Issuu on Google+

    The 36th Annual Conference of   The National Organization for the Professional  Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers   

   

“NOBCChE ‘09 – The Perfect Gateway to STEM”  St. Louis, Missouri       


TABLE OF CONTENTS   Welcome Letters    Alfred P. Sloan Foundationʹs Minority Ph.D. Program                           

ii vii

Hotel Layout 

x

Conference Sponsors   

1

Conference at a Glance    NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund   Program Schedule (Detailed)   NOBCChE 2009 Career Expo Exhibitors   Forum and Workshop Abstracts   Conference Speakers    Technical Abstracts    Poster Session Abstracts    National Conference Planning Committee   National Conference Planning Committee Subcommittees  

4

10 13 49 53 65 85 139 183 184


Many backgrounds. Many cultures. Many perspectives.

One World. One Merck.

At Merck & Co., Inc. we embrace the individual differences each of us bring to the world. We believe that with the collective backgrounds, experiences and talents of our employees, anything can be conquered. It is those unique qualities that give us perspective to spark innovation and address unmet medical needs of people throughout the world. Our professional culture is one of diverse, collaborative and respectful individuals. Together we help deliver Merck medicines to those who need them, impacting lives all around the globe. If you’re ready to find your place in the world of Merck, learn more about us and see employee video profiles at merckcareers.jobs/nobcche.

JWT EC - St. Louis

I/O: NY86183 Client: Merck Media: NoBCChE Color: bw Size: 7.5 x 10 Date: 03.02.09 Artist: ll V: 1 PROOFING

Merck is an equal opportunity employer proudly embracing diversity in all of its manifestations.

PA: AC, Initial: AC, Final:


N BCChE

National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS President Victor McCrary, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University – APL Baltimore, MD Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC

Dear Conference Participants,

Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, MBA/HRM The Dow Chemical Company Port Lavaca, TX

On behalf of the Executive Committee, I welcome you to the 36th Annual Technology Conference of NOBCChE. Our host city, St. Louis, Missouri, the “Gateway to the West,” provides an apt theme for this year’s conference: The Perfect Gateway to STEM. Annually, this conference proves to be a full and exciting experience for students, faculty members, and scientist and engineers in industry. As we begin to meet President Barack Obama’s challenge to improve significantly the nation’s scientific education, invention, and production from elementary schools to graduate education, this conference seeks to surpass all previous meetings of black scientists and engineers This week will combine interesting scientific programs with the hospitality of the St. Louis Renaissance Grand Hotel and the city in what should be the most unforgettable scientific and social gathering of black chemists and engineers ever assembled. I hope that you will vigorously partake in the formal and informal panels and discussion that will ensue. The conference is designed to enhance the scientific and networking skills that will advance your academic and professional career.

Treasurer Lolita Grant, CPA Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Sean Gant University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Eastman Kodak Company Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chair Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Ella Davis, NOBCChE Executive Director Center Square, PA Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA Gloria T. MaGee, PhD, Member at Large Xavier University New Orleans, LA

With kind regards,

Bernice Green, Member at Large Spelman College Atlanta, GA Sandra Parker, National Planning Chair The Dow Chemical Company Dallas, TX

Bobby Wilson, Ph.D.

Isiah Warner, Ph.D., Member at Large Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013-77480 800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS President Victor McCrary, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University – APL  Baltimore, MD

April 2009 NOBCChE 2009 Annual Meeting Attendees, Welcome to St. Louis!!! The theme for this year’s Annual Meeting is “NOBCChE ’09 The Perfect Gateway to STEM”. This week in St. Louis we gather together to listen and to exchange ideas, and to celebrate the accomplishments of both our professional and student members. Our theme is timely, as the Obama Administration is emphasizing the need for new ideas and technological innovations. Science and technology, buttressed by sustained research and development is the fuel for our economic resurgence, and provides hope for a healthy global environment that will be available for future generations. A diverse pool of scientists and engineers ensures there will be a continued rich source of new ideas and intellectual prosperity. Remember, the mission of NOBCChE is creating an eminent cadre of people of color in science and technology. In keeping with our mission, we have attracted many high level and well-respected speakers for this year’s Annual Meeting (AM36), including: ƒ Dr. Mark Wrighton, Chancellor, Washington University in St Louis; ƒ Dr, Nathan Fletcher, President of the National Dental Association; ƒ Dr. Richard Davis, Head of the Mass Section at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures in France; ƒ Dr. Levi Thompson, Associate Dean of Chemical Engineering at the University of Michigan; ƒ Dr Soni Oyekan, Reforming & Isomerization Technologist for Marathon Oil; ƒ Dr Squire Booker, Associate Professor and Pennsylvania State University. I invite you to attend our Grand Opening Business Section where we will discuss the State of the Organization and our vision “NOBCChE 2012: Creating the Cadre – Science for All Americans”. We will present a plan for NOBCChE for the next three years to become that gateway to the STEM disciplines. AM 36 features over 150 technical presentations; symposia in materials, biotechnology, health, and alternate energy; professional development seminars; our NOBCChE-HBCU National Panel; Career Fair Expo; Teacher’s Workshop; the NOBCChE National Science Fair & Science Bowl and much, much more. Thank you all, our attendees, sponsors, members, advocates, and friends for your continued support of NOBCChE and its mission. Please enjoy this year’s Annual Meeting, and we look forward to seeing you again in Atlanta in 2010!!! Best Always,

Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, MBA/HRM The Dow Chemical Company Port Lavaca, TX Treasurer Lolita Grant, CPA Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Sean Gant University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Eastman Kodak Company Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chair Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Ella Davis, NOBCChE Executive Director Center Square, PA   Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA Gloria T. MaGee, PhD, Member at Large Xavier University New Orleans, LA Bernice Green, Member at Large Spelman College Atlanta, GA

Victor M. McCrary, Ph.D. NOBCChE National President

Sandra Parker, National Planning Chair The Dow Chemical Company Dallas, TX Isiah Warner, Ph.D., Member at Large Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013-77480 800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

Sandra K. Parker NOBCChE National Conference Chair

President Victor McCrary, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Physics Labs Baltimore, MD Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC

It is with great anticipation that I welcome each of you to our 2009 national conference. I can say with confidence that we have something for everyone this year. Whether you’re a high school student or teacher, new graduate or working professional, this annual meeting will meet your expectations. We are excited to be here at the gateway to the west as we celebrate “NOBCChE 09 – The Gateway to STEM”. Each year it is our desire to incorporate your feedback into our program and look for ways to improve our national meeting. We are featuring several technical workshops and sessions that will focus on areas specific in Biotechnology, Nanotechnology and Alternate Energy Sources. We’ve worked hard to ensure that the entire St. Louis Community has an opportunity to come out and participate in our conference with our annual Health Symposium where we focus on Diabetes, a disease impacting a great number of African-Americans as well as our Career Expo, where several companies, academic institutions and organizations will be available to discuss career choices and job opportunities. It’s a chance for all attendees to meet future employers and mentors -- undergraduate/graduate students preparing to enter the workforce or seek higher education, professionals who are looking for career changes, and high school students finalizing college choices and validating their educational goals with science or engineering. Being prepared for this vulnerable economy is critical in today’s society. We exist primarily to support the process of preparing young people to excel academically and to pursue careers in science and technology. So, we thank all the registrants, sponsors and supporters of NOBCChE for making this conference a reality. St. Louis, a city where it’s All Within Reach provides a wonderful backdrop for us to come together to commit to improving the skills we possess and forwarding the chemical profession. Enjoy the conference!

Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, MBA/HRM The Dow Chemical Company Seadrift, TX Treasurer Lolita Grant, CPA. Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Sean Gant University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Eastman Kodak Company Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chair Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Ella Davis, NOBCChE Executive Director Center Square, PA   Sandra Parker, National Planning Chair The Dow Chemical Company Dallas, TX Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA

Sincerely,

Gloria T. MaGee, PhD, Member at Large Xavier University New Orleans, LA

Sandra K. Parker

Bernice Green, Member at Large Spelman College Atlanta, GA

Sandra K. Parker 2009 Conference Chair

Isiah Warner, Ph.D., Member at Large Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013

www.nobcche.org

800-776-1419


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS President Victor McCrary, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Physics Labs Baltimore, MD

Dear Colleagues -

Vice-President John Harkless, Ph.D. Howard University Washington, DC

On behalf of the Midwest NOBCChE Region, I am delighted to welcome you to the 2009 NOBCChE National Conference in St. Louis, Missouri. We are proud to continue this tradition of the Annual NOBCChE Conference for our members! This year, we are delighted to be hosting the conference for the first time in St. Louis, Missouri. With this move, we hope to expand the appeal of the Conference to a wider audience, including more professionals and students from schools across the country.

Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, MBA/HRM The Dow Chemical Company Seadrift, TX Treasurer Lolita Grant, CPA. Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Sean Gant University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI

In line with our vision of building a cadre of eminent Chemists and Chemical Engineers, we are pleased to offer a rich content of insightful keynote speakers, technical talks, educational panels and science bowl competitions. This year's theme, "NOBCChE ’09: The Perfect Gateway to STEM", will address the changing face of Science and Technology. We are confident that the myriad of scientific and instructional presentations will appeal to participants of diverse backgrounds and interests. The Conference brings together an unprecedented range and caliber of participants, offering a unique opportunity for attendees to socialize, network and exchange ideas with peers from across the Chemical and Chemical Engineering fields. We hope that this will be a rewarding occasion for all.

Midwest Regional Chair Judson Haynes, Ph.D. The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Tommie Royster, Ph.D. Eastman Kodak Company Rochester, NY Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Livermore, CA

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

We are honored that distinguished speakers, panelists, moderators, faculty and staff have agreed to participate in the Conference, and we thank them for their invaluable contributions. I would also like to thank the conference executive committee, Regional Chairs, Chapter Presidents and numerous volunteers for their exceptional dedication and hard work. Finally, I would like to thank our Sponsors, without whom we would be unable to achieve our ambition of making this the finest NOBCCHE Conference to date.

Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Perry Catchings, Sr. MS, MBA, Vice Chair Prime Organics, Inc. Woburn, MA Ella Davis, NOBCChE Executive Director Center Square, PA   Sandra Parker, National Planning Chair The Dow Chemical Company Dallas, TX

Sincerely,

Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Member at Large Pfizer, Inc. La Jolla, CA

Dr. Judson Haynes III

Gloria T. MaGee, PhD, Member at Large Xavier University New Orleans, LA

Midwest Regional Chair

Bernice Green, Member at Large Spelman College Atlanta, GA Isiah Warner, Ph.D., Member at Large Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013

www.nobcche.org

800-776-1419


Alfred P. Sloan Foundationʹs Minority Ph.D. Program   

The Chemistry Department of the  University of California, Davis         The  Ph.D.  component  of  the  Alfred  P.  Sloan  Foundationʹs  Minority  Ph.D.  Program  provides substantial scholarship support to underrepresented minority students who are  beginning  their  doctoral  work  in  engineering,  natural  science  and  mathematics.    There  are forty‐six universities in this program and ten of them are in chemistry.  The chemistry  department of the University of California, Davis (UCD) joined the program in 2002 and  like  all  of  them  its  acceptance  was  based  in  part  on  its  past  performance  in  producing  minority  students  in  the  field.      At  the  time  of  our  acceptance  in  the  program  UCD’s  chemistry  department  had  awarded  9  PhD  and  2  MS  degrees  to  African  American  students  and  6  PhD  and  one  MS  degrees  to  Hispanics  students  over  the  previous  15  years.  The average number of minority students accepted per year in the program was  1.86  students/year.  Over  the  same  period  of  time  the  overall  retention  rate  (number  graduated/number  graduated  +  those  that  left)  was  82.3%.    We  currently  have  18  Sloan  Fellows  (seven  African  American,  ten  Hispanic  and  one  Native  American)  out  of  a  population  of  31  domestic  minority  students.    That  means  that  58%  of  our  minority  students  are  Sloan  Scholars.    Two  of  the  six  non‐Sloan  Fellows  (one  Native  American  female  and  one  African  American  female)  have  “Bridge  to  the  Doctorate”  Fellowships  funded by NSF.  With our population of 231 students 10.4 % are minority students and  our 4 international students of color would raise this to 12.1 %.  In the past six years, the  Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has provided $ 534,000 in support for minority PhD students  in  Chemistry.    In  that  time  we  have  graduated  4  PhDs:  Dr.’s  Michael  Varela  (2007),  Latasha Lamotte (2008), Erica McJimpsey (2008) and Jimmy Franco (2008).         The Alfred P. Sloan Minority PhD Program works slightly differently at UCD than it  does at other institutions.  Our program is based upon the proposition that all UCD PhD  graduate  students  are  to  be  supported  by  the  department  and  their  Major  Professor.   Thus, all of our students are guaranteed the same financial support.  The current support  includes a stipend of $24,000/year, plus payment of in‐state and health fess of $10,618 and  an additional $14,694 for non‐resident fees if the student is not a California resident.  The  financial offer amounts to a total of $34,618 for California residents and $49,312 for non‐ California  residents.      The  Alfred  P.  Sloan  grant  is  a  one‐time  augmentation  of  up  to  $32,000 that can be used by the student over their graduate career at the University.        The fact that the Sloan students receive the same base support of all graduate students  is  important  because  it  recognizes  the  accomplishments  of  these  students  in  their  previous  career.    We  are  recognizing  that  any  minority  student  who  is  accepted  in  our  regular graduate program is truly unique given the fact that very few minorities achieve  this  level  of  success  in  chemistry.    Those  students  who  then  get  Sloan  grants  are  even  more exceptional because they are the best of those that are accepted.  


