  Award.  At  Howard  University  he  served  as  the  President  of  the  Chemistry  Graduate  Student  Association,  Student Representative for Chemistry Department on the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate and  he was a Lecturer for the Graduate School’s Peer Mentoring workshops.   Dr.  Smith  was  an  ORAU/NASA  Postdoctoral  Fellow  at  NASA  GFSC  in  the  Planetary  Systems  Laboratory.  His  postdoctoral  advisor  was  Dr.  Theodor  Kostiuk  in  the  IRHS  Group  where  his  research projects included: Investigating Isotopic Carbon Dioxide in the Martian Atmosphere Using IRHS  and High Spectral Resolution Infrared Study of Hydrocarbons in the Jovian Atmosphere.  Dr. Smith was featured in the article “Moving the numbers: what must be done to prepare African  Americans for opportunities in STEM fields” published in the July 2009 issue of Black Enterprise. He  as  also  been  quoted  in  several  articles  American  Chemical  Society’s  publication  Chemical  and  Engineering  News,  “Evolving  The  Doctorate  Carnegie  initiative  inspires  reshaping  of  Ph.D.  programs to fit modern times” and “LOFTY GOALS: Describing The Doctorate”.    During  his  personal  time,  Ramsey  participates  in  community  service  and  STEM  related  activities.  Some  of  these  activities  include  Susan  G  Koman  Race  for  the  Cure  volunteer  coordinator,  Ann  Arundel  County  Planet  Walk  Volunteer  (Planet:  Jupiter)  for  the  International  Year  of  Astronomy,  career  day  speaker  and  science  fair  judge  at  various  schools.  He  is  a  member  of  the  following  organizations:  American  Geophysical  Union,  National  Society  of  Black  Engineers  (NSBE),  NSBE‐ Space Special Interest Group and National Society of Black Chemist and Chemical Engineers.                  88


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS  

Wednesday, p.m. 

Presenter: 

  Professional Development Workshop:  3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.  ʺFinancial Strategies: Your Professional STEMulus  Packageʺ    Derry L. Haywood, II, The Peninsula Financial Group 

M105 

  Derry Haywood, II  The Peninsula Financial Group    Mr. Derry L. Haywood, II is the owner and founder of The Peninsula Financial Group, a full service  financial  services  firm.  Since  1995  PFG  has  been  providing  financial  services  to  the  community  at  large  for  24  years.  PFG  currently  operates  in  Virginia,  North  Carolina,  Maryland,  Texas,  and  Indiana. The Peninsula Financial Group has developed extensive experience in providing insurance  and  financial  services.  The  companies  PFG  represent  provide  financial  and  benefit  services  to  businesses, churches, non‐profit organizations, individuals and families. Among those services are  deferred  compensation  plans,  pension  and  profit  sharing  individual  life,  health,  and  disability  insurance. The Peninsula Financial has provided invaluable investment counseling to a spectrum of  business  and  community  organizations  –  including  professional  and student  groups  at  NOBCChE  national and regional meetings for the past 9 years.   

        Wednesday, p.m.  Thursday, a.m.   

  Professional Development Workshop  ʺHermannʹs Whole Brain Thinking Model ‐  Understand Thinking Styles.ʺ  3:00 p.m.  – 5:00 p.m.  1:00 p.m.  – 3:00 p.m.  Sponsored by Procter & Gamble 

        M103 

    Martha White Warren 

Associate Director of Human Resources   Procter & Gamble Company    Martha  White‐Warren  has  been  with  The  Procter  &  Gamble  Company  (P&G) for 28 years.  During this time, she has acquired a broad range of  experience in human resource management, organization development,  and  training  and  development.    Having  worked  at  all  of  P&G’s  North  America  sites  as  well  as  several  in  Europe,  Latin  America,  an  d  Asia,  Martha has touched every P&G brand and a diverse population of P&G  89


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   people.    In  her  current  role,  Martha  is  an  Associate  Director  responsible  for  Organization  Development for P&G’s Corporate Purchasing Division.   

Martha  is  well  known  and  well  respected  internally  and  externally  for  getting  organizations  and  processes  back  on  track  and  delivering  benchmark  results.    Because  of  this,  she  is  a  sought  after  change  agent  who  has  been  a  consultant  to  several  municipalities,  non‐profits,  and  government  agencies, including the City of Albany (GA), the United Way of Iowa City, and the Department of  Commerce, to name a few.   

Prior  to  P&G,  Martha  completed  a  B.A.  in  Psychology  at  Rockford  College  and  a  M.S.  in  Organization  Development  at  Pepperdine  University.    She  also  enjoyed  a  15  year  career  with  The  Chrysler  Corporation,  where  she  was  a  Manufacturing  Manager  with  responsibilities  for  Supply  Chain Operations.     

 

 

Thursday, a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  ʺMaking an Impact on Your Research Project:   Lessons from the Benchʺ 

M102 

 

Presenters: 

Lamont Terrell, PhD, GlaxoSmithKline;   James Tarver, PhD, Lexicon Pharmaceuticals;  Ronald Lewis, II, PhD, Pfizer, Inc 

  Lamont Terrell, PhD  Lamont  Terrell  attended  Texas  Southern  University  as  a  Fredrick  Douglas honor student in Houston,TX and earned a B.S. degree in  Chemistry  in  1995.    As  an  undergraduate  student,  he  studied  inorganic  chemistry  under  the  direction  of  Professor  Bobby  Wilson.    The  focus  of  his  research  was  the  development  of  oil‐ soluble zirconium (IV) complexes as process catalyst for direct coal  liquefaction.    In  addition  to  the  undergraduate  research  on  campus,  he  spent  two  summer  internships  at  the  Oak  Ridge  National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN and one summer with Dow  Chemicals  in  Midland,  MI.    Under  the  direction  and  guidance  of  Professor Robert Maleczka, Jr. at Michigan State University, he studied organic synthesis, completed  the total synthesis of the antileukemic natural product amphidinolide A, and earned a Ph.D. in 2001.      Upon  completion  of  his  graduate  studies  at  MSU,  he  continued  his  synthetic  training  with  a  two‐ year  postdoctoral  stint  with  Professor  Barry  Trost  at  Standford  University.    The  focus  of  his  postdoctoral  studies  was  the  development  of  a  catalytic  dinuclear  zinc  asymmetric  Mannich  reaction.  After completion of his postdoctoral studies, he obtained a position with GlaxoSmithKline  in  the  cardiovascular  medicinal  chemistry  group  and  has  served  as  a  senior  chemist  on  several  90


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   projects over the last 6 years. Lamont has more than 10 peer reviewed publications and/or patents.  He  has  received  numerous  awards  and  scholarships  throughout  his  academic  training  with  a  highlight being the 1998 NOBCChE Eastman Kodak / Dr. Theophilus Sorrell Fellowship.  Lamont is  a  veteran  NOBCChE  member.  He  was  introduced  to  NOBCChE  as  an  undergraduate  in  1994  and  has remained involved with NOBCChE throughout his academic training and professional career.       

Ronald D. Lewis, II, PhD  Pfizer Global Research    Ronald  D.  Lewis,  II  received  his  B.A.  in  Chemistry  from  Johns  Hopkins  University, Baltimore MD in 1990.  As an undergraduate, he worked as a  Summer Intern at the Gillette Company, Boston, MA in the Personal Care  Division.    This  experience  helped  cultivate  his  interest  in  chemistry  as  a  career.  He received his Ph.D. degree in Organic chemistry from Wesleyan  University,  Middletown,  CT  in  1997.  His  research  focused  on  the  use  of  biocatalysts (Aldolase Enzymes) as reagents in organic synthesis.  During  this time, he served as a chemistry and math tutor; served as Chair of the  Minorities  in  Sciences  Lecture  Series,  which  was  geared  toward  encouraging and retaining minority students in the sciences.  In 1996, he  moved to San Diego for a postdoctoral fellowship at The Scripps Research Institute with Dr. Carlos  F.  Barbas,  III.    Our  innovative  research  focused  on  the  utilization  of  monoclonal  antibodies,  produced by a novel process called “Reactive Immunization,” as catalytic reagents.  Since 1999, he  has been working as a medicinal chemist in the local biopharmaceutical��and contract manufacturing  industries  at  Corvas  International  and  Discovery  Partners  International  (now  BioFocus  DPI).   Currently, he is working as a medicinal chemist at Pfizer Global Research and Development in La  Jolla,  CA.    Dr.  Lewis  has  had  the  privilege  of  working  on  several  interdisciplinary  programs  targeting Cardiovascular and Infectious Diseases, Breast, Prostate Cancer, and obesity.    Dr.  Lewis  is  an  active  member  of  the  National  Organization  for  the  Professional  Advancement  of  Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE). Currently, he serves on the Executive Board  and  is  the  San  Diego  chapter  President.    He  has  worked  vigorously  promoting  the  goals  and  objectives of NOBCChE (www.nobcche.org) within the local community and target schools.        James Tarver Jr., PhD 

Lexicon Pharmaceuticals    James E. Tarver, Jr. was born in Honolulu, HI in 1975. Growing up in a  military  family,  he  moved  throughout  country  every  three  years,  ultimately  finishing  high  school  in  Memphis,  TN.   James  attended  Morehouse College where he was the recipient of the Ronald E. McNair  NASA  Scholarship,  DuPont  Minority  Scholarship,  and  National  Merit/Achievement  Scholarship.  At  Morehouse,  his  love  for  math  was  quickly  married  with  chemistry  after  initiation  in  Dr.  Henry  C.  McBay’s  introductory  chemistry  91


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   course.  He spent two years researching in the laboratory of the Late Professor Morris Waugh where  he  developed  a  passion  for  organic  chemistry.  In  1997,  James  graduated  Magna  Cum  Laude  from  Morehouse College with a B.S. in Chemistry & Mathematics, including college honors, departmental  honors  and  Phi  Beta  Kappa  distinction.  James  began  graduate  school  at  the  University  of  Pennsylvania where he studied under Professor Madeleine M. Joullié. While at UPENN, he became  one  of  the  founding  members  of  the  University  of  Pennsylvania  NOBCChE  student  chapter  and  earned a UNCF‐Merck Dissertation Fellowship.  James’s research focused on the total synthesis of a  tyrosine‐constrained analog of Didemnin B, a potent bioactive marine product, and novel synthetic  approaches to non‐proteinogenic amino acids in the natural product Cyclomarin A.    In 2003, he completed his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry and accepted a research position at Lexicon  Pharmaceuticals (Princeton, NJ) in the medicinal chemistry department. James has driven medicinal  chemistry  research  at  Lexicon  both  as  an  individual  researcher  and  in his  current  role  as  a  project  leader, particularly in the areas of immunology, inflammation and osteoporosis. He was a member  of the team that discovered LX2931, presently in Phase IIa trials for rheumatoid arthritis. Dr. Tarver  is currently the acting President of the Delaware Valley Chapter of NOBCChE and is also active in  the NY/NJ chapter. 

 

Thursday, a.m.  

Presenters: 

Plenary IV 11:00 A.M. – 12:00 N  M101    Nigerian Society of Chemical Engineers Plenary  “Development Of 

Relevant Skills Required For Industry In Young Chemical  Engineers Trained From Universities In Nigeria For Optimum  Performance In Indurstry”    Prof Francis O. Olatunji  President, NSChE, Lagos. Nigeria.   

Professor  Olatunji  is  a  renowned  Professor  of  Chemical  Engineering.  He  retired  recently  from  the  University  of  Lagos.  He  had  his  first  degree  in  Biochemistry  from  the  University  of  Ibadan,  and  his  M.Sc.  and  Ph.D.  in  Chemical Engineering from University College, London.     Professor Olatunji worked with Dunlop (Nig.) Limited and Guinness (Nig.)  Limited  in  the  early  ‘60s  before  joining  Federal  Institute  of  Industrial  Research  (FIIRO)  in  1966  as  Research  Officer  and  rose  to  become  Head  of  Food  and  Fermentation  Division  after  eight  (8)  years  of  service.  Professor  Olatunji then moved to University of Lagos as a Lecturer 1 in 1974, where he  lectured for over three decades.    At  the  University  of  Lagos:  He  was  an  Associate  Professor  in  the  Department  of  Chemical  Engineering  1987  –  1998,  Professor  of  Chemical  Engineering  in  1989,  Head  of  Department  1989  –  1990,  Sub‐Dean  School  of  Postgraduate  Studies  1991  –  1993,  Dean,  School  of  Postgraduate  studies  2003 – 2007.  92


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS    Professor  Olatunji  has  also  served  the  nation  in  various  capacities  such  as:  Hon.  Secretary,  Committee  of  Deans  of  Postgraduate  Schools  (CDPGS)  in  Nigerian  Universities,  2003  –  2007.  External  Examiner  to  University  of  Ibadan,  Obafemi  Awolowo  University,  Ile‐Ife,  1984  ‐  2007,External  Examiner  to  YABATECH’s  Department  of  Food  and  Chemical  Technology,  1984  –  1985,Chairman,  National  University  Commission  (NUC)  Accreditation  Team  to  Ladoke  Akintola  University of Technology (LAUTECH) and Federal University of Technology (FUT), Yola, 1995 and  1996,  Chairman,  Task  Force  on  Design  and  Fabrication  of  Bakers’  Yeast  Plant,  Federal  Ministry  of  Science  and  Technology  Project,  1986  –  1992,  Chairman,  Task  Force  on  Model  Phosphate  Beneficiating  Plant  in  Sokoto,  RMRDC  project,  1992  –  1995,  Chairman,  NetTel@Africa  Academic  Board,  2007,  Vice  Chairman,  Centre  for  Entrepreneurship  and  Corporate  Governance  (CECG)  Management Committee, 2003 – 2007.   

        Thursday, p.m.  

Technical Session 7  1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Global Sustainability in Science,   Engineering and Policy  Sponsored by NOBCChE, AiChE and NSChE   

  M106   

Invited Speaker  CREDENTIALING – MAKING SUSTAINABILITY SUSTAINABLE    

      Deborah L. Grubbe, PE, CEng.  AIChE‐Institute for Sustainability    Deborah  Grubbe  is  owner  and  principal  of  Operations  and  Safety  Solutions,  LLC,  a  consultancy  that  specializes  in  safety  and  operations  troubleshooting  and  support.    Deborah  is  the  former  Vice President of Group Safety for BP plc, which had its two safest  years ever during her tenure.   She was trained in the characteristics  of safe operations during her 27 year career at DuPont, where she  held  corporate  director  positions  in  engineering,  operations  and  safety.      Deborah  is  a  member  of  the  NASA  Aerospace  Safety  Advisory Panel, and served as a consultant on safety culture to the  Columbia  Shuttle  Accident  Investigation  Board.      Deborah  currently serves on the Purdue University College of Engineering Dean’s Advisory Council, and is  Co Chair of the Purdue University President’s Diversity Committee.  .She is a member of the closure  committee  for  the  Demilitarization  of  the  US  Chemical  Weapons  Stockpile,  and  is  a  trustee  of  the  National  Safety  Council.    She  is  Chair  of  the  Institute  for  Sustainability,  and  is  a  retired  Board  Member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.  Deborah obtained a Bachelor of Science  in Chemical Engineering with Highest Distinction from Purdue University, and received a Winston  93


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   Churchill Fellowship to study chemical engineering at Cambridge University in England.  A native  of Illinois, she received the Purdue Distinguished Engineering Alumni Award in 2002, and, in that  same year, was named “Engineer of the Year” in the State of Delaware.   

 

   

 

Friday, a.m. 

Science Competition Awards Luncheon  (ticketed), 11:30 p.m. ‐ 1:45 p.m.   

Imperial 

Charles F. Bolden, Jr. (Major General, USMC Ret.)   NASA Administrator   Nominated by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate,  retired  Marine  Corps  Major  General  Charles  Frank  Bolden,  Jr.,  began  his  duties as the twelfth Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space  Administration on July 17, 2009. As Administrator, he leads the NASA team  and manages its resources to advance the agencyʹs missions and goals.  Boldenʹs  confirmation  marks  the  beginning  of  his  second  stint  with  the  nationʹs space agency. His 34‐year career with the Marine Corps included 14  years  as  a  member  of  NASAʹs  Astronaut  Office.  After  joining  the  office  in  1980, he traveled to orbit four times aboard the space shuttle between 1986 and 1994, commanding  two  of  the  missions.  His  flights  included  deployment  of  the  Hubble  Space  Telescope  and  the  first  joint  U.S.‐Russian  shuttle  mission,  which  featured  a  cosmonaut  as  a  member  of  his  crew.  Prior  to  Boldenʹs  nomination  for  the  NASA  Administratorʹs  job,  he  was  employed  as  the  Chief  Executive  Officer of JACKandPANTHER LLC, a small business enterprise providing leadership, military and  aerospace consulting, and motivational speaking.  A  resident  of  Houston,  Bolden  was  born  Aug.  19,  1946,  in  Columbia,  S.C.  In  1964,  he  received  an  appointment  to  the  U.S.  Naval  Academy.  Bolden  earned  a  B.S.  degree  in  electrical  science  in  1968  and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. After completing flight training  in 1970, he became a naval aviator. Bolden flew more than 100 combat missions in North and South  Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, while stationed in Namphong, Thailand, from 1972‐1973.  After returning to the U.S., Bolden served in a variety of positions in the Marine Corps in California  and  earned  a  master  of  science  degree  in  systems  management  from  the  University  of  Southern  California in 1977. Following graduation, he was assigned to the Naval Test Pilot School at Patuxent  River,  Md.,  and  completed  his  training  in  1979.  While  working  at  the  Naval  Air  Test  Centerʹs  Systems  Engineering  and  Strike  Aircraft  Test  Directorates,  he  tested  a  variety  of  ground  attack  aircraft until his selection as an astronaut candidate in 1980.  Boldenʹs  NASA  astronaut  career  included  technical  assignments  as  the  Astronaut  Office  Safety  Officer;  Technical  Assistant  to  the  Director  of  Flight  Crew  Operations;  Special  Assistant  to  the  Director  of  the  Johnson  Space  Center;  Chief  of  the  Safety  Division  at  Johnson  (overseeing  safety  efforts for the return to flight after the 1986 Challenger accident); lead astronaut for vehicle test and  checkout  at  the  Kennedy  Space  Center;  and  Assistant  Deputy  Administrator  at  NASA  94


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   Headquarters. After his final space shuttle flight in 1994, he left the agency to return to active duty  as the Deputy Commandant of Midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy.  Bolden was assigned as the Deputy Commanding General of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force in  the Pacific in 1997. During the first half of 1998, he served as Commanding General of the 1st Marine  Expeditionary  Force  Forward  in  support  of  Operation  Desert  Thunder  in  Kuwait.  Bolden  was  promoted  to  his  final  rank  of  major  general  in  July  1998  and  named  Deputy  Commander  of  U.S.  Forces  in  Japan.  He  later  served  as  the  Commanding  General  of  the  3rd  Marine  Aircraft  Wing  at  Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in San Diego, Calif., from 2000 until 2002, before retiring from the  Marine  Corps  in  2003.  Boldenʹs  many  military  decorations  include  the  Defense  Superior  Service  Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. He was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame in  May 2006.  Bolden  is  married  to  the  former  Alexis  (Jackie)  Walker  of  Columbia,  S.C.  The  couple  has  two  children: Anthony Che, a lieutenant colonel in the Marine and Kelly Michelle, a medical doctor now  serving a fellowship in plastic surgery.   

     

 

95


NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE Conference Chair Sandra K. Parker The Dow Chemical Company

Conference Co-Chair Sharon L. Kennedy, PhD Colgate-Palmolive Company   

Core Team Chairs Meeting Planner & Site Logistics Tim O’Neill Leading Edge Marketing and Planning, Inc. Secondary Education Linda Davis

Conference Participation Felicia Barnes-Beard

Committee for Programs Action Services (CAPS)

The Dow Chemical Company Bernice Green

Spellman College Finance Dale Mack National Treasurer

New Business Development Ken Smith, PhD Elementis Specialties Workshops/Symposiums/Technical Programs Rebecca Tinsley, PhD Colgate-Palmolive Company   

Ex-Officio Member Victor McCrary, PhD ~ National President The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU APL)

97


NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE Sub-Committees Valerie Goss Notre Dame University

Meeting Planning/Site Logistics Tim O’Neill, Meeting Planner Leading Edge Marketing and Planning, Inc.

Technical Programs Rebecca A Tinsley, PhD Colgate-Palmolive Company

Patty Blanchard, Onsite Staff Leading Edge Marketing and Planning, Inc

Kwame Owusu-Adom, PhD 3M Corporation

Marketing/Printing/Publishing Tony Dent, PhD Retiree, PQ Corporation

Nikisha Bent The Dow Chemical Company

Terri Robinson Terri Robinson Presents

Conference Speakers William Jackson, PhD University of California, Davis

New Business Development Kenneth Smith, PhD, Chair Elementis Specialties

Malika Jeffries-EL, PhD Iowa State University

Dale Mack Morehouse School of Medicine

Victor McCrary, PhD JHU Applied Physics Laboratory

Cassandra Broadus Morehouse School of Medicine

Technical Workshops Rebecca A. Tinsley, PhD Colgate-Palmolive Company

Darrell Davis Committee for Program Action Services (CAPS)

Derry Haywood The Peninsula Financial Group

Erick Ellis, PhD Jackson State University

Victor McCrary, PhD JHU Applied Physics Laboratory

Conference Awards Calvin James PhD, Chair Lubrizol Corporation

Professional Development Workshops Talitha Hampton, Chair Merck & Co., Inc

Sharon Kennedy PhD, Co-Chair Colgate-Palmolive Company

Maisha Gray-Diggs, PhD Procter & Gamble

Christine Grant PhD University of North Carolina

Takiya J. Ahmed, PhD CENTC, University of Washington 98


NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE Community Outreach Programs/HBCU

Rebecca Tinsley PhD Colgate-Palmolive Company

G. Dale Wesson PhD, PE, Co-Chair SC State University

Talitha Hampton PhD Merck & Company, Inc

Alvin Kennedy PhD, Co-Chair Morgan State University

Marlon Walker PhD National Institute of Standards and Technology

Student Support Adedunni Adeyemo National Student Representative The Ohio State University

Proceedings Tommie Royster PhD, Chair Eastman Kodak Company

Career Expo Kenneth Smith PhD, Chair Elementis Specialties

Dinah Jordan Princeton University

Dale Mack Morehouse School of Medicine

Alison Williams PhD Barnard University

Henry Beard Temple University

Jesse Edwards PhD Florida A&M University

Teachers Workshop Linda Davis, Chair

Conference Registration Felicia Barnes-Beard, Co-Chair The Dow Chemical Company

Committee for Action Program Services (CAPS)

Sheila Turner Marine Corp Recruit Depot

Bernice Green, Co-Chair Spellman College

Joyce Chesley-Dent Retiree, Federal Government

Brenda Brown San Diego Unified School District

Jennifer Stimpson Dallas Independent School District

Celeste Tidwell San Diego Unified School District

Science Bowl/Science Fair Saphronia Johnson, Co-Chair Benedict College

Shirley Hall Retiree, San Diego City Government

Sherine O’Bare, Co-Chair Western Michigan University

Dorothy Haynes Retiree, Rohm and Haas Company

Sheila Turner Marine Corp Recruit Depot

Henry Beard Temple University

Rodney Dotson CCNY 99


NOTES   

 


• CUSTOM MANUFACTURING • FERMENTATION • LABORATORY TESTING SERVICES • RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT • WAREHOUSING • RAW MATERIALS PROCUREMENT SERVICES

Cherokee Pharmaceuticals LLC Corporate Office 1835 Market Street • Suite 1100 • Philadelphia, PA 19103-2917 Telephone: (215) 988-8979 • Fax: (215) 569-1925

www.cherokee-pharma.com Manufacturing Site 100 Avenue C • PO Box 367 • Riverside, PA 17868-0367 Telephone: (570) 275-2220 • Fax: (570) 271-2121


th

The 37  Annual Technology Conference of   The National Organization for the Professional  Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

Conference Abstracts Book

Atlanta Marriott Marquis Hotel   

 

 

 


Congratulates THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY

OUR PRESIDENT, DR. JOSEPH S. FRANCISCO, FOR BEING CHOSEN BY NOBCChE TO DELIVER THE KEYNOTE ADDRESS AT THE HENRY HILL LUNCHEON.

 Dr. Joseph S. Francisco, President of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is the William E. Moore Distinguished Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Science and Chemistry at Purdue University. He completed his undergraduate studies in Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin and he received his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1983. Dr. Francisco is the second African American to hold the office of ACS President.

Dr. Henry A. Hill Dr. Hill attended Johnson C. Smith University earning his B.A. degree in 1936 and M.I.T. earning his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry in 1942. From early in his career Hill was active in the American Chemical Society—most memorably as the society’s first African American president (1977).


TECHNICAL CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE 

TABLE OF CONTENTS   Technical Conference at a Glance

1

 

 

   

Technical Abstracts     

5

  Poster Abstracts   

57

1


TECHNICAL PROGRAM AT A GLANCE  Date 

Description 

Day /Time 

Room  Event 

Room Location 

  Monday,  March 29    12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:30 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. ‐‐ 6:00 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m.. 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

  Henry Hill Luncheon   Dr. Joseph Francisco, President, American  Chemical Society, Guest Speaker (ticketed) 

Georgia Institute of Technology Technical Session

Technical Session 1: Organic Chemistry   Georgia Institute of Technology Technical Session 

Technical Session 2: Analytical and  Environmental Chemistry  Award Symposium 1: The Winifred Burks‐ Houck Womenʹs Leadership Symposium:   Women of Color Reshaping our Economy  through Science  

Imperial

M102

M105

M106

  Tuesday,  March 30    8:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m.  

Plenary II: Percy Julian Lecture 

M101

Corning Technical Session 

9:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

Award Symposium 2: Henry McBay Outstanding  Teacher Award Symposium:  STEM Education 

    M101

Corning Technical Session 

9:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m.  9:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

Technical Session 3: Chemical Engineering  Corning Technical Sessions 

Technical Session 4: Physical Chemistry 

3

      M102      M105


TECHNICAL PROGRAM AT A GLANCE  1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m. 

Award Symposium 3: Lloyd Ferguson Young  Scientist Award Symposium:  Materials  Chemistry 

     M101

1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m. 

 Technical Session 5: Biochemistry 

     M105

4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:45 p.m.  Technical Session 6: Next Generation Technologies  Wednesday, March 31 

    

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

  Collegiate Scientific Exchange Poster Session  sponsored by Colgate Palmolive   

  

    Thursday,  April 1   

 

 

  

  

 

    Award Symposium 4: Undergraduate  Research Competition Program      Plenary IV: Nigerian Society of Chemical  Engineers Presentation    Award Symposium 5: Milligan Competition 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 10:00 a.m. 

11:00 a.m. ‐12:00 p.m.  1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 

M105

Marquis  Ballroom

M101

M101 M104

1:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Technical Session 7: ʺGlobal Sustainability  Symposium in Science, Engineering and  Policyʺ sponsored by NOBCChE, AiChE and  NSChE 

M106

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Award Symposium 6: Graduate Student  Fellowship Sci‐Mix Symposium 

M101

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Technical Session 8: Inorganic Chemistry 

M102

4


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Monday, PM  

Session Chair 

Georgia Institute of Technology Technical Session  Technical Session 1  3:30 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.  Organic Chemistry  Sandra Mwakwari, Ph.D.   

  M102   

Presenters     DESIGN AND SYNTHESES OF NON‐PEPTIDE MACROCYCLIC HISTONE  DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS (HDACI) – DERIVED FROM TRICYCLIC  KETOLIDES – FOR TARGETED LUNG CANCER THERAPY       Sandra C. Mwakwari*, William Guerrant, and Adegboyega K. Oyelere     School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia  Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA  30332‐0400 USA    Abstract 

  3:30 – 3:50 

  Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are an emerging class of novel anti‐cancer drugs that cause growth  arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis of tumor cells. In addition, they have shown promise as anti‐parasitic,  neurodegenerative,  rheumatology,  and  immosuppressant  agents,  among  others.  Of  the  several  structurally  distinct  small  molecule  HDACi  reported,  macrocyclic  depsipeptides  posses  the  most  complex  cap‐groups  and have demonstrated excellent inhibition potency. However, their development has been hampered due to  lack of natural products and their complex synthesis. Herein, we report a new class of macrocyclic HDACi,  based on the macrolide – tricyclic ketolide – antibiotic skeleton as a peptide mimic. These compounds have  demonstrated improved anti‐HDAC activity with IC50 in the low nanomolar range and HDAC1 and HDAC2  isoform selectivity.     DESIGN, SYNTHESIS, AND APPLICATION OF PEGYLATED PEPTIDES  3:50 – 4:10  CONJUGATED TO PORPHYRINS    Krystal Fontenot*, M. Graça H. Vicente    Louisiana State University A & M College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70803    Abstract    The  goal  of  this  research  is  the  synthesis  and  evaluation  of  water‐soluble  peptides  coupled  to  pegylated  porphyrins. The conjugates herein were designed to target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that  is  predominately  found  on  the  surface  of  colon  cancer  cells.  Six  (EGFR‐L1)  and  twelve  (EGFR‐L2)  residue  peptides  were  synthesized  on  a  solid  support  using  a  Pioneer  Peptide  Synthesis  system  and  then  N‐ methylated  on  the  N‐terminus  (EGFR‐L1‐D1  &  EGFR‐L2‐D2)  to  improve  the  stability  of  the  peptide.  High  Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) was used to purify the peptides and Circular Dichroism (CD),  Nuclear  Magnetic  Resonance  (NMR),  and  Mass  Spectrometry  (MS)  were  used  to  assess  their  structural  characteristics. CD revealed that the four peptides have a random coil structure up to 200 μM concentrations  in H2O/TFE (9/1) at a pH of 7.00. At concentrations above 200 μM, EGFR‐L2 adopts a α‐Helix conformation  that  maybe  due  to  concentration.  1H‐NMR  and  ESI‐MS  were  used  to  confirm  the  structure  of  the  peptides.  Two protocols were developed for the coupling of a 3‐PEG to the four peptides. The first protocol involves  the use of EDC/HOBT in THF, and the second protocol includes the use of EDC/NHS in H2O. The pegylated  5


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS peptides  will  then  be  coupled  to  both  water‐soluble  and  insoluble  porphyrins.  Coupling  each  peptide  to  a  porphyrin will allow us to fluorescently label or detect tumor growths as a result of colorectal cancer. Current  dyes  used for detection do not enhance selectivity and fluoresce at lower wavelengths below 630 nm.   The  pegylated  peptides  conjugated  to  porphyrins  as  discussed  herein  provides  better  selectivity  for  colorectal  cancer tumors, emits at longer wavelengths (above 650 nm), and enhances the ability for earlier detection. In  vitro studies will be used to assess the properties of EGFR‐L1‐D1‐PEG‐POR, EGFR‐L2‐D1‐PEG‐POR, EGFR‐ L1‐PEG‐POR and EGFR‐L2‐PEG‐POR. In vivo studies will be carried out with the most promising molecules.     SYNTHESIS OF NEW PORPHYRIN CONJUGATES WITH AFFINITY FOR  4:10 – 4:25  EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR     Alecia M. McCall,* M. Graca Vicente    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803    Abstract    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is being studied extensively to improve methods of detecting small tumors (< 5 mm).  Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in 95% of colorectal cancers and may prove to be  an  effective mechanism  for  detection  of  these  growths.  While  in  vivo  imaging  agents  have  been  developed,  these  are  unselective  for  cancerous  and  normal  tissues  and  do  not  fluoresce  at  longer  wavelengths.  We  propose improved agents for in vivo imaging, which have these desired characteristics. This project presents  peptidic  and  non‐peptidic  derivatives  of  meso‐tetraphenylporphyrin  which  were  designed  and  synthesized  with  structural  features  that  can  potentially  make  them  selective  for  Epidermal  Growth  Factor  Receptor  (EGFR).  The  porphyrin  conjugates  are  highly  fluorescent  and  therefore  will  assist  in  delineating  colorectal  cancers  via  fluorescence‐based  techniques.  The  usage  of  computational  methods  that  showing  optimized  total lowest energy conformations for peptidic and non‐peptidic molecules with a specific affinity for EGFR is  also  shown.  Our  results  have  impact  in  the  design  of  new  molecules  to  improve  present  in  vivo  imaging  techniques.    APPROACHES TOWARD THE SYNTHESIS OF CHIRAL POLYARYLS 4:25 – 4:40    Donovan Thompson, Alan McDonald, Sierra Mitchell, and Dr. Karelle Aiken*       Department of Chemistry, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460       Abstract       The synthesis of polyaryl compounds using “Lactone Concept” (LC) methodology will be reported.  The LC  approach was developed by Dr. Gerhard Bringmann and colleagues for the synthesis of biologically active,  chiral  biaryls.   It  is  proposed  that  Dr.  Bringman’s  LC  method  can  be  extended  to  the  synthesis  of  chiral  polyaryls.   Potential  applications  for  the  chiral  polyaryl  objective  in  this  research  involve  use  of  the  compounds (i) as glycomimetic inhibitors of enzymes and (ii) as ligands or, chiral auxiliaries in asymmetric  reactions. Initial studies in this project are targeting the synthesis of simple triaryl and tetraryl compounds:    

6


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS OH

O

O

O Br OH

"LC method" Lactone synthesis

"LC method"

O

O

Nu* O

O

OH

Nu*

O

OH Nu*

Triaryl Lactone

    Break    MATRIX ISOLATION INVESTIGATION OF THE MECHANISM OF  4:50 – 5:05  TETRAMETHYLETHYLENE OZONOLYSIS    Bridgett E. Coleman* and Bruce S. Ault    University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221    Abstract    The matrix isolation technique, combined with infrared spectroscopy and twin jet codeposition has been used  to  characterize  intermediates  formed  during  the  ozonolysis  of  tetramethylethylene  (TME).  Literature  and  experimental spectral comparisons provide evidence for the formation of the primary (POZ)  and secondary  (SOZ) ozonides for this system. The other possible intermediate is the unobserved Criegee intermediate (CI).  POZ absorptions in the twin jet experiments grew slightly upon annealing to 35K. Merged jet (flow reactor)  experiments generated “late” stable oxidation products of TME. A recently developed concentric jet method  was also utilized to increase yields and monitor the concentration of intermediates and products formed at  different  times  by  varying  the  length  of  mixing  distance  (d  =  0  to  ‐11cm)  before  reaching  the  cold  cell  for  spectroscopic  detection.  Identification  of  intermediates  formed  during  the  ozonolysis  of  TME  is  further  supported  by  18O  isotopic  labeling  experiments  and  theoretical  density  functional  calculations  at  the  B3LYP/6‐311++G(d,2p) level.     MECHANISM OF PHOTODECOMPOSITION OF TETRAZOLETHIONE 5:05 – 5:20    Olajide Alawode and Sundeep Rayat      Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, Manhattan, KS 66502     Abstract    Tetrazolethiones  chemistry  has  attracted  significant  attention  because  of  their  widespread  applications  in  relevant  fields  such as industry,  agriculture,  photoimaging, and medicine.  The  synthesis  of 1‐ (4‐phenyl)‐4‐ methyl ‐1H‐tetrazole‐5(4H)‐thione and 1‐(4‐methoxyphenyl)‐4‐methyl‐1H‐tetrazole‐5(4H)‐thione were carried  out;  their  UV‐vis  studies  were  preformed  in  cyclohexane,  tetrahydrofuran,  acetonitrile  as  well  as  methanol  and  the  fluorescence  spectrum  were  obtained  in  methanol.  The  photochemistry  of  these  compounds  was  7 4:40 – 4:50 


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS studied  by  H  NMR  spectroscopy  in  methanol‐d4,  acetonitrile‐d3  and  benzene‐d6  at  different  irradiation  wavelengths.  The  expulsion  of  sulfur  and  dinitrogen  from  the  heterocyclic  ring  produces  their  respective  carbodiimides  as  the  primary  photoproduct.  The  mechanism  of  photodecomposition  was  investigated  by  carrying out intermediate trapping experiment; photosenitization as well as quenching experiments and the  results will be discussed.     COMPUTATIONAL INVESTIGATION OF THE CONCERTED DIELS‐ALDER  5:20 – 5:40  AND THE STEPWISE DIRADICAL REACTIONS OF ACRYLONITRILE AND 2,3‐ DIMETHY1,3‐BUTADIENE    Natalie C. James1, Joann M. Um1, H. K. Hall2, K. N. Houk1*      1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095   2Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721       Abstract     The  Diels‐Alder  cycloaddition  reaction  of  2,3‐dimethyl‐1,3‐butadiene  with  acrylonitrile,  and  competing  radical  polymerization  reactions  involving  diradical  intermediates,  studied  earlier  experimentally  (J.  Org.  Chem. 1993, 58, 7049) were explored with density functional theory (B3LYP/6‐31G(d)). Through this analysis,  it was determined that the concerted reaction is favored over the diradical pathway by 2.5 kcal/mol. While it  had  been  postulated  that  the  s‐trans  conformation  of  the  diene  is  significantly  preferred  over  the  s‐cis  conformation, calculations show that the s‐trans conformation is favored by only 1.9 kcal/mol, less than with  butadiene. Diradical formation is stabilized by the combination of substituents on the diene and dienophile.     NONPEPTIDE MACROCYCLIC HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS FOR  5:40 – 6:00  TARGETED CANCER TREATMENT      Dr. Yomi Oyelere*    Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA, USA      Abstract      Histone  deacetylase  (HDAC)  inhibition  is  a  recent,  clinically  validated  therapeutic  strategy  for  cancer  treatment. HDAC inhibitors hold great promise in cancer therapy due to their demonstrated ability to arrest  proliferation of nearly all transformed cell types. However, most of these agents are non‐selective inhibitors  of  all  HDAC  isoforms;  and  a  large  number  of  the  identified  HDAC  inhibitors  have  not  progressed  beyond  preclinical characterizations. Of the several structurally distinct small molecule HDACi reported, macrocyclic  depsipeptides have the most complex recognition cap‐group moieties and present an excellent opportunity  for  the  modulation  of  the  biological  activities  of  HDAC  inhibitors.  Unfortunately,  the  structure‐activity  relationship (SAR) studies for this class of compounds have been impaired largely because most macrocyclic  HDAC  inhibitors  known  to  date  comprise  of  complex  peptide  macrocycles.  In  addition  to  retaining  the  pharmacologically  disadvantaged  peptidyl  backbone,  they  offer  only  limited  opportunity  for  side  chain  modifications. Therefore, if there is no significant paradigm shift in the current molecular design approaches,  the vast therapeutic potentials of HDAC inhibition may remained largely untapped. Toward improving the  therapeutic  indices  of  current  HDAC  inhibitors,  my  lab  is  developing  novel  approaches  for  organ‐selective  delivery  of  HDAC  inhibitors  for  potential  use  in  targeted  lung  cancer  therapy  applications.  In  this  presentation,  I  will  discuss  the  discovery  and  SAR  studies  of  a  new  class  of  macrocyclic  HDAC  inhibitors  1

8


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS based  on  the  macrolide  antibiotics  skeletons.  I  will  also  present  preliminary  evidence  for  lung  selective  accumulation of selected examples of this new class of HDAC inhibitors. In general, the prospect of tissue‐ selective HDAC inhibition is a particularly enticing alternative to isoform selective inhibition and could lead  to the identification of new chemotherapeutic agents with broad application in targeted cancer therapy.     Monday, PM  

Session Chair 

Georgia Institute of Technology Technical Session Technical Session 2  3:30 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.   Analytical and Environmental Chemistry  Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Ph.D.  Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office 

  M105 

Presenters     LYSINE‐BASED ZWITTERIONIC MOLECULAR MICELLE FOR  SIMULTANEOUS SEPARATION OF ACIDIC AND BASIC PROTEINS  USING OPEN TUBULAR CAPILLARY ELECTROCHROMATOGRAPHY     Leonard Moore, Jr.; Candace A. Luces; Arther T. Gates; Min Li; Bilal El‐Zahab; and Isiah M.  Warner*   Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803     Abstract  

  3:30 – 3:50 

 

Analyzing proteins using capillary electrophoresis have proven troublesome due to adsorption of  the  analytes  to  the  capillary  wall.   Coating  the  capillary  wall  with  a  stationary  phase  in  open‐ tubular  capillary  electrochromatography  (OT‐CEC)  can  be  used  to  circumvent  this  problem,  as  well as provide interactions between proteins and wall coatings, thus increasing selectivity.  In this  work,  a  unique  zwitterionic  molecular  micelle,  poly‐ε‐sodium‐10‐undecenoyl  lysinate  (p‐ε‐SUK),  was synthesized and assessed for use as a coating in OT‐CEC for protein separations.  A mixture  containing 4 basic proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome c, α‐chymotrypsinogen A, and ribonuclease A)  and  6  acidic  proteins  (β‐lactoglobulin  A,  β‐lactoglobulin  B,  α‐lactalbumin,  myoglobin,  deoxyribonuclease  I,  and  albumin)  was  evaluated.   The  influence  of  polymer  concentration,  salt  concentration,  temperature,  and  voltage  were  also  investigated.    The  ability  of  the  zwitterionic  coating  to  separate  these  analytes  at  low  and  high  pH  is  based  on  the  ionic  character  of  the  positively  charged  amine  or  the  negatively  charged  carboxyl  group  to  prevent  analyte  wall  absorption  and  protein  interactions  with  the  coating.   A  sample  of  proteins  in human  serum  has  been  evaluated  to  demonstrate  protein  separation  of  a  complex  mixture  at  both  acidic  and  basic  conditions.  All coatings provided stable and reproducible results.  Furthermore, the magnitude of  the EOF was monitored while the pH was varied.  These results showed diminished values of the  EOF at pH ~5.5, which is indicative of the pI of the molecular micelle coating.                           9


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS VARIOUS IONIC STRENGTHS OF SUPPORTING ELECTROLYTES  CHANGE THE RESPONSE SIGNALS OF A  SPECTROELECTROCHEMICAL SENSOR     Eme E. Amba*, Laura K. Morris, Sara E. Andria, Carl J. Seliskar and William R. Heineman  University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221‐0172       Abstract   

3:50 – 4:10 

 

The Department of Energy site at Hanford, WA has leaky tanks of chemically toxic and radioactive  wastes which pose a serious risk to the environment. We are interested in detecting 99Tc existing as  pertechnetate TcO4‐   due to its long half life of 200, 000 years and fast migration in subsurface soils  and  groundwater.  Our  spectroelectrochemical  sensor  was  an  optically  transparent  indium  tin  oxide (ITO) electrode coated with a thin film of sulfonated polystyrene‐block‐poly (ethylene‐ran‐ butylene)‐block  polystyrene  (SSEBS).  In  our  sensor  thin  film,  ion  exchange  competition  occurs  between  our  non  radioactive  analog,  [Ru(bpy)3]2+  and  supporting  electrolytes,  NaNO3  and  Ca(NO3)2.   Cyclic  voltammetry  reversibly  converts  the  analyte  between  its  oxidized  and  reduced  forms,  one  of  which  is  colored.  Total  internal  reflectance quantifies  the  amount  of  analyte which  has preconcentrated into the thin film at each reflection point on the electrolytes increased. ΔA was  plotted  against  sample  conductivity,  which  could  be  used  to  correct  for  the  effect  of  ioelectrode  and change in light intensity is recorded at the detector. The response signals, electrochemical peak  currents and a change in absorbance ΔA, decreased as the ionic strength of supporting nic strength  at  very  low  sample  concentrations  in  the  SSEBS  film.  This  will  be  the  basis  of  work  with  groundwater samples from the Hanford DOE site.     DEVELOPMENT OF A MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR SELEX ANALYSIS  4:10 – 4:30  OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS     Loren Hardeman, Lauren Spivey, Kelly Johanson and Gloria Thomas*   Xavier University of Louisiana, Department of Chemistry, New Orleans, LA 70125       Abstract       There  is  a  critical  need  for  the  development  of  high  throughput  screening  methods  in  order  to  advance  detection  and  treatment  of  disease,  including  that  aided  by  transcription  factor  (TF)  analysis.   Transcription  factors  are  proteins  that  control  transcription  of  DNA  to  RNA  through  sequence‐specific DNA binding.  A change in the regulation or binding specificity of TFs is often a  hallmark of a cells transition to a malignant state.  Identifying the targets of a specific TF involved  in  cancer  development  provides  information  about  disease  progression  and  allows  the  development of new anti‐cancer therapies.       SELEX  (Systematic  Evaluation  of  Ligands  by  Exponential  Enrichment)  has  been  successfully  employed in the past; however, it is labor‐intensive and has certain limitations that prohibit it from  being used as a high‐throughput system, specifically, destruction of the TF during each round of  amplification  and  lengthy  analysis  time.   Because  microfluidic  methods  include  alternatives  for  bioimmobilization and faster analysis, a microSELEX method may offer an opportunity to advance  high throughput screening for TFs.       Thus, this project seeks the development of a microfluidic device capable of performing the SELEX  method in an integrated, modular microdevice using PAX3 as a model for proof‐of‐concept. This  10