Alfred P. Sloan Foundationʹs Minority Ph.D. Program         Our  insistence  that  the  major  professors  use  their  own  funds  to  support  the  Sloan  student  is  important  for  the  student  in  two  ways.    It  insures  that  the  Major  professors  have  the  same  personal  stake  in  the  success  of  the  Sloan  students  as  they  have  in  all  of  their  students  because  it  is  tied  to  their  own  professional  success.    From  the  student’s  point of view, they know that their continuing support in graduate school depends upon  them working with their advisor like it does for all graduate students.  They cannot then  go their own way without consultation and support of their major professor.         The Sloan funds that are supplied to the student can be used for a variety of purposes.   When a student enters graduate school to obtain a PhD in chemistry is, on average, a five‐ year  commitment.    The  base  funding  that  is  supplied  by  the  universities  is  really  only  enough for the basic needs of the student.  It is not designed for emergencies, or for the  initial  establishment  of  residency  in  a  new  place.    The  Sloan  funds  can  be  used  to  help  ease the student’s transition from undergraduate to graduate school.  They can be used to  pay  for  moving  expenses,  computer  support,  travel  for  research,  and  emergencies  that  often  arrive  in  any  student’s  life.    All  of  the  requests  for  funds  have  to  be  approved  by  their  principal  investigator  (PI)  before  they  are  submitted  to  NACME  (National  Action  Council for Minorities in Engineering) for payment.  The PI also has to review the annual  report  of  the  students,  which  is  one  ways  that  the  PI  gets  a  chance  to  have  a  detailed  discussion  about  the  progress  of  the  students.    The  academic  progress  of  each  of  the  students is reviewed on a regular basis to determine if they are progressing at a normal  rate  toward  the  degree.    If  not,  every  effort  is  made  to  provide  any  help  that  can  be  obtained to address  the difficulties  they  may  be having.   In  some cases  this can  involve  tutoring on a particular subject or pointing them to a place where they can obtain the help  that they may need.            Many  of  our  present  and  former  African  American  students  were  recruited  at  the  annual  NOBCCHE  conference  or  by  contacts  with  their  professors  attending  the  conference.  This is one reason that we have been able to meet the goals for recruiting the  students in the program.  The PI has also traveled to many HBCU chemistry departments  to recruit some of the students that we have in the program.  The success of the program  at UC Davis depends upon many people in the chemistry department and the university.   Special  recognition  has  to  be  given  to  the  students’  major  professors  and  their  commitment  to  the  program  as  well  as  to  Ms.  Carol  Barnes  who  is  in  charge  of  the  Graduate Affairs program in the department.    

   


HOTEL LAYOUT  

Meeting Room Location Summary  Room #    Landmark 1 – 7  Pershing  Kingsbury  Lindell    Benton  Parkview 

Portland  Aubert  Lafayette   

Crystal Ballroom*  Landmark Ballroom   

Rooms  200 ‐ 229  Hall 1   

Building    Renaissance Hotel  Renaissance Hotel Renaissance Hotel Renaissance Hotel   Renaissance Hotel Renaissance Hotel Renaissance Hotel Renaissance Hotel Renaissance Hotel   Renaissance Hotel Renaissance Hotel   Convention Center+ Convention Center

Level    Level One  Level One Level One Level One   Mezzane Level  Mezzane Level Mezzane Level Mezzane Level Mezzane Level   Twenty First Floor  Level One   Level Two  Level One   

*Take the express elevators to 21st floor. + Exit via the Washington Avenue entrance and cross the street to the Convention Center.


Hotel Meeting Space

NE -O

rvi

TY

Se

EN

eti

Lucas

Me

ce

E E

Hawthorne

ng

Ro o

ms

H OTE L B U I L D I N G m e e t i n g s pac e

TW

Flora

Crystal Foyer

EN

TY

Se

rvi

ce

E E

TW

Laclede Boardroom

E

Portland

E

Atrium

E

E E

Atrium

Aubert E E

EZ

ZA

Parkview

M

Shaw Boardroom Concierge Desk

Starbucks

Grand Bar E E

Historic Lobby

E

E E

Hotel Entrance

E E

E

Gift Shop

E E

BB

Y

Valet

LO

Front Desk Hotel Entrance Business Center E

E

E E

E

Concourse to Ballroom Plaza

OU

E

NC

E E

CO

Capri Restaurant

RS

E

E E

G U E S T E L E VATO R S TO M E Z Z A N I N E M E E T I N G R O O M S

NI

E

NE

eti

Sales Offices

Benton

ng

Ro o

ms

Lafayette Boardroom

Me

E X P R E S S E L E VATO R S TO T W E N T Y & T W E N T Y- O N E M E E T I N G R O O M S

Crystal Ballroom


HOTEL LAYOUT

Renaissance Ballroom Plaza

Hotel

Floorplans

Floorplans lEVEL TWO MAJESTIC PREFUNCT10N

IF

.