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS presentation  will  focus  on  optimization  of  the  module  used  to  immobilize  the  TF  within  a  polyacrylamide hydrogel for subsequent affinity‐based capture of targets from a pool of randomly  generated DNA constructs.  The design of the device and immobilization of model proteins will be  presented, as well as progress towards PAX3 analysis.       With demonstrated proof‐of‐concept using the well‐characterized PAX3 system, this method will  later  be  extended  to  the  PAX3‐FOXO1  system.   Pax3‐FOXO1  is  an  oncogenic  transcription  factor  that  has  been  implicated  in  the  development  of  Alveolar  Rhabdomyosarcoma  (ARMS),  an  aggressive childhood solid muscle tumor with a four‐year survival rate of <17%.     Break  4:30 – 4:40      SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTEIN‐LIGAND  4:40 – 5:00  INTERACTIONS:  A COMPARISON OF POLY‐SUS AND SDS    Monica R. Sylvain1, Susmita Das1, Jack N. Losso2, Bilal El‐Zahab1, and Isiah M. Warner1*  1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA  2Department of Food Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA    Abstract    

The  complexity  of  the  human  proteome,  particularly  the  structure  and  binding  events  of  intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs,) will certainly benefit from and more probably require the  development of new analytical techniques and experimental approaches.  Therefore, in this study  we  investigate  the  spectroscopic  properties  of  protein‐ligand  interactions  between  globular  proteins  and  the  negatively  charged  anionic  achiral  molecular  micelle,  poly  (sodium  N‐ undecylenic  sulfate)  (poly‐SUS),  and  the  conventional  surfactant,  SDS,  using  steady  state  fluorescence  spectroscopy  (FL)  and  circular  dichroism  (CD).    Examination  of  data  from  intrinsic  fluorescence studies suggests that poly‐SUS binds hydrophobically and has a positive cooperative  binding effect on all proteins studied (as compared to SDS).  Probing the interaction extrinsically  with 8‐anilinonaphthalene sulfonate (ANS) resulted in a similar finding that poly‐SUS binds to the  proteins hydrophobically and saturates the protein at concentrations less than required with SDS.   Examination  of  the  circular  dichroism  data  indicates  that  poly‐SUS  decreased  the  α‐helical  secondary structure of the native and reduced proteins more effectively than SDS with increasing  concentration.  From these data, we conclude that 1) poly‐SUS binds the hydrophobic amino acids  in the proteins; 2) poly‐SUS specifically and strongly binds definite proteins at low concentrations;  3)  the  binding  of  poly‐SUS  to  certain  proteins  is  more  thermodynamically  favorable  at  low  concentrations;  and  4)  poly‐SUS  may  be  an  effective  surfactant  in  analytical  tools  such  as  gel  electrophoresis and may have significant physiological importance to understanding the binding  of IDPs to their targets.   The results of these studies will be highlighted and discussed in this talk.    ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL SERUM LECTINS  5:00 – 5:20  FROM THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS)    Lancia N.F. Darville*1, Venkatta Rhams2, Mark E. Merchant2 and Kermit K. Murray1     1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA   2Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, P. O. Box 90455, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609,  USA   11


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Abstract     Lectins  are  a  class  of  carbohydrate  selective  proteins  that  have  been  characterized  in  plants,  microbes  and  animals.  Lectins  function  in  various  processes  such  as  immune  response  and  inflammation, cell adhesion, apoptosis and tumor metastasis and have found wide application in  medicine where they have been used in antiadhesion therapy, evaluating immunocompetance and  enzyme  replacement  therapy.  Three  novel  lectins  were  isolated  from  the  serum  of  the  American  alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) by affinity chromatography using a mannose and galactosamine  column. The molecular masses of the isolated proteins were determined by liquid chromatography  mass spectrometry and were found to be 35 kDa, representing the mass of the monomer from the  mannose affinity column. The lectin mass of the monomer from the galactosamine column was 69  kDa.  In  SDS‐PAGE  further  separation  was  obtained.  Masses  were  observed  in  the  SDS‐PAGE  at  approximately 37 kDa for the mannose binding lectins and for the galactosamine binding lectins;  masses were observed at approximately 25 and 50 kDa. The gel bands were excised and digested  using  three  different  enzymes  trypsin,  endoproteinase  Lys‐C  and  endoproteinase  Glu‐C.  These  enzymes were used to create small and large peptides, which were overlapped to enhance protein  sequence  coverage.  The  peptides  were  analyzed  by  LC‐MS/MS  and  the  peptide  sequences  were  determined by de novo sequencing.     Impacts of Surface Chemical Aging of Aerosols on Chemistry and Clouds  5:20 – 5:40  over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean       Vernon R. Morris*1, Everette Joseph2, Qilong Min3, and Alison P. Williams4    1NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) Washington, DC 20001  2Howard University, Program in Atmospheric Sciences,Washington, DC 20059  3Department of Atmospheric Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY 14652  4Princeton University, Department of Chemistry, Princeton, NJ 08544      Abstract      The trans‐Atlantic Aerosol and Ocean Science Expeditions (AEROSE) are a series of intensive field  experiments conducted aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown during the northern hemisphere  spring  and  summer.  The  ongoing  AEROSE  mission  focuses  on  providing  a  set  of  critical  measurements  that  characterize  the  impacts  and  microphysical  evolution  of  aerosols  from  the  African continent during their transport across the Atlantic Ocean. The central scientific questions  that  guide  the  missions are:  (1)  What  is  the  nature and  extent  of change  in  the  mineral  dust  and  smoke  aerosol  distributions  as  they  evolve  physically  and  chemically  during  trans‐Atlantic  transport? (2) How do Saharan and sub‐Saharan aerosols affect the regional atmosphere and ocean  during trans‐Atlantic transport? 3) What are the implications of Saharan and west African aerosol  transport on the capability of satellite remote sensing retrievals over the tropical Atlantic?  While  there have been a variety of aerosol campaigns that have encountered mineral dust or smoke, few  have focused on both Saharan dust and sub‐Saharan smoke, and none have sought to characterize  the evolution of these aerosols during long‐range transport as a function of season. The combined  atmospheric and oceanic sampling also constitutes a unique aspect of the mission that will enable  an unparalleled view of the direct and indirect influences that these African aerosols have on the  tropical  marine  environment.  A  brief  overview  of  the  2004‐2009  cruises,  preliminary  results  associated with aerosol chemistry and interactions with maritime clouds, and future directions for  12


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS this project will be presented.      DETECTION OF VOLATILES IN TISSUE SAMPLES BY HEADSPACE  5:40 – 6:00  GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH MASS SPECTROMETRY     Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Ph.D.*, Glenna Thomas, Terry Danielson, Ph.D., D‐ABFT,   and Ashraf Mozayani, Ph.D., D‐ABFT      Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office, Houston, TX 77054       Abstract       Volatile inhalants have become a common and dangerous substance of abuse.  Containers of these  products  are  readily  available,  easily  purchased,  and  can  be  used  without  supervision  or  accessories.  Users inhale or “huff” the vapor of refrigerant solutions and propellants to induce an  intoxicating  “high”  from  acute  anoxic  respiration.   Sustained  use  can  lead  to  displacement  of  oxygen in the lungs and cause death.  Undoubtedly, the ability to confirm these gases in autopsy  specimens presents unique challenges to the forensic toxicologist.      Headspace  gas  chromatography  with  flame  ionization  detection  is  currently  the  most  widely  applied technique in determining the presence of volatile intoxicants.  However, this method does  not provide sufficient data for identifying poorly combustible gases. In these cases, headspace gas  chromatography‐mass spectrometry (GC‐MS) is more advantageous.  This presentation describes  the  application  of  headspace  GC‐MS  for  the  detection  of  volatiles  such  as  1,  1‐difluoroethane  (Dust‐Off), nitromethane, and sevoflurane in postmortem tissues.       Tuesday, AM    

Plenary II 8:30 A.M – 9:30 A.M.  Percy Julian Award Lecture 

  Imperial 

    INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS NEEDED FOR GREEN ENERGY DEVELOPMENT    Thomas Mensah, Ph.D.  Georgia Aerospace Systems    Abstract 

   There  is  the  need  to  develop  future  Green  Energy  Industries  to  maintain  the  global  economic  leadership  of  the  United  States.  This  lecture  will  examine  major  hurdles  faced  by  engineers  and  scientists  as  they  develop  technical  solutions  to  the  challenges  in  Green  Energy  development.  Carbon capture is a key challenge in clean coal technology development, while the lack of enzymes  to  break  down  cellulose  on  large  scale  is  a  critical  barrier  in  converting  waste  sawdust  to  clean  energy.  The presentation will  also  focus  on  generation  of  energy  by  wind  mill  systems  as well  as  solar  techniques  and  the  challenges  of  the  transmission  grid  design  as  they  exist  today  in  the  country.    The development of 21 st century Transportation system proposed to the Obama Administration in  January  2009  by  the  author  will  also  be  discussed.  This  proposal  has  been  adopted  and  is  being  13


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS implemented in different states.    Tuesday, AM  

Session Chair 

Corning Technical Session   Award Symposium 2  9: 45 A.M. – 11:45 A.M.  Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher Award  Sympsoium:  STEM Education  Abby O’Conner  University of Washington 

  M101 

Presenters    Henry Mcbay Outstanding Teacher Awardee  STRATEGIES FOR STUDENT SUCCESS, A CONVERSATION ABOUT  ENGAGMENT    Gloria Thomas*  Xavier University of Louisiana, Department of Chemistry, New Orleans, LA 70125    Abstract 

  9:45 – 10:10 

  Student engagement and engaged learning are relatively new terms used in education circles to describe  the  active  participation  and  ownership  of  students  in  their  educational  pursuits.    It  involves  student  ownership  and  may  include  a  variety  of  activities  in  the  classroom,  such  as  the  incorporation  of  technology,  problem‐based  learning,  service  learning  and  team  projects.    Yet,  how  can  students  be  motivated to take this same approach to every aspect of their growth as scientists and adults?  How does  the community convey the pursuit of knowledge and the value of critical thinking above a degree or a  career?      This  talk  will  explore  various  mechanisms  and  opportunities  for  expanding  student  engagement  into  other  areas  of  academic,  professional  and  personal  development  that  have  had  positive  impact  in  the  author’s  experience.    Topics  to  be  discussed  include  mentoring,  undergraduate  research,  student  leadership  roles,  and  active  participation  in  professional  organizations,  along  with  thoughts  about  institutionalizing student engagement.    A RESEARCH STUDY TO IDENTIFY FACTORS THAT IMPACT THE  10:10 – 10:30  ACADEMIC SUCCESS OF HIGH ACHIEVING AFRICAN AMERICAN  STUDENTS IN STEM DISCIPLINES AT HBCUS      Felecia M. Nave*1,  Sherri Frizell2, Fred Bonner, Chance Lewis, and Mary Alfred3       1 Prairie View A&M University, Department of Chemical Engineering  Prairie View, TX   2Prairie View A&M University, Department of Computer Science Prairie View, TX   3Texas A&M University, College of Education  and Human Development, College Station, TX     Abstract       For  more  than  three  decades,  both  educational  and  scientific  communities  have  focused  resources  on  increasing the number of African American students majoring in and subsequently pursuing careers in  Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines (Bonner, Alfred, Lewis, Nave, &  Frizell,  2009).  Notwithstanding  numerous  initiatives  designed  aimed  at  providing  more  opportunities  14


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS for African American students, retaining these students continues to serve as a conundrum.  Data reveals  that  although  there  has  been  an  overall  increase  in  the  number  of  baccalaureate  degrees  awarded  in  STEM, the percentage of freshman students continues to decline (Chubin, May, & Babco, 2005).     HBCUs are instrumental in their role of producing STEM graduates.  According to an NSF report (2002),  HBCUs  awarded  30%  of  the  undergraduate  engineering  degrees  and  44%  of  the  natural  science  undergraduate  degrees  to  African  American  students  (p.  4‐10).  In  addition  to  these  data,  NSF  also  reported  that  African  Americans  who  completed  their  undergraduate  degrees  at  HBCUs  were  more  likely  to  further  their  education  by attending graduate  school and  completing doctoral degrees.   These  data  were  reified  by  their  findings  that  revealed  HBCUs  as  accounting  for  17%  of  Black  graduate  students in the science and engineering fields (p. 30). One very plausible argument that can be made is  that the national crisis that we are experiencing related to the low numbers of individuals prepared to  enter the STEM workforce could potentially be addressed by HBCUs.     In  2007,  our  research  team  comprised  of  faculty  from  Prairie  View  University  A&M  and  Texas  A&M  University  were  awarded  funding  from  the  National  Science  Foundation  to  identify  the  factors  that  impact African American student success at HBCUs. The project entitled An Empirical Investigation of the  Success  Factors  Impacting  Academically  Gifted  African  American  Students  in  Engineering  and  Technology  at  Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), is a three‐year study using a mix‐method approach.  The research question that guided this study is stated: What are the factors that most significantly impact the  success  of  academically  gifted  African  American  students  in  STEM  disciplines  that  are  enrolled  in  Historically  Black  Colleges  and  Universities  (HBCUs)?  The  population  for  this  project  included  academically  gifted  African  American  students  enrolled  in  STEM  programs  at  four‐year  HBCUs.  Input  was  also  solicited  from STEM faculty members to capture their perspectives on the salient factors they perceived to impact  the  success  of  these  academically  gifted  students  in  the  STEM  disciplines.  This  presentation  discusses  preliminary findings based on the qualitative phase of the project.     STEM EDUCATION IN CENTRAL GEORGIA 10:30 – 10:50    Rosalie A. Richards, Ph.D. *  Science Education Center, Georgia College & State University, Milledgeville, GA 31061        Abstract       Science  to  Serve  at  Georgia  College  &  State  University  is  a  university‐wide  Academic  Program  of  Distinction that seeks to preserve a heritage of science education for all. At the heart of this initiative is  the  Science  Education  Center  that  provides  opportunities  to  explore  the  role  of  science  in  life,  in  education,  and  to  the  economy.  The  Center  offers  teacher  professional  learning  opportunities,  curriculum development, research projects, workshops, camps, and scientific competitions. Partnerships  and educational activities at regional, statewide and national levels promote lifelong curiosity and civic  responsibility by nurturing the discovery and synthesis of scientific knowledge. Dedicated to excellence  in science teaching and learning, the Science Education Center serves to cultivate a community of science  that fosters the intellectual possibilities of students, educators, researchers and the community at large.       R.A.R. gratefully acknowledges the Kaolin Endowment, Faculty Research Awards, and the Department  of Chemistry & Physics at GCSU. Funding for these programs was provided, in part, by the American  Association of Physics Teachers, the American Chemical Society, the Georgia Department of Education,  the USG Board of Regents, the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, and the Institute of Museum and  Library Services.   15


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   10:50 – 11:10 

PREPARING 21ST CENTURY STUDENTS FOR SUCCESS IN SCIENCE AND  ENGINEERING    Sherine O. Obare*  Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 

  Abstract    Despite  the  United  States  global  leadership,  American  students  rank  21st  in  science  and  25th  in  math  compared with students around the world. This alarming ranking, if not confronted in a timely manner,  will  adversely  impact  the  United  States  position  in  science  and  technology.  Moreover,  minority  representation in STEM fields continues to be severely underrepresented. As a result several initiatives  nationwide have been established to alleviate barriers in entering STEM fields. Undoubtedly, engaging  high  school  and  undergraduate  minority  students  in  early  research  programs  is  one  way  to  influence  their  attitudes  toward  STEM  fields.  The  ability  to  engage  students  at  an  early  age  in  fundamental  scientific principles provides significant promise toward increasing the number of trained students in the  United  States  to  new  scientific  and  technological  challenges.  Successful  training  of  scientists  and  engineers in the twenty‐first century requires early intervention through vibrant educational approaches  and  programs.  Student  success  in  scientific  research  programs  relies  on  proper  student  preparation.  Often students join such programs with little or no research background and may feel intimidated in a  new research lab. How can we increase an interest in science for those who may have been intimidated  by  science  in  the  past?  How  can  we  equip  students  with  a  set  of  tools  to  help  them  understand  the  process  of  conducting  research?  In  this  presentation,  the  design  and  implementation  of  a  course  to  introduce students  to  conducting interdisciplinary  research  at  the  interface  of  chemistry and  biological  sciences will be described. The course takes into consideration the important feature of modern science:  the cumulative impact of inter‐related disciplines.    IMPLEMENTATION OF BLOOM’S NOTECARDS TO AID THE RETENTION  11:10 – 11:25  OF STEM CONTENT IN A LOW INCOME, MINORITY HIGH SCHOOL         Ericka Ford*1, Yvette Gilbert2, Marion Usselman3, Donna C. Llewellyn4       1The School of Polymer, Textiles and Fiber Engineering   Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA    2Miller Grove High School, 2645 Dekalb Medical Parkway, Lithonia, GA   3Center for Education Integrating Science, Math and Computing,   Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA    4Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning,   Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA         Abstract       Our  GK‐12  program  forges  teams  between  science,  technology,  engineering,  and  mathematics  (STEM)  graduate  students  enrolled  at  a  major  technological  research  institution  and  STEM  teachers  at  local,  urban  high  schools.   The  teams  of  graduate  fellows  work  toward  the  goal  of  increasing  student  understanding  and  retention  of  STEM  subject  matter,  which  in  turn  prepares  students  to  take  crucial  standardized  and  end‐of‐the‐year  course  examinations.   A  team  at  one  97%  African  American,  low  income high school implemented the teaching of Bloom’s taxonomy to general chemistry in response to  16


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS this particular challenge.       Students  were  challenged  to  create  problems  or  questions  on  various  levels  of  the  Bloom’s  hierarchy.  Furthermore, the hierarchical structure of problems/questions was reviewed weekly as part of classroom  activities.  The preparation of ‘Bloom’s notecards by the students and instructors was an essential part of  the process of facilitating the student’s retention of the content and methods that would later appear on  exams.  This paper will discuss the challenges associated with implementing Bloom’s notecards as well  as useful feedback obtained from these notecards.  Several measurement tools were used to monitor the  progression of student learning via the Bloom’s cards.       PERSPECTIVES ON THE USE OF BIOFUELS AS AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL  11:25 – 11:45  SOURCE: A HIGH SCHOOL OUTREACH PROJECT     Abby R. O’Connor*, Takiya J. Ahmed, Joe Meredith, Rebecca Hayoun, and Eve Perara   University of Washington, Department of Chemistry, Seattle, WA 98195   Center for Enabling New Technologies Through Catalysis (CENTC)     Abstract     Our supply of non‐renewable fossil fuels is diminishing with each day and this in turn will lead to less  fuel to use as energy. Therefore, it is important to develop new and/or alternative fuel sources to sustain  the  energy  demand.  A  possible  remedy  to  this  problem  is  through  the  use  of  renewable  resources  to  produce  our fuels.  Biofuels  are  currently  being  pursued  to  replace  a  portion  of  our  petrofuels,  thereby  reducing our dependence on oil. However, there are practical limitations and moral concerns that hinder  their global utility. Thus, it becomes imperative to inform high school students of the chemical research  currently being investigated to solve this crisis. A versatile high school program based on biofuels will be  discussed  in  this  presentation.  This  program  aims  to  convey  to  the  students  the  broader  impact  of  chemistry  on  the  lives  of  all  citizens  and  the  role  of  the  chemist  in  solving  major  problems  of  societal  importance. Additionally, we mentor students by providing education on the benefits of science careers  and information on how to get involved, provide a perspective on life as a chemistry graduate student,  and support the curriculum currently taught in high school chemistry classes.  

  Tuesday, AM  

Session Chair 

Corning Technical Session   Technical Session 3  9:45 A.M. – 11:45 A.M.  Chemical Engineering  Reginald E. Rogers, Jr, Ph.D.  Rochester Institute of Technology 

  M102

Presenters    ROLE OF SEDIMENTATION IN THE COLLOIDAL ASSEMBLY OF  OPPOSITELY‐CHARGED PARTICLES     Reginald E. Rogers, Jr.*+ and Michael J. Solomon   Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109   +Current address: Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering, Rochester Institute of  Technology, Rochester, NY 14623  

  9:45 – 10:05 

    Abstract   17


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     Ionic colloidal crystals are long‐range ordered structures formed from the finely tuned interaction of  charged  colloids  carrying  opposite  charges.   These  structures  have  been  self‐assembled  under  near‐ equilibrium  conditions  where  the  solvent  is  refractive  index  and  near  density‐matched  to  the  particles.  The allowable range of attractions is apparently limited.  For example, if the attraction is too  great,  ionic  gels  form  rather  than  crystals.   Ionic  colloidal  crystals  hold  promise  in  applications  ranging  from  photonic  bandgap  to  chemical  and  biological  sensing  materials.   Therefore,  a  full  understanding  of  the  extent  to  which  this  type  of  colloidal  crystal  structure  can  be  formed  would  benefit a range of potential applications.        We investigate the role of an applied field, gravity, on ionic colloidal crystal formation through study  of their sedimentation.  We find that the final structure of the ionic colloidal crystal depends on the  sedimentation  velocity,  initial  volume  fraction,  and  interparticle  interactions.   The  strength  of  the  gravitational  field  relative  to  the  randomizing  effects  of  Brownian  motion  plays  a  key  role  in  this  process  and  its  effect  can  be  quantified  by  the  dimensionless  group,  Peclet  number.   Using  poly(diphenyl‐dimethyl)  siloxane  stabilized  poly(methyl  methacrylate)  [DPDM‐PMMA]  particles  (positively  charged)  mixed  with  poly‐12‐hydroxystearic  acid  (PHSA)  stabilized  PMMA  particles  (negatively charged), we evaluate the quality of  ionic colloidal crystals with cesium chloride (CsCl)  structure  formed  in  a  solvent  system  consisting  of  cylcohexyl  bromide  (CHB),  decalin  and  tetrabutylammonium  chloride  (TBAC)  salt  added  for  charge  screening.   The  three‐dimensional  structure  of  these  crystals  is  characterized  by  confocal  laser  scanning  microscopy.   By  varying  the  ratio of CHB to decalin, we manipulate the sedimentation rate, and subsequently the Peclet number,  of  the  assembly  process.   We  show  that  a  range  of  Peclet  values  exists  where  ionic  colloidal  crystallization is observed.             A NOVEL MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR STUDYING PHASE SEPARATION  10:05 – 10:25  KINETICS OF MEMBRANE DOPES  Kayode Olanrewaju1* & Victor Breedveld1  School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology1    Abstract    We have developed a new microfluidic device for measuring the phase separation kinetics that occurs  during the manufacturing of polymeric membranes via immersion precipitation processes. A polymer  solution is exposed to non‐solvent in a controlled manner, after which the position of the precipitating  front is tracked with high spatial and temporal resolution by means of videomicroscopy. We used the  method  to  measure  the  phase  separation  kinetics  of  several  polymer  solutions  with  water  as  the  precipitating  non‐solvent.  We  found  that  the  process  is  diffusion‐limited  and  determined  effective  diffusion coefficients for water through polymer solutions of known concentrations. These results are  used to gain insight into the microstructure of the polymeric network.             18


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS MICROSCALE PATTERNING OF FIBRIN GELS OVER CELLS       Arlyne B. Simon*1, Hossein Tavana2, and Shuichi Takayma1,2       1Macromolecular Science and Engineering Department,   University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109   2 Department of Biomedical Engineering,   University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109       Abstract       Effective development of biopolymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering has been thwarted by our lack  of  understanding  of  the  complex  environmental  cues  that  govern  cell  adhesion,  migration,  and  proliferation. Therefore, the ability to systematically study the effects of substrate elasticity on cellular  function  in  a  high  throughput  format  is  needed  to  elucidate  key  regulatory  mechanisms  that  modulate cell function. To address this challenge, we have developed a high throughput assay that  enables rapid screening of the effects of fibrin elasticity on endothelial cell function. This novel non‐ contact  micropatterning approach  utilizes  a  cell  culture  compatible  aqueous  two‐phase  system  with  2.5% (w/w) poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and 3.0% (w/w) dextran as constituent phases. By varying the  concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin, the elasticity of the generated fibrin gels are regulated and  the  gelation  time  is  quantified.   Fibrin  gels  are  localized  within  the  dextran  phase  and  spatially  deposited  over  endothelial  cells,  cultured  in  the  PEG  phase.  This  protein  patterning  technique  is  unique  in  that  high  fidelity,  nanolitre  volumes  of  protein  gels  are  patterned  over  a  fully  viable  cell  monolayer in a completely hydrated environment.         USING A NOVEL 3D ANGIOGENESIS TISSUE MODEL TO STUDY THE  10:45 – 11:05  EFFECT OF THE FORMATION OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH  FACTOR CONCENTRATION GRADIENTS ON ENDOTHELIAL CELL  BEHAVIOR      Subuola M. Sofolahan*, and Heather Gappa‐Fahlenkamp,    Department of Chemical Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK    Abstract  10:25 – 10:45 

 

Angiogenesis the growth of new capillaries from pre‐existing blood vessels, requiring growth factor  driven recruitment, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of endothelial cells (ECs).  The study  of angiogenesis has many clinical applications in numerous fields, including peripheral and coronary  vascular disease, oncology, hematology, wound healing, dermatology, and ophthalmology.  In 1980,  bovine capillary ECs were found to spontaneously form tubes when cultured in gelatin in vitro.  Since  then, many in vitro models have been used to recapitulate the basic steps of the in vivo process.  Such  in  vitro  models  of  angiogenesis  offer  many  possibilities:    the  clinical  testing  of  potential  drug  therapies;  the  modeling  of  pathological  conditions;  the  study  of  the  processes  of  endothelial  cell  differentiation,  lumen  formation,  and  vascular  inoculation;  and  the  investigation  of  the  molecular  mechanisms associated with angiogenesis.      Endothelial  cell  differentiation,  the  lumen  or  tube  formation,  can  be  studied  in  vitro  both  in  two  dimensions and in three dimensions (3D); however, to study the other cellular mechanisms involved,  19


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS a  more  complex  3D  model  that  includes  cell  and  extracellular  environment  interactions  is  required.   Such 3D models involve seeding ECs either on or in gels.  Studies involving 3D angiogenesis models  have  investigated  the  role  of  some  key  design  factors  on  the  migration,  proliferation,  and  differentiation  of  ECs,  including  endothelial  cell  type,  type  of  matrix,  the  concentration  and  the  biochemical  conditions  of  the  matrix  polymerization  that  can  affect  the  density  and  the  mechanical  properties  of  the  substrate,  the  culture  media  composition,  and  the  bioavailability  of  angiogenic  factors.      The effect of the formation of concentration gradients of angiogenic factors within the 3D models on  EC  behavior  has  not  been  fully  explored.    We  have  designed  a  3D  angiogenesis  model  that  can  be  used to investigate such concentration gradients on the migration, proliferation, and differentiation of  ECs.    Such  a  model  is  comprised  of  ECs  growth  on  a  bovine  type  I  collagen  gel  formed  within  a  Transwell® membrane plate.  This system allows access to compartments both above and below the  gel  that  can be  used for  the  delivery  of  factors  or for  sampling.   Vascular  endothelial growth  factor  (VEGF) was the angiogenic factor selected to study because it has been identified as the key regulator  in both physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Changes in collagen thickness and growth factor  concentration  added  to  the  tissue  model  were  used  to  vary  concentration  gradients  within  the  3D  tissue model. Collagen thickness was varied at 0.73 mm, 2.01 mm and 2.90 mm. VEGF concentration  was  varied  at  5  ng/ml,  50  ng/ml,  and  100  ng/ml.  The  results  show  an  increase  in  cell  viability,  proliferation,  sprouting,  and  migration  with  an  increase  in  VEGF  concentration  and  a  decrease  in  collagen  thickness.    By  understanding  the  effect  of  VEGF  concentration  gradients  on  EC  behavior,  new therapeutic strategies for controlling angiogenesis can be developed.        ANTISENSE RNA MEDIATED REDIRECTION OF GLYCOLYTIC FLUX FOR  11:05 – 11:25  HETEROLOGOUS PATHWAY PRODUCTION       Kevin V Solomon*, Tae Seok Moon, Kristala L Jones Prather       Department of Chemical Engineering, Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center (SynBERC),  Massachusetts Institute of Technology,   Cambridge, MA 02139, USA       Abstract       Heterologous  pathway  production  in  microbes  has  been  tapped  as  a  sustainable  alternative  for  the  production  of  a  variety  of  commodity  chemicals  and  novel  organic  compounds.    However,  productivity  in  these  pathways  is  limited  by  competition  from  endogenous  pathways.  While  numerous  strategies  exist  to  solve  this  problem  for  secondary  metabolites,  redirecting  primary  metabolites  still  remains  a  challenge  due  to  their  essential  nature  and  high  flux.   In  this  project  we  propose  to  use  antisense  RNA  mediation  of  a  glycolytic  enzyme  (glucokinase)  to  increase  glucose  availability  for  heterologous  pathways.    In  doing  so  we  attempt  to  increase  the  efficiency  of  such  pathways and open up new opportunities where unphosphorylated glucose may be used directly as a  substrate.  Such a device also offers the potential for optimization of existing pathways by reducing  waste  by‐products  such  as  acetate.   As  a  testbed,  we  examined  the  one  step  formation  of  gluconate  from glucose by glucose dehydrogenase.  This presentation will highlight current successes with these  antisense constructs as well as challenges and alternative flux control strategies.       20


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS SOLID PHASE SYNTHESIS OF DENDRITIC POLY(N‐ISOPROPYL  ACRYLAMIDE) FOR TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY     Kai Chang*, Lindsey A Bergman, and Lakeshia J. Taite   Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Atlanta, GA  30332  

11:25 – 11:45 

    Abstract       Targeted  delivery  vehicles  for  small  molecule  pharmaceuticals  have  the  potential  to  revolutionize  cancer  treatment.   The  high  patient  morbidity  associated  with  chemotherapy  can  be  vastly  reduced  through  localized  delivery  and  the  risk  of  metastasis  or  relapse  can  be  reduced  through  the  use  of  actively  targeting  drug  delivery  constructs.   The  current  state  of  the  art  for  actively  targeted  drug  delivery uses antibody or peptide functionalized dendrimers. Dendrimers are perfectly defined tree‐ like  macromolecules  with  distinct  branching  structures.   Their  architecture  provides  a  relatively  sparse  interior  with  drug  loading  capabilities  while  having  a  dense  surface  full  of  end  groups  for  functionalization.  These properties make them ideal targeting vehicles.        Dendrimers are generally small, branching molecules linked together iteratively.  By linking together  polymers  with  desirable  properties,  such  as  the  thermal  transition  properties  of  poly(n‐isopropyl  acrylamide) (pNIPAAm), in a similar fashion, we aim to infuse dendrimers with new functionality.   These dendritic macromolecules are not perfectly defined like their dendrimer counterparts yet still  exhibit many of the same interesting properties, such as large numbers of functionalizable end groups  on the surface of the molecule and densely packed branches with a sparse core.       We  have  successfully  synthesized  well  defined  linear  pNIPAAm  with  polydispersities  of  as  low  as  1.04.   We  have  also  characterized  the  linear  polymers  and  are  currently  using  solid  phase  synthesis  techniques to create dendritic pNIPAAm.  We aim to combine the thermally responsive properties of  pNIPAAm  with  the  drug  loading  and  targeted  delivery  aspects  of  dendritic  macromolecules.   Our  ultimate goal is to couple this technology with gold nanoshell technology which has been shown to  heat up significantly under the presence of certain wavelengths of light.  This combination will form a  multifunctional hybrid system for targeted and controlled drug delivery.           Tuesday, AM  

Session Chair    9:45 – 10:05 

Corning Technical Session   Technical Session 4  9:45 A.M. – 11:45 A.M.  Physical Chemistry  Shawn Abernathy, Ph.D.  Howard University 

  M105

Presenters    ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF SULFUR COMPOUNDS: BONDING AND EXCITED STATES      John A.W. Harkless*  

    Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059   Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (Visiting), Cambridge, MA 02139     21


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Abstract     Quantum  Monte  Carlo,  density  functional,  and  post‐Hartree‐Fock  methods  are  applied  to  estimate  the electronic structure of Sn, (n=1‐4), and SNN polymeric isomers. Various approaches to VMC and  DMC trial function design are tested for quality of result as a function of increasing user input and  insight in the development and optimization.  The overall effectiveness and accuracy of this approach  to QMC trial function design is compared against other theory and experiment.     MOLECULAR DYNAMIC STUDY ON THE CONFORMATIONAL  10:05 – 10:25  DYNAMICS OF HIV‐1 PROTEASE SUBTYPES B, C, F       Dwight McGee Jr.1*, Jesse Edwards2, Adrian E. Roitberg3     1,3Department of Chemistry and Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608  2Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, Fl 32307     Abstract      AIDS is responsible for millions of deaths worldwide each year. One of the major targets in anti‐HIV  therapeutics is protease inhibition. The HIV protease has a critical role in the reproductive process of  the virus, and its inhibition would prevent the maturation and spreading of the virus to neighboring  cells. Previous studies have shown, of approved FDA protease inhibitors, HIV‐1 subtype B protease is  more responsive to drug therapy than that of subtype C and F. The use of computational techniques  such as Molecular Dynamics (MD) and others have proven useful in elucidating and confirming the  many  different  HIV  protease  conformations.  In  this  current  study  we  investigate  conformational  dynamics  of  the  flaps,  and  effects  of  the  binding  pocket  size  in  the  hopes  of  correlating  how  the  mutations  allow  for  different  conformations  of  protease.  Our  results  offer  insight  and  suggestions,  which might be proven to be useful in the development new pIs.       PLASMONICS FOR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF INDIVIDUAL YEAST  10:25 – 10:45  CELLS       Marvin A. Malone* and James V. Coe   The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry, Columbus, OH 43210       Abstract       The  yeast  cell  is  one  of  the  most  studied  microorganisms  in  all  of  science  because  it  is  a  simple  eukaryote  that  shares  a  surprising  amount  of  biochemistry  with  human  cells.   Scientists  use  it  as  a  first  model  system  for  things  they  might  study  in  human  cells  including  the  response  of  cells  to  different conditions and stimuli.  Infrared microspectroscopy can be useful (as it is non‐invasive) and  significant information can be obtained from the vibrational spectra of yeast cells.  There is however a  major  issue  with  studying  a  single  isolated  yeast  cell.   Given  that  it  is  about  the  same  size  as  the  wavelength of the probing light, it scatters light very efficiently and vibrational features can be much  smaller  than  the  scattering  with  disruptive  phase  changes  in  the  lineshapes.   These  effects  can  be  greatly  reduced  by  allowing  single  yeast  cells  to  be  drawn  into  the  holes  of  plasmonic  metal  films  with arrays of microholes.  By reducing scattering effects, small shifts in vibrational absorbance bands  become interpretable with standard Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy techniques.   22


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is used to highlight small changes in the FTIR spectra that are  important  to  specific  experiments  like,  incubation  in  a  sugar  solution,  dehydration  and  exposure  to  anti‐fungal agents.      CYCLOADDITION FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES: A  10:45 – 11:05  DFT STUDY   

Olayinka O. Ogunro1 and Xiao‐Qian Wang*2  Department of Chemistry, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA  2Department of Physics, Center for Functional Nanoscale Materials,   Clark Atlanta University Atlanta, GA     Abstract    Covalent functionalizations represent a promising avenue to engineer or manipulate semiconducting  and metallic carbon nanotubes1,2. The band gap opening in metallic tubes associated with the sp2 to  sp3 rehybridization of the sidewall carbons typically depends on the concentration, doping, and the  addend.  The  unique  band  gap  opening  of  metallic  single‐walled  carbon  nanotubes  through  [2+2]  cycloaddition  functionalization3  is  studied  using  first‐principles  density  functional  calculations.  Our  calculation  results  suggest  that  carbon‐carbon  rehybridization  is  the  driving  force  behind  a  novel  route to modulate the electronic properties of nanotubes via optical or electrochemical techniques.    1

    Figure 1. Top view of optimized structure of perfluoro (5‐methyl‐3,6‐dioxanon‐1‐ene) (PMDE)  functionalized armchair (8,8) tube. The red, light blue, grey, and yellow colored atoms represent  oxygen, fluorine, carbon, and sulfur, respectively.              23


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SLIP LENGTH AND  INTERFACIAL VISCOSITY ON MICA, DLC  and HOPG     Deborah J. Ortiz1*, Douglas Chui2 Elisa Riedo2   1School of Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Ave., Atlanta, GA   2School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St., Atlanta, GA     Abstract     The properties of nanoconfined water are crucial to the understanding and of biological systems and  the  design  of  many  engineering  systems  such  as  nanofluidics,  and  nano  filtration  devices.  Atomic  Force  Microscopy  (AFM)‐a  versatile  tool  for  imaging,  measuring  and  manipulating  matter  at  the  nanoscale‐was  used  to  probe  the  nano‐confined  behavior  of  water  at  the  interface  of  three  different  substrates,  with  varying  wettability  and  surface  roughness.  Classical  fluid  dynamics  assumes  that  liquid at the interface of a solid surface adheres to the surface and does not flow, known as the no‐slip  (zero  velocity)  boundary  condition.   Although  valid  in  macroscopic  flows,  recent  studies  show  that  this condition no longer holds on the micro/nano scale as surface properties such as wettability and  surface  roughness  have  a  strong  effect  on  the  overall  flow  at  reduced  dimensions,  thus  slippage  is  possible.    Here  we  report  an  experiment  where  a    Silicon  AFM  tip  approached  a  hydrophobic  nanometer‐smooth diamond‐like‐carbon (DLC) surface deposited on silicon, hydrophilic atomically‐ smooth  muscovite  mica  as  well  as  hydrophobic    atomically‐smooth    Highly  Ordered  Pyrolytic  Graphite (HOPG), all performed in ultrapure water. While normally approaching, the AFM tip was  also  laterally  oscillated,  by  means  of  a  Lock‐in  Amplifier,  allowing  the  direct  measurement  of  the  (interfacial) viscous lateral force, as a function of tip sample distance, from which the slip length on  the hydrophobic surfaces was determined. The data suggests that the slip length does not depend on  shear speed and is minimally influenced by the contact angle.    DETERMINING THE VAPOR PRESSURE OF TOLUENE IN PENNZOIL 5W‐ 11:25 – 11:45  30 AND MINERAL OIL MIXTURES     Shawn M. Abernathy*, Ph.D.1, Brian Garrett2, Jockquin Jones1, and Anwar Jackson1       Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC, 2005911   Morehouse College, Department of Chemistry, Atlanta, GA, 30314 2     Abstract       There  is  a  significant  lack  of  empirical  data  on  the  temperature  dependent  vapor  pressure  (vp)  of  mineral  based  oils  of  petroleum  origin.   Automotive  engine  oil  is  comprised  of  a  base  mineral  oil  (paraffin,  80‐90%)  that  displays  a  wide  range  of  vapor  pressure  due  to  its  composition  of  alkanes,  alkenes, alkynes etc.  Motor oil is also highly viscous and contains additives to stabilize its viscosity,  to control corrosion, and lubricate the engine parts. These additives have their own vapor pressure,  and  enhance  the  difficulty  of  acquiring  this  type  of  data.   In  this  investigation,  the  vapor  pressure  versus temperature of toluene in a series of Pennzoil 5W‐30 /toluene mixtures (5.0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50,  60, 70, and 80% v/v) was measured over the temperature interval of 293.15 K (0.003411 K‐1) to 373.15 K  (0.002680 K‐1).  Identical measurements were performed on a system of mineral oil/toluene (5.0, 10, 20,  30, 40, 50, 60, and 80% v/v).  The data was acquired using the boiling point method.  Vapor pressure  data  was  also  obtained  for  pure  toluene  (bp  110.6C)  for  comparison.   The  heat  of  vaporization  (∆Hvap)  of  toluene  was  also  determined  for  each  system  by  means  of  the  Clausisus‐Clapeyron  11:05 – 11:25 

24


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS equation.  The values of ∆Hvap ranged from 35.3 ‐ 19.6 kJ/mol for the 5W‐30/toluene mixtures (5.0 –  80.0%) and from 35.2 ‐ 15.7 kJ/mol for the mineral oil/toluene mixtures (5.0 – 80.0%) respectively.  It is  anticipated that this work will provide valuable insight to a pathway for determine vp data of motor  oil.       Tuesday, PM  

Session Chair    1:45 – 2:15 

Award Symposium 3 1:45 P.M. – 3:45 P.M.  Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Award  Sympsosium:    Materials Chemistry  Michelle Gaines, Ph.D.  Georgia Tech Research Institute 

  M101  

Presenters    Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Awardee  TAILORING NANOMATERIALS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION  APPLICATIONS  Sherine O. Obare, Ph.D.*  Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008    Abstract 

  Nanoscale  metallic  particles  are  of  great  interest  due  to  their  importance  in  advanced  technological  applications.  Synthetic  procedures  that  produce  gram‐scale,  well  defined  and  monodisperse  metallic  nanoparticles with controlled size and shape, is a continuing challenge in nanoscale science. We have  developed  new  organic  ligands  that  when  used  as  stabilizers  for  metal  nanoparticles,  provide  the  ability  to  gain  control  of  the  particle  size  in  a  one‐step  synthetic  procedure.  Monodisperse  metallic  nanoparticles  were  synthesized  and  characterized  using  spectroscopic,  microscopic  and  x‐ray  techniques. We have further investigated the electrochemical quantized double‐layer (QDL) charging  differences of 1‐2 nm metallic nanoparticles. Within this size range, the electronic properties transition  from a bulk‐like continuum of electronic states to molecule‐like, discrete electronic orbital levels. Such  properties have led us to investigate their charging and discharging at large band‐gap semiconductor  interfaces.  The  results  are  paramount  toward  understanding  and  developing  advanced  materials  for  catalysis.  We  demonstrate  the  efficiency  of  the  semiconductor/metal  nanoparticle  interfaces  for  the  storage of solar energy and for using this energy as needed, specifically, in the degradation of common  environmental pollutants.  

25


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS

100 nm Magnetic nanowires

Magnetic nanoparticles

Hollow nanoparticles

    Controlled nanoparticle morphology allows for detailed investigations of electron transfer processes on the   nanoscale.   SELECTED REFERENCES 

1. Ciptadjaya,  C.  G.  E.;  Guo,  W.;  Angeli,  J.  M.;  Obare,  S.  O.  ‘Controlling  the  Reactivity of  Chlorinated Ethylenes with FMNH2,’ Environ. Sci. Technol. 2009, 43,  1591‐1597.    2. Major, K. J.; De, C.; Obare, S. O. ’Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Plasmonic  Bimetallic Nanoparticles,’ Plasmonics 2009, 4, 61‐78.  3. Ganesan,  M.;  Freemantle,  R.;  Obare,  S.  O.  ‘Monodisperse  Thioether  Stabilized  Palladium  Nanoparticles:  Synthesis,  Characterization  and  Reactivity,’  Chem.  Mater. 2007, 19, 3464‐3471.     2:15 – 2:35 

COMBINATORIAL STUDIES OF SURFACE INTERACTIONS IN BLOCK  COPOLYMER THIN FILMS       Thomas H. Epps, III*, Julie N. Lawson, Michael J. Baney, Timothy Bogart  

    University of Delaware, Department of Chemical Engineering, Newark, DE 19716       Abstract       As  future  technological  progress  necessitates  the  design  and  control  of  smaller  devices  for  electronic  and  biological  applications,  new  methods  for  the  facile  templating  of  nanoscale  features  must  be  discovered.   To  employ  block  copolymers  for  these  templating  applications,  it  is  essential  to  understand how the interfacial interactions originating from the substrate and free surface in ultrathin  (~nm)  films  affect  diblock  and  triblock  copolymer  morphologies.   Surface  energetics  and  film  thickness,  which  are  not  influential  in  bulk  behavior,  play  an  important  role  in  polymer  thin  film  structure  formation.   Because  the  majority  of  potential  applications  (e.g.,  membranes  and  nanotemplating)  employ  block  copolymers  as  thin  films,  the  interplay  between  bulk  ordering  phenomena  and  thin  film  effects  must  be  understood.   We  manipulate  polymer  thin  film  interfacial  interactions  using  gradient  methods  to  control  the  free  surface  interactions,  and  gradient  arrays  of  assembled  monolayers  to  influence  the  substrate  surface  interactions.   These  high  throughput  26


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS techniques allow us to quickly generate libraries of data useful for exploring the interactions between  block  copolymers  and  surfaces.   Two  areas  of  recent  progress  in  the  group  involve:  (1)  controlled  vapor  deposition  of  chlorosilanes  that  generates  functional  substrate  surface  energy  gradients  on  silicon wafers to probe block copolymer thin film behavior, and (2) controlled solvent vapor annealing  of block copolymer films to induce the morphology orientation switching of one‐ and two‐dimensional  nanostructures.     SCANNING FORCE MICROSCOPY STUDIES OF AU FILMS VAPOR‐ 2:35 – 2:55  DEPOSITED ON 3‐AMINOPROPYLTRIETHOXYSILANE/GLASS  SUBSTRATES       Sonya L. Caston*1 and Robin L. McCarley2       1Dillard University, Chemistry Department, New Orleans, LA  70122   2Louisiana State University, Chemistry Department, Baton Rouge, LA  70803       Abstract       Evaporated Au on 3‐aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) treated glass has a 111 face that is used to make  microdevices.   Thin  evaporated  films  of  Au  (10  and  100  nm)  deposited  on  modified  substrate  of  3‐ aminopropyltriethoxysilane  on  glass displayed  morphologies  that  indicated  the  metals  where  flat  on  the surface.  Scanning tunneling microscopy is used to observe the topography of vapor deposited Au  film  on  modified  glass.  The  images  of  Au  on  APS  treated  glass  were  compared  to  Au  on  Cr  treated  glass  and  Au  on  mica  to  access  the  surface  roughness.   X‐ray  diffraction  of  Au  at  10  nm  thickness  shows that the surface has a 111 face on APS treated glass.       INVESTIGATION OF HYDROPHOBICLLY STABILIZED METAL  2:55 – 3:15  NANOPARTICLES UNDER ETHANOL ANTI‐SOLVENT CONDITIONS  USING SMALL‐ANGLE NEUTRON SCATTERING    Gregory V. White II*, Christopher L. Kitchens    Clemson University, Chemical Engineering Department, Clemson, SC 29634    Abstract    Metallic  nanoparticles  in  the  <  100  nm  size  range  are  well  known  for  their  unique  size‐dependent  properties.  Solution‐based  synthesis  methods  are  widely  used  for  the  production  of  metallic  nanoparticles  due  to  the  uniformity  of  the  nanoparticle  population  and  ability  to  control  the  size,  shape, composition and chemistry of the surface stabilizing ligands. In most solution based synthesis  of  ligand‐stabilized  metallic  nanoparticle  synthesis,  a  post‐synthesis  processing  step  is  required  to  purify, isolate, or fractionate the nanoparticles. Anti‐solvent precipitation is commonly used to isolate  surface  modified  nanoparticles  from  solution  in  order  to  remove  excess  reagents,  surfactants,  byproducts, or ligands that remain in solution. In many nanoparticle applications, excess surfactants or  ligands could prove detrimental. Anti‐solvent precipitation methods have also been used to fractionate  polydisperse  populations  of  nanoparticles  based  on  size.    Although  this  technique  is  routinely  used,  questions remain regarding the structure of the stabilizing ligand shell and how the ligand solvation  changes during the precipitation process.  We have employed small‐angle neutron scattering (SANS)  27


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS to investigate the behavior of 1‐octadecanethiol and dodecanethiol ligands on the surface of gold and  oleic acid on the surface of magnetite nanoparticles as a function of ethanol composition in toluene and  hexane. Interestingly, our results show that the hydrophobic ligands begin to collapse onto the surface  of the nanoparticle at ethanol compositions prior to that required to fully precipitate the nanoparticles  from  solution.  Moreover,  this  presentation  aims  to  discuss  changes  in  ligand  solvation  and  the  local  solvent composition within the ligand shell as a function of ethanol composition.    PORPHYRINS: SYNTHESIS AND SPECTROSCOPY 3:15 – 3:35    Kidus D. Debesai, 1 Tseng Xiong,1 Tiffany Shoham,1 DeAndre Beck, 1 Catrena H. Lisse Ph.D., 1  and  Rosalie A. Richards, Ph.D. 1*  2 Nick Gober  and Candace Jordan2, Jah‐Wann Galimore3 and Geovic Jadol3     1Georgia College & State University, Department of Chemistry & Physics, Milledgeville, GA 31061  2Washington County High School, 201 E Greene St., Milledgeville, GA 31024  3Georgia Military College Preparatory School, 201 E Greene St., Milledgeville, GA 31061    Abstract    The  chemistry  of  porphyrins  is  a  central  focus  of  chemical  education  at  Georgia  College  &  State  University  because  of  the  diverse  chemistry  and  application  of  the  macrocycle.    Key  to  the  advancement  of  research  conducted  at  Georgia  College,  a  mostly  undergraduate  university,  are  statewide,  national  and  international  collaborations.  Students  at  the  pre‐college  and  undergraduate  levels conduct classroom or research projects that engage them either in the synthesis, spectroscopy or  material fabrication using porphyrins for various applications. This paper presents the synthesis and  spectroscopic investigation of these efforts.     (1) Immobilized  porphyrins  have  been  employed  in  various  applications  over  the  past  few  decades.  Such  applications  include  oxidative  catalysts,  gas  and  aqueous  phase  colorimetric  sensors,  and  photodynamic  therapy.  The  ease  and  efficiency  of  immobilizing  the  porphyrins  via  the  sol‐gel  method  shows  promise  in  these  applications.  We  have  fabricated  a  series  of  porphyrin/sol‐gel  monoliths.  The  synthesis,  characterization,  and  functional  properties  of  these materials will be presented.    (2) The  detection  of  lithium  ions  (Li+)  in  biological  fluids  is important  for  patients  using  lithium  for psychotropic treatments as non‐compliant levels can lead to toxicity. Lithium is also used  in  batteries  for  powered  devices.  Li+  ion  detection  ion  traditionally  requires  dedicated  instrumentation such as flame emission photometry or ion‐selective electrodes. As such, cost‐ effective  and  faster  methods  of  analyses  of  Li+  ion  concentrations  are  required.  For  this  purpose,  we  are  developing  robust  materials  using  by  immobilizing  novel  porphyrins  in  silicate materials to fabricate colorimetric glasses. In this paper, we present our advances to the  synthesis and spectroscopy of these sol‐gel detectors. 

28


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS CH3

+N Br

Br Br

H3C

Br N

NH

+

N

N

+

HN

N Br

CH3

Br Br

Br N+ CH3

    (3) Previous  studies  toward  the  synthesis  the  GdTMPyPBr85+,  the  gadolinium  (III)  complex  of  beta‐octabrominated  tetrakis(4‐N‐methyl)pyridiniumyl  porphyrin,  were  confounded  by  high  temperature conditions and long reaction times for the insertion of gadolinium (III) ion. Since  the  lithium  (I)  complex  can  be  prepared  under  slightly  alkaline  conditions,  it  provides  a  precursor for facile Gd(III) insertion. As such, we have isolated the Li2TMPyPBr84+ complex for  reactivity with the Gd(III) ion.     (4) Manganese porphyrins have been implicated in the treatment of a Lou Gehrig’s‐type disease,  amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in mice. In a recent study at the University of Arkansas for  Medical  Sciences,  the  effects  of  a  manganese  porphyrin  given  at  symptom  onset  of  ALS  extended  the  survival  after  onset  up  to  3.0‐fold.  We  are  currently  synthesizing  a  family  of  manganese  porphyrins  to  elucidate  how  the  antioxidant  properties  of  these  materials  affect  motor  neuron  architecture.    In  this  study,  beta‐chlorinated  porphyrins  were  prepared.  The  synthesis and spectroscopic analyses of these investigations will be presented.    R.A.R. gratefully acknowledges the Kaolin Endowment, Faculty Research Awards and the Department  of  Chemistry  &  Physics  at  GCSU.  Financial  support  for  pre‐college  students  was  provided  by  the  American  Chemical  Society.  K.  D.  gratefully  acknowledges  the  Chemistry  Scholars  Program  and  R.A.R. acknowledges support from Faculty Research Awards and the Science Education Endowment  at  GCSU.    N.G  and    C.J.  gratefully  acknowledge  the  American  Chemical  Society’s  Project  SEED  program    for  support  of  this  project.    J‐W.G  and  G.J.  gratefully  acknowledge  the  Young  Scientists  Academy at GCSU.  R.A.R. and C.H.L. gratefully acknowledge Dr. Beckum, Dr. Leisen, and Bo Xu at  the Georgia Institute of Technology for technical assistance.      

29


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Tuesday, PM   Session Chair 

Technical Session 5 1:45 P.M – 3:45 P.M.  Biochemistry  Carma Cook, Ph.D.  Auburn University 

  M105  

Presenters    METAL ASSISTED ASSEMBLY OF COLLAGEN PEPTIDES    Lyndelle, T, LeBruin, Martin, A, Case*    University of Vermont, Department of Chemistry, Burlington, VT, 05405    Abstract    The modification of natural collagens has proved challenging, and these difficulties are compounded  by immunological problems when modified collagens are expressed in higher animals. Consequently  there  is  a  demand  for  collagen‐like  peptides  (CLPs)  to  serve  as  models  in  which  these  problems  are  minimized. The tertiary structure of collagen consists of a triple helix of polyproline type(II) sequences  (Xaa‐Yaa‐Gly)n  with  the  consensus  triplet  Pro‐Hyp‐Gly  (Hyp  is  (4R)‐hydroxyproline).  We  have  developed  short  CLPs  whose  assembly  into  collagen  triple  helices  is  directed  by  interchain  metal‐ ligand  interactions.  The  covalent  attachment  of  2,2ʹ‐bipyridyl  ligands  to  the  N‐termini  of  (Pro‐Hyp‐ Gly)5  CLPs  directs  the  formation  of  the  collagen  triple  helix  in  the  presence  of  hexacoordinate  nickel(II). We describe the remarkable stability of these metal‐assembled CLPs, and the enrichment of a  preferred  heterotrimeric  CLP  from  a  mixture  of  PPII  sequences.  Crystal  structures  of  the  apo‐ homotrimers are guiding the redesign of sequences that adopt the staggered collagen triple helix.      POSSIBLE DRUG TARGETS FOR MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS: FREE  2:00 – 2:15  ENERGY CALCULATIONS OF IRON‐DEPENDENT REPRESSOR (IdeR)     1:45 – 2:00 

Joycelynn D. Nelson1,2*, T. Logan1,2, W. Yang1,2       1Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tallahassee FL   2Florida State University, Institute of Molecular Biophysics, Tallahassee FL       Abstract       Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is responsible for the deaths of nearly 2,000,000 people per year in  the world or nearly one person every 15 seconds according to the World Health Organization (WHO).   The bacteria usually assault the lungs but are capable of attacking any part of the body, including the  brain, kidneys, and spine.  Currently, victims of tuberculosis are subjected to a cocktail of drugs with  treatment  lastly  at  least  6  months  up  to  over  a  year  where  affective  drugs  are  available.   The  sheer  length of treatment is substantial both finically and physically. Iron is an essential component of life for  all living organism, yet, bacteria, like Mtb, are unable to produces its own supply and must acquire it  from  the  host.   Mtb  is  heavily  dependent  on  iron  for  many  critical  processes  like  electron  transport,  respiration, and DNA replication. A more detailed understanding of metal binding properties of Mtb  may  guide  researchers  in  more  effective  and  efficient  drug  treatments.   In  Mtb,  iron‐dependent  repressor (IdeR), which has at least two metal binding sites, is the protein responsible for sensing iron  levels and, as a consequence, regulating the extortion of iron from the host.  Using molecular dynamics  30


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS (MD) simulations, we present binding free energy calculations and conformational change experience  by  IdeR  (PDB  1U8R)  upon  metal  binding  (state  1)  and  unbinding  (state  2).   These  studies  show  an  average free energy difference between the two states is about 4 kcal/mole at each metal binding site  and  the  atomistic  details  of  the  conformational  changed  experienced  by  IdeR.   These  data  are  in  excellent  agreement  with  confirmed  experimental  data1.   The  present  results  indicate  that  an  atomic  model  may  be  sampled  adequately  without  computational  expense  and  with  good  accuracy.   More  specifically,  our  data  show  the  most  probable  metal  binding  pathway  of  IdeR.  The  potential  application  for  computer  simulations  in  drug  design  has  proven  to  be  at  the  forefront  of  science  as  many attractive drug targets have metals bound in the active sites.       1. Semavina, M., Beckett, D., Logan, T.M. Metal‐linked dimerization in the iron‐dependent regulator  from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Biochemistry 45, 12480‐12490 (2006).     DUAL ACTING HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITOR‐ESTROGEN  2:15 – 2:30  MODULATOR CONJUGATES FOR TUMOR‐SPECIFIC DELIVERY    Kenyetta A. Johnson*, Vishal Patil, Li‐Pan D. Yao, Marcie Rice, Bahareh Azizi, Donald F. Doyle, and  Adegboyega K. Oyelere    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences,  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332‐0400    Abstract    A cooperative anti‐proliferative activity, against estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positive breast cancer  cells,  has  been  seen  in  combination  therapy  consisting  of  selective  estrogen  receptor  modulators  (SERMs) and histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). However, one common liability of multiple drug  therapies is the inherent pharmacokinetic disadvantage of two (or more) separate drugs.  Identification  of  agents  that  possess  ʺcombination  chemotherapyʺ  potential  within  a  single  molecule  could  ameliorate many of the shortcomings of the traditional combination therapy approach. We described  herein  the  identification  of  a  new  class  of  dual  acting  HDACi‐estrogen  modulator  conjugates.  We  found that an appropriate covalent linkage of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a prototypical  HDACi, with tamoxifen, a classic SERM, resulted in conjugates that retained independent anti‐HDAC  and  estrogen  receptor  binding  activities.  Specifically,  the  anti‐estrogen  activities  of  conjugates  8,  13a,  and  13b,  are  3‐fold  more  potent  than  that  of  tamoxifen  in  a  yeast  chemical  complementation  assay.  Additionally,  conjugate  8  possess  a  superior  anti‐proliferative  activity  against  ERα  positive  breast  cancer  cells  relative  to  tamoxifen  and  SAHA,  either  as  stand  alone  agent  and  co‐administered  in  a  combination  therapy  setting.  Our  results  suggest  that  conjugation  of  estrogen  modulators  to  HDACi  moiety  could  facilitate  a  selective  delivery  of  HDACi  to  hormone  positive  tumors  and  possibly  broaden the scope of ER ligand clinical use.                    31


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS SYNTHESIS OF MODIFIED NUCLEOTIDES AS PROBES AND INHIBITORS  FOR DNA REPAIR ENZYMES     JohnPatrick Rogers1, Sheng Cao2, and Sheila S. David*1     1              University of California‐Davis, Department of Chemistry, Davis, CA 95616           2University of Utah, Department of Chemistry, Salt Lake City, UT     Abstract     When  a  cell  is  under  conditions  of  oxidative  stress,  Guanine,  the  most  susceptible  base  to  oxidative  damage,  can  be  oxidized  to  produce  oxidation  products  such  as  7,8‐dihydro‐8‐oxoguanine  (OG),  guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminohydantoin (Sp). If these oxidized products are not removed  from  DNA  by  enzymes  belonging  to  the  Base  Excision  Repair  Pathway  (BER),  further  replication  events can result in permanent mutations within the genome. To understand how the enzymes in the  BER  pathway  process  these  oxidized  guanine  products  within  a  DNA  duplex,  we  have  synthesized  substrate  mimics  of  OG  containing  fluorine  at  the  2ʹalpha  or  2ʹbeta  position  of  the  nucleotide.  The  modified  phosphoramidite  monomers  were  incorporated  into  oligonucleotide  strands  which  were  then  oxidized  to  make  the  corresponding  2ʹfluoroderivatives  of  FGh  and  FSp.  They  were  used  for  biochemical studies of DNA repair enzymes. Our preliminary data indicates that the processing of the  2ʹ‐fluoro‐containing   oligonucleotides  by  BER  glycosylases  is  highly  influenced  by  the  sugar  conformation, the damaged base, as well as the specific DNA glycosylase examined.     APPLICATION OF THE GOLGI TWO‐HYBRID ASSAY TO STUDY PROTEIN  2:45 – 3:00  INTERACTIONS INVOLVED IN ER ASSOCIATED DEGRADATION (ERAD)     Whitney Henry1, Bin Li2, Jennifer Kohler2    1Department of Biology, Grambling State University, Grambling, LA  2Internal Medicine, Division of Translational Research, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX      Abstract    In  the  endoplasmic  reticulum  (ER)  associated  degradation  process  (ERAD),  terminally  misfolded  or  unassembled  proteins  in  the  early  secretory  pathway  are  targeted,  translocated  to  the  cytoplasmic  ubiquitin conjugating machinery and later destroyed by 26S proteasomes. The primary objective of this  project  is  to  apply  the  Golgi  Two‐Hybrid  assay,  a  modification  of  the  traditional  Yeast  Two‐Hybrid  assay,  to  elucidate  the  mechanism  of  the  ERAD  process  by  studying  protein interactions  involved in  this process. The fundamentals of this assay involved the reconstitution of the modular Golgi‐resident  1, 6 mannosyltransferase, Och1, which has been genetically separated into two non‐functional catalytic  (Cat) and localization (Loc) domains. In this project, the Golgi two‐hybrid assay was applied to test the  negative controls that will be used in studying the interaction between two ER resident glycoproteins ‐  OS9 and GRP94. Recent studies indicate that GRP94, a molecular chaperone, may be associated to the  ER‐lectin, OS9, which binds to ERAD substrates. The three isoforms of OS9 were genetically fused to a  vector containing the non‐functional catalytic domain of Och1 and then transfected into ∆ Och1 MAT a  yeast  strain  along  with  plasmid  constructs  containing  the  Gal80‐Loc  and  Hap5‐Loc  protein  fusions  respectively. Gal80 and Hap5 are two transcriptional factors that are not expected to interact with any  of the isoforms of OS9 and thus should not reconstitute Och1. These double transformed yeast strains  showed slower growth on Congo red agar at 30  C as well as enhanced binding to fluorescein labeled  2:30 – 2:45 

32


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS wheat  germ  agglutinin,  which  was  analyzed  by  flow  cytometry.  These  results  coincide  with  the  hypothesis  that  the  three  variants  of  OS9  do  not  interact  with  both  Hap5  and  Gal80,  and  that  the  subsequent  negative  controls  prepared  are  suitable  for  further  study  of  protein  interactions  between  OS9  and  other  proteins  thought  to  be  involved  in  ERAD.  Our  understanding  of  this  control  surveillance  process  is  imperative  as  accumulation  of  misfolded  proteins  in  the  ER  may  induce  ER  stress.  Sustained  ER  stress  has  been  implicated  in  neurodegenerative  diseases  such  as  Huntington,  Parkinson and Alzheimer.       STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION STUDIES OF STT3P, THE CATALYTIC  3:00 – 3:20  DOMAIN OF YEAST OLIGOSACCHARYLTRANSFERASE    Carma O. Cook*  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849    Abstract    Oligosaccharyltransferase  (OST)  is  a  multi‐subunit  enzyme  that  catalyzes  the  co‐translational  N‐ glycosylation of nascent polypeptides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen.  In the central step of  N‐glycosylation,  a  preassembled  oligosaccharide  moiety  is  transferred  to  the  asparagines  side  chain  located in the Asn‐X‐Ser/Thr consensus sequence of the nascent polypeptides in the lumen of the ER.   Defects  in  the  N‐glycosylation  pathway  can  cause  disorders  known  as  congenital  disorders  of  glycosylation (CDG).  Complete loss of N‐glycosylation is lethal in organisms. Clearly, understanding  the function of each subunit and the mechanism of N‐glycosylation catalysis has significant biomedical  ramifications.    In  the  case  of  Saccharomyces  cerevisiae,  temperature  and  staurosporine  sensitivity  screening  has  revealed  that  the  protein  product  of  the  STT3  gene,  Stt3p,  is  one  of  nine  multi‐ transmembrane subunits of the OST enzyme complex.   Due to the inherent difficulties associated with  integral  membrane  protein  studies,  the  enzymatic  mechanism  of  OST  function  remains  obscure,  although overwhelming results indicate that the C‐terminal domain of the Stt3p (Stt3p‐Cterm) subunit  contains  the  substrate  recognition  and/or  catalytic  site.    The  expression,  purification,  and  structural  characterization  of  the  Stt3p‐Cterm  in  the  yeast  host  Pichia  pastoris  will  be  presented  and  discussed.   The expressed membrane protein was solubilized, isolated, and purified successfully to homogeneity.   Hydropathy index and TM domain prediction programs indicate that at least one TM domain may be  present in the Stt3p‐Cterm.  Therefore, structural characterization of this protein in detergent micelles  using circular dichroism (CD) and high‐resolution solution NMR methods will be presented.    STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION STUDIES OF THE C‐TERMINAL DOMAIN  3:20 – 3:40  OF STT3P, A SUBUNIT OF YEAST OLIGOSACCHARYLTRANSFEARSE    S. Mohanty;  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn University, Auburn, AL  Abstract    Oligosaccharyl  transferase  (OST)  is  a  multi‐subunit  enzyme  that  catalyzes  the  co‐translational  N‐ glycosylation of nascent polypeptides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In the case of Saccharomyces  cerevisiae, OST is composed of nine non‐identical transmembrane protein subunits. In the central step  of N‐glycosylation, a preassembled oligosaccharide moiety is transferred to the asparagine side chain  located  in  the  Asn‐X‐Ser/Thr  consensus  sequence  of  the  nascent  polypeptides  in  the  lumen  of  the  endoplasmic  reticulum  (ER).  Defects  in  N‐glycosylation  pathway  can  cause  disorders  known  as  33


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). Complete loss of N‐glycosylation is lethal in organisms.  Due  to  the  inherent  difficulties  associated  with  integral  membrane  protein  studies,  the  enzymatic  mechanism of OST function remains obscure, although overwhelming results indicate that C‐terminal  domain of Stt3p subunit contains the substrate recognition and /or catalytic site. The three‐dimensional  structure  of  the  smallest  subunit,  Ost4p  will  be  presented.  The  C‐terminal  domain  of  Stt3p  subunit  production in E.coli, purification and structural characterization will also be discussed. The protein is  expressed as inclusion bodies (IB). The IB have been denatured, refolded and purified successfully to  homogeneity.  Hydropathy  index  and  TM  domain  prediction  programs  indicate  that  at  least  one  transmembrane domain may be present in this C‐terminal domain of Stt3p. Structural characterization  in detergent micelles using circular dichroism (CD) and high‐resolution solution NMR methods will be  presented. 

  Tuesday, PM   Session Chair 

Technical Session 6 4:00 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.  Next Generation Technologies  Issac Gamwo, Ph.D.  U.S. Department of Energy 

  M105  

Presenters   FILTER CAKE FORMATION ON THE WELLBORE WALL DURING DRILLING  OPERATION     Isaac K. Gamwo1* and Mohd A. Kabir1,2    1U.S Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15236‐0940  2ORISE, U.S Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15236‐0940   Abstract      During drilling process, the drilling fluid continuously cycles through the drill assembly. The fluid or  slurries is expected to perform many functions simultaneously. Some of the most important functions  are transport of drilled solids from the wellbore and release them at the surface, lubricate the drilling  assembly, reduce friction and wear on the drilling assembly, maintain a favorable pressure difference  between the wellbore and the rock formation, seal the well wall in permeable formation by forming a  filter cake at the wall. The primary purpose of the filter cake is to reduce the large losses of drilling fluid  to  the  surrounding  formation.  Unfortunately,  formation  conditions  are  frequently  encountered  which  may  result  in  unacceptable  losses  of  drilling  fluid  to  the  surrounding  formation  despite  the  type  of  drilling fluid employed and filter cake created. The filter cake forms in permeable zones in the wellbore  wall can also cause stuck pipe and other drilling problems. Despite filter cake importance in well bore  drilling operations, very limited studies have been carried on the filter cake formation.       In this presentation, we discuss the simulation of the filter cake formation using a computational fluid  dynamics  code  FLUENT.  In  particular,  we  examine  the  cake  formation  during  drilling  miles  in  the  sediment where high temperature (150 oC) and high pressure (20, 000 psi) are encountered.               4:00 – 4:20 

34


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 4:20 – 4:40 

A N‐ALKYLDITHIENOPYRROLE AND DIKETOPYRROLOPYRROLE‐BASED  COPOLYMER AS AN ORGANIC SEMICONDUCTOR FOR ORGANIC FIELD  EFFECT TRANSISTORS     Toby L. Nelson, Tomasz Young, Junying Liu, Sarada P. Mishra,   Tomasz Kowalewski, Richard D. McCullough*       Carnegie Mellon University, Chemistry Department, Pittsburgh, PA  15213  

    Abstract       A narrow bandgap polymer that unites the properties of the strong donor dithienopyrrole (DTP) and  the  strong  acceptor  diketopyrrolopyrrole  (DPP)  has  been  synthesized.   This  new  donor‐acceptor  polymer,  poly[2,5‐dihexadecyl‐3‐{5‐[4‐(2‐hexyl‐decyl)‐4H‐dithieno[3,2‐b;2ʹ,3ʹ‐d]pyrrol‐2‐yl]‐thiophen‐2‐ yl}‐6‐thiophen‐2‐yl‐2,5‐dihydro‐pyrrolo[3,4‐c]pyrrole‐1,4‐dione]  (PDDTP‐DPP),  demonstrates  behavior  contributed  to  the  donor‐acceptor  system  such  as  red‐shifted  absorption  maxima  (~860  nm)  and  a  narrow  band  gap  (1.2  eV).   Moreover,  this  copolymer  exhibits  high  reproducible  mobilities.   The  microstructure of PDDTP‐DPP thin films was investigated by two‐dimensional grazing incidence wide  angle x‐ray scattering and atomic force microscopy to understand the thin film morphology as it relates  to FET performance.     GUMBOS: A NEW BREED OF NANOMATERIALS 4:40 – 5:00    Isiah M. Warner*, Bilal El‐Zahab, Min Li, and Susmita Das    Dept. of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803     Abstract    Spectroscopy has been a fundamental component of my research since the beginning of my academic  career more than 30 years ago.   More recently, my research has begun to focus on the development of  new  approaches  to  production  of  nanoparticles  using  a  group  of  uniform  materials  based  on  organic  salts (GUMBOS).  In this regard, we have recently developed novel nanomaterials with capabilities for  easily providing a variety of properties which can be exploited for bioanalytical measurements.  These  nanoparticles are typically produced from frozen ionic liquids using a variety of methods for creating  relatively  monodispersed  nanoparticles.    This  talk  will  focus  on  discussions  of  these  new  kinds  of  nanomaterials  currently  under  development  in  my  laboratory,  as  well  as  provide  a  contrast  to  other  currently used nanomaterials.  The spectroscopic properties of some of our new nanoparticles will also  be discussed in detail.     FABRICATING MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS USING HIGH SPEED  5:00 – 5:20  MULTIPHOTON ABSORPTION POLYMERIZATION     George Kumi1, Floyd Bates1, Ciceron O. Yanez2, Kevin D. Belfield2,3, John T. Fourkas*1,4,5,6     1Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742   2Department of Chemistry, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, 32816   3CREOL, The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816   4Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742   35


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742   6Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials,   University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742       Abstract       The  true  three‐dimensional  (3D)  fabrication  capability  offered  by  multiphoton  absorption  polymerization  (MAP)  permits  the  creation  of  arbitrarily  complex  3D  microstructures.  This  capability  can be exploited to develop microfluidic devices that require complicated 3D master structures for their  production.  We  have  fabricated  several  microfluidic  master  structures  using  high  MAP  laser  writing  speeds. These speeds, which are markedly faster than those typically employed for MAP, mitigate one  of the major drawbacks of MAP – long fabrication times. To illustrate the potential of high speed MAP,  our focus has been on microfluidic systems that pose a challenge to standard photolithography. To this  end,  we  have  produced  a  variety  of  non‐rectangular  microfluidic  channel  cross‐sections  that  yield  unique  flow  profiles.  We  have  also  designed  and  fabricated  devices  that  utilize  3D  hydrofocusing  to  produce sheathed streams in microfluidic channels. These sheath‐flow devices are important for wide  variety  of  chemical  and  biological  applications,  such as  flow  cytometry,  micro‐droplet  formation,  and  rapid  diffusion‐based  microfluidic  mixing.  In  addition,  3D  microfluidic  devices  with  intricate  microfluidic  paths  that  afford  the  facile  manipulation  of  fluid  boundaries  in  a  microchannel  will  be  presented. Specific applications for these devices will be discussed.     HIGH RESOLUTION SPECROSCOPY OF COMETS WITH LARGE  5:20 – 5:40  TELESCOPES    William M. Jackson*, Anita L. Cochran**, Walt Harris*, Ron Vervack***,  Neil Dello Russo***, and Hal  Weaver***    *    University of California, Davis, CA 95616  **  University of Texas McDonald Observatory, 1 University Station, C1402, Austin, TX 78712  ***Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD  20723‐6099      Abstract    5

      Simultaneous observations of comet Wild 2 were made with the two 10 m Keck telescopes (Keck I and  Keck II) on the top of Mauna Kea in Hawaii are described. The Keck I telescope is equipped with a high‐ 36


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS resolution  echelle  spectrograph  (HIRES)  that  records  emissions  from  comet  in  the  spectral  region  between  307.0  to  574.5  nm.    While,  the  Keck  II  telescope  records  the  infrared  emissions  with  the  near  infrared  spectrometer  (NIRSPEC)  in  the  spectral  region  from  2.84  to  3.63  m.  These  simultaneous  measurements  provide  detailed  information  about  links  between  the  parent  molecules  H2O,  HCN,  CH3OH, H2CO, C2H6, C2H2, and NH3 observed by NIRSPEC and there daughters O, OH, CN, CH, C2,  C3, NH, and NH2 observed with the HIRES instrument.  The specific questions that will be addressed  are  links  between  the  parents,  daughters,  and  granddaughters.    Examples  of  such  links  are  the  CH4  and/or C2H6  CH; NH3 NH2 NH; HCN CN; and C2H2 C2; C2H6 C2.     WMJ,  was  supported  by  NSF  grant  AST‐0908529.  ALC  was  supported  by  NASA  Grant  NASA  NNX08A052G.  NDR,  RV  and  HW  were  supported  by  NASA  PAST  grant  NNG06G142G  The  authors  wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of  Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community. We are most fortunate to have  the opportunity to conduct observations from this mountain.               +JET MEASUREMENTS IN AU+AU COLLISIONS WITH THE SOLENOIDAL  5:40 – 6:00  TRACKER AT RHIC (STAR)       Martin J.M. Codrington1,2 & Saskia Mioduszewski*1,3 (for the STAR Collaboration)         1The Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843   2The Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843   3The Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843         Abstract         One of the most intriguing results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) experiments thus far,  is the observed suppression of hadrons at high transverse momentum; which is attributed to final state  medium‐induced energy loss of hard scattered partons. To quantify the energy loss, and the response of  the medium to the deposited energy and momentum; a probe is needed that has negligible interaction  with the medium itself, and thereby can provide a calibration of the momentum scale of the underlying  process.  One  such  probe  is  a  prompt  photon  (i.e.  produced  from  the  initial  hard‐scattering  process).  Studying correlations of a prompt photon with a jet (γ+Jet), should allow one to study the attenuation  and  modification  of  a  jet  with  well‐defined  energy  quantitatively.  And  thus  promises  to  provide  a  wealth of information about the energy‐loss process. There is, however, a large background of photons  from the decay of neutral mesons (mainly the π0). Ideally, a large fraction of these decay photons are  rejected before a correlation study is undertaken. In the STAR experiment, this can be done using the  transverse  shower  profile  measured  in  the  Shower  Maximum  Detector  (SMD)  of  the  Barrel  Electromagnetic Calorimeter (BEMC). The latest results of this analysis will be presented.           37


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Thursday, AM  

Professional Outreach Symposium 4:00 P.M. – 5:45 P.M. 

  M105 

Funding Opportunities for  Students and Professionals    4:00 – 4:45 

Presenters  THE TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION PROGRAM   Marlon L. Walker*    Technology Innovation Program  National Institute of Standards and Technology  Gaithersburg, MD  20899    Abstract 

 

  The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology was  established to assist U.S. businesses and institutions of higher education or other organizations, such as  national  laboratories  and  nonprofit  research  institutions,  to  support,  promote  and  accelerate  innovation  in  the  United  States  through  high‐risk,  high  reward  research  in  areas  of  critical  national  need. These are areas that justify government attention because the problems are large and the societal  challenges  that  need  to  be  overcome  are  not  being addressed,  but  could  be  addressed  through  high‐ risk, high‐reward research.    High‐risk,  high‐reward  research  has  the  potential  for  transformational  results  enabling  disruptive  changes over and above current methods and strategies. Transformational results have the potential to  radically  improve  our  understanding  of  systems  and  technologies,  challenging  the  status  quo  of  research  approaches  and  applications.  These  revolutionary  new  technologies  can  have  a  profound  impact on the challenges our society faces.   Details of the program will be discussed, including past and current competitions, eligible applicants,  joint ventures and single applicants, evaluation criteria, and competition guidelines.    Break  4:45 – 5:00    SCIENCE FOR POLICY & POLICY FOR SCIENCE: FELLOWSHIP  5:00 – 5:45  OPPORTUNITIES IN WASHINGTON    Daniel Poux*    Science and Technology Policy Fellowships  American Assoication for the Advancement of Science    Abstract     “Science and technology are responsible for almost every advance in our modern quality of life. Yet  science  isnʹt  just  about  laboratories,  telescopes  and  particle  accelerators.  Public  policy  exerts  a  huge  impact on how the scientific community conducts its work.” From Beyond Sputnik: U.S. Science Policy in  the 21st Century by Homer Neal, Tobin Smith and Jennifer McCormick     38


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS This  session  will  explore  fellowship  opportunities  at  the  intersection  of  science  and  policy,  both  in  terms  of  ʺscience  for  policyʺ  and  ʺpolicy  for  scienceʺ.  The  session  will  highlight  needed  skills  in  the  realm of science policy, as well as introduce several ways scientists can learn more about opportunities  in science policy, including the AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowships.      Thursday, AM  

Session Chair    8:00 – 8:20 

Award Symposium 4 8:00 A.M. – 10:00 A.M.  NOBCChE Undergraduate Award  Competition  Calvin James, Ph.D.  The Lubrizol Corporation 

  M101 

Presenters    The Lubrizol Corporation Undergraduate Awardee  EXPANDING THE PROCESSING WINDOW OF NANOPARTICLE THIN  FILMS    Earnest F. Long, Jr. and Dr. Daeyeon Lee*  School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Pennsylvania    Abstract 

  In  1966,  R.K.  Iler  published  an  article  detailing  a  technique  in  which  layers  of  oppositely  charged  nanoparticles are deposited sequentially onto a substrate in order to form a nanoparticle thin film. This  process came to be known as Layer‐by‐Layer Deposition (LbL). However, Iler’s method did not receive  any  considerable  attention  until  25  years  later,  when  G.  Decher  and  his  team  of  scientists  began  working  with  oppositely  charged  polymers  to  assemble  LbL  films.  Their  research  highlighted  the  possible  applications  of  these  thin  films  by  exploring  the  properties  they  impart  upon  glass.  In  particular, a TiO2/SiO2 nanoparticle thin film manufactured in this way has three notable properties: it  is anti‐fogging, anti‐reflective, and self‐cleaning.    The properties mentioned above are derived from the nature of the film. The anti‐fogging property, for  instance,  is  a  result  of  the  structure  of  the  film  making  the  glass  superhydrophilic.  Hydrophilic  surfaces “attract” water and distribute it across the surface. Hydrophobic surfaces, on the other hand,  “repel”  water  and  cause  it  to  bead  on  the  surface.  In  quantitative  terms,  a  hydrophilic  surface  is  defined to be one for which the contact angle of a water droplet (the angle at which the droplet is in  contact with the surface) is less than 90 degrees. A water droplet on a hydrophobic surface would have  a  contact  angle  of  90  degrees  or  greater.  Whether  a  surface  is  hydrophilic  or  hydrophobic  depends  largely on its structure and surface chemistry. Surfaces containing many crevices and depressions are  generally  more  hydrophilic  because  water  distributes  itself  into  those  spaces.  However,  when  water  vapor comes into contact with glass, the water does not distribute itself well across the surface. In other  words,  tiny  condensed  water  droplets  maintain  a  flattened  oval  shape  on  the  surface  of  the  glass  which,  in  turn,  causes  the  glass  to  appear  foggy.  The  reason  thin  films  make  glass  so  hydrophilic  is  because  they  are  very  porous.  Thus,  water  has  many  more  crevices  to  fill  upon  contact  with  the  surface, and a droplet can distribute itself completely across the surface almost instantaneously.    The anti‐reflective property is also derived from the nature of the film. Anti‐reflection occurs because  of the way that the film interacts with light. With normal glass, when light hits the surface, most of it is  transmitted, but some light is reflected back off of the surface. It is this reflected light that causes the  39


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS faint  reflection  people  sometimes  see  in  glass.  The  refractive  indices  of  thin  films  help  eliminate  this  reflection by causing destructive interference with the reflected light and constructive interference with  the transmitted light, reducing the reflection and making the glass appear clearer.    Unlike the other two properties, the self‐cleaning property stems mostly from the nature of one of the  components  of  the  film,  titanium  dioxide  (TiO2).  Titanium  dioxide  is  photocatalytic,  meaning  that  it  reacts  with  sunlight.  Specifically,  it  absorbs  UV  radiation  in  sunlight  and,  with  that  energy,  decomposes dirt and other organic contaminants. From here,��dirt can easily be washed off of the glass  thanks to the superhydrophilicity of the film.    8:20 – 8:40  Colgate‐Palmolive Company Undergraduate Awardee  SYNTHYESIS OF FLUOROGENIC CYANINE DYES     Stanley Oyaghire*, Dr. Angela Winstead1, Dr. Bruce Armitage2   

Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore MD 21251   Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Chemistry, Pittsburgh PA 73110    Abstract    Cyanine  dyes  have  become  widely  used  in  the  fields  of  Biology  and  Biotechnology,  where  they  are  applied  in  areas  such  as  flow  cytometry  and  cell  microscopy.  Non‐symmetrical  cyanines  are  widely  used  as  stains  for  nucleic  acids  because  of  their  fluorogenicity.  Such  applications  derive  from  the  ability  of  these  dyes  to  show  significantly  improved  fluorescence  in  conformationally  restricted  environments such as DNA intercalation sites.     Constantin  et.  al  synthesized  Dimethyl  Indole  Red(DIR),  an  example  of  a  non‐symmetric  dye  that  suppresses non‐specific binding to nucleic acids and proteins. While these dyes introduce specificity,  they permit only imaging of ‘fixed’ cells as their substituents cause electrostatic repulsion against the  phosphate backbone of the cell membrane. Also, synthesis of these dyes using conventional techniques  is known to yield a mixture of both the symmetric and non‐symmetric products.     Herein,  we  attempt  to  obtain  a  derivative  of  DIR  based  on  our  success  at  obtaining  high  quality  product in the synthesis of the heptamethine dyes. Synthetic steps involved the quaternization of both  heterocycles,  followed  by  synthesis  of  the  hemicyanine,  and  finally,  the  condensation  of  the  hemicyanine  with  the  complimentary  quaternized  heterocycle  to  obtain  the  target  dye.  A  mixture  of  both  the  symmetric  and  non‐symmetric  dyes  was  obtained  by  conventional  organinc  synthesis.  However,  preliminary  results  based  on  synthesis  of other  non‐symmetric  dyes  using  MAOS,  show a  preference  for  the  non‐symmetric  products.  Such  methods  would  be  employed  in  synthesizing  the  target  dye. We  also  intend  to  increase  the  conjugation  of  the  fluorogenic  dye,  extending its  emission  spectrum  to  the  near  infra‐red  (NIR)  region.  Such  modification  would  suppress  background  interference  from  fluorescent  proteins  within  the  cell.  The  quaternization  of  the  intermediate  heterocycles,  which  posed  a  considerable  challenge  with  conventional  methods,  would  also  be  explored  with  MAOS.  This  study  was  supported,  in  part,  by  a  grant  from  NSF  awarded  to  Dr.  Bruce  Armitage, Department of Chemistry, Carngie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213          1

2

40


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 8:40 – 9:00 

Winifred Burks‐Houck Undergraduate Awardee  ELECTROLESS NICKEL BASED CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGEN  GENERATION BY HYDROLYSIS OF NABH4    Shannon P. Anderson, Egwu Eric Kalu    Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering  FAMU‐FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL    Abstract    Catalysts  based  on  electroless  nickel  and  bi‐metallic  Ni‐Mo  nanoparticles  were  developed  for  the  hydrolysis  of  sodium  borohydride  for  hydrogen  generation.  The  catalysts  were  synthesized  by  polymer‐stabilized Pd nanoparticle‐catalyzation and activation of Al2O3 substrate and electroless Ni or  Ni‐Mo plating of the substrate for selected time lengths. Catalytic activity of synthesized catalysts was  tested for the hydrolyzation of alkaline‐stabilized NaBH4 solution for hydrogen generation. The effects  of  electroless  plating  time  lengths,  temperature  and  NaBH4  concentration  on  hydrogen  generation  rates were analyzed and discussed. Compositional analysis and surface morphology were carried out  for  nano‐metallized  Al2O3  using  XRD,  SEM  and  EDAX.  Suggestions  are  provided  for  further  work  needed  prior  to  using  the  catalyst  for  hydrogen  generation  for  portable  devices  including  fuel  cell  powered smart phones, hand‐held video games etc.    9:00 – 9:20  The Lubrizol Corporation Undergraduate Awardee  ARTIFICAL KIDNEY RESEARCH    Yazmin Feliz, Edward Leonard*, Michael Hill* and Joe Woo*    1Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY  2Columbia University, New York, NY    Abstract    Background:  At  Columbia  University,  the  Artificial  Kidney  Research  Group  is  working  towards  developing  a  model  of  a  kidney  that  would  be  effective  in  removing  excess  waste  from  the  human  blood of patients who have failing kidneys. Our purpose is to devise a filter that could act a nephron  by separating the entering blood into a stream of waste, and a clean stream that would be re‐deposited  into  the  body.  An  unforeseen  problem  that  arose  was  the  excessive  clotting  in  the  filters  that  would  ultimately  lead  to  filters  not  separating  blood.  Click  Chemistry  is  being  used  to  find  an  appropriate coating that would avoid cohesion of blood to the surface of the chips.  Another goal of the  team  is  to  find  the  right  dimensions  and  power  needed  for  the  motor  of  this  apparatus.  The  group  worked as a whole on providing input to improve the model and its dimensions, and devise new tests  which would result in more reproducible and presentable data.   Results:  High pressure readings were obtained when running blood through filters, which led to the  conclusion of clotting. Electron Scanning Microscope pictures clearly showed material adhesion on the  surface of the chips. When running blood tests with different surface treatments, the chip treated with  PerFluorinated OctoTrichloroSilane (FOTS), yielded best results of lower hemoglobin levels. However,  the  composition  of  FOTS  was  overly  hydrophobic,  restricting  all  passage  of  blood.  Simultaneously,  work  through  a  series  of  different  tests  allowed  for  a  successful  determination  of  power  (Watts)  consumption of the apparatus using one and two feed streams.  41


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Conclusions: The majority of the artificial kidney apparatus has been developed, which entails specific  dimensions  that  work  best  with  fluid  dynamics  to  allow  for  steady  separation  of  blood.  The  unexpected  problem  of  clogging  has  not  yet  been  resolved,  and  the  molecules  to  be  used  in  proper  coating of the chip are still being processed. Power consumption of the motor for three to four input  streams is still being computed. With further work, healthcare for patients with this delicate condition  can be reformed for the better.    9:20 – 9:40  Colgate‐Palmolive Company Undergraduate Awardee  OCEAN ACIDIFICATION IMPACTS ON LARVAL SHELL FORMATION BY  ARGOPECTEN IRRADIANS (BAY SCALLOP) OF NEW ENGLAND    Melissa A Pinard*1, Dr Daniel McCorkle2, Dr Anne Cohen3    Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore MD, 21251(1)  Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole MA, 02543(2,3)    Abstract    Bay scallops bring in millions of dollars in revenue to New England commercial fishermen each year  and  any  negative  impact  on  shellfish  growth  would  affect  them  adversely.  Increasing  levels  in  atmospheric carbon dioxide lead to decrease of the carbonate ion concentration in the ocean. This may  negatively  impact  the  larval  shell  formation  of  the  bay  scallop  because  these  organisms  require  an  environment  saturated  with  carbonate  and  calcium  ions  to  form  their  shells.  In  this  study  the  sensitivity of larval shell formation in Argopecten Irradians (bay scallops) to changes in surface water  saturation  (Ω)  (CO‐23  ion  concentration)  was  investigated  by  manipulating  CO2  concentration  in  sea  water on a laboratory scale. Fertilized bay scallop eggs were obtained two hours post‐fertilization and  were grown under four different CO2 concentrations: 380 (control), 560, 840 and 2280 ppm for 72 hours  and then harvested. The effects of elevated CO2 on shell formation were quantified by measuring hinge  length  as  well  as  the  number  of  larvae  recovered.  The  initial  study  shows  that  elevated  CO2  has  a  negative impact on both the shell formation and the survival rate. At lower CO2  the effect on survival  rate was not as great as in the highest CO2 level. Increasing CO2  also resulted in decreasing shell size  (hinge length). Possible future work would involve growing out the larvae for a longer period of time  as well as seeing the effects that feeding this larvae would have on shell formation.    Thursday, AM  

 

Plenary IV 11:00 A.M. – 12:00 N  Nigerian Society of Chemical Engineers  Plenary 

M101 

    DEVELOPMENT OF RELEVANT SKILLS REQUIRED FOR INDUSTRY IN YOUNG CHEMICAL  ENGINEERS TRAINED FROM UNIVERSITIES IN NIGERIA FOR OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE  IN INDURSTRY 

  Prof Francis O. Olatunji  President, NSChE  Infinite Grace House, Plot 9, Oyetubo Street, Off Obafemi Awolowo Way, Ikeja Lagos. Nigeria.    Abstract    42


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS This paper takes a look at the present need for developing relevant skills required for industry in our  newly‐trained,  young  Chemical  Engineers.  Nigeria  gained  independence  in  October,  1960  and  established  its  first  University  department  of  Chemical  Engineering  in  1968  at  the  University  of  Ife  (now  Obafemi  Awolowd  University,  Ile‐Ife).  We  now  have  over  fifteen  (15)  Universities  offering  degrees in Chemical Engineering.    A review is undertaken of our Chemical Engineering curriculum since the establishment of Chemical  Engineering departments in our Universities starting with a 3‐year programme from “A” level entry to  the  present  5‐year  programme  from  “O”  level  entry  and  with  a  sandwich  industrial  training.  The  minimum academic standard for Engineering & Technology education set up by a regulatory body in  Nigeria,  the  National  Universities  Commission  (NUC)  are  reported  especially  to  achieve  sustainable  industrial development.    The  present  widespread  assessment  of  our  young  Chemical  Engineering  graduates  is  that  they  are  lacking in the required skills to be productive in the industrial and business world and are therefore  largely unemployable. This paper takes a look at the skill gap that exists in our present graduates and  offers suggestions as to how to bridge the gap in order to improve the quality of our human capital.    Finally,  suggestion  is  made  about  a  possible  establishment  of  a  specialized  skill  training  center  in  Nigeria  for  training  young  Chemical  Engineers  in  appropriate  skills  for  industry,  with  technical  support from NOBCChE and challenges in such establishment are discussed.      Thursday, PM  

Session Chair    1:00 – 1:30 

Technical Session 7 1:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.  Global Sustainability in Science,  Engineering and Policy  Darlene Schuster,  AIChE‐Institute for Sustainability 

  M106 

Presenters    CREDENTIALING – MAKING SUSTAINABILITY SUSTAINABLE     Deborah Grubbe*   

AIChE‐Institute for Sustainability    Abstract    Today there are many definitions of sustainability, and if you ask x people, you will get x+n different  answers.    One  of  the  current  efforts  within  the  Institute  for  Sustainability  is  to  create  a  credentialing  process, so that engineers who desire to practice in the sustainability space will be able to point to a  recognizable  testament  of  their  knowledge.      Also,  when  employers  hire  people  who  have  the  credential,  they  will  know  more  about  the  candidate’s  competence.    While  in  the  early  stages,  the  sustainability credential is supportive of and additive to other certifications and licenses.  The speaker  will address the current and future areas of development.            43


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 1:30 – 1:50 

KINETICS OF BIO‐CATALYZED PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL FROM  RENEWABLE FEEDSTOCKS      Michael Gyamerah*   Department of Chemical Engineering, Roy G. Perry College of Engineering,  Prairie View A & M University,   Prairie View, TX 77446  

    Abstract      Biodiesel and bioethanol are renewable biofuel alternatives to fossil fuels receiving increased interest  as  a  result  of  rising  crude  oil  prices,  depletion  of  resources  and  the  potential  for  CO2  neutral  production.  Although  base‐catalyzed  chemical  conversion  of  vegetable  oils  and  an  alcohol  (mainly  methanol) to biodiesel is a mature technology, microbial/enzyme catalyzed biodiesel production with  its  potential  process  advantages  is  still  under  development,  and  only  one  industrial  scale  process  in  China has been reported. This paper presents an overview of the case for biofuels, and research being  initiated  at  Prairie  View  A  &  M  University  (PVAMU).  The  research  approach  to  resolving  the  lipase/microbial  catalyzed  reaction  mechanisms  of  the  biotransformations,  and  obtaining  the  kinetic  data to establish the appropriate rate equation for rational biochemical reactor design by predicting the  progress  of  biodiesel  production  using  vegetable  oils  and  fermentation  ethanol  in  a  batch  bioreactor  will  be  presented.  Finally,  bioprocessing  strategies  for  improving  industrial  enzymatic/microbial  conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel will be highlighted.     CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF GLYCEROL INTO HIGHER VALUE MIXED  1:50 – 2:10  ALCOHOLS    Roderick McDowell1, Rukiya Umoja, George Armstrong1,    Mouzhgun Anjom2, and Devinder Mahajan*2   1Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174, 2Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973    Abstract    Catalytic  hydrogenation  reactions  are  pervasive  throughout  our  economy,  from  production  of  margarine as food, to liquid fuels for transportation. Due to the rapid depletion of natural resources,  the production of alternative energy sources is vital. As such, the biodiesel industry is seeking novel  ways  to  utilize  its  main  by‐product,  glycerol.  The  conversion  of  glycerol  to  higher‐valued  products  achieved  by  catalytic  transformation  presents  a  more�� resourceful  way  to  hydrogenate  glycerol.  Although this process is a viable method, it requires the development of highly efficient catalysts that  operate  at  low  pressures  and  temperatures.  We  analyzed  several  metal  catalysts  that  are  capable  of  producing mixed alcohols (C1‐C5). The catalysts include Mo(CO)6, RhCl3(H20)3, Ruthenium on, CoCl2,  and Mo(CO)6  + S2. All of the reactions were conducted in a 300 mL batch Parr reactor fitted with gas  and liquid outlets for sampling under H2 or N2  at 500‐715 psig under 250‐280  oC.  Gas chromatography  was used to confirm the identity of all products. Initially, Mo(CO)6 was used as a catalyst at 715 psig  pressure  and  280  oC  temperature.  The  alcohols  detected  were  methanol  (C1),  ethanol  (C2),  propanol  (C3),  butanol (C4), and  pentanol  (C5).  In  our  first  experiment,  a  total  of 0.17%  C1,  0.88%  C2, 0.12%  C3,  0.1% C4  and 0.25% C5 were detected. The demonstrated  results have implications in the development  of next‐generation hydrogenation reaction systems that would lead to the production of biofuels and  other chemicals, thus reducing the carbon footprint in the transportation sector.     44


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Break    REACTION KINETICS OF CELLLULOSE HYDROLYSIS IN SUBCRITICAL  2:20 – 2:35  AND SUPERCRITICAL WATER     Kazeem B. Olanrewaju, Taiying Zhang, and Gary A. Aurand*       The University of Iowa, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Iowa City, IA, 52242    Abstract       More  efficient  conversion  technologies  are  needed  to  utilize  cellulosic  biomass  for  the  production  of  fuels and chemicals. Cellulose can be hydrolyzed very rapidly in supercritical water without the need  for an enzyme or other catalyst. Fermentable sugar yield and selectivity obtained from this continuous  flow  process  are  low  due  to  monosaccharide  decomposition  at  high  temperatures.  High  selectivity  could  be  achieved  by  ensuring  that  the  rate  of  cellulose  hydrolysis  is  high  relative  to  the  rate  of  monosaccharide  decomposition.  However,  treatment  at  lower,  subcritical  temperatures  is  ineffective  because  of  cellulose  insolubility.  Results  of  hydrothermal  oligosaccharide  reactions  suggest  that  monosaccharide  yield  and  selectivity  may  be  enhanced  significantly  via  control  of  the  reactor  temperature.  More  detailed  understanding  of  hydrothermal  cellulose  dissolution  and  hydrolysis  kinetics  is  required  to  develop  an  efficient  treatment  process.  Computer  simulations  of  cellulose  hydrolysis  have  been  performed  based  on  a  variety  of  hydrolytic  scission  modes.  The  simulation  results  will  be  compared  to  cellulose  molecular  weight  distributions  from  hydrolysis  experiments  in  subcritical  and  supercritical  water.  The  objective  is  to  determine  the  mode(s)  of  scission  and  the  corresponding  reaction  kinetics  parameters.  The  results  will  be  incorporated  into  a  comprehensive  model  describing  the  process  of  cellulose  conversion  in  hydrothermal  systems.  The  model  subsequently will be used in the development of an improved process design.     UNCATALYZED ESTERIFICATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS WITH  2:35 – 2:50  SUPERCRITICAL ETHANOL     Kehinde S. Bankole and Gary A. Aurand*     The University of Iowa, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering,  Iowa City, IA, 52242       Abstract     To shift from a petroleum‐based to a biomass‐based economy will require the development not only of  biofuels,  but  also  of  biorenewable  replacements  for  petroleum‐derived  chemicals.  In  this  regard,  environmentally friendly biomass‐derived esters may serve as alternatives to fossil‐derived chemicals  such  as  toxic  halogenated  solvents  and  glycol  ethers.  Therefore,  esterification  of  biorenewable  resources such as ethanol, acetic acid, lactic acid, and levulinic acid has been initiated by the chemical  industry  to  convert  biomass‐derived  resources  into  useful  chemicals.  At  atmospheric  condition,  esterification is a reversible reaction limited by the low equilibrium conversion and slow reaction rate,  and  has  recently  been  performed  with  excess  alcohol  to  shift  the  equilibrium  conversion  and  either  heterogeneous  or  homogeneous  acid  catalysts  to  achieve  higher  reaction  rates.  Although  the  acid‐ catalyzed process has been extensively developed, it has at least the following inherently undesirable  drawbacks:  the  homogeneous  acid  catalyst  can  erode  process  equipment;  miscibility  of  acid  catalyst  2:10 – 2:20 

45


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS with  the  reaction  medium  requires  expensive  downstream  separation  operations;  there  are  possible  side reactions  such  as  dehydration  and  etherification;  and  acid disposal  can  be  an issue.  In  addition,  the heterogeneous acid‐catalyzed reactions can be mass transfer limited, require complex catalyst pre‐ treatment,  suffer  from  deactivation  of  solid  catalyst,  and  require  longer  reaction  time.  Supercritical  fluids have received considerable attention over the last few years in the chemical industry due to their  favorable  gas‐like  and  liquid‐like  properties.  Performing  reactions  under  supercritical  conditions  rather  than  in  the  conventional  gas  or liquid  phase  could  be  an interesting  option  for  improving  the  equilibrium  conversion,  enhancing  the  reaction  rate,  and  making  the  process  more  environmentally  friendly. Supercritical ethanol has received attention as an alternative reaction medium because of its  positive  effects  on  the  reaction  rate,  selectivity,  and  yield.  Considering  the  growing  importance  of  esterification reactions in industry, this work investigated the kinetics of uncatalyzed esterification at  supercritical  conditions  with  a  stoichiometric  ratio  of  carboxylic  acid  (acetic  acid,  lactic  acid,  and  levulinic  acid)  to  ethanol,  using  a  corrosion  resistant  capillary  tube  batch  reactor.  Data  will  be  presented  regarding  the  effect  of  reaction  temperature  on  equilibrium  conversion,  reaction  kinetics,  and thermodynamic parameters.     KINETIC STUDY OF ALCOHOLYSIS OF BROWN GREASE CATALYZED BY  2:50 – 3:05  ALUMINUM CHLORIDE      Solomon Simiyu, John B. Miller and Steven B. Bertman*         Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008     Abstract       Biodiesel  (BD)  is  a  mixture  of  fatty  acid  esters  (typically  methyl  and/or  ethyl)  derived  from  both  vegetable and animal fats. BD is biodegradable and generally considered an environmentally benign  alternative  diesel.  Currently,  commercial  production  of  BD  relies  on  refined  oil  or  fat  using  base‐  catalyzed  transesterification,  but  the  high  cost  of  virgin  feedstock  is  a  deterrent.   One  approach  to  making BD economically competitive with petroleum diesel is to use less‐expensive feedstocks such as  waste  cooking  oils  or  greases.  The  high  free  fatty  acid  (FFA)  content  of  waste  feedstocks,  however,  makes  base‐catalyzed  chemistry  impossible.   A standard  means of  BD  production  from  waste  grease  involves a two–step process, where an initial acid‐catalyzed esterification of the FFA is followed by a  base‐catalyzed  transesterification  of  the  triglycerides.   Sulfuric  acid  is  often  the  catalyst  for  the  acid  step.  However,  a large amount  of  base  is  required to  neutralize the  acid  remaining in  the  pretreated  greases using this two‐step process, which increases the production cost. In this study, we examined  the  use  of  aluminum  chloride  (AlCl3)  as  catalyst  for  the  esterification  of  waste  grease  to  fatty  acid  methyl  esters  (FAME).  High  yields  of  FAMES  under  reflux  conditions  in  methanol  were  achieved.  Compared to H2SO4, AlCl3 has shown to have higher rates of conversion of FFA into esters than H2SO4.  The  use  of  AlCl3  may  have  economic  advantages  compared  to  mineral  acid  catalysts.   Herein,  the  variables  affecting  esterification  of  waste  grease  using  AlCl3,  such  as  molar  ratio  of  alcohol  to  oil,  temperature,  concentration  of  the  catalyst  and  the  concentration  of  grease  were  studied.  Finally  the  efficacy  of  recycling  the  catalyst  was  investigated.  A  kinetic  investigation  revealing  the  order  of  the  reaction  and  the  dependence  of  the  order  on  both  the  concentration  of  grease  and  of  catalyst  was  undertaken.  The  energy  of  activation  determined  in  this  study  was  compared  with  that  reported  for  H2SO4‐catalyzed waste grease esterification.         46


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 3:05 – 3:25 

A GENERAL APPROACH TO MULTICOMPONENT DISTILLATION  COLUMN DESIGN     T.J. Afolabi1 and A. O. Denloye2*      1Department of Chemical Engineering,   Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria   2Department of Chemical Engineering,   University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba. Lagos, Nigeria   1Corresponding author; kdenloye@yahoo.com  

    Abstract       The  application  of  the  developed  VLE  analytical  correlations  to  computer  aided  multicomponent  distillation designs showed that it is not enough that a property model (VLE) predicts well, the model  must  also  have  continuous  first  order  derivative  to  be  useful  in  computer  aided  design.  A  general  procedure  therefore  has  been  developed  that  can  be  used  for  complex  systems  such  petroleum  mixtures by modifying the “ θ‐method” of convergence to handle situation in which discontinuity can  be encountered.     SELF‐ASSEMBLED POLYMERIC MATERIALS FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC  3:25 – 3:45  APPLICATIONS       Dahlia Haynes*, Courtney Balliet, Tomask Young, Richard McCullough   Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213       Abstract       There  are  many  polymers  that  exhibit  supramolecular  properties  i.e.  show  binding  affinity  and  selectivity  towards  anions,  exhibit  charge  transport,  and  have  significant  electrical  and  optical  properties,  One  of  the  most  versatile  of  this  family  are  Polythiophenes,  which  are  well  studied  structures which have been utilized in a variety of applications due to their unique properties. There is  considerable precedence towards the design of functional polythiophenes and their utility in variety of  applications  such  as  field  effect  transistors,  light  emitting  diodes,  photovoltaic  cells,  biomedical  and  optical  sensing  systems.   The  ability  to  control  self‐assembly  in  nano‐structured  materials  plays  a  prevalent  role  towards  the  development  of  highly  optimal  electronic  devices.   As  such,  the  self‐ assembled components can strongly affect the internal processes associated with energy transfer and  conversion  in  polymeric  devices  and  scaffolds.    For  instance,  nanoscale  self‐assembly  of  poly(3‐ alkylthiophenes)  have  been  thoroughly  investigated  towards  the  optimization  of  charge  carrier  mobility  and  conductivity.  One  strategic  technique  has  been  the  incorporation of  other  polymers  via  copolymerization  and/or  organic  syntheses  to  induce  various  idealized  morphologies  via  self  assembled  copolymer  templates  towards  the  design  of  efficient  and  high‐performance  electronic  devices.   Herein,  I  demonstrate  the  use  of  copolymerization  procedures  to  influence  the  degree  and  design of self‐assembled poly‐3‐alkylthiophenes by the addition of “soft” biodegradable segments and  flexible elastomeric units.  Block copolymers consisting of various units will be discussed in terms of  their  structure‐property  relationships  with  distinct  focus  on  the  influence  on  self‐assembly  and  electronic properties of P3HTs with emphasis in photovoltaic applications.     Break  3:45 – 3:55  47


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   TECHNOPRENEUSHIP CONSIDERATIONS IN ENHANCING CAPACITY  BUILDING FOR DEVELOPING NATIONS    Engr. Enefiok E. Ubom*    Infinite Grace House, Plot 9, Oyetubo street, Off Obafemi Awolowo Way, Ikeja Lagos, Nigeria. 

3:55 – 4:15 

  Abstract    This  paper  gives  a  clarification  initially  between  Entrepreneurship  and  Technopreneurship.  It  then  takes  a  look  at  the  present  need  for  enhancing  capacity  building  in  developing  nations  through  the  Technopreneurship  route.  Leaning  on  the  milestones  achieved  in  selected  economies  through  Technopreneuship route for capacity building, the paper assesses the situation in Nigeria and seeks to  propose models geared towards lifting poor communities out of poverty. The presentation will discuss  the  merits  of  the  models  some  of  which  are  amenable  to  global  applications  while  some  could  be  specific.         THE NEED FOR THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES TO DEVELOP A MIX OF  4:15 – 4:35  ALTERNATI.VE ENERGY SOURCES FOR INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT  AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS: THE CHALLENGE FOR  NIGERIA                         Prof. Francis O. Olatunji*   

President, NSChE  Infinite Grace House, Plot 9, Oyetubo Street, Off Obafemi Awolowo Way, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria.    Abstract    The official Nigeriaʹs position at the recent Copenhagen Conference on global warming is to join with  other African countries to speak with one voice in terms of seeking compensation for the damage done  to the African continent as a result of the greenhouse gas emission by the developed economies. While  Nigeria  supports  the  new  drive,  globally,  towards  a  cleaner  atmosphere/environment,  it  is  also  mindful  of  the  building  blocks  established  through  the  Bali  Action  Plan  at  the  l3th  session  of  the  conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on climate change, held in Bali,  Indonesia,  2007,  which  included  adaptation  measures,  mitigation,  financial  mechanism  and  capacity  building.    While,  through  these  clear  mechanisms  above,  funds  should  be  obtained  from  the  international  community  for  development  in  order  to  ameliorate  these  damages,  it  is  necessary  for  Nigeria  to  increase  its  capacity  building  in  various  alternative  energy  sources.  It  is  the  NSChEʹs  position  that  Nigeria  should  develop  a  mix  of  alternative  energy  sources,  to  the  conventional  fossil  fuels,  such  as  solar, wind, hydroelectric and renewable‐based forms of energy.    This  presentation  will  discuss  the  merits  and  demerits  of  these  mix  of  alternative  energy  sources,  highlighting their contributions to industrial development as well as cleaner atmosphere/environment.  The role of Chemical Engineers in this capacity building will be discussed.  48


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   4:35 – 4:55 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING: A CRITICAL TOOL FOR ECONOMIC  ADVANCEMENT OF NIGERIA      Nche John D. Erinne*       Chex & Associates   (Consultants & Engineers)   3 Wilmer Street, Ilupeju, Lagos, Nigeria       Abstract       Situated on the West Coast of Africa, Nigeria is the largest country in Africa, with a population of  140m. The country is also a major petroleum producer, ranked as the 6th leading oil exporter and has  the 7th largest reserve of natural gas in the world. The economy of Nigeria is indeed dominated by  petroleum, to the extent that the Petroleum Industry accounts for over 80% of the revenue of the  government.       Nigeria has been ruled by military regimes for a total of about 30 years out of nearly 50 years of  independence. Since the return to elective governance 10 years ago the government has struggled to  consolidate democracy. It is also faced with the stiff challenge of delivering rapid economic  development and improved living standards for her people, especially in such areas as: efficient and  gainful exploitation of oil & gas resources, provision of public infrastructure and utilities,  diversification of the economy for reduced dependence on petroleum, development of technological  capability, growth of manufacturing and job creation.       This paper highlights the key role of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Engineers in the realization  of these developmental goals. It also examines the constraints and profers solutions to ensure the  fulfillment of the potentials of Chemical Engineering in this regard.         Thursday, PM  

Session Chair 

Award Symposium 6 3:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.  Graduate Student Fellowship   Sci‐Mix Symposium  Daphne N. Robinson  The Lubrizol Corporation

  M101 

Presenters    Procter & Gamble Fellowship Awardee  CELL‐RESPONSIVE PEPTIDE NUCLEIC ACID SIRNA  NANOCONJUGATES FOR GENE DELIVERY    Abbygail A. Palmer*, Millicent O. Sullivan  University of Delaware, Department of Chemical Engineering, Newark, DE 19716    Abstract    The  development  of  a  small  interfering  RNA  (siRNA)  delivery  vehicle  designed  to  address  the  hierarchical nature of the gene delivery pathway may overcome the limitations in delivering siRNA    3:00 – 3:20 

49


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS therapeutics.  Our  design  consists  of  a  modular  system  allowing  for  site‐directed  delivery  by  introducing components for protection and targeting in a step‐wise fashion. SiRNA is tethered to a  multifunctional poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugate via a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) clamp and a  cathepsin L‐cleavable linker peptide. Targeting and endosomolytic peptides are attached to the PEG  backbone to form siRNA‐PNA‐peptide (siRP) conjugates. The siRNA‐PNA interaction was validated  using  agarose  gel  electrophoresis.    Matrix‐assisted  laser  desorption  ionization  time‐of‐flight  (MALDI‐TOF)  mass  spectrometry  was  used  to  explore  the  PNA‐peptide  and  peptide‐PEG  linkage  reactions.  We  are  currently  further  exploring  siRP  conjugate  formation  via  sequential  component  additions, purification by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography, and validation by  MALDI‐TOF mass spectrometry.      3:20 – 3:40  Winifred Burks‐Houck Graduate Awardee  INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF ELECTRON DELOCALIZATION ON  INTERACTIONS BETWEEN WATER AND HYDROCARBONS       Kari L. Copeland* and Gregory S. Tschumper    University of Mississippi, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,   University, MS 38677       Abstract     Diacetylene  (H  −  C  ≡  C  −  C  ≡  C  −  H)  is  one  of  the  smallest  neutral,  closed  shell  molecules  with  a  delocalized π electron system. Unlike acetylene (H − C ≡ C − H), the delocalized π electron system in  diacetylene  causes  it  to  closely  mimic  many  of  the  important  characteristics  of  the  benzene  dimer,  which  has  been  extensively  used  as  a  model  for  π‐type  interactions,  which  are  seen  in  the  helical  structure  of  DNA.  In  this  work,  ab  initio  electronic  structure  computations  have  been  used  to  examine the structures and energetics of small hydrocarbon molecules interacting with water. Full  geometry optimizations and vibrational frequency calculations were performed at the MP2 level of  theory  with  Dunning’s  correlation  consistent  triple‐ζ  basis  set,  denoted  haTZ  (cc‐pVTZ  for  H  and  aug‐cc‐pVTZ  for  C  and  O).  The  CCSD(T)  complete  basis  set  (CBS)  limit  was  determined  by  combining explicitly correlated MP2‐R12 computations with corrections for higher‐order correlation  effects.  Results  for  these  clusters  (CH4,  C2H2,  C2H4,  C2H6,  C4H2  and  C6H6  paired  with  H2O)  are  compared in order to gain insight into changes that occur as the π electron system delocalizes.     3:40 – 4:00  Dow Chemical Company Fellowship Awardee  SELF‐ASSEMBLED MONOLAYER DIRECTED GROWTH OF PLATINUM  NANOPARTICLES BY ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION    Marja Mullings,*1 Xirong  Jiang2 and Stacey Bent1  mullings@stanford.edu, xrjiang@stanford.edu, sbent@stanford.edu  1Department of Chemical Engineering, 2Department of Physics  Stauffer III, Chemical Engineering  381 North‐South  Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA    Abstract    50


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Nanoparticles  possess  interesting  chemical,  physical,  electronic  and  mechanical  properties  not  typically observed on a larger scale.  In the case of catalysis, the spatial distribution of nanoparticles,  together  with  particle  size and  composition,  are important  considerations  for  increasing  reactivity.  The  availability  of  new  methods  for  simultaneously  controlling  the  density  and  size  of  catalyst  nanoparticle  materials  in  a  range  of  solid  supports  would  be  of  tremendous  value  to  the  field  of  catalysis.  We  are  exploring  a  method  of  fabricating  Pt  nanoparticles  by  atomic  layer  deposition  (ALD) using surface functionalization of substrates to serve as a template for controlling the spatial  dispersion and size of nanoparticles. ALD provides excellent capabilities for depositing materials in  high  surface  area  supports,  while  the  use  of  functionalization  would  allow  control  over  the  morphology of the deposited material.      Octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS) self‐assembled monolayers (SAM) were grown on silicon dioxide‐ coated  silicon  substrates  through  solution  phase  deposition.  The  ODTS‐coated  samples  were  introduced into an ALD reactor for subsequent Pt ALD.  The Pt ALD process was carried out using  (methylcyclopentadienyl)‐trimethylplatinum and dry air as precursors at 280oC. Our previous work  has shown that whereas no Pt ALD occurs on dense ODTS SAMs, Pt deposition does occur on lower  quality  SAM  films.    Moreover,  the  amount  of  growth  is  sensitive  to  the  quality  of  the  SAM  and  depends on the presence of defects in the film.1   Nucleation during ALD at defects in the SAM can  result in nanoparticle formation.  In the current study, the defect density was controlled by the SAM  formation time.  Following immersion of the substrates into ODTS precursor solution for lengths of  time  ranging  from  2  to  12  hours,  Pt  ALD  was  performed.    The  densities  of  the  deposited  Pt  nanoparticles  were  estimated  using  scanning  electron  microscopy  (SEM).  We  find  that  there  is  an  inverse relationship between density of nanoparticles and ODTS SAM immersion time. The sizes of  the  deposited  nanoparticles  range  from  4  to  600  nm.    The  composition  of  the  nanoparticles  was  confirmed  by  X‐ray  photoelectron  spectroscopy  (XPS)  and  scanning  Auger  electron  spectroscopy  (AES).  Consistent  with  the  SEM  results,  the  atomic  percentage  of  Pt  decreases  with  an  increase  in  ODTS SAM immersion time.    In addition to the density of nanoparticles, we are actively studying the effect of the number of Pt  ALD  cycles  on  nanoparticle  size  for  a  fixed  ODTS  SAM  template.    Preliminary  results  show  that  while nanoparticle size increases with increasing number of Pt ALD cycles, nanoparticle density also  increases.  This finding might indicate that more Pt nucleation sites become available with increasing  number  of  ALD  cycles.  The  applicability  of  this  SAM  template  technique  for  nanoparticle  growth  may  be  applied  to  other  materials,  including  those  with  catalytic,  photocatalytic  or  optoelectronic  properties.     1.  X. Jiang and S. F. Bent, Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 154 (12), D648‐D656, (2007)                          51


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 4:00 – 4:20 

 

 

Lendon N. Pridgen, GlaxoSmithKline ‐ NOBCChE Fellowship Awardee  A DIASTEREOSELECTIVE FISCHER INDOLIZATION APPROACH  TOWARD FUSED INDOLINE‐CONTAINING NATURAL PRODUCTS    Tehetena Mesganaw*    University of California, Los Angeles   

Abstract    The discovery of efficient methods to synthesize complex bioactive molecules continues to be a vital  area  of  research.  A  subset  of  compounds  that  have  received  substantial  interest  due  to  their  medicinal properties and impressive structures are those that possess the fused indoline ring system.  Specifically,  enantioenriched  fused‐indolines  are  of  particular  interest  since  most  medicinal targets  exhibit  biological  activity  in  one  enantiomeric  form.  This  presentation  will  highlight  a  novel  and  convergent  method  to  prepare  indoline‐containing  products  by  way  of  an  interrupted  Fischer  indolization sequence, as well as a diastereoselective variant to produce enantiopure products.    E.I. Dupont Graduate Fellowship Awardee 4:20 – 4:40  THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE PARKINSON’S DISEASE‐RELATED  MUTANT I93M OF THE DEUBIQUITINATING ENZYME UCHL1    Christopher W. Davies, Tushar K. Maiti, Chittaranjan Das*    Purdue University, Department of Chemistry, West Lafayette, IN 47905    Abstract     Ubiquitin is a 76 amino acid protein that is ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotes and is involved in  signally pathways in which proteins are covalently linked to ubiquitin and subsequently degraded  by  the  proteasome  or  lysosome.    Deubiquitinating  enzymes  (DUBs)  are  proteases  that  regulate  ubiquitin‐dependent  pathways  by  counteracting  ubiquitination  by  virtue  of  their  ability  to  hydrolytically remove ubiquitin tags from protein adducts. Ubiquitin carboxy‐terminal hydrolyase  L1  (UCHL1)  is  a  DUB  that  is  expressed  exclusively  in  the  brain,  accounting  for  the  majority  of  soluble  protein  in  brain  tissue  (2%).      A  variant  of  UCHL1,  I93M,  has  reduced  enzymatic  activity  relative to the wild type enzyme and is known to be associated with the autosomal‐dominate form  of  Parkinson’s  disease.    We  have  crystallized  and  determined  the  structure  of  the  I93M  variant  in  both apo and ubiquitin‐bound (I93MUb) forms.  Our analysis has shown that the overall structure of  the  I93M  mutant  is  very  similar  to  the  wild  type  UCHL1;  however,  the  catalytic  cysteine  of  the  mutant  is  misaligned  relative  to  the  wild  type  enzyme.    This  misalignment  of  the  cysteine  residue  could account for the difference in activity of the mutant as compared to the wild type enzyme.                     52


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Thursday, PM   Session Chair    3:00 – 3:20 

Technical Session 8 3:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.  Inorganic Chemistry 

  M104  

  Presenters    EFFECT OF ANCILLARY LIGANDS AND SOLVENTS ON H/D EXCHANGE  REACTIONS CATALYZED BY CP*IR COMPLEXES     Yuee Feng*, Bi Jiang, Paul Boyle, Elon A. Ison  

Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 27695‐8204   Abstract   A  series  of  complexes  of  the  form  Cp*Ir(NHC)(X)n  and  [Cp*Ir(NHC)(L)2][(OTf)2]  (NHC  =  1,3,4,5‐ tetramethl‐imidazol‐2‐ylidene,  X  =  Cl,  NO3,  TFA,  n  =  2;  X  =  SO4,  n  =  1;  L  =  H2O,  CH3CN;  TFA  =  trifluoroacetate,  OTf  =  trifloromethanesulfonate)  have  been  synthesized  and  utilized  for  catalytic  H/D  exchange  reactions  between  benzene  and  various  deuterium  sources.   The  reactivity  of  these  complexes  in  catalytic  H/D  exchange  reactions  was  assessed  by  GC/MS.   The  influence  of  the  ancillary ligands (Cl, SO4, NO3, TFA, H2O, and CH3CN), and deuterium sources (CD3OD, CF3COOD,  CD3COCD3, and D2O) on the catalytic reactivity in H/D exchange reactions was probed.  In addition,  the  influence  of  the  NHC  ligand  itself  was  probed  by  comparing  the  reactivity  of  the  complex  [Cp*Ir(NHC)(OH2)2][(OTf)2] with [Cp*Ir(OH2)3][(OTf)2] in catalytic H/D exchange reactions between  benzene and CD3OD and CF3COOD.  From these investigations, valuable insight into the mechanism  of C‐H activation by Cp*Ir(NHC) complexes was attained.     3:20 – 3:35 

MOLECULAR BASED SYNTHESIS OF SOLID STATE HIGH NUCLEARITY  LANTHANIDE CHALCOGENIDE CLUSTERS FOR OPTOELECTRONIC  AND SCINTILLATION APPLICATIONS     Brian F. Moore1 , Thomas Emge1 ,Ajith Kumar2 , Richard Riman2 , John G. Brennan1     (1)       Department of Chemisty & Chemical Biology, Rutgers, The State University of New  Jersey, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854   (2)        Department of Ceramics and Materials Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of  New Jersey, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854       Abstract     The  room  temperature  synthesis  and  characterization  of  a  new  series  of  Heptadecanuclear  lanthanide chalcogenide ((Py)16Ln17Se18 (SePh)16Na ) clusters, will be presented, (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd; Py =  Pyridine). The 17 member core consists of a single Ln(III) center encapsulated by 10 μ3  Se2‐  ions that  are then surrounded by Ln, with the surface of the cluster capped with additional Se2‐, py, and SePh.  The ((Py)16Nd17Se18 (SePh)16Na) system exhibits NIR emissions with the highest Quantum Efficiency  (Q.E.), of any molecular based lanthanide system to date, while the ((Py)16Ce17Se18 (SePh)16Na) system  shows remarkable potential as a highly efficient scintillator.          53


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 3:35 – 3:50 

ANISOTROPIC MAGNETISM IN LnNiGa4 (Ln = Y, Gd – Yb)     Kandace R. Thomas*1, Richard D. Hembree1, Amar B. Karki2, Yi Li2,   Jiandi Zhang2, David P. Young2, John Ditusa2 and Julia Chan1  

  

 

1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 USA   2Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803  USA     Abstract     We have studied the lattice structure, electronic and magnetic properties of a series of single crystals  of LnNiGa4 (Ln = Y, Gd ‐ Yb).  The LnNiGa4 (Ln = Y, Gd – Yb) crystallize in the orthorhombic YNiAl4‐ type structure with Cmcm (No. 63) space group symmetry.  The crystal structure may be viewed as  an  intergrowth  of  partial  AlB2‐superstructures  and  Ga  only  slabs,  which  adopt  a  distorted  α‐Fe  structure  type.   The  magnetic  properties  of  LnNiGa4  (Ln  =  Y,  Gd  ‐  Yb)  were  also  investigated  and  show  anisotropic  behavior  in  the  susceptibilities  and  field‐dependent  magnetizations,  where  dramatic changes in the magnetization occur within a small change in applied field in the c‐direction  of  the  crystal.   Several  analogues  are  field‐dependent,  as  they  magnetically  behave  as  antiferromagnets  in  relatively  low  field,  but  change  to  ferromagnets  at  higher  field.   X‐ray  photoelectron spectroscopy results reveal the itinerant character of Ni in the compound such that the  measured  magnetic  moments  are  mainly  originated  from  rare‐earth  elements  rather  than  from  Ni;  while the multiple components in Ga 2p cores clearly indicate the distinct Ga sites in the compounds,  in consistence with results of structural studies.     DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL PHARMACEUTICAL COCRYSTALS: THE USE  3:50 – 4:05  OF NUTRACEUTICALS AS GENERAL PURPOSE COCRYSTAL FORMERS   Heather D. Clarke, Michael J. Zaworotko*   University of South Florida, Department of Chemistry, Tampa, FL 33620   Abstract   Pharmaceutical  cocrystals,  crystalline  solids  formed  via  complexation  between  different  molecules,  an API and a pharmaceutically acceptable “cocrystal former”, are a rapidly emerging class of active  pharmaceutical  ingredients  (APIs).   It  has  been  reported  that  80%  of  APIs  currently  on  the  market  are poorly soluble and henceforth exhibit poor oral bioavailability.  The formation of salt forms is the  traditional approach to the improvement of oral bioavailability of the API, however according to the  orange  book  database,  53.2%  of  drug  candidates  exists  as  non‐ionizable  forms.   Pharmaceutical  cocrystals  provide  an  alternative  for  controlling  the  physicochemical  properties  of  the  API  such  as  solubility and bioavailability. The report herein investigates the use of nutraceuticals, gallic acid in  particular, as general purpose cocrystal formers in the design and synthesis of novel pharmaceutical  cocrystals.   Gallic  acid,  an  antioxidant,  possesses  carboxylic  acid  and  phenol  moieties  that  are  multiple  hydrogen  bond  donors  and  acceptors  and  are  therefore  capable  of  forming  stable  and  diverse intermolecular interactions (supramolecular heterosynthons) with complementary functional  groups.    Experiments  were  designed  by  empirical  analysis  of  the  supramolecular  heterosynthons  formed  between  carboxylic  acids  and  phenols  and  other  functional  groups  using  the  Cambridge  Structural Database.  Cocrystal formers were then chosen based on their functional moieties present  and  their aqueous  solubility.   Finally,  dissolution  studies  were  performed  to  see  if  there  is  a  direct  54


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS correlation between the solubility of the pharmaceutical cocrystal and the component properties.      4:05 – 4:20 

THE ELECTRON TRANSFER CHEMISTRY OF REVERSIBLE TWO  ELECTRON PLATINUM REAGENTS       Ronnie Muvirimi*, Jeanette A. Krause, William B. Connick     University Of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221       Abstract  

    A  central  problem  in  thermal  and  photochemical  catalysis  is  the  manipulation  and  delivery  of  multielectron  redox  equivalents  for  substrate  activation.   As  a  step  towards  understanding  and  learning to control cooperative outer‐sphere two‐electron transfer reactions and with an eye towards  constructing  multielectron  catalysts,  we  have  developed  a  strategy  for  designing  platinum  complexes whose reactivity is characterized by transfer of the first electron being less favorable than  transfer  of  the  second.   The  complexes  are  composed  of  two  potentially  meridional‐coordinating  tridentate ligands that are capable of stabilizing both four‐coordinate platinum(II) and six‐coordinate  platinum(IV). In this presentation the synthesis, characterization and electronic properties of a series  of outer‐sphere two‐electron reagents will be presented.  In addition, we will discuss how variable  temperature  1H  NMR  is  used  in  the  detection  and  evaluation  of  the  interactions  between  the  platinum  metal  center  and  the  dangling  nucleophiles.  We  will  also  show  how  ligand  modification  can be used to systematically tune the two‐electron redox couple.     PREPARATION AND VOLTAMMETRIC STUDY OF DIRUTHENIUM  4:20 – 4:35  PADDLEWHEEL COMPLEXES BEARING EQUATORIAL FERROCENE  SUBSTITUENT       Darryl A. Boyd*1, Phillip E. Fanwick1, Robert J. Crutchley2, Tong Ren*1       1Purdue University, Department of Chemistry, West Lafayette, IN 47907   2Carleton University, Department of Chemistry, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, CANADA       Abstract       Our group is interested in the possibility of electronic communication between metal redox centers  within single molecules at varying distances and through various molecular bond configurations.  In  the  work  presented  here,  ferrocene  carboxylate  ligands  are  attached  to  diruthenium  metal  centers,  under  reflux  conditions,  forming  the  peripherally  modified  diruthenium  paddlewheel  complexes  Ru2(D(3,5‐Cl2Ph)F)3(O2CFc)Cl  and  cis‐Ru2(D(3,5‐Cl2Ph)F)2(O2CFc)2Cl,  where  “Fc”  denotes  ferrocene  and “D(3,5‐Cl2Ph)F” denotes the ligand N, N’‐bis(3,5‐dichlorophenyl) formamidine.  The goal of this  work is to determine if there is electronic communication between the iron and diruthenium centers.   Various electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques have been employed to monitor the electronic  communication  of  the  synthesized  complexes.   Results  indicate  the  existence  of  an  intervalence  charge  transfer  (IVCT)  band  for  the  bis‐substituted  complex  monocation,  demonstrating  electronic  communication between the iron centers through the diruthenium center.       55


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 4:35 – 4:55 

COMBINING INDUSTRIAL AND ACADEMIC RESEARCH STRENGTHS  TO TACKLE GRAND CHALLENGES     Takiya J. Ahmed,* Karen I. Goldberg, D. Michael Heinekey        University of Washington, Department of Chemistry, Seattle, WA 98105       Abstract  

    Selective  reductions  of  over‐functionalized  molecules  will  be  key  to  the  efficient,  cost‐effective  utilization  of  biomass,  and  efforts  in  this  area  are  also  at  the  forefront  of  academic  and  industrial  research.  Current progress toward the selective deoxygenation of polyols, such as glycerol, using a  traditional academic approach and state‐of‐the‐art high throughput industrial resources for catalyst  development will be presented.  More specifically, in this contribution, the reactivity of a variety of  late  transition  metal  complexes  toward  the  partial  deoxygenation  of  diol  and  glycerol  substrates  under  a  plethora  of  reaction  conditions  will  be  discussed.   The  catalysts  will  be  evaluated  by  comparison to the preeminent Ru, Rh, and Pt systems previously reported.  The effects of water and  acid  content  on  reaction  rate  and  selectivity  will  be  examined,  and  mechanistic  pathways  that  improve or derail selectivity will be entertained.     

   

56


POSTER ABSTRACTS    Wednesday, p.m.  

NOBCChE Scientific Exchange  Poster Session 

  Convention Center Hall 1 

      4:00 – 6:00 p.m.     

 

 

Posters (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)   

CACTUS MUCILAGE: TOWARD AN ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY ALTERNATIVE TO  REMOVE ARSENIC FROM DRINKING WATER    Dawn I. Fox1, Thomas Pichler2, Daniel H. Yeh3, and Norma A. Alcantar1   1Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620  2Geosciences, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany  3Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida Tampa, FL 33620    Abstract    Arsenic  contamination  of  groundwater  is  a  problem  of  global  proportions  and  is  the  focus  of  research into new and improved methods to remove contaminants from drinking water.  Conventional  arsenic  removal  methods  require  centralized  treatment  facilities  which  may  be  economically  inaccessible  to  poor  rural  communities.  Further,  these  technologies  have  significant  negative  environmental impacts. Our work focuses on investigating a natural material, cactus mucilage, which  has excellent flocculation properties, for arsenic removal. This material is an extract from the Opuntia  ficus‐indica (also known as Nopal or Prickly Pear cactus). The mucilage has shown an interaction with  arsenic  and  it  separates  As(V)  ions  from  solution.    Currently,  we  are  investigating  the  kinetic  mechanism by which the mucilage interacts with arsenic, with the aim of optimizing the process. Batch  kinetic  experiments  were  performed  in  which  the  mucilage  was  contacted  with  aqueous  arsenic  solutions.  The  arsenic  concentration  was  detected  with  hydride  generation  atomic  fluorescence  spectroscopy.  Electronic  and  chemical  structural  changes  were  observed  with  Attenuated  Total  Reflection‐Fourier  Transform  Infrared  (ATR‐FTIR)  and  Ultraviolet‐Visible  (UVVIS)  spectroscopy.  Arsenic concentrations increased 5‐15% at the air‐water interface of mucilage‐treated arsenic solutions  and it has been shown to remove up to 85% of dissolved As.  This increase was influenced by solution  pH  and  optimal  activity  was  shown  at  pH  5‐6.      FTIR  and  UVVIS  spectroscopy  showed  that  the  carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups of the mucilage are involved in the reaction with arsenic. Our  results suggest that the mucilage binds the arsenic, and then transports it to the air‐water interface due  to  increased  hydrophobicity.    A  mucilage‐based  technology  has  the  potential  to  be  an  inexpensive,  environmentally sustainable alternative to removing arsenic from drinking water. 

 

57


POSTER ABSTRACTS  2 

INCREASED LIGHT EXTRACTION OF INASGASB LIGHT EMITTING DIODE THROUGH WET  CHEMICAL ETCHING       Deandrea Leigh Watkins1*, Jonathon Olesberg1,    Thomas Boggess2, and Mark Arnold1     Departments of Chemistry1 and Physics2, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 52246       Abstract       Near  infrared  spectroscopy  is  under  development  for  measuring  glucose  and  other  bio‐ molecules in biological fluids at wavelengths between 2.0 and 2.5 μm. High quality spectra are needed  to  successfully  extract  analytical  information  from  near  infrared  spectra  collected  from  clinical  samples.  A solid‐state near infrared spectrometer would advance the field by providing a means for  collecting  high  quality  spectra  under  non‐laboratory  conditions.   We  are  developing  solid‐state  light  emitting  diode  (LED)  sources  from  unique  InAsGaSb  semiconductor  materials.  Physical  geometry  of  the LED region is a critical parameter and the physical geometry depends on many factors associated  with  the  etching  process,  such  as  composition  of  the  etching  solution,  relative  concentrations  of  the  etching components, and time of the etching reaction.  This presentation will focus on the optimization  of the etching solution to produce LED’s with high radiant powers.  Results indicate that the depth of  etching and the angle of the etched sidewalls can be optimized by controlling the etching conditions.   Through this optimization of etch solution composition there was an increase in etch depth from 18.20  μm  to  60.4  μm  and  an  increase  in  etch  rate  from  0.61  μm/min.  to  2.01  μm/min.  when  etched  for  a  period of 30 minutes. In addition, the sidewall angle was reduced from 102⁰ to 62⁰ at 30 minutes of etch  time.  

MICROFLUIDIC DEVICES TO DETERMINE THE EFFICACY OF USING SURFACE BOUND  EARLY TRANSITION METAL COMPLEXES IN THE SILYLCYANATION OF ALDEHYDES       DeWayne D. Anderson, Wayne Tikkanen*, Frank A. Gomez     Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University‐‐Los Angeles, 5151 State  University Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90032       Abstract       Tethering coordination complexes to a heterogeneous support is one method to improve the  efficiency of homogeneous catalysts. However, the testing of catalysts is often time consuming and  requires expending valuable quantities of reactants and catalysts to determine the selectivity and  activity of a catalyst. More efficient methods to determine these properties are desirable, but have not  been proven with Lewis acid catalysts. This project plans to: one, determine if microfluidic devices  (MFDs) can be used on a nano‐scale level to determine the enantiomeric composition of products  generated from our (Binol)‐Cl‐Zr‐O‐Si(O)3‐(bulk silica gel) catalyst; two, determine if the same type of  qualitative separation that is seen using chiral gas chromatography can be seen using MFDs; and three,  determine the enantioselectivity of a catalyst with different substrates if MFDs are able to separate the  enantiomeric products from a Lewis acid catalyzed silylcyanation reaction. Commonly used aldehyde  substrates in silylcyanation reactions are P‐nitrobenzaldehyde, P‐trifluoromethylbenzaldehyde, 3‐ pyridinecarboxaldehyde, P‐methylbenzaldehyde, Benzaldehyde, and P‐anisaldehyde. In order to  determine if MFDs can be used in the detection of enantiomeric products, it is imperative to determine  the effect that a catalyst has on “macroscale” reactions with aldehyde substrates using several aldehyde 58


POSTER ABSTRACTS  3 

substrates from the list that has been mentioned. This requires determining the efficiency of our  Lewis  acid  catalyst  on  a  macroscale  level;  the  effect  that  substrates  have  on  catalyst  efficiency;  the  ability  of  chiral  chromatographic  media  to  separate  enantiomers;  and,  the  ability  to  reuse  the  same  chiral chromatographic media in the separation of enantiomers. In order to determine if the (Binol)‐Cl‐ Zr‐O‐Si(O)3‐(bulk silica gel) catalyst works, chiral gas chromatography will be used to determine the  enantiomeric composition of products produced from the catalyst. Afterwards, the MFDs can be used  on a nano‐scale level to determine their use in determining the enantiomeric composition of products  from  the  silylcyanation  of  various  substrates.  Once  all  of  the  previous  steps  mentioned  have  been  completed, we should be able to identify promising chromatographic media for MFDs, and gauge the  ability of the devices to determine the enantiomeric composition of products generated from a Lewis  acid catalyst.  

  4 

TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETRIC FRAGMENTATION OF SELECTED  ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: A STUDY OF FRAGMENTATION MECHANISMS OF  HORMONAL STEROIDS       Elizabeth I. Adeyemi*, Victor M. Ibeanusi, Yassin A. Jeilani   Spelman College, Environmental Science and Studies Program, Atlanta, GA 30087       Abstract       Endocrine‐disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been detected in the environment and contribute to  groundwater and soil contamination.  There has been an increasing concern in the potential negative  health  effects  from  EDC  exposure.   Due  to  the  environmental  and  physiological  effects  of  EDCs,  tandem  mass  spectrometric  (MSMS)  methods  with  low  detection  limits  have  been  developed  for  environmental  sample  analysis.  The  increased  use  of  these  methods  makes  it  necessary  to  study  the  MSMS  fragmentation  patterns  of  EDCs.  The  selected  EDCs  include:  progesterone,  17α‐ ethynylestradiol, and β‐estradiol. The M+ peak and prominent ions in the mass spectra of the selected  steroids were studied by product/precursor ion scanning at various collision energies. A fragmentation  pathway was proposed for each of the selected steroids. The pathways include both neutral loss and  ring  cleavage  fragmentations.  Free  energies  of  these  pathways  were  calculated  by  ab  initio  methods  using the hybrid density functional methods (B3LYP) theory with the 6‐311g** basis set.  

IDENTIFICATION OF 15N ISOTOPE‐ LABELED CARBOXYL CONTAINING  METABOLITES PRESENT IN HUMAN URINE BY TWO DIMENSIONAL HYDROPHILIC  INTERACTION CHROMATOGRAPHY (HILIC) AND NMR TECHNIQUES.      Emmanuel Appiah‐Amponsah*, Kwadwo Owusu‐Sarfo, Tao Ye,   G.A Nagana Gowda and Daniel Raftery     Purdue University, Department of Chemistry, 560 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907       Abstract        The  field  of  metabolomics  has  garnered  tremendous  interest  resulting  from  the  relatively  high  sensitivity of metabolite profiles to subtle stimuli which potentially can serve as indicators of adverse  biological perturbations. Notwithstanding the advancements in current analytical technology, the 

59


POSTER ABSTRACTS  5 

issue of sample matrix complexity persistently limits the quantitative detection of multiple metabolites  only  to  a  small  fraction,  consequently  hindering  the  ability  to  draw  meaningful  conclusions  from  analytical data.      The  emergence  of  targeted  metabolite  profiling  has  sought  to  circumvent  some  of  the  issues  resulting from sample complexity. We have recently demonstrated the use of a simple isotope tagging  strategy,  in  which  metabolites  with  carboxyl  groups  are  chemically  tagged  with  15N  ethanolamine  followed  by  detection  by  2D  NMR.  This  approach  showed  improved  detection  (on  the  order  of  100x  with LOD a few micromolar), with concomitant high resolution and reproducibility. However, the use  of  a  chemo  selective  tag  (though  beneficial)  presents  an  additional  challenge  of  altering  the  chemical  shift values of metabolites thus making accurate peak assignment cumbersome. This is especially the  case  when  in  crowded  NMR  spectra.  We  present  an  approach  involving  the  use  of  hydrophilic  interaction  chromatography  to  facilitate  the  resolution  of  these  polar  “tagged”  metabolites  in  human  urine prior to detection by NMR.  We discuss the analytical methods and procedure employed for the  detection and identification of a number of lower concentrations urine metabolites of interest.    

  6 

RESEARCHING THIN‐FILM ELECTRODE DYNAMICS THROUGH RUTHERFORD  BACKSCATTERING    Olajide Banks and Kenneth Brown*  Department of Chemistry, Hope College, Holland MI    Abstract    Chemical modification of electrodes is key in developing electrochemical sensors that can detect  various  substances  in  our  environment,  such  as  hydrazine,  which  the  EPA  has  classified  as  a  compound  that  causes  liver  and  kidney  problems.  As  the  need  for  these  sensors  increases,  new  techniques  and  compounds  will  be  used  in  the  chemical  modification  of  electrodes.  A  ruthenium  complex,  [(bpy)  Ru(5‐phenNH2)(PF6)2.2H2O],  is  attached  to  the  surface  of  a  glassy  carbon  electrode  using  electropolymerization.  This  film  is  being  used  as  an  electrocatalyst  in  developing  sensors  for  detecting  hydrazine.  The  characterization  of  this  multilayered  film  is  accomplished  with  cyclic  voltammetry  and  Rutherford  Backscattering  Spectrometry.  The  goal  was  to  successfully  electropolymerize  the  ruthenium  complex  onto  the  surface  of  glassy  carbon  electrodes  for  hydrazine  detection, and to determine the concentration of ruthenium on the film as well as the film thickness.     

 

60


POSTER ABSTRACTS  7 

SOLID TISSUE PHANTOMS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF INSTRUMENTATION FOR  NONINVASIVE RAMAN TOMOGRAPHIC INVESTIGATION OF BONE GRAFT  OSSEOINTEGRATION IN ANIMAL MODELS       Paul I. Okagbare*, Francis W. L. Esmonde‐White, Kathryn A.  Dooley and Michael D. Morris   Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109       Abstract       The  use  of  bone  allografts  for  reconstruction  following  tumor  resection  is  a  common  practice  in  orthopaedic  surgery.  Allografts  are  also  used  in  repair  of  total  disunions.  Allograft  implantation  procedures have failure rates approaching 25% and complications that may require additional surgical  intervention  or  even  amputation.  Failures  are  related  to  the  limited  incorporation  and  remodeling  of  the grafts, in turn leading to biomechanical failure and collapse. There are few noninvasive methods to  assess  the  progress  of graft  incorporation.   Computed  tomography  and  MRI  are  slow  and expensive,  and  in  the  case  of  the  former,  require  exposure  to  ionizing  radiation.  DXA  and  ultrasound  are  alternatives,  but  provide  limited  information.  All  of  these  techniques  provide  information  on  the  morphologic  and  geometric  properties  of  the  graft  or  graft/host  interface  and  no  information  about  other aspects of bone quality, most especially the metabolic status of the graft, i.e. the composition of  the regenerated tissue, which is critical to the fate of the graft and its successful incorporation.       There is a need for methodology to evaluate the compositon‐related status of bone allografts.    Diffuse Raman tomography may be a suitable method for in‐vivo assessment of composition and the  progress  of  allograft  implantation.  It  is  known  that  Raman  signatures  for  bone  mineral  and  matrix  change  with  tissue  development,  biomechanical  status  and  pathology,  and  can  be  monitored  non‐ invasively  in  vivo.   Geometrically  accurate  gelatin‐based  solid  tissue  phantom  representing  the  hind  limb of Sprague‐Dawley rat (rat tibia) were constructed and used with a customized fiber‐optic probes  holder for evaluation of Raman tomography instrumentation for monitoring allograft osseointegration  in  a  rat‐model.  The  phantom  incorporates  materials  that  model  bone  mineral  Raman  scatter  (hydroxyapatite,  bone  matrix  and  connective  tissue  Raman  scatter  (gelatin),  light  scattering  (IntraLipid), light absorption (food coloring) and fluorescence (food coloring and hydroxyapatite).  The  molds  for  the  multi‐layer  phantom  were  designed  from  micro‐CT  images  of  a  Sprage‐Dawley  rat.  Rapid prototyping equipment was used to design the forms from which silicone molds were cast.       To  evaluate  fiber  optic  probes,  we  have  designed  a  prototype  with  50  illumination  and  50  collection  fibers.   The  fibers  can  be  positioned  at  points  around  the  phantom.  Raman  spectra  are  collected with a commercial Raman system (Rxn‐1, Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc.) that incorporates a 400  mW  830  nm  diode  laser  and  a  back‐illuminated  deep‐depletion  CCD.  With  this  system  we  have  collected  Raman  spectra  that  contain  Raman  signatures  similar  to  those  of  bone  mineral  and  matrix.  The  system  is  used  to  study  the  effects  of  excitation  and  collection  fiber  placement  and  to  provide  inputs  for  both  probe  development  and  software  development  for  the  target  application  –  diffuse  Raman tomography of allograft osseointegration.    

61


POSTER ABSTRACTS  8 

A  COMPARATIVE  IN  VITRO  STUDY  OF  THE  DEHALOGENATION  PRODUCTS  OF  BROMINATED‐ AND IODATED‐DNA UPON UVA EXPOSURE USING MASS SPECTROMETRY  AND HPLC       Renee T. Williams and Yinsheng Wang*     University of California, Riverside, Chemistry Department, Riverside, CA 92521‐0403       Abstract       Nucleosides  5‐bromo‐2’‐deoxyuridine  (BrdU)  and  5‐iodo‐2’‐deoxyuridine  (IdU),  after  being  incorporated into cellular DNA, are well known to sensitize cells to UV irradiation.  We report here for  the first time that the dehalogenation of BrdU and IdU to 2’‐deoxyuridine (dU) upon UVA exposure  was  not  strand‐type‐dependent.   Quantitative  HPLC  data  showed  that  both  single‐  and  double‐ stranded ODNs yielded comparable amounts of dU.   IdU, however, was found to generate 50% more  dU than BrdU, which may be attributed to the fact that IdU absorbs better than BrdU in UVA range.  In  addition,  there  was  no  significant  difference  in  dU  formation  between  the  low  (30  min,  400  mJ)  and  high (60 min, 800 mJ) doses.  Perhaps the low dose exceeds the energy‐dependent thresholds that exist.   Therefore, future work will require shorter time intervals.  We found that UVA irradiation also yielded  the  d(G[8‐5]U)  intrastrand  cross‐link,  where  the  C8  of  guanine  is  covalently  bonded  to  the  C5  of  the  uracil.   LC‐MS/MS  data  revealed  that  cross‐link  formation  is  dose‐  and  strand‐type‐dependent.   For  both BrdU and IdU, the tandem lesion occurred at a much higher frequency in double‐stranded ODNs  with a significant increase in lesion formation at 60 minutes.  At the low dose, both  thymine‐analogs  generate similar quantities of the cross‐link for the single‐stranded samples, but for double‐stranded,  IdU was approximately 70% more effective.  Again, this may be due to better absorption of UVA light  by IdU.  Conversely, at the longer time point, the double‐stranded brominated‐ODN was nearly 40%  more  effective  than  IdU.   Furthermore,  the  double‐stranded  IdU  at  both  doses  produced  equivalent  amounts  of  d(G[8‐5]U),  which  implies  that  the  IdU  was  most  likely  consumed  before  the  30  minute  mark. Together, these findings are consistent with those from mechanistic studies, which suggest that  cross‐links  are  formed  via  electron  transfer,  whereas  dU  results  from  homolytic  cleavage  of  the  C‐X  bond and subsequent hydrogen abstraction.     WETTING STUDIES FOR ALKYL BONDED PHASES USING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY      Reygan M. Freeney*1, Mark A. Lowry2, and M.Lei Geng1      1University  of  Iowa,  Department  of  Chemistry  and  the  Nanoscience  and  Nanotechnology  Institute, Iowa City, IA 52242   2Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803       Abstract       In reverse phase chromatographic separations, the wetting of the stationary phase influences the  chemical  separation.   The  wetting  process  is  dependent  upon  the  solvent  composition  and  under  highly  aqueous  conditions  (>90%)  abnormal  chromatographic  behavior  is  observed.   Typically,  the  mobile  phase  consists  of  water  (or  an  aqueous  buffer)  with  an  organic  solvent  such  as  methanol  or  acetonitrile.  In this study, the interfacial properties of alkyl bonded nanoporous silica are investigated  during  the  wetting  process.    The  nanoscopic  environment  is  examined  using  confocal  microscopy  allowing direct observation of the wetting process to be seen.  The ratios of the aqueous and organic  content of the mobile phase are adjusted.   Depending upon the ratios, the rate and degree of wetting of  62


POSTER ABSTRACTS  9 

10 

modified  nanoporous  silica  varies.   It  was  found  that  with  a  mobile  phase  consisting  of  a  high  acetonitrile content, the wetting of the alkyl bonded stationary phase occurs quickly. Whereas, a highly  aqueous  mobile  phase  took  much  more  time  to  wet  the  hydrophobic  nanopores.   Non‐patterned  wetting  is  observed,  and  the  rates  and  the  direction  of  wetting  varied  significantly  from  particle‐to‐ particle  indicating  great  inhomogeniety  for  the  same  type  of  modified  particle.   The  significant  nanoheterogeniety  of  the  pore  wetting  observed  in  the  surface‐modified  silica  appears  to  affect  the  properties exhibited by such particles.     ULTRAFAST AND SENSITIVE BIOASSAYS USING METAL‐ENHANCED  LUMINESCENCE, MICROWAVES AND ELECTRICALLY SMALL SPLIT RING RESONATOR  ANTENNAS     Sarah Addae1, Melissa Pinard1, Humeyra Caglayan2, Deniz Caliskan2,   Ekmel Ozbay, Ph.D.2 and Kadir Aslan, Ph.D.*, 1       1 Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD, 21251, USA.   2 Bilkent University, Nanotechnology Research Center, Ankara, 06680, TURKEY.       Abstract     Currently two major limitations are encountered in bioassays used for luminescence‐based drug  discovery and high throughput screening: rapidity of the bioassay and detection sensitivity. Rapidity is  limited by the chemical kinetics involved during the binding of proteins. Sensitivity is affected by the  quantum yield of fluorophores and the optical limitations of the detection system.       We  report  an  ultrafast  bioassay  preparation  method  that  overcomes  the  above  mentioned  limitations  using  a  combination  of  various  technologies;  metal‐enhanced  luminescence,  microwaves  and electrically small resonant antennas composed of split ring resonators (SRR). The SRR antenna is a  square frame of gold thin film (1 mm wide) with overall length of ~9.4 mm on each side, which was  deposited  onto  a  silicon  chip  (2x2  cm2).  A  single  micro‐cuvette  (6  ul  volume  capacity)  is  etched  into  one  side  of  the  square  frame  gold  thin  film.  Theoretical  energy  flow  calculations  show  that  electric  fields  are  focused  in  and  above  the  micro‐cuvette  without  the  accumulation  of  electrical  charge  that  breaks down the gold film. Subsequently, the micro‐cuvette was coated with silver nanoparticles (~80  nm in diameter). The silver nanoparticles serve two purposes: 1) as enhancers of luminescence signals  and  2)  as  mediator  for  the  creation  of  thermal  gradient  between  the  bulk  and  the  surface  where  the  bioassay  is  constructed.  Focused  electric  fields  are  able  to  cause  rapid  heating  of  the  bulk,  and  the  thermal  gradient  between  the  bulk  and  the  silver  nanoparticles  result  in  the  rapid  assembling  of  the  proteins on the surface of silver nanoparticles without denaturing the proteins. The proof‐of‐principle  demonstration  of  the  ultrafast  bioassays  was  accomplished  using  a  model  biotin‐avidin  bioassay.  In  this  regard,  biotinylated‐Albumin  (bovine  serum,  b‐BSA)  with  bulk  concentrations  (1  uM  to  10  pM)  was  tested  on  silver  nanoparticle‐deposited  SRR  antenna  at  room  temperature  and  with  microwave  heating.  While  the  identical  room  temperature  assays  (no  microwave  heating)  took  50  minutes  to  reach95% completion, the ultrafast took only 25 seconds to complete. The concentration of b‐BSA was  determined by measuring the luminescence signal from the bioassay.   We  are  currently  working  on  increasing  the  number  of  samples  that  can  be  tested  at  once  by  designing new SRR‐antennas containing multiple micro‐cuvettes and the assembling an array of SRR‐ antennas. These results will be reported in due course.     63


POSTER ABSTRACTS  11 

INSULIN DETECTION BASED ON TRANSITION METAL COMPLEXES    Toni K. Thornton and Waldemar Gorski*  The University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of chemistry, San Antonio, TX 78249    Abstract    Two electrochemical systems based on transition metal complexes and salts were investigated in  order  to  develop  new  detectors  for  hormone  insulin  at  physiological  pH.    The  homogeneous  system  was  based  on  the  oxidation  of  insulin  by  cyano‐complexes  of  iron(III)  and  ruthenium(IV).    The  heterogeneous system involved sparingly soluble redox salts that were immobilized on the surface of  glassy carbon electrodes using a polysaccharide chitosan.  The electrochemical methods that were used  indicated  that  the  selected  transition  metal  complexes  were  able  to  mediate  the  electron  transfer  between the insulin and the electrode.  The kinetics and mechanism of mediation is being investigated.   The optimization of the insulin detector based on the sparingly soluble redox salts is in progress.     This work was supported by NIH/NIGMS/MARC‐U*STAR GM07717. 

12 

PRINCIPAL COMPONENT DIRECTED PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES ANALYSIS FOR  COMBINING NMR AND MS DATA IN METABOLOMICS: APPLICATION TO THE  DETECTION OF BREAST CANCER       Haiwei  Gu1,  Zhengzheng  Pan2,  Bowei  Xi3,  Vincent  Asiago2,  Brian  Musselman4,  and  Daniel  Raftery2*      1Department  of  Physics,  2Department  of  Chemistry,  and  3Department  of  Statistics,  Purdue  University, West Lafayette, IN 47907   4IonSense Inc., 999 Broadway, Suite 404, Saugus, MA 01906       Abstract    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two most  commonly  used  analytical  tools  in  metabolomics,  and  their  complementary  nature  makes  the  combination  particularly  attractive.  A  combined  analytical  approach  can  improve  the  potential  for  providing  reliable  methods  to  detect  metabolic  profile  alterations  in  biofluids  or  tissues  caused  by  disease,  toxicity,  etc.  In  this  presentation,  1H  NMR  spectroscopy  and  direct  analysis  in  real  time  (DART)‐MS were used for the metabolomics analysis of serum samples from breast cancer patients and  healthy controls. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the NMR data showed that the first principal  component  (PC1)  scores  could  be  used  to  separate  cancer  from  normal  samples.  However,  no  such  obvious clustering could be observed in the PCA score plot of DART‐MS data, even though DART‐MS  can  provide  a  rich  and  informative  metabolic  profile.  Using  a  modified  multivariate  statistical  approach, the DART‐MS data were then reevaluated by orthogonal signal correction (OSC) pretreated  partial  least  squares  (PLS),  in  which  the  Y  matrix  in  the  regression  was  set  to  the   PC1  score  values  from  the  NMR  data  analysis.  This  approach  resulted  in  a  significant  improvement  of  the  separation  between  the  disease  samples  and  normals,  and  a  metabolic  profile  related  to  breast  cancer  could  be  extracted from DART‐MS. An improved metabolic profile obtained by combining the complementary  methods of MS and NMR by this approach may be useful to achieve more accurate disease detection  and gain more insight regarding disease mechanisms and biology.  

64


POSTER ABSTRACTS  13 

EXTRACTION  AND  CONCENTRATION  OF  PCBs  USING  CONDUCTIVE  POLYMERS  POST‐MODIFIED WITH PCBs SELECTIVE PENTAPEPTIDES    Edikan Archibong* and Nelly Mateeva  Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahasse, FL    Abstract   

Polyaniline  (emeraldine  base)  was  synthesized  according  to  a  literature  procedure  at  room  temperature as well as at 0 oC. Samples of both polymer batches were treated with glutaraldehyde to  create  appropriate  binding  sides  for  an  amino  function  of  the  PCB  selective  pentapeptides.  The  pentapeptides  were  synthesized  using  FMOC  solid  state  synthesis  method  on  Wang  resin.  After  the  synthesis, the peptides were hydrolyzed and immobilized on the polyaniline substrate with chemical  bond  to  the  available  carbonyl  groups.  Polyaniline  films  as  well  as  electrospun  fibers  were  also  synthesized  and  underwent  similar  pentapeptide  post‐modification  procedure.  The  reactions and  the  presence  of  the  functional  groups  on  the  materials  were  followed  by  FTIR.  The  polymeric  materials  were  brought  in  contact  with  solutions  of  PCBs  and  the  amount  of  the  toxin  was  determined  before  and after the exposure to the reagents by GC/MS.  

  14 

METABOLITE PROFILING OF HUMAN SERUM USING HPLC AND NMR SPECTROSCOPY   Kwadwo Owusu‐Sarfo*, Emmanuel Appiah‐Amponsah, Tao Ye,   G. A. Nagana Gowda and Daniel Raftery  Department of Chemistry, Purdue University,   West Lafayette, IN    Abstract   

Metabolomics  is  increasingly  recognized  as  an  important  tool  for  its  ability  to  resolve  complex  biological  problems  while  providing  useful  and  complementary  information  to  genomics  and  proteomics to present a more complete systems biology model. Although a combination of advanced  one‐dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and chemometric techniques enable  comparison  of  metabolic  features  in  complex  biological  samples,  such  methods  are  focused  on  relatively  high  concentrated  metabolites  which  are  often  less  specific  to  a  particular  pathological  condition.  Hence,  there  is  a  significant  interest  to  enhance  the  metabolic  pool,  by  increasing  the  resolution and sensitivity of NMR.  Considering the advantages of NMR to identify new and low concentrated biomarkers in complex  biological  samples,  recent  research  in  our  group  has  focused  on  the  development  of  methods  that  involve  tagging  of  the  metabolite  class  with  isotopes  such  as  15N,  13Cor  31P,  which  is  favorable  to  detection  by  NMR.1,  2  Our  results  show  that  15N  tagging  of  carboxyl  groups  detects  nearly  two‐ hundred  carboxyl  containing  metabolites  in  a  single  step  with  greatly  improved  resolution  and  sensitivity. In the current work, we have explored a number of approaches to identify the structures of  these metabolites. Notably, a variety of columns designed to aid the separation of structurally similar  hydrophilic  metabolites  were  employed  to  isolate  and  identify  new  molecules  by  NMR.  In  this  presentation we discuss the coupling of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) 

65


POSTER ABSTRACTS  14 

column and two‐dimensional NMR to isolate and identify low concentration 15N tagged metabolites  in human serum.   (1) Tao, Y.; Huaping, M.; Shanaiah, N..; Gowda, G. A. N.; Zhang, S.; Raftery, D. Anal. Chem. 2009,  81, 4882‐4888. 

15 

16 

(2) Shanaiah, N.; Desilva M. A.; Gowda G. A. N.; Raftery, A. M.; Hainline, E.; Raftery, D. PNAS  2007, 104, 11540‐11544.        TOWARDS AFM IMAGING OF DNA ORIGAMI ON SILICON IN A FLUID CELL      Valerie Goss*1, Amro Mentash2, Lesli Mark1, Kyoung Nan Kim1, Koshala Sarveswaran1   and Marya Lieberman1       1The University of Notre Dame, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry   Notre Dame, IN, 46556   2Ivy Tech Community College, Department of Biotechnology, South Bend, IN, 46610       Abstract       We  are  developing  ʺsmartʺ  molecules  based  on  DNA  origami  that  will  adhere  to  functionalized  silicon.   Our  goal  is  to  use  these  smart  molecules  as  templates  to  form  electronic  circuitry  that  has  smaller  individual  features  at  higher  resolution  than  integrated  circuits  (IC)  commonly  used  in  the  electronics  industry.   As  a  starting  point,  understanding  the  factors  that  control  binding  of  DNA  origami to silicon in an aqueous environment is explored by AFM imaging in a fluid cell.  The silicon  surfaces  are  treated  with  several  different  self‐assembled  monolayers  (SAMs)  to  control  the  surface  charge  density  and  hydrophobicity.   By  imaging  the  DNA  origami  under  buffer  solution,  pH  effects  and ionic strength effects can also be probed, and mobility of the origami can be determined.   MUTATION ANALYSIS OF VACM‐1/cul5 Exons In T47D CANCER CELL LINE   Angelica Willis, Steven Lewis and Maria Burnatowska‐Hledin  Departments of Biology and Chemistry, Hope College, Holland MI 49423    Abstract    The VACM‐1 protein is a cul‐5 gene product which functions via an E3 ligase complex and has an  antiproliferative effect on many cell types. Structure‐function analysis of the VACM‐1 protein sequence  identified consensus sites specific for phosphorylation by protein kinases PKA and PKC and a Nedd8  modification  site.  We  showed  previously  that  mutation  in  the  PKA‐specific  phosphorylation  site  at  Serine 730 reverses the phenotype and thus negates the antiproliferative effect of the VACM‐1 gene. T  his  effect  was  associated  with  the  appearance  of  larger  Mr  species  when  Western  blots  were  probed  with  anti‐VACM‐1  specific  antibody.  Since  T47D  breast  cancer  cells  express  a  modified  form  of  the  VACM‐1 protein, we hypothesized that this modified form results from mutations at one of the sites  described above.  To  sequence  all  exons  identified in  the  genome  of VACM‐1,  we  designed  18 sets  of  primers. We used genomic DNA and mRNA isolation methods and amplified both genomic DNA and  mRNA through PCR and RT‐PCR, respectively. Since Serine 730 is located in the 19th exon of the  66


POSTER ABSTRACTS  16 

18 

19 

VACM‐1 genome and was our region of interest, or “hot spot,” we began by sequencing exon 19. Our  results  suggested  that  no  mutation  exists  in  exon  19  of  the  VACM‐1  genome.  Our  next  goal  is  to  amplify the other 18 exons of VACM‐1 and examine their sequences for mutations. Our ultimate goal is  to  identify  a  mutation  in  VACM‐1  that  could  be  used  as  a  biomarker  in  cancer  characterization  and  development of new antiproliferative treatments.    SYNTHESIS OF GLYCOSYLATED GRANULATIMIDE ANALOGS MEDIATED BY A  “CLICK” REACTION FOLLOWED BY DIRECT ARYLATION       Crystal L. O’Neil*, Jie Shen, Peng George Wang   The Ohio State University,  Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Columbus, OH 43210       Abstract     Rebeccamycin  (Reb),  a  β‐glucosylated  indolocarbazole,  is  an  effective  anti‐tumor  agent  which  exerts  its  effects  via  the  formation  of  a  ternary  structure  with  DNA  and  topoisomerase.  Its  aglycone  moiety intercalates into the base pairs of DNA, while the glycan moiety reinforces the stability of the  Reb‐DNA‐Topo ternary structure. Granulatimide (Gra), which has no sugar moiety, is a kinase (chk1)  inhibitor.       We have designed novel monosaccharide analogs of Gra, which should be promising candidates  for  anti‐cancer  activity,  due  to  their  structural  similarity  to  the  natural  antibiotics  Reb  and  Gra.  It  would be especially interesting to explore the biological target profile of these new analogs, since Reb  is the inhibitor of topoisomerase and Gra is the inhibitor of kinase chk1. Besides the structural novelty,  the  chief  merit  of  this  design  is  the  convenience  of  the  synthesis via application  of click  chemistry in  combination with direct arylation of the resulting triazole‐intermediate.     DO MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS CONTRIBUTE TO SKELETAL MUSCLE THROUGH  SATELLITE CELL DEPENDENT OR INDEPENDENT PATHWAY?    Denis O. Madende1, Jeremy Traas2, Ted Hofmann2, Archana Bora2, and Tim Brazelton2  1Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, 1837 University Circle, Cheyney, PA 19319  2Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania,34th Street  Civic center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104    Abstract    Bone  marrow  (BM)  contains  hematopoietic  stem  cells  (HSCs)  that  maintain  hematopoiesis  throughout adult life.   HSCs generate progenitor cells including Myeloid Progenitor Cells (MPCs) and  Lymphoid  Progenitor  Cells  that  subsequently  differentiate  into  mature  blood  cell  types.    Recent  research  in  animals  and  humans  indicates  that  adult  BM‐derived  HSCs  can  contribute  to  non‐ hematopoietic  cells  of  different  tissues  such  as  epithelial  cells  of  the  gastrointestinal  tract,  liver  hepatocytes, neuronal cells in the brain, and heart‐ and skeletal‐muscle myocytes.  Thus, it appears that  BM contains stem and progenitor cells with a differentiation capability that exceeds hematopoiesis, a  process  also  referred  to  as  plasticity.  These  findings  create  novel  strategies  in  regenerative  medicine  that can be used in treatment of such diseases as muscle dystrophy.  Studies  have  suggested  that  regeneration  of  non‐hematopoietic  cell  lineages  can  occur  through  heterotypic cell fusion with hematopoietic cells of the myeloid lineage, i.e. the MPCs.   Skeletal muscle    67


POSTER ABSTRACTS  19 

is maintained and repaired by the proliferation of satellite cells, the stem cells of skeletal muscle.  Here  we test the hypothesis that the contribution of MPCs to skeletal muscle progresses through a satellite  cell‐like state using a double transgenic mouse line in which a gene associated with satellite cells, myf5,  drives  the  expression  of  a  LacZ  reporter  gene  and  a  in  which  the  green  fluorescent  protein  (GFP)  reporter gene is constitutively expressed.    Specifically, 10,000 MPCs or 1,000 satellite cells from an 8‐12 week old GFP(+)/Myf5LacZ(+) donor  mouse  were  isolated  by  FACS  and  injected  into  the  irradiated  and  Notexin‐injured  tibialis  anterior  muscle of an 8‐12 week old, Rag1‐/‐ recipient mouse.   The recipientʹs leg was irradiated to minimize  the  regenerative  response  of  recipientʹs  endogenous  satellite  cells.    Injection  of  Notexin,  a  myotoxin,  destroys a patch of skeletal muscle and creates a strong need for muscle  regeneration.  After 4 weeks,  the  muscles  were  harvested,  fixed,  sectioned,  mounted  on  slides,  (some  slides  stained  using  primary  and  secondary  antibodies),  and  then  analyzed  by  confocal  microscopy  for  the  presence  of  GFP‐ expressing  myofibers.    Some  slides  were  stained  using  LacZ/  X‐gal  staining  to  determine  (by  use  of  bright  field microscope)  the  presence of  Myf5LacZ(+)  satellite  cells.    The  presence  of  numerous  GFP‐ expressing myofibers demonstrated that both satellite cells and MPCʹs contributed to damaged skeletal  muscle in vivo.  However, while thousands of Myf5LacZ(+) cells were observed in skeletal muscle that  received  satellite  cells,  no  Myf5LacZ(+)  satellite  cells  present  in  skeletal  muscles  that  received  MPCs,  indicating that MPCs contribute to skeletal muscle by a satellite cell independent pathway. 

  20 

RATIONAL VS. RANDOM MUTAGENIC APPROACHES IN ENGINEERING THE HUMAN  VITAMIN D RECEPTOR    Hilda Castillo*, Donald F. Doyle, Bahareh Azizi  Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332    Abstract    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand‐activated transcription factors that regulate the expression of  genes  involved  in  biologically  important  processes.  The  diversity  of  ligand  binding  pockets  among  NRs suggests the possibility of engineering these proteins to bind arbitrary small molecules, creating  molecular  switches,  for  applications  in  gene  therapy.  The  human  vitamin  D  receptor  (hVDR)  was  engineered  using  two  approaches.    In  the  first  approach,  structural  analysis  and  in  silico  modeling  allowed  the  rational  design  of  two  libraries  using  randomized  synthetic  oligonucleotides  with  degenerate codons.  The second approach involved random mutatagenesis, using error‐prone PCR to  create a library of variants. All of the hVDR variants were analyzed using chemical complementation.   These  libraries  allowed  us  to  gain  a  better  understanding  of  ligand  binding,  as  well  as  mutational  toleration in the binding pocket of the vitamin D receptor. 

 

68


POSTER ABSTRACTS  21 

22 

PROBING STRUCTURAL BEHAVIOR OF THE N‐TERMINAL DOMAINS OF THE HUMAN  WILSON PROTEIN    Joshua M. Muia*, David L. Huffman   Western Michigan University, Department of Chemistry, Kalamazoo, MI 49008     Abstract     The  human  Wilson  protein  (ATP7B)  is  a  copper  transporting  ATPase  that  is  involved  in  copper  homeostasis, and unlike in the other known P‐type ATPases, it possesses an additional six homologous  metal binding domains (WLN1‐6) at the N‐terminal end each capable of binding one Cu(I) ion. Several  mutations in the gene coding for this protein leads to Wilson Disease (WD), a hepatological disorder  characterized mainly by impaired excretion of copper in bile, and  accumulation of the copper metal in  the liver, brain, kidney, and cornea. To understand the structural behavior of these multidomains, the  WLN1‐6  protein  was  expressed  as  a  thioredoxin  fusion,  purified  by  HIS‐tag  Nickel  chelating  matrix  and gel filtration chromatography. The thioredoxin was cleaved off the multidomains entity with TEV  (Tobaccho  Etch  Virus)  protease.  The  protein  was  characterized  by  high  resolution  gel  filtration  chromatography,  Circular  Dichroism  (CD)  spectroscopy  and  2D  SDS‐Polyacrylamide  gel  electrophoresis.  The  initial  CD  studies  predict  that  the  WLN1‐6  protein  is  highly  helical  in  structure,  and  it  gradually  unfolds  under  increasing  ionic  strength  of  guanidine  hydrochloride.  The  protein  abnormally migrates faster compared to protein of similar mass through superdex 200 matrix columns  indicating  that  the  six  domains  might  not  be  tightly  packed  together  but  spread  out.  In  conclusion,  further  work  need  to  be  done  to  determine  the  individual  domain’s  structural  contribution  and  the  protein’s hydrodynamic radius to assess its movement in a solvated matrix.     CANINE MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS CAN DIFFERENTIATE INTO MULTIPLE  CELL TYPES AND EXPRESS COMMON MSC SURFACE MARKERS    Paul Gwengi1, Ted Hofmman, PhD*2  1Cheyney University of Pennsylvania   1837 University Circle, Cheyney, PA 19319  2Department of Surgery, Center for Fetal Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,  Philadelphia, PA    Abstract    Little research has been done on canine MSCs (cMSC) in contrast to the extensive research that has  been  done  with  mouse  and  human  MSCs.  There  are  a  number  of  canine  models  for  human  diseases  and the study of cMSCs can contribute to our understanding of how well MSCs work as cell therapy to  treat these diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the multipotent differentiation capacity of  cMSCs and to test for the specific cell surface markers that are common on mouse and human MSCs.  The  multipotency  of  the  cMSCs  was  demonstrated  by  differentiating  the  cMSCs  into  adipogenic,  chondrogenic and osteogenic cells. Lineage specific differentiation was confirmed by staining cells with  Oil  Red  O,  Alcian  Blue  and  Alizarin  Red  S  respectively.  Cell  surface  markers  used  to  characterize  MSCs  were  analyzed  using  flow  cytometry.  This  analysis  served  not  only  to  characterize  the  expression of marker molecules but as a test of the cross‐reactivity of some human‐ and mouse‐specific  antibodies to the canine cells.  Canine MSC reacted positively to the anti‐dog CD90 and anti‐human 

69


POSTER ABSTRACTS  22 

23 

CD105, both markers of MSCs, but were negative for the hematopoietic markers tested with anti‐dog  CD4,  CD8,  CD34,  CD45  and  anti‐human  CD18.  There  was  no  cross‐reactivity  with  either  anti‐mouse  CD73 or CD105 antibodies.     The  results  indicated  that  canine  MSCs  are  capable  of  differentiating  into  adipocytes,  chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. cMSCs do not express markers characteristic of hematopoietic cells but  do express the well known MSC markers that have been previously established in mouse and human  MSCs.    SYNTHESIS OF NITRIC OXIDE DONORS FOR TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY AND  TREATMENT OF GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME      Shahana Safdar*, Lakeshia J. Taite,  Georgia Institute of Technology,  School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Atlanta, GA 30332    Abstract      Brain  tumors  originating  from  glial  cells,  the  supporting  cells  in  the  brain,  are  categorized  as  gliomas. Actrocytomas, which are gliomas developed in astrocytes account for 80‐85% of all gliomas.  The  World  Health  Organization  has  classified  actrocytomas,  according  to  histopathology,  into  four  grades.  Glioblastoma  multiforme  (GBM),  Grade  IV  astrocytoma  is  the  most  malignant  and  deadly  glioma, with a 5 year survival rate of less than 10%. The ability of GBM cells to rapidly disperse and  invade healthy brain tissue coupled with their high resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy have  resulted  in  extremely  poor  prognosis  among  patients.  Nitric  oxide  (NO)  is  a  small,  easily  diffusible  molecule  which,  at  sufficient  concentrations,  has  shown  to  induce  apoptosis  as  well  as  increase  radiosensitization in tumor cells.       The aim of this work is the development of controlled release nitric oxide donors for the treatment  of  GBM.   In  order  to  effectively  target  tumor  cells  as  well  as  cross  the  blood  brain  barriers  short  peptides sequences and small proteins that were able to specifically bind to tumor cells were used as  the basis for this drug delivery system. Two such biomolecules, chlorotoxin and VTWTPQAWFQWV  (VTW),  were  identified  from  a  literature  survey.  They  were  reacted  with  NO  gas  for  24  hours  after  which NO release from the biomolecules was measured at 37oC using a free radical detector equipped  with a nitric oxide microsensor. It found at physiological pH of 7.4 both the biomolecules were able to  release  NO  for  over  6  days.  When  the  pH  was  reduced  to  5.5,  similar  to  the  local  tumor  microenvironment,  the  peptides  have  a  sharp  burst  release  of  NO  in  the  first  10  seconds  after  which  there is a gradual release of NO for 4 days.         In  order  to  validate  the  targeting  ability  of  the  biomolecules  after  the  reaction  with  NO,  the  biomolecules were first conjugated with FITC and then reacted with NO. This FITC labeled NO donor  was  then  incubated  with glioma and  fibroblast  cells.  Using fluorescent  microscopy,  it  was  confirmed  that  even  after  the  reaction  with  NO  both  chlorotoxin  and  VTW  were  able  to  target  the  glioma  cells,  binding to them but showing only minimal binding to the fibroblast cells.  

 

70


POSTER ABSTRACTS  24 

SYNTHYESIS OF FLUOROGENIC CYANINE DYES   Stanley Oyaghire*, Dr. Angela Winstead1, Dr. Bruce Armitage2  1Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore MD 21251  2Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Chemistry, Pittsburgh PA 73110    Abstract    Cyanine dyes have become widely used in the fields of Biology and Biotechnology, where they are  applied  in  areas  such  as  flow  cytometry  and  cell  microscopy.  Non‐symmetrical  cyanines  are  widely  used as stains for nucleic acids because of their fluorogenicity. Such applications derive from the ability  of these dyes to show significantly improved fluorescence in conformationally restricted environments  such as DNA intercalation sites.    Constantin et. al synthesized Dimethyl Indole Red(DIR), an example of a non‐symmetric dye that  suppresses non‐specific binding to nucleic acids and proteins. While these dyes introduce specificity,  they permit only imaging of ‘fixed’ cells as their substituents cause electrostatic repulsion against the  phosphate backbone of the cell membrane. Also, synthesis of these dyes using conventional techniques  is known to yield a mixture of both the symmetric and non‐symmetric products.    Herein, we attempt to obtain a derivative of DIR based on our success at obtaining high quality  product in the synthesis of the heptamethine dyes. Synthetic steps involved the quaternization of both  heterocycles,  followed  by  synthesis  of  the  hemicyanine,  and  finally,  the  condensation  of  the  hemicyanine  with  the  complimentary  quaternized  heterocycle  to  obtain  the  target  dye.  A  mixture  of  both  the  symmetric  and  non‐symmetric  dyes  was  obtained  by  conventional  organic  synthesis.  However,  preliminary  results  based  on  synthesis  of  other  non‐symmetric  dyes  using  MAOS,  show  a  preference  for  the  non‐symmetric  products.  Such  methods  would  be  employed  in  synthesizing  the  target  dye.  We  also  intend  to  increase  the  conjugation  of  the  fluorogenic  dye,  extending  its  emission  spectrum  to  the  near  infra‐red  (NIR)  region.  Such  modification  would  suppress  background  interference  from  fluorescent  proteins  within  the  cell.  The  quaternization  of  the  intermediate  heterocycles,  which  posed  a  considerable  challenge  with  conventional  methods,  would  also  be  explored with MAOS. This study was supported, in part, by a grant from NSF awarded to Dr. Bruce  Armitage, Department of Chemistry, Carngie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213   

71


POSTER ABSTRACTS  25 

26 

THE EFFECTS OF GROUND  CLOVES ON OXIDATIVE STRESS, DYSLIPIDEMIA, AND  ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN AZOXYMETHANE INDUCED COLORECTAL CANCER IN MALE  WISTAR RATS    Tamina L Johnson*, Dr. Ngozi Ugochukwu  Florida A&M University, Tallahasse, FL  Abstract  Colorectal  Cancer  is  a  malignant  neoplasm  characterized  by  an  accumulation  of  inflammatory  cytokines, inhibition of apoptotic pathways, and increased levels of oxidative stress.  Oxidative stress is  a precursor of colorectal cancer.  Oxidative stress occurs when the formation of reactive oxygen species  (ROS)  overwhelms  an  organisms  antioxidant  defenses.    Phytochemicals,  such  as  eugenol,  have  been  linked  to  the  prevention  of  cancerous  diseases.    Eugenol,  a  major  phytochemical  in  cloves,  has  been  found to possess antioxidant properties.  This study was set to investigate the chemopreventive role of  cloves in modulating oxidative stress in azoxymethane‐induced colorectal cancer in male Wistar rats.    Twenty‐four 3‐month  old male  Wistar rats  were used  for  this  study.   The animals  were  divided  into 2 groups: 12 animals in the control group, 12 animals in the cloves group.    Each group contains  two  subgroups  of  6  animals  each:  a  group  that  received  a  placebo  subcutaneous  saline  injection  (15  mg/kg  body weight)  and a  group  that received  a  subcutaneous injection  of azoxymethane (15  mg/kg  body weight).  Cloves were found to reduce cholesterol and significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD),  glutathione  peroxidase  (GPx)  and  catalase  activity.  It  also  significantly  decreased,  reactive  oxygen  species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as well as aberrant crypt foci (ACF).    This study provided evidence that Cloves could be a potential non‐invasive, preventive treatment  for  colorectal  cancer  via  the  reduction  of  reactive  oxygen  species,  lipid  peroxidation  and  oxidative  stress known to be the underlying physiological dysfunction associated with colorectal cancer.    DETERMINING  THE  DNA  BINDING  ACTIVITY  OF  NEURAL  ZINC  FINGER  FACTOR  1e  BY FLUORESCENCE ANISOTROPY     Tiffany Strickland*, Dr. Holly Cymet  Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore MD 21251    Abstract    The  zinc  finger  family  is  a  family  of  protein  motifs  that  bind  to  zinc  in  order  to  stabilize  their  structure. Neural zinc finger factor 1 (NZF‐1) has six zinc binding domains and binds specifically to the  β‐retinoic acid response element (β‐RARE) DNA sequence. NZF‐1e is a single domain fragment that is  a  part  of  NZF‐1.  The  purpose  of  this  research is  to determine  the  DNA  binding  activity  of  the  single  domain fragment NZF‐1e using the fluorescence anisotropy technique. Plasmid containing the NZF‐1e  gene was transformed into BL21 (DE3) or BL21 (DE3) plysS competent bacteria. A bacterial colony was  then transferred onto LB‐Ampicillin + 100μM zinc chloride media. Protein synthesis was induced with  1 mM IPTG. The bacterial cells were lysed, and then the bacterial supernatant was purified by cation  exchange chromatography using SP Sepharose as the matrix. The NZF‐1e peptide was further purified 

72


POSTER ABSTRACTS  26 

27 

using  reverse  phase  high  pressure  liquid  chromatography  (HPLC),  dried  down  and  stored  in  an  anaerobic chamber. The purified NZF‐1e peptide was tested using a UV/Vis Spectrometer to determine  the  concentration  of  protein  and  quantify  the  amount  of  functional  protein  present.  NZF‐1e  was  titrated into an oligonucleotide solution that contained the β‐RARE sequence and the anisotropy was  measured.  A  dissociation  constant  in  the  low  micromolar  range  was  determined  demonstrating  that  there was weak binding of NZF‐1e to β‐RARE DNA. Additional fluorescence anisotropy studies were  performed  using  a  random  DNA  sequence  that  did  not  contain  the  β‐RARE  binding  site  and  no  binding was observed. Thus, NZF‐1e binds weakly to β‐RARE DNA, but the observed binding is still  sequence  specific.  These  experiments  showed  that  fluorescence  anisotropy  can  be  used  to  quantitate  and compare DNA binding of individual zinc fingers within NZF‐1.  (Supported by HBCU‐UP ‐ NSF  HRD 0506066 and NIH/MARC U*STAR 2T34GM007977‐23A2)     LENTIVIRAL GENE DELIVERY TO FETAL MOUSE RESULT IN BROAD TRANSDUCTION  OF TISSUES    Tolani  Adebanjo*,    David  Stitelman  MD  ,  Philip  Zoltick  MD,  Alan  W  Flake  MD,  Tim  Brazelton  MD PhD  1Cheyney University of Pennsylvania   1837 University Circle, Cheyney, PA 19319  2Department  of  Surgery,  Center  for  Fetal  Research,  Children’s  Hospital  of  Philadelphia,  Philadelphia, PA    Abstract    Gene  therapy  allows  new  gene  to  be  introduced  into  the  cell  of  an  organism  and  holds  great  promise to treat genetically based diseases. One major challenge of gene therapy is efficient delivery of  genes to target tissues. Compared to an adult, fetal development is characterized by many migrating  and proliferating cell population, reduced barriers between organ compartments in smaller organism  size. Thus, we hypothesized that more efficient gene transfer will occur during fetal development.       An  HIV  based  lentiviral  construct  in  which  GFP  expression  was  driven  by  the  constitutively‐ active  CMV  promoter  was  packaged  into  vesicular  stomatitis  virus  envelope  and  injected  intra  vascularly into a fetal mice at embryonic day fourteen.     In  mice  sacrificed  after  birth,  strong  GFP  expression  was  observed  in  a  broad  range  of  tissues  including the skeletal muscle, heart, kidney, liver, spleen and the brain, within each organ, twenty to  eighty  percent  of  organs  express  GFP,  with  the  exception  of  some  brain  regions  where  the  GFP  expression was five to twenty percent. Such a broad and efficient transduction exceeds that observed in  mice transduced after birth.     In  conclusion  our  data  indicates  that  gene  therapy  during  the  fetal  period  may  be  clinically  advantageous way to treat a variety of genetic diseases.           

73


POSTER ABSTRACTS  28 

29 

ANTIOXIDANT EFFECTS OF BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS IN PEANUT SKINS   Lisa O Dean1, Wanida E. Lewis*1, Leon C Boyd2  1North  Carolina  State  University,  USDA‐ARS  Market  Quality  and  Handling  Research  Unit,  Raleigh, NC   2North  Carolina  State  University,  Department  of  Food,  Bioprocessing  and  Nutrition  Science,  Raleigh, NC 27695     Abstract      Peanut  skins  have  been  regarded  as  a  waste  by‐product  of  peanuts;  however,  skins  have  been  shown to contain a high phenolic load making them a possible source of antioxidants.  The purpose of  this study is to determine the antioxidant effects of peanut skins. Peanut skins were ground to a fine‐ like  powder  using  a  Wiley  Mill.  Peanut  skins  were  extracted  with  three  different  solvents:  acetone‐ water  (AW),  ethanol‐water  (EW)  and  methanol‐water  (MW)  to  achieve  an  optimized  amount  of  phenolic  compounds.  Antioxidant  capacity  was  measured  using  the  oxygen  radical  absorbance  capacity  assay  (ORAC),  total  phenolics  and  DPPH  (1,  1‐Diphenyl‐2‐picrylhydrazyl)  analyses.  AW  extract  yielded  the  highest  ORAC  and  total  phenolics  value  compared  to  EW  and  MW  extracts.  Research  has  shown  that  there  is  a  correlation  between  inflammation  and  oxidative  stress  and  that  increased  consumption  of  antioxidant  containing  compounds  will  reduce  oxidative  stress.  Therefore,  future studies will include the composition of antioxidants in peanut skin extracts will be determined  as well as screening for anti‐inflammatory effects in cell based assays.     CHARACTERIZATION OF THE N‐TERMINAL WILSON DISEASE PROTEIN  DOMAIN 4       Wilson Okumu* and David. L. Huffman  (david.huffman@wmich.edu);  Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008    Abstract    Wilson  disease  is  an  autosomal  recessive  disorder  of  copper  metabolism  in  the  liver,  brain  and  kidney  cells.  The  disease  is  caused  by  mutation  in  Wilson  disease  protein  (ATP7B).  The  mutation  affects copper balance in the cells resulting in copper overload in tissues. The buildup of copper ions in  the cornea of the eye is manifested in Kayser‐Fleischer rings.         ATP7B is a copper transporting P‐type ATPase found in the copper secretory pathway. The P‐type  ATPases  are  membrane  proteins  involved  in  the  uphill  transport  of  cations  coupled  to  energy  of  hydrolysis  of  the  ATP.  The  ATP7B  possesses  six  cytosolic  metal  binding  domains  in  the  N‐terminus.  These  domains  are  involved  in  the  acquisition  of  copper  (I)  from  the  metallochaperone  HAH1.  Of  particular interest in these domains are size, shape and domain‐domain interactions in the transfer of  copper from the HAH1. Studies have been conducted in the fourth domain (WLN4) and other domains  expressed together with WLN4 of the ATP7B. Important results of these studies will be presented    

74


POSTER ABSTRACTS  30 

31 

HIGH RESOLUTION MELTING ANALYSIS OF MISCANTHUS X SINENSIS  ORNAMENTAL VARIETIES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH‐DENSITY GENETIC MAP    Adebosola Oladeinde* and Stephen Long  Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois Urbana‐Champagne    Abstract    Miscanthus  is  an  ornamental  plant  species  that  originated  from  Asia.  Most  available  information  about  Miscanthus  accessions  has  been  collected  by  horticulturists  for  its  use  as  an  ornamental plant. Miscanthus x giganteus is an exceptionally high yielding biomass crop but its origins  and  parental  lineage  is  unknown.  Morphological  classification  of  relatives  provides  ambiguous  information on potential parents and the genetic origins of its almost uniquely high productivity. My  research  aims  to  use  novel  high‐throughput  DNA  screening  methods  to  provide  a  more  robust  classification  of  the  extant  Miscanthus  lines  in  the  USA  and  their  evolutionary  relationship  to  M.  x  giganteus.    This  is  being  achieved  via  High  Resolution  Melt  (HRM)  technology  which  uses  genetic  markers  that  I  have  generated  for  a  high‐density  genetic  map  of  Miscanthus.  HRM  creates  melting  curves that are dependent on the composition of the genomic sequence. The more of the DNA bases  G:C  the  higher  the  melting  curve,  allowing  rapid  identification  of  variation  in  markers  between  accessions.  Based  on  the  difference  in  melting  curve  peaks  for  specific  regions,  variation  within  the  genome  are  determined  without  the  need  for  costly  whole  genome  sequencing.  This  ability  to  map  genetic traits will allow the development of a phylogenetic tree of Miscanthus that shows the familiar  relationship within the species. I am also growing each accession, replicated in a common garden, so  that  I  can  obtain  a  functional  association  between  the  genotype  and  phenotypes,  in  particular  productivity.     MECHANISM AND INHIBITION OF PROTEIN ARGININE METHYLTRANSFERASE 1    Obiamaka Obianyo*, Corey P. Causey, Tanesha C. Osborne and Paul R. Thompson  Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29209    Abstract    Protein  arginine  methyltransferases  (PRMTs)  are  SAM‐dependent  enzymes  that  catalyze  the  mono‐  and di‐methylation of peptidyl arginine residues. Although all PRMTs produce mono‐methyl arginine  (MMA),  type  1  PRMTs  go  on  to  form  asymmetrically  dimethylated  arginine  (ADMA),  while  type  2  enzymes  form  symmetrically  dimethylated  arginine  (SDMA).    PRMT1  is  the  major  type  1  PRMT  in  vivo,  thus  it  is  the  primary  producer  of  the  competitive  NOS  inhibitor,  ADMA.  Hence,  potent  inhibitors, which are highly selective for this particular isozyme, could serve as therapeutics for heart  disease.  However,  the  design  of  such  inhibitors  is  impeded  by  a  lack  of  information  regarding  this  enzyme’s kinetic and catalytic mechanisms. We have reported analyses of the substrate specificity and  kinetic  mechanism  of  human  PRMT1  using  both  an  unmethylated  and  a  mono‐methylated  substrate  peptide  based  on  the  N‐terminus  of  histone  H4.  Our  studies  have  previously  shown  that  PRMT1  preferentially methylates substrate peptides with positively‐charged residues distal to the methylation  site.  Recently, we have determined that the enzyme utilizes a rapid equilibrium random methylation  mechanism  with  dead‐end  EBQ  complexes.  These  results  have  initiated  the  design,  synthesis  and  analysis of various inhibitors targeting the enzyme.    75


POSTER ABSTRACTS  32 

A NOVEL ELASTIN MIMETIC PEPTIDE FOR TISSUE ENGINEERED VASCULAR GRAFTS   Dhaval Patel*, Lakeshia J. Taite  Georgia Institute of Technology,   School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Atlanta, GA 30332    Abstract    The goal of this work is to incorporate an elastin mimetic peptide into a PEG‐DA hydrogel in an  effort  to  fabricate  a  tissue‐engineered  vascular  graft  (TEVG).    The  graft  will  be  capable  of  creating  a  microenvironment  to  sustain  ECM  growth  and  development  leading  to  better  compliance  once  implanted  in  vivo.  A  23  amino  acid,  AAKAAKVGVAPGRGDSAAKAAKK,  and  a  19  amino  acid,  AAKAAKVGVAPGAAKAAKK,  sequence  peptides  were  designed  to  mimic  elastin  that  would  be  capable  of  generating  functional  elastin  fibers  once  incorporated  into  the  TEVG.    By  isolating  key  functional  groups  of  elastin,  these  peptides  were  engineered  to  contain  crosslinking,  cell  adhesion,  proliferation, and migration motifs.  Furthermore, RGDS was introduced in the 23 amino acid sequence  to  enhance  cell  adhesion  and  assist  with  improving  elastin  production.    The  peptides  were  characterized in vitro in order to assess the deposition of elastin and desmosine, crosslinking domain  unique to elastin.  Human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were incubated with either peptides at  varying  concentrations  and  the  amount  of  elastin  and  desmosine  deposited  was  determined  after  48  hours.  A  Fastin  assay  was  used  to  measure  elastin  production  whereas  a  competitive  enzyme‐linked  immunosorbent  assay  (ELISA)  was  used  to  quantify  desmosine  production.    The  23  amino  acid  sequence showed an increasing trend in elastin as well as desmosine deposition.  Cell adhesion studies  in  vitro  were  also  conducted  by  conjugating  the  peptides  with  bovine  serum  albumin  (BSA)  to  yield  either BSA‐23 or BSA‐19.  After 48 hours, a higher SMC adhesion was observed on surfaces coated with  BSA‐23.    With  improved  cell  adhesion  as  well  as  elastin  and  desmosine  production  in  vitro,  the  23  amino  acid  sequence  is  showing  capabilities  of  generating  a  microenvironment  suitable  for  vascular  growth in a TEVG.   

33 

THE FABRICATION OF ZINC OXIDE NANOWIRES AND ITS SOLAR CELL  APPLICATIONS       Mallarie D. McCune*, Yulin Deng†  Georgia Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,  Atlanta, GA 30332    Abstract      There has been a very extensive amount of research dedicated to Zinc Oxide (ZnO). Because of  its excellent and unique physical properties, ZnO has been the main element of many applications in  numerous  scientific  fields  all  over  the  world.  Specifically,  ZnO  nanowires  have  proved  to  be  very  functional  for  dye‐sensitized  solar  cell  applications  as  a  part  of  the  world‐wide  effort  to  create  alternative energy resources. However, compared to TiO2 nanoparticles, reports of efficiencies for solar  cells based on ZnO nanowires are quite small. The highest reported efficiency for dye‐sensitized solar  cells based on ZnO nanowires is about 4.1%. In my research, I have proposed two main ideas that will 

76


POSTER ABSTRACTS  33 

34 

potentially help to improve the overall efficiency of ZnO nanowire dye‐sensitized solar cells based on a  liquid  electrolyte.  The  first  idea  is  based  on  a  physical  barrier  via  a  polymer  block  that  will  prevent  electron back transfer at the anode, thus eliminating short‐circuiting of the cell and increasing the cell  efficiency. The other idea is based on the addition of 2,2,6,6‐tetramethyl‐1‐piperidinyloxy (TEMPO), a  complex  organic  radical  compound,  to  the  liquid  electrolyte,  iodide/triiodide  redox  couple.  It  is  expected  that  the  chemical  interaction  between  the  redox  couple  electrolyte  (I‐/I3‐)  and  TEMPO  will  significantly  improve  the  overall  power  conversion  efficiency  of  ZnO  nanowire‐based  dye‐sensitized  solar  cells;  thus  far,  my  experimental  results  have  been  favorable  to  this  idea.  Additionally,  my  research project extends the work done in liquid‐based dye‐sensitized solar cells to  organic‐inorganic  hybrid  polymer  solar  cells  based  on  both  organic  polymers/molecules  and  inorganic  semiconducting  materials. It is expected that the ZnO nanowires can be used as a template to help separate the organic  phases  in  an  interdigitated  fashion,  reducing  the  amount  of  “aggregated  islands”  that  hinder  charge  carrier  mobility;  moreover,  a  polymer  block  is  expected  to  reduce  recombination.  Thus,  this  hybrid  solar  cell  design,  incorporating  this  polymer  block  layer  and  the  nanowires,  should  produce  higher  efficiencies  than  the  presently  reported  conjugated  polymer‐based  solar  cells.  All  of  my  research  objectives are vital to the universal research efforts dedicated to resolving the global energy crisis.     SUSTAINABILITY  EVALUATOR:  AN  EXCEL  BASED  TOOL  FOR  EVALUATING  PROCESS SUSTAINABILITY    

Olamide O. Shadiya, and Karen A. High*   Oklahoma State University, School of Chemical Engineering, Stillwater, OK 74075    

Abstract   

A  new  tool  titled  the  “SUSTAINABILIY  EVALUATOR”  has  been  developed  for  evaluating  processes  for  sustainability.  Traditionally,  engineers  designed  processes  to  meet  economic  goals;  however with the awareness of sustainability, engineers are now considering other constraints such as  resource usage, environmental impacts, social benefits and economics. This tool uses selected metrics  that  address  economic  concerns,  environmental  impact  and  health  and  safety  concerns.  The  SUSTAINABILIY EVALUATOR is a Microsoft Excel based tool that uses mass and energy balance as  inputs to evaluate the sustainability of a process. Some of the concerns that are addressed by this tool  include the following:   • Economic Concerns: Profit, revenue. e.t.c.   •  Environmental  Concerns:  Atmospheric  acidification,  global  warming,  environmental  burdens,  ozone depletion, photochemical smog etc.   • Resource Usage: Water consumption, energy consumption, material intensity, E‐Factor etc.   • Health and Safety Impact: Cancer risks, process risks such as risk of explosion, flammability etc.       The  ultimate  goal  in  every  industrial  process  is  to  maximize  profits;  thus  a  process  is  not  sustainable  if  it  is  not  economically  viable.  Thus,  this  paper  introduces  a  methodology  that  involves  addressing  economics  concerns  by  completing  a  profitability  analysis,  addressing  environmental  concerns  by  using  a  set  of  selected  environmental  metrics  and  addressing  social  concerns  by  completing a health and safety risk analysis. The “SUSTAINABILITY EVALUATOR” could be used to  evaluate the sustainability of a process or compare process alternatives to select the most sustainable  process.    

77


POSTER ABSTRACTS  35 

36 

EFFECT  OF  HIGH  TEMPERATURE  TREATMENT  ON  AQUEOUS  CORROSION  OF  LOW‐ CARBON STEEL BY ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY       Samuel J. Gana1, Nosa O. Egiebor*2, Ramble Ankumah3  1Tuskegee University Materials Science and Engineering, Tuskegee, AL 36088  2Tuskegee University Department of Chemical Engineering, Tuskegee, AL 36088  3Tuskegee University, Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Tuskegee, AL    Abstract      Severe  corrosion  is  encountered  in  aggressive  (high  temperature)  environments  where  the  degradation of metallic components is of great importance to a wide range of industrial applications.   The  corrosion  behavior  of  1020C  carbon  steel  samples  that  had  been  subjected  to  oxidizing  heat  treatment  at  550°C  and  675°C  was  studied  in  sodium  chloride  electrolytes  using  a  3‐electrode  electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Experimental data were used to evaluate the corrosion of the  samples  while  optical  microscopy  was  employed  to  investigate  the  surface  characteristics  of  the  samples before and after aqueous corrosion. The results showed that while the sample treated at 550°C  revealed an increasing corrosion rate with time, the sample treated at 675°C indicated a higher initial  corrosion rate, but the rate declined gradually over the 4‐day experimental period. Optical microscopy  revealed  significant  formation  of  surface  corrosion  products  on  both  heat  treated  samples,  but  the  complex plane diagrams indicated significant capacitive behavior for the heat treated samples relative  to the untreated samples.     DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TRANSPORT IN OPEN‐CELL MESOPHASE  PITCH DERIVED CARBON FOAMS    Shawn Austina, E. E. Kalua, C. A. Mooreb, G. D. Wessona,*, D. Stephensd  a Department of Chemical Engineering, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL. 32310, b Department  of Mechanical Engineering, Florida A&M Univeristy, Tallahassee, FL. 32310, d Department of  Mathematics, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL. 32307, * Research & Economic Development,  South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, SC 29115    Abstract    Production of graphite carbon foams from mesophase pitch opened a new frontier in the field  of advanced carbon materials.  Because of their predominantly spherical topology and continuous pore  network,  carbon  foams  can  yield  high  surface  areas.    The  combination  of  an  open  cellular  structure  with  high  specific  thermal  conductivities  up  to  200  (W/mK/g/cc)  makes  carbon  foams  excellent  candidates  for  heat  transfer  applications.    In  comparison  with  high  thermal  conductive  metals,  graphitic carbon foam have effective thermal conductivities almost on the same order of magnitude of  the solid thermal conductivity of dense (non‐porous) aluminum with approximately 1/5 the weight of  dense aluminum.      Currently, heat transfer and fluid flow in porous structures is numerically investigated by  volume averaging the governing equations over a representative elementary volume.  The volume  averaged equations, however, require supplementary empirical relations to recapture the ‘microscopic’ 

78


POSTER ABSTRACTS  36 

37 

information within the microporous structures.  Limitations exist with empirical models and in some  cases experiments are required to calibrate the empirical model.  Experimental studies of the flow field  at  the  pore  level  are  practically  impossible.    Thus,  in  order  to  explore  open‐celled  mesophase  pitch  derived  carbon  foams  for  thermal  energy  management  applications,  it  is  convenient  to  develop  representative  computer  models  and  then  utilize  direct  numerical  simulation  for  subsequent  convective heat transfer simulations.    Direct  numerical  simulation  of  fluid  flow  and  heat  transfer  in  representative  carbon  foam  models was performed using a commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics code (ANSYS  Inc).  Three unit cell models as well were used as geometric representation of carbon foam.  Results of  the  simulation  were  compared  to  a  72%  porous  POCO©  foam  with  an  average  pore  diameter  of  350  m.  Results of the pressure drop as a function of the air maximum velocity show that the tetrahedral  unit cell is a better approximation to mesophase pitch derived carbon foam.  Maximum pore Reynolds  number for the tetrahedral cell was 600 when experimental conditions were applied.    FISCHER TROPSCH PLATFORM ENHANCED BY HIGH THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY  CATALYSTS    1 1 1 Tunde Dokun , Don Cahela , Symon Sheng , Hongyun Yang2and *Dr. Bruce J. Tatarchuk    Chemical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL  2Intramicron Inc. Industry Drive. Auburn Al.  *tatarbj@auburn.edu Tel: +1‐334‐844‐2023    Abstract    In  using  a  Micro‐Fibrous  Entrapped  Catalyst,  MFEC,  we  simulate  and  accurately  model  a  Fischer  Tropsch  reactor  which  will  meet  the  Navyʹs  requirement  of  producing  JP‐5  for  portability,  process  robustness,  and  volume  productivity  from  a  catalyzed  reaction  involving  Syngas  (CO2  and  H2).  MFEC  is  comprised  of  a  small  grain  catalyst;  Alumina  supported  Cobalt  catalyst,  entrapped  within a sinter‐locked network of a metal, Stainless Steel and Copper micro fiber. With the use of this  metal  fiber  network,  we  are  able  to  increase  the  effective  thermal  conductivity  within  the  reactor  by  about 40%, and reduce hot spots within the reactor and increase selectivity for JP5 production. MFEC  are readily manufactured and provide high intraparticle and mass transport properties.   This  poster  will  incorporate  areas  of  applied  fluid  mechanics  and  a  mathematical  model  of  transport  processes. Using  an implicit finite integrating  scheme, we  are able  to  determine  the  reactor  temperature  profile  by  modeling  a  plug  flow  reactor  which  includes  the  energy  balances  on  the  gas  phase. The catalyst temperature will be assumed to be uniform inside the catalyst particles, so all heat  of reaction is generated inside the catalyst particles. This model takes into account the detailed kinetics  of the FTS and water gas shift reaction.   The  application  of  applied  mathematics  and  numerical  methods  in  solving  these  sets  of  differential  equations  is  the  key  to  fully  understanding  the  temperature  profile.  By  effectively  designing  an  FTS  reactor  that  has  limited  heat  transfer  issues,  an  optimized  balance  of  plant  can  be  achieved;  where  the  operating  equipments  are  limited  by  the  weight  and  volume  criteria  due  to  selective production and separation for JP‐5.    

79


POSTER ABSTRACTS  38 

39 

DESORPTION  AND  SURFACE  CHEMICAL  REACTIONS  OF  AROMATIC  SULFUR  HETEROCYCLES FROM SILVER BASED SORBENTS  Zenda D. Davis*, Sachin A. Nair, Alexander Samokhvalov and Bruce J. Tatarchuk   Auburn University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Auburn, AL 36849 (USA)     Abstract     The  Ag‐TiO2‐based  adsorbent  has  been  found  to  selectively  remove  sulfur  –containing  heterocyclic compounds from high sulfur logistic fuels. The Ag‐TiO2 has a capacity to remove 6‐7 mg/g  of sulfur aromatics from JP5 fuel in the presence of 160 fold excess of competing aromatics. Ag‐TiO2 is  regenerable in air for multiple cycle operation. Desorption, adsorption and chemical reactions of sulfur  containing  heterocyclic  compounds  at  the  surface  of  the  sorbent  were  studied  to  provide  molecular  information  about  the  mechanism  and  active  sites  involved  in  desulfurization  of  fuel,  as  well  as  the  thermal  regeneration  of  the  sorbent.  Thermogravimetric  analysis  mass  spectroscopy  (TGA‐MS),  temperature  programmed  desorption  /  temperature  programmed  reaction  spectroscopy  (TPD/TPRS)  and  X‐ray  photoelectron  spectroscopy  (XPS)  were  the  techniques  used  to  investigate  the  Ag‐TiO2  sorbent for this study.         EFFECTS OF VISCOSITY ON PHASE SEPARATION OF LIQUID MIXTURES WITH A  CRITICAL POINT OF MISCIBILITY       Filomena Califano*  Chemistry and Physics Department, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY, 11201    Abstract      After quenching a high‐viscosity partially miscible critical liquid mixture to a temperature far  below  the  critical  point,  we  observed  the  formation  of  rapidly  coalescing  droplets,  whose  size  grew  linearly  with time,  indicating  that  phase  separation process  is  driven  by  convection.  As  predicted  by  the diffuse interface model, this experimental work showed that the viscosity did not have any effect  on  the  growth  rate  and  the  speed  of  the  nucleating  droplets.  Eventually,  when  the  droplets  size  reached its critical length, they started to sediment and separated by gravity. At this point, the viscosity  influenced the settling speed and the total separation time.       

80


POSTER ABSTRACTS  40 

OZONATION OF PRODUCED WATER   Johnathan k. Vann*1, Shawn k. Kuriakose1, Dr. Jorge Gabitto1,  Joanna McFarlane2 and Dr. Costas Tsouris2  1Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX 77446  2Nuclear Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN    Abstract    Produced water, also known as brine or “formation water”, is generated by oil and gas industrial  operations.  It  has  a  high  concentration of  dissolved organics and minerals, as well  as  small  particles.  “Clean”  water  that  is  pumped  into  oil  and  gas  reservoirs  to  aid  in  the  process  of  capturing  natural  oil/gas  and  other  minerals  is  converted  into  produced  water  when  it  interacts  with  these  natural  systems. Because of the high organic and salt concentrations, produced water must be treated before  recycling  or  reuse.  One  method  used  to  help  purify  produced  water  is  ozonation.  Various  types  of  reactors can be used for ozonation. In this study, a gas‐liquid batch reactor and a centrifugal contactor  was  used  to  treat  the  produced  water.  The  gas‐liquid  reactor  used  in  this  study  was  a  single  pass  operation  and  a  centrifugal  contactor  that  has  been  used  in  nuclear  separations  by  liquid‐liquid  extraction was set up to investigate the ozonation kinetics of produced water. The centrifugal contactor  provides  intense  mixing  in  a  high‐shear  gap  between  the  outer  wall  of  the  contactor  and  a  rotating  rotor.  In  both  studies,  a  fine  dispersion  of  gas  bubbles  containing  ozone  interacts  with  the  organic  compounds  in  the  produced  water.  Samples  of  this  interaction  were  periodically  collected  and  analyzed by a gas chromatograph, chlorine analysis and pH analysis. From the centrifugal contactor,  the  results  can  be  used  to  determine  the  kinetics  of  the  reaction  in  the  absence  of  mass‐transfer  limitations. In conclusion, drastic change in relative area of peaks from the GC analysis and the clarity  difference in samples after ozonation, showed that there was a reduction of organic compounds in the  treated produced water. The kinetic rates obtained from these experiments can be used in the design of  produced water ozonation reactors. 

 

81


POSTER ABSTRACTS  41 

DETECTION OF REDUCED PHOSPHORUS OXYANIONS IN GEOTHERMAL WATER VIA  ION CHROMATOGRAPHY       Amanda Henry, Herbe Pech, Krishna L. Foster*  California State University ‐ Los Angeles,  Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA  90032    Abstract      It  is  widely  assumed  that  reactive  phosphorus  appears  in  the  environment  exclusively  as  fully  oxidized phosphate, P (V), in the forms H2PO4‐ and HPO42‐.  Research on the origins of life suggests  that  reduced  forms  of  phosphorus,  with  oxidation  states  +1  and  +3,  may  also  be  present  in  reducing  environments  such  as  geothermal  hot  springs.   Data  will  be  presented  indicating  that  one  of  these  reduced compounds, phosphite P (III), is present in geothermal water samples from Hot Creek pools  near  Mammoth  Lakes,  California.   Samples  were  analyzed  using  ion  chromatography  and  mass  spectroscopy.  Phosphite and phosphate peak assignments were based on retention times and verified  using  standards.   A  secondary  confirmation  of  the  presence  of  a  phosphite  peak  was  performed  via  chemical oxidation of phosphite to phosphate using potassium iodate.  

  42 

REACTIONS OF SINGLET OXYGEN WITH A FURAN‐CONTAINING DRUG,  FUROSEMIDE: ATTEMPTS TO GENERATE A SECONDARY OZONIDE    B.M. King, R.M. Uppu, and M.O. Fletcher Claville  Department  of  Environmental  Toxicology,  College  of  Sciences,  Southern  University  and  A&M  College, Baton Rouge, LA    Abstract    In an effort to synthesize a secondary ozonide with potential antimalarial activity from a reaction  between  furosemide  and  singlet  oxygen,  derivative  product(s)  were  made  that  may  be  useful  in  determining  the  toxic  metabolites  that  result  from  oxidation  of  furan‐containing  drugs  in  vivo.    Typical  experiments  utilized  furosemide  (a  diene,  5  mM)  and  singlet  oxygen  (a  dienophile)  that  was  generated  by  slowly  bubbling  molecular  oxygen  through  the  reaction  mixture  that  contained  Rose  Bengal (0.1 mM) as a photosensitizer, in quartz cuvettes.  Reaction mixtures were irradiated at 254 nm  using six side positioned UVC bulbs in a LZC‐EDU photoreactor (Luzchem, Ottawa, ON, Canada) at  room  temperature  for  15,  30,  and  60  min  intervals.    Although  proton  NMR  analyses  of  reaction  mixtures  that  were  irradiated  for  15  and  30  min  revealed  the  consumption  of  the  furosemide,  the  growth  of  product  signals  were  not  consistent  with  the  expected  secondary  ozonide  product  as  predicted by ChemNMR H‐1 estimation, a function of  ChemDraw  Ultra.  Based on literature precedent,  the  desired  Diels‐Alder  adduct,  i.e.  secondary  ozonide  may  have  reacted  via  one,  or  several  reaction  pathways to form a conjugated diene aldehyde.  The formation of such an electrophilic intermediate(s)  may prove to be toxic metabolites of furan‐containing in vivo.  

 

82


POSTER ABSTRACTS  43 

Impact of Ti02 Metallized Carbon Nanotubes (Ti02‐CNT) on Regenerative Bone Growth    Edidiong C. Obot*1, Renard L. Thomas1  Environmental  Toxicology  Program,  Department  of  Chemistry,  Texas  Southern  University,  Houston, TX 77004    Abstract    In the field of modern medicine such as drug delivery, virus detection, and molecular methods for  disease diagnosis using Carbon Nanotubes (CNT’s) have recently started to emerge and hence they are  expected to develop into large scale industrial production. However the use of CNT`s in various fields,  especially  in  medical  applications  raises  serious  concerns  about  health  and  safety  issues.  Currently  there  are  several  areas  that  are  looking  towards  nanotechnology  as  a  new  form  of  enhancement,  specifically  Regenerative  Medicine.  Previous  studies  in  Regenerative  Medicine  of  osteoblast  with  the  use of titanium oxide carbon nanotubes have shown promising faith in nano‐biotechnology methods.  Studies have proven that titanium oxide nanotubes are a key role in accelerating the healing process of  bone  tissue.  In  our  study  we  will  test  the  toxicity  level  of  Single  Wall  Carbon  Nanotubes  Metalized  with Titanium Oxide (Ti02) in osteoblasts. The purpose of our research is to investigate the impact of  Texas Southern Universities’ (TSU) proprietary Ti02 Metalized Carbon Nanotubes (Ti02‐CNT) on the  growth  of  osteoblast  cells.  The  purpose  of  this  study  is  to  evaluate    the  outcome  of  Ti02‐CNT’s  by  examining  the  toxicity  using  MTT  and  live  dead  cell  assays  in  order  to  test  its  vulnerability  or  resistance with the aim of determining the impact of various doses of Ti02‐CNT’s and possibly using  Ti02‐CNT’s as an enhancing agent for bone healing. If Titanium Oxide Carbon Nanotubes enhance the  growth  of  osteoblasts,  then  these  bone  cells  have a likelihood  of  accelerating  the  growth  of fractured  bones cells leading to a rapid recovery.  The use of Titanium Oxide Carbon Nanotubes plays a major  role in regenerative studies due to the fact that they have greater wear resistance and fatigue. Currently  regenerative studies use Titanium Oxide nanotubes for the acceleration of bone growth, however this  study is interested in to assessing the use of Titanium Oxide CNT’s, a more durable form of nanotubes,  to  observe  cell  proliferations  and  toxicity  measurements  are  used  the  possibility  the  cell  there  is  an  attraction between the cells and the Metalized Carbon Nanotubes then it will cause a toxic response in  the cell. The research will consist of culturing a cell line of osteoblast cells, exposing the osteoblast cells  to  a  Metalized  Carbon  Nanotube  and  Single  Wall  Nanotube  and  comparing  the  two,  then  using  Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to determine if the  nanoparticles entered the cell.  

 

83


POSTER ABSTRACTS  44 

DISTRIBUTION AND CYCLNG OF MERCURY SPECIES IN THE YOCONA RIVER AND  ENID RESIVIOR IN NORTHWEST MISSISSIPPI     Garry Brown, Jr., James Cizdziel*   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University MS    Abstract     Mercury (Hg) is a global health concern due to its toxicity, potential to bioaccumulate up the  aquatic  food  chain,  and  global  dispersion  through  atmospheric  pathways.   A  fish  consumption  advisory was issued for the Enid Reservoir in May 1995 and the Yocona River in September 1996 by the  Mississippi  Department  of  Environmental  Quality  (MDEQ)  due  to  high  levels  of  Hg  in  fish  tissue  sampled  in  the  waters.  The  goal  of  this  research  is  to  determine  the  distribution  and  cycling  of  Hg  species in the Yocona River and Enid Reservoir in Northwest Mississippi. In the work proposed here,  we will study the distribution and cycling of Hg species in surface water in Northwest Mississippi. The  origin  of  Hg  in  these  water  bodies  is  unclear  but  our  proposed  hypothesis  is  the  sources  of  Hg  may  include  atmospheric  deposition, geological  formations  that  leach  Hg  into  the  watershed,  and  historic  land use practices. We will utilize mercury instrumentation involving a cold vapor atomic absorption  spectrometer,  cold  vapor  atomic  fluorescence  spectrometer,  and  a  inductively  coupled  plasma  mass  spectrometer  (ICP‐MS)  to  quantify  Hg  species  such  as  mono‐methyl‐mercury  (MeHg)  in  the  aquatic  systems.  Specifically, this research will determine the extent to which the Yocona River is contributing  Hg  and  MeHg  to  the  Enid  Reservoir.  Water  samples  will  be  collected  from  strategic  locations  using  clean  sampling  techniques  designed  for  trace  levels  of  Hg.  The  impact  of  storm  events  on  the  distribution and levels of aquatic Hg species entering and leaving the Yocona River will be measured.  We will also measure other standard water quality parameters, such as conductivity, dissolved oxygen,  pH, and oxidative reductive potential (ORP), during field sampling events. This research will produce  quantitative data with known quality in which the State of Mississippi could potentially use to manage  and  protect  its  aquatic  resources.   The  project  will  assess  water  quality  at  a  watershed  and  sub‐ watershed level.      

  45 

FUNCTIONALIZED NANOPARTICLES FOR REMEDIATION OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS      Jully S. Senteu* and Sherine O. Obare  Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008    Abstract    For  decades,  organohalide  (RX)  compounds  have  been  heavily  used  in  the  chemical  and  pharmaceutical  industries  and  in  agriculture  as  pesticides.  Improper  disposal  of  organohalides  has  resulted in their presence in the environment as pollutants, and they have therefore presented serious  environmental  and  toxicological  concerns.  These  organohalides  have  been  associated  with  various  health  and  environmental  problems.  Therefore.  effective  methods  for  their  remediation  are  required.  Photoreduction  of  the  riboflavins,  flavin  mononucleotide  (FMN)  to  FMNH2  is  a  well‐known  two‐ electron two‐photon process. The resulting FMNH2 is involved in two‐electron transfer reactions to a  given  substrate.  Given  that  catalysts  capable  of  delivering  two  electrons  are  attractive  toward  small  molecule activation and dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons, we examined the reactivity of 

84


POSTER ABSTRACTS  45 

FMNH2  with  chlorinated  ethylenes  ‐  dichloroethylene  (DCE),  trichloroethylene  (TCE)  and  tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solution. However, no products were observed after 48 hours of  reactivity.  On  the  other  hand,  FMNH2  anchored  to  nanocrystalline  titania  or  zirconia  via  the  phosphonic acid functional groups, reacted rapidly with DCE, TCE and PCE. Origins of the enhanced  reactivity and the reaction mechanisms of riboflavin functionalized titania with chlorinated ethylenes  will be presented.    

46 

A KINETIC STUDY OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS     Karma James*  Grambling State University, Grambling, Louisiana     Abstract      The  primary  focus  of  our  research  group  is  the  kinetics  study  of  important  chemical  reactions  such as combustion, pyrolysis, and the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds.1 Two different  techniques are used for these measurements, one based on predictive kinetic models and another based  on  kinetics  experiments.  Over  the  past  several  years,  the  group  has  developed  a  software  named  Reaction  Mechanism  Generator  (RMG)  used  for  predicting  reaction  rates  of  new  chemical  reactions.  RMG  uses  its  huge  database  library  containing  information  about  energetics,  rates  etc.  of  many  elemental reactions known in the literature. The software then uses a group additivity scheme to make  predictions about new reactions.   Green  research  group  over  the  past  ten  years  has  been  developing  this  database,  which  is  structured  on  the  basis  of  chemical  reactions  of  a  similar  nature,  called  reaction  families.  The  data  contained in these families are used to predict the kinetics of a given reaction or serve as models for  other  reactions.  The  data  available  was  sourced  from  experimental  measurements,  quantum  calculations,  and  sometimes  even  from  other  predictions.  However,  the  source  of  much  of  the  data  cannot  be  accounted  for  due  to  the  lack  of  proper  documentation.  My  goal  is  to  research  and  track  down  reliable  sources  for  the  data  in  the  database,  as  well  as  verify  these  data.  I  have  done  this  by  reviewing  published  articles,  abstracts,  conference  proceedings,  theses,  books,  and  internet  sites.  In  most  cases,  we  were  able  to  identify  and  document  the  correct  literature  citation  and  verify  that  the  numerical  entries  in  the  database  were  correct.  However,  several  numerical  discrepancies  were  identified in the database, and these are discussed.  

47 

EFFECT OF PH AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE LEVELS ON THE INITIAL CORROSION OF  COPPER SURFACES IN DRINKING WATER INVESTIGATED WITH ATOMIC FORCE  MICROSCOPY         Stephanie L. Daniels,1 Darren A. Lytle2* and Jayne C. Garno1  1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803  2National Risk Management Research Laboratory, WSWRD,   U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268    Abstract      Copper  plumbing  systems  are  traditionally  used  in  residential  homes  due  to  durability  and  ease of installation.  However, pipes that are exposed to aggressive water chemistries can corrode and   85


POSTER ABSTRACTS  47 

leach copper into drinking water, thus causing a concern for consumer health.  The Lead and Copper  Rule (LCR) was implemented in an effort to reduce deleterious copper levels in drinking water. During  the corrosion process, the initial formation of cuprite (Cu2O) on copper surfaces is thought to occur at  the  micrometer  or  even  nanometer  level.   Atomic  force  microscopy  (AFM)  is  suitable  for  directly  observing the early stages of the progressive development of solids that form on copper surfaces at the  nanoscale.  Our purpose was to investigate the initial changes in surface chemistry and morphology as  the copper begins to corrode with designed changes in experimental parameters of pH, exposure time,  and  dosages  of  orthophosphates  in  water  samples.   Copper  coupons  were  exposed  to  water  samples  with selected chemistries for 6 and 24 hours and then examined ex situ using AFM and XRD.  Results  sensitively  reveal  changes  as  cuprite  by‐products  of  copper  corrosion  formed  over  time.   Substantial  differences  were  observed  for  different  samples,  that  were  dependent  on  pH  and  exposure  time.   Addition of orthophosphate was found to reduce the growth rate of corrosive deposits and mitigates  the release of copper into drinking water.     

  48 

CHARACTERIZATION  OF  ORGANIC  COMPOUNDS  IN  THE  EFFLUENT  WASTE  WATER  TREATMENT PLANTS     Zuri Dale*1, Anthony Maye2, Renard L. Thomas3, and Bobby Wilson2  1Space, Engineering & Science Internship Program., Texas Southern University, Houston, TX  2 Environmental Research Technology Transfer Center, (ERT2C),  Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004  3Department of Health Sciences, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004    Abstract    Given  the  number  of  pharmaceuticals,  steroids,  and  other  organic  compounds  that  make  their  way into wastewater, there is great concern about how well wastewater treatment plants process raw  sewage  into  effluent  that  is  returned  to  the  ecosystem.  The  importance  of  ensuring  that  wastewater  effluent is sufficiently treated is imperative to ensuring clean surface water.       This study was conducted to detect and characterize organic compounds in the effluent of 69th    Street  waste  water  treatment  plant.   Preliminary  results  show  three  estrogen  contaminants  were  detected  in  the  effluent  of  69th  Street  WTP  at  the  ppb  level.  There  were  also  other  numerous  unidentified compounds present in the sample. Fractions of the unknown compounds were collected  and  characterized  using  several  analytical  methods.   Characterization  of  the  unknown  organic  compounds will aide in the development of new standards to measure the cleanliness of wastewater  effluent and minimize the adverse impact this water has on the environment.       Future  studies  include  exposing  the  fish  gonad  cells  to  the  contaminants  that  were  found  and  determining the effects.    

86


POSTER ABSTRACTS  49 

HPLC METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS  (PAH) ANALYSIS       Benji Macaulay1, Miheer Shah1, Ruth Montes2, Krishna L. Foster*2  1Pasadena City College, Department of Natural Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91106  2California State University – Los Angeles,  Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90032    Abstract      Polycyclic  aromatic  hydrocarbons  (PAHs)  are  organic  compounds,  which  are  known  to  be  carcinogenic  and  mutagenic.   Although  PAHs  occur  in  nature,  they  manifest  more  frequently  from  anthropogenic sources, adsorbing to air‐particulate matter such as soot and dust that settles down into  the  environment.   This  poses  a  threat  to  sustaining  proper  health  quality  in  the  metropolitan  areas.   This study focuses on optimization of a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for  analyzing  PAHs  in  water  and  sediment  samples  collected  from  Ballona  and  Fern  Dell  Creeks.  Separations were performed on an Accela HPLC system configured with a Hyposil Gold column (1.9  m)  held  at  30 C  coupled  with  a  photodiode  array  (PDA)  detector.   Peaks  were  assigned  using  referenced retention times and reproducible results were obtained.  Optimal parameters were used for  the quantitative analysis of 16 separate PAHs in standards, enabling the application of this technique  for the analysis of environmental water and sediment samples.    

50 

TRACE METAL ANALYSIS OF PRIMARY TEETH AS AN ENVIRONMENTAL  INDICATOR USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY     Terrell Gibson1, Renard L. Thomas2, Bobby Wilson3  1Graduate Student, Environmental Toxicology Program, Texas Southern University, Houston,  Texas; 2Assistant Professor of Health Science, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas ; 3Professor of  Chemistry, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas 77004    Abstract    Numerous  independent  studies  have  identified  the  existence  of  trace  metals  sequestered  within  collected  teeth  of  adults  and  children.   A  quantification  of  these  metals  should  serve  as  an  indicator  of  prolonged  exposure  to  such  environmental  risk  factors  and/or  dietary  habits.   A  comparative study of the levels of trace metals with the correlated demographics and geographies of  the  sample  sources  will  provide  valuable  information  on  the  urban  areas  that  are  affected  by  trace  metals  and/or  cultural  groups  that  are  exposed  more  frequently  to  significant  levels  of  trace  metals.   Deciduous and adult teeth were collected cataloged, analyzed using the Inductively Coupled Plasma  Mass  Spectrometer  (ICP‐MS).  The  analyzed  concentrations  of  each  targeted  trace  metal  found  in  the  tooth tissue are as follows: aluminum ranged from 7.68 ug/g to 653.2, titanium ranged from 5.99 mg/g  to 13.77 mg/g, chromium ranged from 18.45 ng/g to 3,619 ng/g, manganese ranged from 16.93 ng/g to  1,236 ng/g, and copper ranged from 56.65 ng/g to 312.6 ug/g.  The ranges for lead (206), lead (207), and 

87


POSTER ABSTRACTS  50 

lead  (208)  were  2.74  ng/g  to  17.19  ug/g,  39.53  ng/g  to  16.95  ug/g,  and  9.47  ng/g  to  17.41  ug/g,  respectively.  The focus of this project is to correlate the levels of trace metals in primary teeth of urban  children with the urban environmental factors of exposure routes to define environmental risk factors  that contribute to children’s body burden of toxic metals.  Ultimately, this work will contribute to the  understanding of urban environmental risk factors and their impact on the quality of life for children  living in the urban environment.  

  51 

52 

SELECTIVE AEROBIC OXIDATIONS CATALYZED BY MANGANESE (III) COMPLEXES  CONTAINING REDOX ACTIVE LIGANDS    Clarence Rolle, Jake Soper*  Georgia Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Atlanta, GA, 30332    Abstract    Selective  oxidations  are  important  tools  for  the  functionalization  of  compounds  in  organic  synthesis and chemical industry.  However, over 70% of oxidations rely on stoichiometric reagents to  generate  products.    O2  as  a  terminal  e‐  acceptor  is  ideal  because  it  is  cheap  and  environmentally  friendly, but aerobic oxidations are often prone to radical autoxidation.  Recent advances in selective  aerobic oxidations use palladium as a catalyst, but it would be more advantageous to use a 3d metal.   We are pursuing the development of square‐planar manganese (III) complexes containing redox‐active  ligands  as  catalysts  for  the  selective  aerobic  oxidation  of  organic  substrates.    For  instance,  we  have  shown that these complexes can aerobically oxidize catechols to quinones at 0.2% catalyst loadings.  In  this reaction, the non‐innocent ligands impart a multi‐electron character to the metal, which facilitates  reactivity.  We  are  extending  this  oxidation  chemistry  to  the  oxidation  of  alcohols,  amines,  and  to  oxidative coupling for C‐C and N=N bond forming reactions. The mechanistic details of these reactions  will be presented.    ELECTROPHILIC  OXIDATION  USING  COORDINATIVELY  UNSATURATED  IR  III  COMPLEXES       Michael D. Heinekey, Katherine Schultz, and Cristina Thomas*  The University of Washington Department of Chemistry, Seattle Washington, 98195    Abstract      Petroleum  is  a  major  source  for  transportation  fuel  and  various  chemical  productions  such  as  pharmaceuticals  and  polymers.  Unfortunately,  petroleum  availability  is  problematic,  making  it  imperative to seen an alternative fuel source. Methane is an attractive alternative, but methane is costly  and difficult to transport and prohibitively expensive to generate. Catalytic activation of methane and  methanol  may  eliminate  the  issue  of  transportation  and  produce  a  viable  source  of  longer  chain  hydrocarbons that may ultimately serve as alternative transportation fuel.    

88


POSTER ABSTRACTS  52 

53 

This study extends a.) the findings of Alexander Shilov who developed a process to catalytically  convert  methane  to  methanol  using  platinum  as  a  catalyst  and  b.)  addresses  the  prohibitive  expense  and  low  yield  associated  with  the  generation  of  the  target  product  via  the  identification  of  a  novel  catalyst,  Iridium.  Previous  studies  have  shown  fourteen  electron  Ir  III  complexes  to  activate  dihydrogens. We now show that fourteen electron Ir III is also capable of activating cyclohexanes. The  proposed  work  was  to  synthesize  a  ligand  based  on  phenylimidazole  and  asses  the  amount  of  C‐H  activation.  We  successfully  methylated  the  phenylimidazole.  However  the  deprotonation  was  precluded  due  to  a  high  yield  of  nonspecifically  methylated  product.  Therefore,  we  were  unable  to  produce the target complex, but were able to characterize some impurities.     SYNTHESIS  OF  DR1‐ICPTEOS  FOR  THE  PRODUCTION  OF  3‐DIMENSIONAL  DATA  STORING DEVICES       Jason E. Davis*, L. Zane Miller, and Dr. Carole E. Brown   Department of Chemistry, North Georgia College and State University     Abstract      In light of the limitations of traditional 2‐dimesional data storage devices, new materials for 3‐ dimensional data storage are being developed.1 One such material, Silica can be used, since, it is stable  and inert which makes it a more robust and non‐reactive support as a storage medium.2 The silica, by  itself,  possesses  none  of  the  desired  photorefractive  abilities.3  However,  optically  active  organic  compounds can be added into the silicon dioxide network, which allows the resulting hybrid covalent  network  to  display  the  desired  photorefractive  properties.4  The  organic  chromophore  used  in  this  project  was  4‐[N‐ethyl‐N‐(2‐hydroxyethyl)]  amino‐4‐nitroazo‐benzene  (DR1).5  This  dye  is  functionalized with (3‐isocyanatopropyl)‐triethoxysilane (ICPTEOS) to create a system (DR1‐ICPTEOS)  which  can  be  co‐condensed  with  TMOS  in  the  sol‐gel  process.6  The  resulting  hybrid  silica‐based  organic‐inorganic  material  has  been  proven  to  possess  a  very  high  electro‐optical  coefficient,  which  allows  for  a  stable  photorefractive  memory  effect.7  Since,  the  development  of  a  successful  storage  medium,  using  silica,  is  dependent  on  the  functionalization  of  the  organic  chromophore  in  the  inorganic  matrix.  This  distinctive  study  has,  therefore,  developed  a  successful  functionalization  method by using the microwave accelerated reaction system (MARS) to produce higher yielding and  more  homogeneous  (DR1‐ICPTEOS)  dye  mixtures.  Thus,  by  conducting  the  dye  synthesis  via  the  MARS,  our  innovative  technique  opened  numerous  benefits  for  our  project.  These  benefits  include  increasing  the  rate  of  the  reaction,  thereby  reducing  the  overall  reaction  time  by  half,  as  well  as  eliminating  the  use  of  pyridine,  which  then  eliminates  the  need  for  vacuum  distillation.  Most  importantly,  since  we  used  an  efficient  source  of  heating,  we  recovered  a  more  homogenous  dye  mixture, reduced costs and saved energy. Our project is heading into an exciting direction, and we are  on the way toward producing a viable 3‐dimensional data storing device.  

 

89


POSTER ABSTRACTS  SYNTHESIS OF HIGH FREE VOLUME ACID FOR PROTON  CONDUCTING ELECTROLYTES  LaRico Treadwell and Dr. Jason Ritchie*  Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, Ms 38677‐1848 

54 

  Abstract    Proton  conducting  electrolytes  composed  of  mixture  of  MePPG3BzSO3H  acids  in  a  polymer  MePEG7  were  prepared  with  two  different  concentrations  of  the  acid.  The  solutions  displayed  anhydrous  proton  conductivity  at  55  degrees  Celsius.  The  acidity  of  the  acid  (MePPG3BzSO3H)  was  measured  to  be  98%.  The  percent  of  the  final  product  was  calculated  to  be  92%.  The  conductivity  measured  for  MePPG3BzSO3H  was      1.51x10‐5(s/cm)  at  low  concentration  of  the  acid  and  1.74  x10‐ 6(s/cm) at the high concentration of the acid.   

  55 

SYNTHESIS OF NEW INORGANIC CLUSTERS: TRIDECAMERIC GROUP 13 HYDROXIDES  AS INKS FOR MATERIALS     Maisha K. Kamunde‐Devonish1*, Zachary L. Mensinger1, Sharon A. Betterton2, Lev N.  Zakharov1, Douglas A. Keszler2, and Darren W. Johnson*1  1Department of Chemistry and the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute  (ONAMI), University of Oregon, Eugene, OR  2Department of Chemistry and ONAMI, 153 Gilbert Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR    Abstract    We  have  synthesized  a  series  of  tridecameric  hydroxy/aquo  clusters  with  the  formula  M13‐xInx  (μ3‐OH)6(μ  ‐OH)18(H2O)24(NO3)15,  where  M=  Ga  or  Al,  and  x=  0  thru  7.   These  clusters  were  prepared  by  adding  an  organic  nitrosoamine  to  a  methanolic  solution  of  metal  nitrate  salts  and  evaporating the solutions.  Due to the difference in Lewis acidity between gallium and aluminum the  clusters containing aluminum require the addition of base.  Here we report the synthesis of five Ga/In  clusters, including Ga13 and two Al/In clusters which have been characterized by single‐crystal X‐ray  diffraction.  These high purity, crystalline clusters are of interest as solution precursors (inks) for metal  oxide materials.  This includes the use of the Ga13 and Ga7In6 nanoclusters as single‐source precursors  for the preparation of amorphous thin film oxides for use in semiconductor devices.        

 

90


POSTER ABSTRACTS  56 

57 

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF BIMETALLIC ZINTL CLUSTERS   Domonique O. Downing and Bryan W. Eichhorn*  University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College Park, MD 20742    Abstract    The synthesis and characterization of bimetallic Zintl clusters with main group and transition  metal atoms has been of particular interest to the growing field of nanotechnology.  Nanomaterials are  at  the  core  of  advances  in  electronic  technology,  information  storage,  optical  biosensors,  and  drug  delivery vehicles to name a few.  Despite their importance, much is still unknown about the structure,  stability, and dynamic properties of small nanoparticles; more specifically, clusters containing two or  more elements.  The synthesis, characterization, and applications of very large bimetallic nanoclusters  will aid in addressing these critical issues.  Studies in this area can lead to an understanding of how big  nanoclusters or small nanoparticles behave in applications such as heterogeneous catalytic reforming  in  the  oil  and  gas  industry,  fuel  cell  electrocatalysis,  or  advancements  in  high  temperature  superconductors.    This  proposal  targets  chemistry  designed  to  move  to  the  next  level  of  bare  cluster  anions,  which  serves  an  important  role  of  relating  gas  phase  clusters  to  those  in  the  solid  state.    The  new  binary  clusters  which  will  lead  to  the  next  generational  size  of  nanoclusters.    In  preliminary  studies  cluster  anions  [Sn9Ir(cod)]3‐  and  [Pb9Ir(cod)]3‐  have  been  synthesized and  characterized  and  sub‐10 nm PtSn4 nanoparticles have been fabricated from the bimetallic cluster [Pt2Sn9(PPh3)]2‐.  The  former two are the first known examples of Sn‐Ir and Pb‐Ir bimetallics and provide new insight into  structure  and  bonding  of  these  bimetallic  systems.    New  clusters,  such  as  IrPb123‐,  Rh4Sn202‐  and  Co4Ge604‐ will be pursued during the course of Fellowship.  All complexes have been studied via X‐ ray  crystallography  and  Nuclear  Magnetic  Resonance  spectroscopy  while  the  nanoparticles  were  studied via TEM and X‐ray diffraction methods.      DIELECTRIC MONITORING OF EPOXY POLYMERIZATION                                             Abdul‐Rahman Raji*, Alvin P. Kennedy, and Solomon Tadesse   Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251     Abstract     Dielectric  spectroscopy  has  been  used  to  monitor  the  isothermal  cure  of  Diglycidyl  Ether  of  Bisphenol A with 3,3ʹ‐ Diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) and 4,4ʹ‐Diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The  network  formation  was  followed  in  real‐time  through  the  dielectric  spectra  which  depend  on  the  reorientational  motion  of  the  molecules  during  polymerization.  Such  real‐time  dielectric  changes  reflect the reaction mechanism and the morphology of the thermoset. Dielectric permittivity depends  on the mixing ratio of epoxy resin with the above curing agents. Loss peak heights decrease with cure  time and finally levels off. Their appearance is thus associated with amount of curing agents present in  the  reaction  mixture.  Previous  work  with  Diaminodiphenyl  methane  (DDM)  reveals  no  permittivity  dependence  on  mixing  ratio.  This  may  be  due  to  the  polarity  of  sulfone  groups  on  DDS  molecules  during  cure  in  comparison  with  DDM  molecules  which  have  methyl  groups  between  its  two  rings.  This  sort  of  correlations  with  processing  properties  lays  the  foundation  for  our  ongoing  in  situ  monitoring  of  nanocomposite  formation  in  which  we  now  incorporate  clay  nanoparticles  into  the  network.     91


POSTER ABSTRACTS  58 

59 

SURFACE FUNCTIONALIZATION OF GOLD NANOPARTICLES FOR DUAL OPTICAL  AND ELECTROCHEMICAL DETECTION OF PATHOGENS        Clara P. Adams1, Motez Mejri2, Hamdi Baccar2, Adnane Abdelghani2 and Sherine O. Obare1*       1Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008   2University of 7 November, Carthage, Tunisia         Abstract       Synthetic  procedures  that  produce  gram‐scale,  well  defined  and  monodisperse  metallic  and  bimetallic  nanoparticles  in  the  1‐4  nm  size  range  is  a  continuing  challenge  in  nanoscale  science.  We  have developed new organic ligands that when used as stabilizers for metal nanoparticles, provide the  ability to gain control of the particle size in one‐step synthetic procedures. We have synthesized and  characterized  monodisperse  metallic  gold  and  bimetallic  alloys  of  gold  nanoparticles.  Within  the  1‐4  nm  size  regime  the  nanoparticles  exhibit  unique  electrochemical  and  optical  properties.  We  have  investigated  the  electrochemical  quantized  double‐layer  (QDL)  charging  differences  of  these  metallic  nanoparticles. Within this size range, the electronic properties transition from a bulk‐like continuum of  electronic states to molecule‐like, discrete electronic orbital levels. Such properties provided evidence  that the nanoparticles were ideal for biosensing applications. Studies that demonstrate the appropriate  functionalization of the nanoparticles for the detection of pathogens will be presented.     ULTRAFAST BAND EDGE LUMINESCENCE DYNAMICS OF QUANTUM SIZED ZNO  NANOPARTICLES    Jameel A. Hasan, Shankar Varaganti, and Guda Ramakrishna  Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo MI 49008    Abstract    Size  dependence  luminescence  of  quantum  sized  semiconductor  nanoparticles  has  been  an  area of great research interest both because of the fundamental understanding of nanoscience1 as well  as  applications  in  biological  imaging  and  quantum  dot  lasers.  In  the  present  work,  band  edge  luminescence  dynamics  of  quantum  sized  zinc  oxide  (ZnO)  nanoparticles  has  been  followed  with  femtosecond  fluorescence  up‐conversion  spectroscopy.  Quantum  sized  (ZnO)  nanoparticles  were  synthesized  by  the  controlled  hydrolysis  of  Zinc  Acetate  (CH3COO‐)  in  ethanol2  and  the  band  gap  luminescence  dynamics  has  been  monitored  as  a  function  of  size.  Onset  of  absorption  is  used  to  calculate the band gap and the size of the nanoparticles. Excitation of the particles was carried out at  266 nm (Third Harmonic Generation of Ti:Sapphire) and the emission was monitored from 340 nm as a  function of size.     Steady‐state  measurements  have  shown  very  little  band  gap  luminescence  for  small  size  nanoparticles and its intensity is increased as well as shifted to longer wavelengths as the size of the  nanoparticle is increased. Lifetime of the fast component of band gap luminescence was as short as 300  fs for small size particles and increased to 30 to 40 ps for large size nanoparticles (Figure 1.0).    

92


POSTER ABSTRACTS  59 

  Absence  of  steady‐state  band  edge  luminescence  is  explained  by  the  ultrafast  decay  of  electrons  and  holes  to  trap  states  in  small  sized  nanoparticles.  Dynamics  of  the  band  edge  luminescence  has  given  very  important  information  about  the  exciton  trapping  as  the  size  of  the  particles is increased. Comparative measurements are also made with the large size ZnO nanoparticles  of 100 nm and the polyvinylpyrrolidone capped quantum sized ZnO nanoparticles. 

FL. Counts (cps)

8000

6000

Increase in particle size 4000

2000

0 0

5

10

15

Time (ps)

60 

  Figure 1.0: Band gap luminescence traces of ZnO nanoparticles with an increase in size    References  1. Alivisatos, A. P. Science 1996, 271, 933.  2. Meulenkamp, E.A. J. Phys. Chem. B 1998, 102, 5566.      ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY ENHANCEMENT WITH ORGANOMETALLIC  COMPOUND    Joel S. N. Tietsia*  Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, University Institute of Technology Fotso Victor   Bandjoun, Cameroon    Abstract    Electrostatic discharge is a major source of failures in electronic devices such as scanners and  photocopiers. Such discharge is dispelled when the flow of electrons reaches a threshold value of 10 ‐12  s/cm. The use of an organometallic compound namely Copper phthalocyanine with thermoplastic  results in a compound that disperses electrostatic while enhancing the compound electrical  conductivity. The main objective of our investigation is to improve the threshold value that allows  electrostatic discharge by manipulating the conductivity and resistivity ratio. In this study, we have  developed a model to predict the electrical conductivity of copper phthalocyanine [Cu(pc)I] starting  from the fundamental theory of electrical conductivity. The model is valid for pure and impurity‐ dominated material over a wide range of temperatures and has a single input: the ionic concentration.  The new model has been validated for normal inorganic compound [Cu(pc)I] using experimental  electrical conductivity based on chemistry molecular variation thermodynamic, spectral, and chemistry  redox properties.    93


POSTER ABSTRACTS  61 

UHMWPE/NANODIAMOND NANOCOMPOSITES: STRUCTURE, PROPERTY, AND  PROCESSING RELATIONSHIPS       Dr. Derrick Dean and John Tipton*  University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Department of   Materials Science and Engineering, Birmingham, AL 35205    Abstract      We present ultra‐high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) nanocomposites reinforced  with detonation nanodiamonds (ND).  Many reports in the literature describe the morphology of non‐ reinforced  UHMWPE  systems  and  this  polymer’s  wide  range  of  high  performance  applications.   However,  possibly  due  to  extreme  difficulty  in  processing,  few  reports  describe  nanocomposite  formulations  and  their  respective  property  enhancements.   The  theoretical  potential  for  these  composites  may  lead  to  near  drop‐in  material  enhancements  in  applications  where  mechanical,  tribological  and  UV  exposure  properties  are  critical.   The  presented  work  describes  a  powder  processing/mechanical  mixing  technique  to  incorporate  various  loadings  (0.1,  1.0,  5.0wt%)  of  nanodiamond  particles  into  the  polymer  and  corresponding  thermomechanical  and  morphological  characterization.        Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) shows increases in the storage modulus with diamond loadings  from sub‐ambient temperature to just below melting temperature.  Thermal conductivity and thermal  stability properties are reported as a function of nanodiamond loading.  Surface and bulk crystallinity  is  studied  through  FTIR  and  differential  scanning  calorimetry  (DSC).   Avrami  kinetics  experiments  indicate  a  change  in  crystallization  mechanism  with  the  addition  of  nanodiamond  particles.   Preliminary  interpretation  yields  the  hypothesis  that  the  uniquely  faceted  structure  of  the  nanodiamonds provides heterogeneous nucleation sites.  Hence, nanodiamonds may be integrated into  the  lamellar  structure  of  UHMWPE  crystals.   This  morphological  to  bulk  analysis  provides  a  unique  route to understanding and predicting final properties to  provide insight into the nature of physical  and chemical interactions between the polymer and nano‐scale reinforcement.     

94


POSTER ABSTRACTS  62 

63 

SYNTHESIS AND SINGLE MOLECULE CHARGING OF ARYLAMINE REDOX  NETWORKS     Melody Kelley 1,2, Grace Chotsuwan 1,2, Silas Blackstock*1,2  1University of Alabama, Department of Chemistry, Tuscaloosa, AL 35404  2University of Alabama, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), Tuscaloosa,  AL 35404    Abstract      Efforts to improve the efficiency of memory storage devices commonly involve the application  of molecular electronics. In the group’s previous work3, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin  Probe Microscopy (KPM) have successfully demonstrated the single molecule charging (and discharge)  of conjugated arylamines. A novel class of arylamines is being synthesized and their charge storage  and transport characteristics will be studied via AFM and KPM. The design of the molecule includes  multiple redox centers of known charge capacity with varied oxidation potential and varied connection  patterns. We predict the possibility of selectively charging domains of the single molecule. These  experiments will investigate how to pattern and store charge on a nm scale within single molecule  domains. The synthesis and Atomic Force Microscopy single molecules with built in charge reservoir  networks will be presented.       3 Chotsuwan, C.; Blackstock, S. C. JACS 2008, 130, 12556‐12557.     HYDROXYCRUCIFORMS: AMINE‐RESPONSIVE FLUOROPHORES       Psaras L. McGrier*, Kyril M. Solntsev, Shaobin Miao, Laren M. Tolbert, Oscar R. Miranda,  Vincent M. Rotello, and Uwe H. F. Bunz  Department of Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia    Abstract      The synthesis of three hydroxy‐substituted cruciforms (XF, 1,4‐bis(4’‐hydroxystyryl)‐2,5‐ bis(4’’‐methoxyphenylethynyl)benzene, 1,4‐bis(4’‐methoxystyryl)‐2,5‐bis(4’’‐ hydroxyphenylethynyl)benzene, and 1,4‐bis(4’‐hydroxystyryl)‐2,5‐bis(4’’‐ hydroxyphenylethynyl)benzene) starts with a Horner reaction followed by a Sonogashira Coupling  and subsequent deprotection. The three herein described XFs contain either two or four free phenolic  hydroxyl groups. All three XFs were subjected to photometric UV/Vis titrations in a methanol/water  mixture. The respective pKa values were obtained by data deconvolution. As the three XFs display a  significant change in emission color upon photoinduced deprotonation, the XFs were taken up in  different solvents and exposed to twelve amines. The amine‐dependent change in emissivity of the  tetrahydroxy XF is sufficiently distinct in the eight solvents that all of the inspected amines are  discerned by a linear discriminant analysis. The tetrahydroxy XF in different solvents forms a sensor  array, the response of which is based on the excited‐state proton transfer (ESPT) to amines and  mediated by the choice of the battery of solvents that are utilized.   

95


POSTER ABSTRACTS  64 

65 

ACETYLENE SUBSTITUED POLYTHIOPHENES FOR USE IN MOLECULAR  ELECTRONICS       Racquel C. Jemison, Toby L. Nelson, Sarada P. Mishra, Richard D. McCullough*  Carnegie Mellon University, Chemistry Department, Pittsburgh, PA  15206    Abstract      Poly(3‐alkylthiophene)s have become the benchmark for π‐conjugated materials due to their  environmental stability, processability, excellent electrical conductivity, and high charge carrier  mobilities, making them ideal organic components in several molecular electronic applications. To  improve these properties for the fulfillment of several device requirements, chemical modifications  such as improving the regioregularity, increasing the molecular weight and decreasing the  polydispersity have been implemented. However, little research has been done to improve properties  by incorporating conjugated side chains. Herein, the synthesis of acetylene substituted polythiophene  copolymers will be presented. Due to its rigidity, the triple bond leads to greater planarity relative to  alkyl substituted polythiophenes thus improving the pi‐stacking and its properties. Electrical and  physical properties of these materials will also be discussed.     THE USE OF SERS CHIPS FOR THE TRACE DETECTION OF HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL  COMPOUNDS    Tolecia S. Clark*, Sehoon Chang, Srikanth Singamaneni,  Zachary Combs, and Vladimir V. Tsukruk  Georgia Institute of Technology,  Materials Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332    Abstract    In light of recent concerns on threats to our national security, interest in research focused on the  development of ultrasentive sensors for trace detection of biological and chemical agents has grown  significantly. Challenges associated with the design of sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity,  accuracy, and precision include cost, time of analysis, scope, reproducibility and reusability,  sampling/standard requirements, and portability for in‐field use. Although traditional methods of trace  monitoring, i.e. high‐performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, are highly sensitive  and selective, use of these methods are incompatible for in‐field analysis for lack of portability, a  required multistep analysis regimen, and a high level of user expertise for obtaining accurate and  precise information, so, thus, an alternative method is needed. A clear and viable alternative to trace  monitoring by traditional methods is surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based analysis. The  contribution of electromagnetic and chemical enhancements from the surface plasmon resonance (SPR)  of noble metal (i.e. Au, Ag) nanostructures increases the weak Raman signal by a factor of 1014 thereby  advancing the use of SERS in chemical and biological sensing even at the single‐molecule level 

96


POSTER ABSTRACTS  65 

66 

.To  address  the  design  challenges  of  ultrasensitive  sensors,  we  developed  a  robust,  engineered  nanostructure used for SERS based analysis of hazardous chemical and biological compounds. Porous  alumina  membranes  (PAMs)  are  selectively  coated  with  poly(allylamine  hydrochloride)  (PAH),  a  polyelectrolyte  used  to  bind  Ag  nanospheres along  the  channel  walls,  to  form a SERS  chip used  in a  microfluidic  system.  The  integrity  of  the  SERS  chip  design  was  confirmed  by  SEM  and  Raman  mapping. Preliminary data shows the viability of the SERS chip for trace detection of pyridine.      MULTIFUNCTIONAL ELECTROSPUN POLYCAPROLACTONE/NANODIAMOND  COMPOSITE SCAFFOLDS FOR DELIVERY OF THERAPUETICS     Amanee D. Salaam*1, Derrick Dean2 and Elijah Nyairo3       1University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Birmingham, AL  2 University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Materials Science and Engineering,   Birmingham, AL 35294   3 Alabama state Unversity, Department of Physical Sciences, Montgomery, AL 36101       Abstract       In the United States, there are an outstanding number of people suffering from bone abnormalities  such as cancer, fracture, and osteoporosis. Current methods of treatment for these abnormalities are  limited to grafting techniques where tissue is extracted from one part of the body and transplanted to  another. Since the supply of treatment methods fails to meet the demand, tissue engineering has  become the central research topic as it allows the development of new tissue while maintaining the  structure of damaged tissue. Scaffold design is an area of focus primarily because tissue scaffolds  provides structure for cell attachment, guides cell proliferation and differentiation, and mimicks the  native extracellular matrix (ECM) of bone. For bone tissue regeneration, the scaffold should sustain  mechanical loading throughout the duration of implantation to healing phases and simulate new bone  growth. Because it is implanted in vivo, a scaffold could also serve as a substrate for localized, systemic  delivery of therapeutics (e.g., growth factors and cancer drugs).  With this knowledge, electrospinning is utilized to fabricate a nanocomposite scaffold from  polycaprolactone (PCL) and various concentrations of detonation nanodiamond (ND). ND serves two  purposes in our system: reinforcement and mediation of therapeutic delivery. We expect to see  increased mechanical properties in our PCL/ND composite nanofibers. Furthermore, we hope to  extend the functionality of our tissue engineering substrate by introducing tunable localized drug  delivery capabilities. Thus, our research focuses on the potential use of ND to deliver therapeutics, the  compatibility concerns with using carbon based nanomaterials (i.e., cytotoxicity), and the fabrication  and characterization of these novel nanocomposite scaffolds for localized chemotherapy.    

97


POSTER ABSTRACTS  67 

ELECTRON MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDIES ON NANOWIRE AND  NANOPARTICLE ARRAYS    O. K. Amponsah*1, R. R. Rakhimov1, Yu Barnakov1, R. A. Lukaszew2, J. C. Owrutsky3, M.  Pomfret3 and N. Noginova1  1Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA; 2College of William &  Mary, Williamsburg, VA; 3Naval Research Lab, Washington DC    Abstract    Arrays  of  magnetic  nanowires  and  well‐oriented  chains  of  superparamagnetic  nanoparticles  were fabricated using polymer and alumina membrane templates. The systems were characterized by  SQUID  and  studied  by  electron  magnetic  resonance  methods.    Comparative  analysis  of  the  obtained  results for different geometries and sizes of the magnetic inclusions is presented.  

  68 

CHARACTERIZATION AND OPTOMIZATION OF THE VISCOSITY OF SURFACTANT  MODIFIED BIOACTIVE GLASS       Reginna E. Scarber*, Derrick R. Dean, and Gregg M. Janowski   University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Materials Science and  Engineering,  Birmingham, AL 35294    Abstract      Disease affects different areas of the bone and can impact individuals of all pathologies and ethnicities.  These bone diseases can result in weakening which leads to trauma during ordinary function, the need  for reconstructive surgery, and eventual bone replacement. Bone disease is often treated by replacing  the diseased bone using autogenous grafting or orthopedic implants. Tissue engineering can provide a  less traumatic and more fundamental solution to the current therapies implemented. Bioactive glasses  are  promising  materials  in  tissue  engineering  applications  because  of  their  ability  to  form  hydroxycarbonate apatite in the presence of simulated body fluid. This ultimately results in supported  cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation, bone formation, and the ability to bind bone morphogenic  proteins in vivo.       The purpose of this study was to optimize the processing of bioglass nanofibers, resulting in a  better distribution of fibers with a reduction in the occurrence of beading. Another aim of this study  was to understand the electrochemical (charge density and viscosity) process in which the surfactant  improves  the  electrospinning  of  bioactive  glass.  The  electrospinning  process  was  used  to  form  nanometer dimension fibers of bioactive glass. A varied concentration of surfactant (2%, 5%, 6.5%) was  used  to  control  polymer  interactions  and  viscosity.  The  scaffold  was  characterized  using  X‐Ray  diffraction,  Fourier  Transfer  infrared  spectroscopy  (FT‐IR),  and  scanning  electron  microscopy  (SEM).  Fiber diameters and distributions were calculated. Rheometry was conducted on the sol‐gel solution.  SEM  images  displayed  uniform  fiber  diameter  and  absence  of  beads  with  an  increase  in  surfactant  concentration.  The  increase  in  viscosity  coupled  with  the  ability  of  the  surfactant  to  limit  polymeric  secondary  bonding  led  to  improved  fiber  quality.  The  addition  of  surfactant  increased  viscosity  and  reduced polymeric interactions which improved the fiber quality of the bioglass scaffold.     98


POSTER ABSTRACTS  69 

BIOINFORMATIC  ELUCIDATION  OF  CONSENSUS  PHOSPHORYLATION  MOTIFS  UTILIZING INTER‐SPECIES FUNCTIONAL DATA      Leethaniel Brumfield1*, Joshua K. Sailsbery1, Douglas E. Brown1, Dr. Ralph A. Dean1   1Center for Integrated Fungal Research, North Carolina State University, CB 7244, Raleigh, NC      Abstract      It is estimated that the world needs to produce 40% more rice by 2030 to feed its more than five  billion rice consumers. Fungal disease, particularly that caused by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe  oryzae, is a major factor limiting rice production. The Center for Integrated Fungal Research (CIFR) is  actively  involved  in  researching  fungal  pathogenicity  with  the  intention  to  control  fungal  disease,  while enhancing the overall safety and protection of the agricultural food supply across the globe. A  key to controlling rice blast disease is a better understanding of M. oryzae’s pathogenic mechanisms;  an  important  part  of  which  resides  in  the  ability  of  cellular  signaling  molecules  (kinases)  to  phosphorylate a core set of transcription factors (TF) in a direct and controlled manner. Therefore, the  more we know about the downstream targets of kinases, their associated pathways, and TF‐regulated  genes,  the  more  effective  controlling  pathogenicity  efforts  will  be.  Previous  pathway  and  network  structure  research  in  S.  cerevisiae  and  H.  sapiens  may  be  utilized  to  better  understand  cellular  signaling  in  M.  oryzae  when  investigating  similar  proteins.  Large  scale  protein  phosphorylation  microarrays  can  be  used  to  accurately  identify  functional  TF  targets  of  homologous  kinases  across  these  species.  Potentially  phosphorylated  binding  motifs  were  identified  in  these  TFs  using  the  Pratt  algorithm that detects sequence patterns.1 These TF phosphorylation motifs were used to examine the  shared  functionality  between  homologous  kinases.  Such  motifs  may  also  provide  potential  chemical  targets and aid in developing disease control strategies. Our findings showed that in all three species  there were slightly more kinases that fell into the MAPK kinases family, and within M. oryzae enriched  MAPK TFs reached 75.64% and 77.54% and 90.78% in H. sapiens and S. cerevisiae respectively. In our  continued mission to fully understand the transcriptional control of each gene and the targets of each  TF  involved  in  controlling  infection  related  development  and  pathogenicity,  future  research  includes  comparing the data compiled from Pratt with other motif‐finding programs and eventually composing  an open‐to‐the‐public online M. oryzae TF database.       1. Jonassen, I., Collins, J.F., Higgins, D. Finding flexible patterns in unaligned protein sequences.  Protein Science, 1995, 4(8):1587‐1595.   *Poster presenter to whom correspondence should be addressed: E‐Mail: lbrumfi@ncsu.edu  

 

99


POSTER ABSTRACTS  70 

SYNTHESIS AND ANTIBACTERIAL POTENTIATION OF β‐LACTAM ANTIBIOTIC‐BASED  IONIC LIQUIDS       Marsha R. Cole1, Min Li1, Bilal El‐Zahab1, Marlene E. Janes2,   Daniel Hayes3, and Isiah M. Warner*1    1 Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA  2 Department of Food Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge,  Louisiana 70803, USA  3 Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton  Rouge, Louisiana, 70803, USA    Abstract      The  emergence  of  drug‐resistant  bacteria  has  led  to  an  exponential  reduction  in  the  amount  of  effective antibiotics and treatment. The reduced efficacy and antibacterial activity of various medicinal  compounds used to treat bacteria resistance may be remedied using an ionic liquid approach. In this  study, a new class of ionic liquids were prepared by combining cationic antibacterial/disinfectant and  anionic pharmacological components. Here, the anion used is the antibiotic ampicillin and the cations  are  the  surfactants  1‐hexadecyl‐3‐methylimidazolium,  1‐hexadecyl‐2,3‐dimethylimidazolium,  cetylpyridinium,  and  cetyltrimethylammonium.  Therefore,  the  ampicillin‐based  ILs  (Amp‐ILs)  synthesized  are  1‐hexadecyl‐3‐methylimidazolium  ampicillin,  1‐hexadecyl‐2,3‐dimethyimidazolium  ampicillin,  cetylpyridinium  ampicillin,  and  cetyltrimethylammonium  ampicillin.  The  minimum  inhibitory  concentration  (MIC)  was  used  to  establish  the  antibacterial  properties  of  the  Amp‐ILs  against seven pathogens. A vast improvement in antibacterial activity was observed in the new Amp‐ ILs  once  compared  to  the  ampicillin  starting  material.   In  sum,  the  ampicillin  content  required  for  activity  was  2‐30  times  less  for  the  Amp‐ILs  than  sodium  ampicillin  for  the  investigated  bacteria,  indicating an improvement in activity for a lower amount of materials.  

71 

SCOPE AND MECHANISM OF GOLD(I)‐CATALYZED INTERMOLECULAR  HYDROAMINATION AND OF ALLENES WITH ARYLAMINES       Alethea N. Duncan* & Ross A. Widenhoefer  Duke University, Chemistry Department, Durham, NC 27708    Abstract    Reaction  of  1,2‐butadiene  and  aniline  with  a   catalytic  amount  of  [P(t‐Bu)2‐o‐biphenyl]AuCl  and AgOTf (5 mol%) in dioxane at 45 °C for 24 hours formed a 4.1:1 mixture of N‐prenylaniline and  N,N‐diprenylaniline  in  73%  and  17%  yield,  respectively.  This  catalytic  system  was  effective  for  monosubstituted  and  1,1‐  and  1,3‐disubstituted  allenes  with  primary  and  secondary  arylamines.  Deuterium‐labeling  studies,  in  conjunction  with  kinetic  and  chirality  transfer  experiments,  support  a  mechanism for the gold‐catalyzed hydroamination of allenes with arylamines involving outer‐sphere  attack  of  the  gold‐ ‐allene  complex  to  form  a  gold‐ ‐alkenyl  ammonium  complex.  Deprotonation  of  this complex by free aniline to give a neutral gold‐ ‐alkenyl complex followed by protonolysis releases  the hydroamination product.  

100


POSTER ABSTRACTS  72 

GUEST CATALYZED MOLECULAR ROTOR      Brent E. Dial, Roger D. Rasberry, Ken D. Shimizu*  University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC    Abstract    Reported herein, is a system in which bond rotation is catalyzed or accelerated via a molecular  recognition event.  The design is such that the rotational motion of the molecular rotor is accelerated  upon  binding  with  select  guests.   Presented  here  is  the  synthesis  and  measurement  of  rotational  barriers of an axially chiral N‐arylimide that exhibits restricted rotation about the Caryl‐Nimide bond  at  ambient  temperature.   An  investigation  of  this  phenomenon  and  suggested  explanation  of  the  dynamic recognition property of this receptor is presented.       dial@mail.chem.sc.edu, raspberry@mail.chem.sc.edu and shimizu@mail.chem.sc.edu.  

73 

PROGRESS TOWARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF POTENTIAL PATHOGEN BIOSENSORS       Charlee K. McLean1*, Dr. Angela Winstead2, Dr. Richard Williams3  Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251    Abstract      Cyanine dyes are used in various biological applications, such as fluorescence labeling probe.  Cy‐5 dyes are currently being used to detect pathogens but they exhibit fluorescent properties in the  670‐710  nm  region,  this  region  is  subjected  to  the  interference  of  other  biological  molecules  and  fluorescent probes. Replacement of the Cy‐5 dyes with Cy‐7 dyes eliminates this problem because they  fluoresce in the near infra‐red region. The objective of this research is to synthesize water‐soluble Cy‐7  dyes that will be used to detect pathogens; these dyes will fluoresce at a longer wavelength than the  Cy‐5 dyes.     Initial studies have been conducted towards optimizing the synthesis of various heptamethine  dyes  in an  efficient  time  using  Microwave  Assisted  Organic  Synthesis (MAOS).  Five  symmetric  dyes  and one unsymmetric dye were successfully synthesized with percentage yields ranging from 65% to  84%.  The  absorbance  spectra  ranged  in  the  780‐790  nm  region  and  the  1HNMR  spectra  for  the  dyes  concluded  that  the  dyes  are  significantly  clean.  The  synthesized  symmetric  carboxylic  dye  was  converted to its NHS‐ester by a reaction of the dye with N‐hydroxy‐succinmide and DCC. The NHS– dye complex was used to covalently label the protein streptavidin. An absorption spectra analysis was  conducted  on  the  protein  streptavidin  and  the  protein‐dye  complex.  An  8:1  molar  ratio  of  dye  to  protein molecule was obtained.   The  Cy‐7  dyes  were  successfully  synthesized  using  the  microwave,  however  without  the  sulfonate groups they are not water soluble and cannot be used to synthesize biosensor. Therefore, the  synthesis of the indolenium sulfonate salt is currently being investigated. Future works include   

101


POSTER ABSTRACTS  73 

the  synthesis  of  the  indolenium  sulfonate  salt  derivatives  and  using  these  derivatives  to  synthesize  water soluble Cy‐7 dyes that will be used to detect pathogens. 

  74 

THE TOTAL SYNTHESIS OF N‐METHYLWELWITINDOLINONE C ISOTHIOCYANATE    Dave A. Jenkins1, Kenneth J. Shea*2, John Brailsford3, and Siu‐Ling Sit4   University of California, Irvine, Department of Chemistry, Irvine, CA 92697     Abstract     The  total  synthesis  of  N‐methylwelwitindolinone  C  isothiocyanate  also  known  as  methyl  welwistatin has yet to be accomplished. Methyl welwistatin has been found to suppress the function of  P‐glycoprotein,  a  transmembrane  protein  which  functions  as  an  efflux  pump  that  removes  toxins  located inside a cell. Over‐expression of this protein in cancer cells works against drugs such as taxol  that are readily expelled by P‐glycoprotein. The synthesis and evaluation of the mechanism of methyl  welwistatin and its derivatives will enable doctors to use lower therapeutic levels of drugs like taxol.  This would result in lower peripheral damage to the patient from these toxic compounds. The overall  goal of the project was to develop a practical and efficient total synthesis of methyl welwistatin and its  derivatives.  A  key  step  in  our  strategy  was  the  formation  of  pentacyclo  [4.3.1]  oxindole  via  cycloaddition of the Diels‐Alder precursor. Preliminary work focused on synthesis of the Diels‐Alder  precursor, which was envisioned to perform a Type‐2 Intramolecular Diels‐Alder reaction (T2IMDA).  

75 

SYNTHESES OF ORGANOMETALLIC COMPLEXES THAT MODEL THE  SEMICONDUCTOR INTERFACE OF TiO2 BASED DYE SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS       Dayne D. Fraser and Kevin H. Shaughnessy*  Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Box 870336, Tuscaloosa, AL   

Abstract      Currently TiO2 dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) are only ~11% efficient. A better  understanding of the electron transfer cycle is needed to improve efficiency. This study  investigates the binding of the organic dye compound to the surface of the TiO2  semiconductor with the main focus being on how the linker functionality between the dye  and the semiconductor affects charge transport. To do this, a series of TiO2 model complexes  will be synthesized containing carboxylate, hydroxamate, sulfonate and phosphonate linker  functionalities. The mode of attachment (monodentate, chelating or bridging) of these  functionalities to the TiO2 surface will be determined with the use of (IR, Raman) vibrational  spectroscopy with the model complexes acting as references. A better understanding of the  binding motif on the semiconductor’s surface brings insight on which conditions provide the  most efficient charge transport.    

102


POSTER ABSTRACTS  76 

77 

PROGRESS TOWARD THE SYNTHESIS OF CYANO CYANINE DYES     Deveine Toney*, Dr. Angela Winstead  Morgan State University Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251    Abstract    Cyanine  dyes  can  be  used  in  many  different  areas  such  as  nonlinear  optics,  chemotherapy,  and  live  cell  imaging1.  These  dyes  are  significant  for  they  have  the  ability  to  detect  cancer  at  its  earliest  stages2. However, in some cases, cyanine dyes used in these studies tend to photobleach in light. With  the addition of α‐cyano group to the cyanine dyes, one can improve the photostability of the dye.   The  main  focus  of  this  research  is  to  improve  the  synthesis  of  the  α‐cyano  cyanine  dyes.  Preliminary studies focused on the synthesis of the dye’s heterocyclic salts. Microwave assisted organic  synthesis  (MAOS)  is  used  to  decrease  the  time  it  take  to  synthesize  the  salts  and  the  dyes.   Methylbezothiazole and methylbenzothiazole acetonitrile reacted with several alkyl halides to produce  the salts in the yields ranging from 13 to 90 percent. All compounds were identified using NMR. Ethyl  methybenzothiazole salt reacted with sodium acetate and DMF in the microwave at 120º C, 2 minute  ramp  time, and  a 20  minute  hold.  Based  on  NMR  data  synthesis of  the  cy‐3  dye  was  successful.  The  dye  produced  an  8  percent  yield.  Future  work  will  be  focused  on  studying  of  the  filtrate  and  manipulating the reaction conditions in the microwave oven.     REFERENCES   1. Renikuntla,Babu Rao, Rose,Heather C., Eldo, Jody Waggoner, Alan S., Armitage, Bruce A.,  Improved Photostability and Fluorescence Properties through Polyfluorination of  a Cyanine Dye.  Organic Letter. 2004.Vol.6.No.6.909‐912   2. Toutchkine, Alexei, Nguygen, Dan‐Vinh, Hahn, Klaus M. Merocyanine Dyes with Improved  Photostability. Organic Letter. 2007.Vol.9.No.15.2775‐2777       Funded by: NSF‐Rise No. 0627276 and HBCU‐ UP‐NSF HRD 0506066     DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC GLYCANS TO CAPTURE SHIGA TOXIN VARIANTS      Hailemichael Yosief and Suri S. Iyer*  Center for Chemical Sensors and Biosensors,  Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221.    Abstract      Shiga  toxin  (Stx)  1  and  2  are  the  major  virulence  factors  of  E.coli  O157:H7.  These  toxins  cause  diarrhea, which can proceed to hemolytic uremic syndrome and kidney failure in 10‐15% of the 70,000  annual  cases  of  E.coli  infection  in  the  United  States.  Epidemiological  and  animal  model  studies  have  indicated  that  Stx2  is  more  toxic  than  Stx1.  There  is  a  great  need  to  develop  diagnostics  and  therapeutics for these deadly toxins.    

103


POSTER ABSTRACTS  77 

    Stx belong to AB5 family of toxins. Cellular entry is mediated by the B subunit which recognizes  the  globotrioacylceramide  (Gb3),  a  glycolipid,  present  on  the  cell  surface.  Using  a  modular  synthetic  approach, we are developing Gb3 analogs to capture the toxins. These molecules are expected to find  application  in  diagnostics  and  therapeutics.  The  synthetic  strategy  and  the  synthesis  of  the  target  molecules will be presented.    

79 

OPTIMIZATION OF A WATER ELECTROLYSIS CELL AS AN ALTERNATIVE  FUEL SOURCE       Michael B. Miller, Patrice Bell*  Georgia Gwinnett College, School of Science and Technology, Lawrenceville, GA    Abstract     With  greenhouse  gases  on  the  rise  and  the  quantity  of  fossil  fuels  diminishing,  the  need for more alternative fuel sources is paramount. The method of electrolysis to decompose  water  molecules  into  their  elemental  gases  has  been  around  since  1800  as  introduced  by  Nicholson  and  Carlisle.[1]  This  poster  presents  an  optimized  method  to  effectively  and  inexpensively  use  the  electrolysis  process  to  generate  hydrogen,  eventually  replacing  fossil  fuels. Initial experiments with grade 316L stainless steel as an electrode stack using alkaline  electrocatalysts  at  room  temperature  reveal  direct  correlations  of  1)  concentration  of  the  electrocatalyst and amperage of the system; 2) temperature and time; and 3) amperage with  gas flow rate. The current output for the system is 1.6LPM at 5.9 Amps.       [1] Buckmaster, John Charles. The Elements of Magnetism & Electricity, 7th Ed.;  Simpkin, Marshall: 1879, p 109.    

80 

SYNTHESIS OF SPIROKETALS VIA GOLD CATALYSIS OF HYDROXY KETO‐ COMPOUNDS: A CURRENT APPROACH       Morgan Hudson‐Davis, John Oxford, Ebonni Fischer, Kyle Manning and Dr. Karelle Aiken*  Georgia Southern University, Department of Chemistry, Statesboro, GA 30460    Abstract      Spiroketal  moieties  are  present  in  a  number  of  naturally  occurring  compounds  isolated  from  various marine, fungal and bacterial organisms.  These compounds exhibit various forms of biological  activity, including but not limited to, the inhibition of cell proliferation, insect pheromone activity and  activity against the ulcer bacteria, Helicobacter pylori.  In the proposed study, a series of propargylated  hydroxy keto‐compounds will be synthesized as precursors for the synthesis of various spiroketals, via  gold salt catalysis.  These spiroketals will serve as potential precursors for complex biologically active  molecules.   Approaches  toward  the  synthesis  of  the  propargylated  hydroxy  keto‐compounds  will  be  discussed.  

104


POSTER ABSTRACTS  81 

A CONVENIENT MICROWAVE SYNTHESIS OF QUINOLINE DERIVATIVES AS  POTENTIAL ANTI‐CANCER DRUGS  Morgan Price and Nripendra Bose, Ph.D.*  Department of Chemistry, Georgia Southern University    Abstract    In  our  research  group,  we  are  mainly  focused  on  the  synthesis  of  drugs  using  derivatives  of  quinoline.    In  pursuit  of  greener  synthesis,  synthetic  chemists  have  explored  the  use  of  reactions  performed with ionic liquids and without solvents. The use of microwave heating has eliminated the  need for toxic solvents in many traditional and emerging reactionsQuinoline (C9H7N) is a heterocyclic  aromatic organic compound.  This compound can be extracted through the distillation of coal tar.  An  environmentally  benign  method  for  a  convenient  synthesis  of  quinolines  has  been  developed  by  the  modification  of  Friedlaender’s  method,  incorporating  the  use  of  ionic  liquids.    The  experimental  procedure  is  simple  and  the  product  can  be  easily  isolated  in  high  yields.    The  problems  associated  with  earlier  reported  procedures  have  been  modified.    Previously  known  for  it  uses  in  making  anti‐ malarial  drugs,  the  combinatorial  libraries  of  quinolines  will  be  tested  as  an  anti‐cancer  drug  for  prostate  cancer.    The  most  prevalent  of  drug  synthesis  of  anti‐malarial  known,  is  in  the  synthesis  of  anti‐malariamedicines,  in  the  case  of  Quinaldine,  2‐methylquinoline.    Other  uses  for  the  quinoline  compound  are  fungicides,  biocides,  and  flavoring  agents.    The  compound  has  also  shown  to  have  antiseptic and antibacterial properties.  Due to their importance, quinoline has become one of the main  subjects  of  organic  synthesis.    In  the  past  methods  to  synthesize  quinoline  using  the  Friedlaender  method  incorporated  hydrochloric  acid,  sulfuric  acid,  AuCl3,  and  ZnCl2  as  acidic  catalysts.    These  catalysts often resulted in relatively low yields, drastic reaction conditions, side reactions, and chemical  expense.    In  this  experimentation,  the  catalyst  used  will  be  an  acidic  ionic  liquid.    Ionic  liquids  are  known  for  their  eco‐friendly,  reusable,  recoverable,  and  cost  efficient  nature.    Once  a  more  efficient  method is found, the focus of this research will shift to discuss quinoline as a possible tyrosine kinase  inhibiting  agent.      The  importance  of  using  ionic  liquids  is  to  give  a  greener  synthesis.    This  way,  instead  of  harsh  solvents,  ionic  solvents  will  be  used  which  are  better  for  the  environments  and  are  much  less  expensive.    Modifying  the  Friedlander’s  synthesis  will  also  hopefully  yield  in  less  side  reactions and less harsh conditions.   

105


POSTER ABSTRACTS  82 

SYNTHESIS OF NOVEL EPOXY GEMINI SURFACTANTS FROM VERNONIA OIL    Nikki S. Johnson*, Folahan O. Ayorinde  Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC, 20059    Abstract    Vernonia galamensis is a new potential industrial oilseed crop found in Africa.  It is the source  of a naturally epoxidized oil called vernonia oil (VO) which is extracted from the seed of the plant.  It is  this epoxy functionality that makes vernonia oil unique in comparison to all other vegetable oils such  as coconut oil, palm kernel oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, etc., of which none contain the level of epoxy  acid  found  in  VO.   Generally,  vegetable  oils,  which  are  biorenewable  resources,  are  good  starting  materials  for  surfactants,  which  are  surface  active  molecules  containing  both  hydrophobic  and  hydrophilic  groups.   They  are  used  as  wetting  agents  because  they  lower  surface  tension  and  interfacial tension.  Surfactants can be found in paints, fabric softeners, dyes, cosmetics, and detergents  as well as many other materials.  In these applications surfactants aid in lubrication, catalysis, tertiary  oil recovery, drug delivery, etc.        Classically,  there  are  four  main  types  of  surfactants:  anionic,  cationic,  nonionic,  and  zwitterionic.   However,  a  new  type  of  surfactant,  called  gemini  surfactants,  has  recently  evolved.   Gemini surfactants have shown superior surface activity in comparison to the others.  For this reason,  we  have  chosen  these  surfactants  to  be  the  focus  of  our  research.   The  purpose  of  my  research  is  to  synthesize  surfactants  more  specifically  gemini  surfactants,  from  vernonia  oil,  that  are  more  efficient  and economical in their applications.  

  83 

MICROWAVE ASSISTED NITRILE SYNTHESIS    Ofuje Daniyan and Yousef Hijji*  Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University    Abstract      Nitriles are useful precursors for the synthesis of ketones, carboxylic acids, amines, and a host  of  other  classes  of  compounds.  They  have  wide  applications  in  industries  and  are  versatile  intermediates. The conversion of aldehydes to nitriles is therefore a highly valued reaction. The goal of  this project is to efficiently synthesize nitriles in good yields in a short time. A typical synthetic method  is  mixing  the  aldehyde  with  hydroxylamine  hydrochloride  and  pyridine  then  addition  of  acetic  anhydride  and  microwave  irradiation  which  results  in  the  formation  of  the  nitrile.    Isolation  of  the  solid nitrile is achieved by adding water to the mixture and filtration of the precipitate.  This one pot  reaction was convenient for a variety of aromatic, aliphatic and heterocyclic aldehydes.  The results of  these reactions, conditions and advantages will be presented.    

106


POSTER ABSTRACTS  84 

85 

GOLD CATALYSES OF ‐PROPARGYLATED KETO SUBSTRATES TO FORM FURAN  DERIVATIVES       Rayaj Ahamed and Dr. Karelle Aiken*  Georgia Southern University, Department of Chemistry, Statesboro, GA 30460    Abstract      Extreme pressures and temperatures are needed to cyclize many organic molecules. Gold salts  are known for their catalytic activation and reactive capabilities of alkynes. In addition, gold salts have  an  incentive  property  of  recycling  in  a  reaction.  A  very  small  amount  of  gold  salt  can  catalyze  vast  amounts of substrate. The use of gold salts as a catalytic process constitutes an easy and efficient means  to manufacture building blocks for products that have a high biological and medicinal interest.       In  the  proposed  project,  α‐propargylated  keto  substrates  will  be  catalyzed  with  various  gold  salts  in  order  to  create  furan  subunits.  The  synthesis  of  various  analogs  of  furan  derivatives  will  be  attempted via the variation of functional groups in the substrate. These will include but are not limited  to:  amides,  nitro,  thiols,  phenyl,  sterically  hindered  groups.  Furthermore,  a  mechanistic  study  will  probe  the  efficiency  of  the  gold‐catalyzed  reaction.  The  variables  that  we  will  modify  will  include  temperature, solvents, and duration. Gold salts have not been fully researched. Its rarity and scarcity  has hindered many advancements with this specific metal.     APPROACHES TOWARD THE SYNTHESIS OF POLYARYLS USING THE LACTONE  CONCEPT    Sierra Mitchell, Donovan Thompson, W. Alan McDonald,  Dr. Karen Welch and Dr. Karelle Aiken*  Chemistry, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460    Abstract    The attachment of carbohydrates with proteins is essential to the assembly, modification, and  interpretation  of  carbohydrate  signals.  Carbohydrate  coding  carries  information  that  is  needed  amongst  cells,  tissues,  and  organs.  Such  processes  are  often  essential  to  the  propagation  of  diseases.  Glycomimetics  is  a  phenomenon  in  which  molecules  are  able  to  “mimic”  the  functions  of  carbohydrates in the body. When attached, the protein or enzyme is incapable of performing properly  thus the glycomimic can prevent the spread of a disease.     The  “Lactone  Concept”  is  a  three‐step  sequence  that  is  used  to  produce  biologically  active  biaryls and is applied to the synthesis of polyaryls that are prospective glycomimics. The first step in  this method is the synthesis of 6H‐benzo[c]chromen‐6‐one derivatives via esterification of phenols and  benzoic acids. The second step is a lactone‐synthesis using the Heck coupling reaction to form an axial 

107


POSTER ABSTRACTS  85 

86 

bond; and the third step in this sequence is an asymmetric cleavage of the lactone to form biologically  active biaryl compounds. In this project, the “Lactone Concept” is extended to the synthesis of polyaryl  compounds that can be probed for (i) biological activity and (ii) use as ligands or catalysts in organic  reactions.  As a model, initial studies are geared towards simple triaryl and tetraaryl units. The results  of  probing  the  intermediates  in  the  triaryl  and  tetraaryl  synthesis  for  glycomimetic  activity  will  be  reported.        EFFORTS TOWARD THE DESIGN AND EFFICIENT SYNTHESIS OF THE  ZOANTHAMINE ALKALOIDS       Stefan France*     Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry,   Atlanta, GA, 30332       Abstract       The zoanthamine alkaloids, a type of heptacyclic marine alkaloid isolated from colonial  zoanthids of the genus Zoanthus sp., have attracted much attention from a wide area of science,  including medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, natural product chemistry, and synthetic organic  chemistry, because of their distinctive biological and pharmacological properties as well as their  chemical structures with stereochemical complexity. Presently, however, these alkaloids can only be  isolated in milligram quantities.  Although one member of the family (norzoanthamine) is available  commercially, the actual logistics of obtaining that material are extremely prohibitive (15 mg cost  ~$3500 and there is a long lead‐time).  Similarly, current reported synthetic efforts fall short regarding  efficiency and yield of final product. Thus, in an effort to address these limitations, we will discuss an  efficient protocol for the divergent synthesis of the zoanthamine alkaloid family from a common  precursor derived from a Rh(II)‐catalyzed cyclization‐cycloaddition cascade reaction.    

108


POSTER ABSTRACTS  87 

88 

ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTIONS FROM ZANTHOXYLUM  SETULOSUM IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL STRUCTURES FOR CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC  DRUGS       Tameka, M., Walker*, William, N. Setzer  University of Alabama in Huntsville,  Department of Chemistry, Huntsville, AL, 35899    Abstract      In  this  work,  the  fractionation  of  active  materials,  cytotoxic  activity,  and  determination  of  chemical  structures  of  isolated  compounds  from  Zanthoxylum  setulosum  were  evaluated.  Zanthoxylum setulosum was notably cytotoxic (100% kill at 100  g/ml) on MCF‐7, MDA‐MB‐231, and  MDA‐MB‐468  cells  in  vitro.  Therefore,  the  cytotoxic  effects  of  isolated  extracts  from  Zanthoxylum  setulosum  were  tested  against  MCF‐7  breast  cancer  cell  lines.  Two  pure  compounds  of  the  isolated  fractions (F14 and F37) exhibited high cyctotoxic killing against MCF‐7 cells at 100% and 86% kill at 100  g/ml, respectively. LC50 values where determined for the pure compounds, with F14 having a value  of  36.4  g/ml  and  F37  46.4  g/ml.  The  chemical  structure  of  F29  was  determined  by  X‐ray  crystallography  and  nuclear  magnetic  resonance  spectroscopy  (NMR)  to  be  sesamin.  The  chemical  structure  of  F14  was  determined  by  NMR  to  be  lupeol.  The  primary  objective  is  to  isolate  fractions  from Zanthoxylum setulosum and identify the active components for new potential chemotherapeutic  drugs.     PURIFICATION OF BACTERIAL APOA‐1 AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL  NANOPARTICAL ANTICANCER DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM    Thurman M. Young* Nirupama Sabnis and. Andras G. Lacko  University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX    Abstract      Background: Although chemotherapy regimens have proved effective in attacking cancer cells  and tumors, side effects and drug resistance remain a major concern during cancer therapy. The use of  reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticles has been investigated as a drug delivery  system,  including  the  transporting  of  small  interfering  ribonucleic  acid  (siRNA).  The  use  of  rHDL  nanoparticles has great potential, in this regard, due to their ability to specifically target cancer cells via  the HDL (SR‐B1) receptor.     Objective: The goal of these studies was to improve the purification of Apolipoproteins A‐1  (ApoA‐1), a major component of rHDL, and the preliminary characterization of the siRNA carrying  rHDL nanoparticles    

109


POSTER ABSTRACTS  88 

89 

90 

Methods: E.coli cells transfected with the apo A‐I gene was grown at 37OC, until an optical density of  0.6 was reached. The cells were then induced with 0.5mM Isopropyl β‐D‐1‐thiogalactopyranoside  (IPTG) and centrifuged. Subsequently, the pellets were suspended in the lysate solution and loaded  onto a Nickel‐Sepharose column. Thereafter, rHDL nanoparticles using siRNA were prepared.     Results: 160 mg per liter of purified ApoA1 was obtained. Particle measurements and the  chemical composition of the particles are being investigated.      Significance: Further investigation regarding the efficiency of the incorporation of siRNA, the  physical and chemical properties as well as cytotoxicity of the particles will contribute to the  assessment of the efficiency of these particles as a novel anti‐cancer drug delivery system.       REACTIVITY OF DISTONIC SPECIES DERIVED FROM OXIDIZED METHIONINE   Tyrslai M. Williams*, Ashley Wallace, Michelle O. Claville Ph. D  Southern University & A&M College, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70813    Abstract    When amino acids are subjected to high energy irradiation, they will form highly reactive  distonic ions. Since gamma irradiation is currently being touted as a choice method for purifying foods,  it is necessary to determine if distonic ions will derive from gamma‐irradiated foods, and if formed,  their subsequent reactivity. Compared to other amino acids, Methionine is quite unique once  irradiated.  It is hypothesized that by performing single electron oxidation on Methionine‐containing  compounds chemically, distonic ions will be generated.  It is further hypothesized that upon  generation, they will subsequently exhibit reactivity that will afford different isolable metabolites,  depending on the environment of generation. To test this hypothesis, protected Methionine analogs  were used and then subjected to various oxidation methods within different environments. The results  of this study are presented herein.     ACCESSING SKELETAL DIVERSITY USING CATALYTIC CONTROL: SYNTHESIS OF A  MACROCYCLIC TRIAZOLE LIBRARY       Esther O. Uduehi*, Ann R. Kelly, Lisa Marcaurelle  Broad Institute, Diversity‐Oriented Synthesis, Cambridge, MA 02142    Abstract    The  preparation  of  small  molecule  libraries  using  diversity‐oriented  synthesis  (DOS)  is  one  approach  for  the  discovery  of  biological  probes  and  pharmaceutical  agents.  Rather  than  a  single  biological target used in techniques such as target‐oriented synthesis, DOS uses small molecules with  stereochemical, skeletal, and building block diversity to test for biological activity using various assays.  We  set  out  to  use  the  Huisgen  cycloaddition  methodology  recently  developed  in  our  group  to  synthesize a macrocyclic triazole DOS library.    

110


POSTER ABSTRACTS  90 

91 

Our approach was to utilize the backbone amide linker (BAL) solid phase lanterns. We loaded  a primary amine with a propargylic functional group onto the solid phase using reductive alkylation  with sodium cyanoborohydride. Then, using an amide coupling with an azido acid we installed the  second functional group necessary for the pairing. With the appropriate handles in place, we screened  conditions for both the copper and ruthenium variants of the catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition to  achieve skeletal diversity.   We were successful in synthesizing both the 1,4 and the 1,5 model macrocyclic triazole ring  systems on solid phase. This is the first example of the ruthenium intramolecular Huisgen  cycloaddition on solid phase. We then used the conditions from the model macrocyclic triazole systems  in order to create the library. We started by the synthesis of an alloc azido acid in order to add building  block diversity as well as stereochemical diversity through its stereocenter located on the aspartic acid.  Then, the alloc azido acid was incorporated into the model system on solid phase. Because of the  success of these reactions, a library of diverse small molecules can be made. With the two stereocenters  and triazole regioisomers, eight cores can be synthesized with 100 building blocks to produce an 800  compound library.     KINETIC EVALUATION OF DUAL BINDING HUMAN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE  INHIBITORS     Alexander Lodge*, Manza Atkinson, Elizabeth Elacqua, and Daniel Quinn     University of Iowa, Department of Chemistry, Iowa City, IA 52242       Abstract       Synthesis and kinetic evaluation of dual binding acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors targets  both  the  cholinergic  and  β‐amyloid  plaque  pathways  of  Alzheimer’s  disease  (AD)  treatment.   Aryl‐ trifluoroketones,  ladderane  natural  product  derivatives,  and  paracylcophane  moities  have  been  evaluated as potential  human  AChE  inhibitors.   Dose  response assays, using  the  Ellman1 method,  of  quinoline  and  N‐methylquinolinium  aryl‐trifluoroketones  showed  IC50  values  in  the  10‐9  M  range.   Additionally,  both  aryl‐trifluoroketone  moities  were  observed  to  be  tight  binding  while  only  the  N‐ methylquinolinium  showed  time  dependent  inhibition.   Dose  response  assays  of  chiral  and  achiral  tetrapyridyl‐5‐ladderane (TPL5) showed IC50‐ values in the 10‐6 M range.  Similarly, the tetrapyridyl‐ paracylcophane  (TPPCyc)  and  N‐methyl  tetrapyridyl‐paracylcophane  (N‐MeTPPCyc)  showed  IC50‐  values  in  the  10‐‐5  M  and  10‐6  M  range  respectively.   Lineweaver‐Burk  analysis  of  N‐MeTPPCyc  showed its mode of inhibition to be noncompetitive.        Reference:   Ellman, G.L., Courtney, K.D., Andres, V., Jr. & Featherstone, R.M. Biochem. Pharmacol. (1961),  7, 88‐95    

111


POSTER ABSTRACTS  92 

93 

EQUILLIBRIUM CONCENTRATION OF AMMONIA DISSOCIATION PRODUCTS UNDER  HIGH TEMPERATURES AND PRESSURES; A THEORETICAL STUDY      ₁, Asia S. Jackson*  and Dr. Beatriz Cardelino₂  ₁ Undergraduate Student, Spelman College, Chemistry Department, Atlanta, GA 30314  ₂ Professor of Chemistry, Spelman College, Chemistry Department, Atlanta, GA 30314    Abstract      The present theoretical study predicts the equilibrium concentrations of ammonia dissociation  products, under high temperatures and pressures, and when ammonia is adsorbed on an indium  nitride substrate.  The temperature range considered is 300 K to 1400 K, the pressure range is 1 atm to  100 atm, and the model substrate consists of 37 indium‐nitride units.  The predictions are based on  calculated thermodynamic properties that have been obtained using quantum mechanical calculations  and statistical thermodynamics.  Indium nitride semiconductors are produced by chemical vapor  deposition, using flow modulation or pulsing, where alternate layers of indium and nitrogen are  formed above a hot substrate.  The most common source materials for this type of epitaxy are  trimethylindium and ammonia. At high temperatures and pressures, both trimethylindium and  ammonia dissociate in the gas phase. As temperature and pressure increase, trimethylindium and  ammonia reach the substrate where the epitaxy occurs. The indium atoms create a hexagonal lattice,  with the nitrogen atoms interspersed in tetrahedral spaces.  Thus, all atoms of a given type are  tetracoordinated with atoms of the other type. As the layers of atoms begin to build up on the  substrate, the indium nitride film grows.  Indium nitride exhibits an extremely high peak drift velocity  at room temperature, and achieves the highest steady‐state peak velocity among all group III‐nitrides.  In addition, it has the lowest effective mass for free electrons among all the group III nitride  semiconductors.  Therefore, there is considerable interest in indium nitride, and this study predicts the  equilibrium growth parameters, starting from the source material, and assuming that the source  materials reach the substrate separately.     DETERMINING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN EMULSIONS DURING  MICROWAVE HEATING BY STUDYING UNDERLYING HEATING MECHANISMS OF TWO  LAYERED SYSTEMS.       Daryl Cunningham, Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy  Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, MD, 21251    Abstract      Microwaves are replacing conventional ovens in chemical labs because it allows rapid heating,  causing  reactions  to  occur  faster  and  making  it  easy  to  identify  the  heating  rates  of  substances  like  multiphase  layered  systems  quickly.   This  research  focuses  on  how  microwave  heating  is  used  to  measure  the  temperature  differences  between  polar  and  non‐polar  substances  using  mixtures  of  ethylene  glycol,  water,  and  hexane.   The  purpose  of  this  research  is  to  use  these  measurements  to  identify the underlying heating mechanisms of these multiphase layered systems especially in the non‐ polar region.  Previous research has proven that the polar phase heats faster than the non‐polar phase.   This is because the polar phase is heated by microwave radiation while the non‐polar phase heats 

112


POSTER ABSTRACTS  93 

94 

through conduction and convection.  The orientation of the upper and lower phase of the system  determines which heating mechanism would be dominant in the non‐polar region.  If the non polar  phase is on the top it would be heated by convection (circulation of heat) and conduction (transfer of  heat through contact) but if the non‐polar phase is on the bottom then this phase could only heat  through conduction.  By heating a 40 mL (20mL each substance) sample of the ethylene glycol/hexane  and water/hexane mixtures it has been shown that in water/hexane mixtures, water heats up faster  than hexane at a rate of about a 20 degree difference while in the ethylene glycol/hexane mixture, the  ethylene glycol heats up faster than hexane at about a 40 degree difference.  According to the data, the  polar phase always heats faster than the non‐polar phase.  Although water and ethylene glycol are both  polar substances their heating rate when mixed hexane are very different.  This could be because of  their molecular structures and their individual interactions with the non‐polar phase.       SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION STUDIES OF TUNGSTEN DOPED TITANIUM  DIOXIDE       Faith Dukes *  Department of Chemistry, Tufts University    Abstract      The synthesis of anatase phase tungsten‐doped titanium dioxide (W‐TiO2) has been prepared  using inorganic precursor, titanium tetrachloride, and organic precursor, titanium isopropoxide. Un‐ doped TiO2 is photoactive in the ultraviolet spectrum with a band gap of 3.2eV in its anatase form.  Tungsten has been introduced as a metal dopant to reduction electron hole pair recombination with the  aim of increasing activity in the visible spectrum. Ultaviolet‐Visible spectroscopy of both inorganic and  organic W‐TiO2 colloids has shown activity above 400nm. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational  spectroscopy has been the primary technique for investigating the surface reactions of TiO2. Two  adsorption modes are observed for methanol on the surface of un‐doped TiO2 in the C‐H region of  2800 to 3000cm‐1: a molecular physisorption and a dissociative chemisorption mode.  A comparative  analysis between un‐doped and W‐TiO2 has been conducted to conclude if tungsten quenches  dissociative adsorption as has been shown in doping with iron. The free‐OH region (3600‐3800cm‐1)  has been observed to analyze changes in surface hydroxyl groups from the synthesis of organic and  inorganic precursors.    

113


POSTER ABSTRACTS  95 

96 

MRMP2 ACTIVE SPACE COMPARISON OF THE CIS TO TRANS ISOMERIZATION OF  CYCLOHEXENE AND SUBSTITUTED CYCLOHEXENE STRUCTURES     Jeffrey D. Veals* and Dr. Steven R. Davis  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi,  University, Ms 38677    Abstract    For this work two effects were investigated.  The first effect was how replacement of an olefinic  hydrogen with a functional group would affect the geometries and π‐bond rotational barriers of each  substituted structure relative to cyclohexene.  The second was how a change in the multi‐ configurational self consistent field active space orbitals would affect the geometries and the π‐bond  rotational barriers in all of these structures.  There are two baseline parameters.  Cyclohexene was the  baseline structure, and CAS (4,4) was the baseline active space.  It was from this point that all analysis  and comparison of data began. Each Isomerization process could proceed by either a boat conformed  pathway or a chair conformed pathway.  The ground state geometries for each structure was computed  using multi‐configurational self consistent field method. The Energetics for these pathways were  computed using multi‐reference Møller‐Plesset second order perturbation theory. The first finding of  interest was that having a functional group substituted in place of an olefinic hydrogen had a very  small effect on the activation energy for trans to cis isomerization when comparing MRMP2/CAS(4,4)  energy data . It caused a change in trans‐to‐cis activation energy by an average of  ‐0.68  kcal/mol(methyl),+1.75 kcal/mol(amino),+0.87 kcal/mol(nitro‐chair),‐0.31 kcal/mol(nitro‐boat).              COLORIMETRIC HOST/GUEST INTERACTIONS OF CYCLODEXTRIN/SPIROPYRAN  MOLECULES     Kamia Smith* and Thandi Buthelezi  Wheaton College, Department of Chemistry, Norton, MA, 02766  buthelezi_thandi@wheatoncollege.edu, smith_kamia@wheatoncollege.edu    Abstract    The study of colorimetric cyclodextrin/spiropyran systems may yield practical applications in  biology (biological fluorescence markers); optometry (photochromic lenses); and optics (development  of  optical  shutters).   Host/guest  systems  of  cyclodextrin  bound  and  unbound  spiropyran  in  the  condensed  phase  have  been  investigated.   Under  visible  light  irradiation,  the  solvated  unbound  spiropyran  molecule  (SP,  closed‐ring  form)  is  colorless,  but  under  ultraviolet  light  irradiation  it  changes  to  a  colored  solution,  merocyanine  molecule  (MC,  open‐ring  form).  MC  molecule  absorbs  visible  light  and  converts  back  to  SP  molecule.   However,  the  photoconversion  from  a  colorless  unbound  SP  form  to  a  colored  unbound  MC  molecule  is  thermally  unstable.   Thermodynamic  and  kinetic studies of host/guest interactions in the cyclodextrin/spiropyran system (bound SP form) have  been investigated.  Absorption and fluorescence titration experiments are carried out by holding either  the concentration of the host or guest constant while varying the concentration of the other component.  Association constants are determined from titration experiments.   Unbound and bound SP molecules 

114


POSTER ABSTRACTS  96 

97 

follow first‐order kinetics.   Data suggest that the photoconversion of cyclodextrin bound SP‐inclusion  complex‐to cyclodextrin bound MC is thermodynamically and kinetically favored.  The observed  thermal stability of the cyclodextrin bound SP or MC is possibly due to the microenvironment of the  cyclodextrin cavity.            FORMATION OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN AQUEOUS POLYMERIC SOLUTIONS OF  SULFONATED POLY ETHER���ETHER KETONE (SPEEK)/POLY VINYL ALCOHOL (PVA)       PaviElle Lockhart1, Brian Little*1, German Mills1, Lewis Slaten2  1Auburn University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn, AL 36832  2Auburn University, Department of Consumer Affairs, Auburn, AL 36832    Abstract    Kinetic studies into the formation of hydrogen peroxide are essential in understanding its role  as a decontaminating agent for the degradation of toxic organic chemicals. This work investigates the  formation of H2O2 from air‐saturated aqueous polymeric solutions with a focus on key factors such as  pH,  diffusion  of  O2,  light  intensities,  and  quantum  yields.  Air‐saturated  aqueous  solutions  of  SPEEK/PVA  were  illuminated  with  350  nm  photons  to  generate  polymeric  reducing  radicals  via  a  hydrogen  abstraction  reaction  with  3SPEEK*  and  PVA  i.e. a  hydrogen  donor.  Experimental  evidence  suggest that 2 SPEEK radicals (SPEEK•) reduce oxygen to form hydrogen peroxide. [H2O2] shows a  linear increase with the quantum yield of SPEEK•, (Øi(SPEEK•) =0.018 at a pH of 7; furthermore, the  quantum yield of H2O2 appears independent of light intensity. In situ measurements for the diffusion  of O2 into a stirred, open vessel solution of SPEEK/PVA (ri = 4 x 10‐7 Ms‐1) were similar to the rate of  O2 consumption, via reduction by SPEEK•, in a stirred, closed vessel of SPEEK/PVA solution (I0 = 3.01  x 10‐5 M(hν)/s). A steady state condition for [H2O2] was observed, at optimum conditions for SPEEK•  production,  and  reached  an  equilibrium  point  around  200s  between  [O2]  and  [H2O2].  Preliminary  studies  of  degassed  SPEEK/PVA  polymer  solutions  show  relatively  fast  rates  of  decomposition  for  H2O2 which can only be attributed to a chain reaction.    

115


POSTER ABSTRACTS  98 

99 

THE EFFECT OF NANOCLAY PERCENT LOADINGS ON POLYMERIZATION AND  THERMAL PROPERTIES       Brittany Fisher*, Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy,  Chemistry Department, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251    Abstract      The  focus  of  this  research  is  to  determine  the  effect  of  nanoclay  percent  loadings  on  thermal  properties  and  polymerization  processes  that  occur  in  real  time.   With  the  addition  of  nanoclay  as  a  filler to form a nanocomposite, it is possible that the inclusion of the nanoclay facilitates the formation  of  the  polymer  network,  which  stems  from  the  molecular  geometry  of  the  curing  agent  and  its  interaction  with  the  epoxy  and  nanoclay.   In  addition,  this  research  queries  whether  the  addition  of  Nanomer  I.28E  to  a  thermoset  composed  of  Epoxy  Resin  825  and  4,4‐diaminodiphenylsulfone  (4,4’DDS) will affect the glass transition temperature (Tg), polymerization exotherm, and the extent of  reaction of the nanocomposite at various cure times.  Prior research states that the addition of nanoclay  to thermosets can either decrease or increase the Tg of the resulting nanocomposite, depending on the  stoichiometric ratio.  Higher Tgs result in materials with greater strength and higher resistance to heat.   In this experiment, a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) will be used to show how curing of the  nanocomposite under a nitrogen atmosphere at the ideal stoichiometric ratio (2:1) and at 100 degrees  Celsius,  yields  a  higher  Tg,  higher  polymerization  exotherm,  and  a  greater  extent  of  reaction  when  compared to the curing of the thermoset at the same stoichiometric ratio.  Results of this research have  determined that the average Tg, polymerization exotherm, and extent of cure for the Epon 825/4,4’DDS  thermoset  and  nanocomposite  are  comparable  for   the  full  cure;  however,  there  is  a  decrease  in  the  final Tg of the residual cure for the nanocomposite in comparison to the residual cure of the thermoset.   Future  research  will  include  additional  testing  of  the  thermoset  and  nanocomposite  at  other  stoichiometric ratios, longer cure times, and various percent loadings of the nanoclay.     THREE‐DIMENSIONAL STUDY OF SOLID HYDROGEN FLUORIDE ENERGIES AND  STRUCTURES USING MANY‐BODY PERTURBATION METHODS     Olaseni Sode and So Hirata*     Quantum Theory Project and The Center for Macromolecular Science and Engineering,  Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611‐8435    Abstract     A linear‐scaling electron‐correlation method based on a truncated many‐body expansion of the  energies of molecular crystals has been applied to solid hydrogen fluoride. The energies and structures  of the solid have been simulated employing an infinite, periodic, one‐dimensional zigzag hydrogen‐ bonded chain model in three‐dimensions upon the inclusion of the long‐range electrostatic  contribution to the Madelung constant in all directions. The Hartree–Fock and second‐order Møller– Plesset have been combined with the aug‐cc‐pVDZ basis set and the counterpoise corrections of the  basis‐set superposition errors. The computed structural parameters agree with the observed within 0.2  – 0.3 Å. The three‐dimensional arrangement conflicts somewhat with experiment but coincides well  with previous theoretical investigations.    116


POSTER ABSTRACTS  100 

SENDING MIXED MESSAGES: INSTRUCTORS WHO ASK STUDENTS TO SHOW THEIR  WORK BUT PENALIZE THEM WHEN THEY DO     Jacinta M. Mutambuki1, Herb Fynewever*2  1Western Michigan University,  Department of Chemistry, Kalamazoo, MI 49008  2Calvin College,  Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Grand Rapids, MI 49546    Abstract    This study sought to understand the beliefs that chemistry faculty hold and the practices that they  follow when grading student solutions of problem. Overall, the authors were interested in examining if  a conflict exists between the faculty beliefs about what they say they want to see in student’s work and  the score they assign to student’s solutions. In order to elicit the faculty beliefs, five student solutions  were presented to ten instructors (participants) for grading. Data were collected through one‐on‐one,  30‐60 minute, semi‐structured think‐aloud interviews. Categories and themes were developed through  constant comparison of the interview transcripts. Four major themes that guided grading decisions of  the  faculty  were  identified,  three  of  which  confirm  Henderson  et  al.’s   (2004)  study  with  physics  faculty:  (1)  instructors  desire  to  see  student  explanation  of  their  reasoning  in  order  to  evaluate  if  a  student understands the concepts learned; (2) instructors indicate a reluctance to deduct points from a  student solution that might be correct, but do deduct points from a student solution that is explicitly  incorrect;  (3)  instructors  desire  to  see  discipline  and  organization  in  terms  of  indicating  units,  labels,  and balanced chemical equations; and  (4) instructors tend to project correct thought processes onto a  student solution, even when the student does not explicitly show them. The findings indicated varied  levels of consistency between these faculty beliefs and the score they assigned to the student solutions.  Scoring  of  the  students’  solutions  was  dependent  on  preferential  weight  given  to  each  theme  by  an  instructor. In situations where a participant expressed at least two themes, the conflict was resolved by  faculty  placing  a  burden  of  proof  on  either  the  student  or  the  instructor.  In  this  study,  all  faculty  appeared  to  advocate  explication  of  the  student  reasoning  as  an  important  element  in  chemistry  problem  solving,  but  only  a  slim  majority  (6  out  of  10)  directed  the  burden  of  proof  on  the  student  rather than on the instructor.    

117


POSTER ABSTRACTS  101 

102 

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY AS A MECHANISM FOR ENHANCING STUDENT LEARNING      Odell Glenn Jr.*, Derrick Huggins and Mike Matthews    Department of Chemical Engineering and Vehicle Management and Parking Services  The University of South Carolina    Abstract      The University of South Carolina (USC) seeks to become a leader in environmental stewardship and  sustainability by working with students, faculty, and staff to support local farmers, waste reduction,  recycling, and water and energy conservation.  With an initial focus on fuel cell technology (FCT), we  are committed to conserving resources and reducing the impact our services and activities create on  the environment. The inherent nature of a sustainability culture requires us to think and solve  problems in an integrated, systematic approach.  This concept requires us to begin to think about and  solve problems through a systematic approach to learning. Some of the Fuel Cell Technologies include  the Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Bus, Fuel Cell Light Rail Technology studies, and the Fuel Cell Score  Board.  These technologies strengthen USC’s capabilities to promote current learning in students.       ANALYSIS OF CHEMISTRY ATTITUDES AND EXPERIENCES QUESTIONNAIRE  (CAEQ)I AND RESEARCH EXPERIENCE SURVEYS AT A NEW FOUR YEAR INSTITUTION.  PHASE TWO FINDINGS.       Patrice Bell*, Deborah Sauder  1Georgia Gwinnett College, School of Science and Technology, Lawrenceville, GA 30043    Abstract      Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) is the first public four year college established in the U.S. in  the  21st  century.  The  chemistry  faculty  developed  a  general  chemistry  curriculum  that  fosters  active  learning  environments,  innovative  use  of  educational  technology  and  an  integrated  research  experience.   Due  to  a  greater  student  enrollment  (greater  power)  in  the  General  Chemistry  course,  Phase  Two  findings  suggest  more  substantial  results.  This  presentation  reports  the  second  year  analysis  of  Chemistry  Attitudes  and  Experiences  Questionnaire and  research  experience  perspectives  of  first  year  Chemistry  students.  These  results  will  provide  insight  on  students’  perspectives  of  chemistry, in general, and of an embedded research experience in the general chemistry curriculum.   Additionally,  these  perspectives  will  serve  to  inform  and  to  guide  our  on‐going  modifications  of  our  new curriculum.       iColl, R.K.; Dalgety, J.; Salter, D. Chem. Ed. Res. and Prac. in Europe, 2002, 3, 19‐32.    

118


POSTER ABSTRACTS  103 

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF “CLICKABLE” AND ION EXCHANGED  ZEOLITE Y FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS    Nicholas Ndiege, Renugan Raidoo, Michael K. Schultz, Sarah Larsen*  University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242  Abstract  Porous  nanomaterials  have  recently  become  popular  in  biomedical  research  due  to  their  multifunctional capacity. Given their low dimensions, high surface area and porosity, they are prime  candidates  for  covalently  anchored  catalysts,  enzymes  or  sensors,  hence  their  popularity  in  drug  delivery studies and selective imaging of biological systems. Zeolite materials can be modified through  ion  exchange  to  incorporate  specific  ions  for  enhanced/selective  sensitivity  to  certain  imaging  techniques  e.g.  Mn3+  or  Gd3+  for  Magnetic  Resonance  Imaging  (MRI).  The  surfaces  can  also  be  conjugated  with  various  components  (e.g.  site  specific  moieties,  drugs,  fluorescent  molecules)  to  incorporate  additional  functionality.  This  work  is  a  proof  of  concept  study  that  seeks  to  show  the  viability  of  NaY  zeolite  for  the  previously  stated  applications.  NaY  is  exchanged  with  Ga3+  then  subsequently functionalized with an azidopropyl moiety. The Ga3+ ions impart sensitivity for positron  emission tomography to the zeolite. The azide functionalized zeolite is used as a platform for efficient  1,3‐dipolar  cycloaddition  of  alkyne  containing  molecules  via  a  Cu(I)  catalyzed  azide‐alkyne  “click”  reaction  (CuAAC).  Analytical  techniques  employed  include  ICP  (Inductively  Coupled  Plasma),  BET  (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared), TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis)  and  NMR  (Nuclear  Magnetic  Resonance).  CuAAC  reactions  are  important  in  various  branches  of  organic, polymer, materials and biological chemistry.   

   

 

119


NOTES   

 


NOTES   



NOBCChE 37th Annual Conference | Atlanta, GA | March 29 - April 2, 2010