E

cl

D

1- -------- ~ G

,,, ,,

.,

,

.... _... _... _-_ ..,, I

LH------'-~_

·, ··

, ··

·

~ ---------I

-------i

I

-------J '1""

!,

MAJESTIC BAllROOM

TWENIY.fliSl

B

fLOOR

TWENTIETH

(ryrtaI82llhcom

WQ'

~---------I

,I

_--s-i_AJ

I

~

Coyrta' foyer I

LEVEL ONE lANDMA.IlK FOYER

I

Westmore­

land

Kingsbury

I

:-

~._---~._--j.

I 6 1 t------·---~

L

::

4

LANDMARK BALLROOM

I

3

MEZZANINE

LEVEL

~-_._-----~ I r-------------- i 2

1

-.J

_7_"""-----

I

Washington Avenue

_

~.~

Entrance---,

1/

g#

Landmark Foyer

/

---I

!

5

4 3

/ Landrnark /

6

/ Ba//room

,

I

--j 7 I

!

;I

FLOOR

E¥-1

llEE

fJ

z a


HOTEL LAYOUT  

Convention Center Level 1 

               Career Fair Expo  Across Washington Avenue from Renaissance Hotel   


HOTEL LAYOUT  

Convention Center Level 2

 

  Thursday: Science Fair and Bowl Competitions Rooms


CONFERENCE SPONSORS  

Our Sponsors THANK You for Contributing to the Overall Success of our conference – we salute you! ********

3M    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)    Agilent Technologies    American Chemical Society    Atlanta Metropolitan Chapter – NOBCChE    Bayer Material Science    Boehringer Ingelheim    Brazoria County Area Chapther – NOBCChE    Claflin University     Colgate‐Palmolive Company     

  Committee for Action Program Services (CAPS)    1


CONFERENCE SPONSORS   Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists (COACh)    The Dow Chemical Company    Dupont    Eastman Kodak Company    Eli Lilly & Company    Florida A&M University – Science Institute    GlaxoSmithKline    The Johns Hopkins University – Applied Physics Laboratory    The Lubrizol Corporation    MIT Chemistry & Chemical Engineering    Northeast Section – American Chemical Society    National Research Council of the National Academies    National institute of Standards & Technologies (NIST)     

        2


CONFERENCE SPONSORS     National Masinet Management Office    Procter & Gamble    Roche    Texas Southern University    Washington University in St. Louis     

   

3


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE   Date 

Description 

Day /Time  Sunday,  April 12 

Room  Event 

Room Location 

    Conference Registration   

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Landmark  Foyer/Reg Office 

Monday,  April 13   

7:30 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

Conference Registration   

Landmark  Foyer/Reg Office 

7:30 a.m. ‐ 8:00 a.m. 

NPC Committee Meeting 

Lafayette 

8:00 a.m. ‐‐ 10:00 a.m. 

NOBCChE Executive Board Meeting 

Pershing/Lindell 

10:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m  

  Henry Hill Lecture  Speaker Dr. Richard Davis, Head, Bureau  International des Poids et Mesures  Mass Section, Lyon, France,   “Redefining the Kilogram Through a  Fundamental Constant.” Sponsored  by  Northeast Section of ACS and MIT  Chemistry Department   

Landmark 6‐7 

12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:30 p.m. 

Opening Luncheon (ticketed) –    

Landmark 1‐4 

Guest Speaker: Chancllor Mark Wrighton    sponsored by Washington University in St. Louis 

1:45 p.m. ‐ 2:45 p.m. 

  Grand Opening Business Session    

Landmark 6‐7 

 

 

 

1:45 p.m. ‐ 5:30 p.m. 

  COACH Workshop ‐ registration required 

Lindell 

4


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE       3:00 p.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

Plenary 1  New Developments in Dentistry Materials 

Landmark 6‐7 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m.. 

Technical Session 1: Lloyd L. Ferguson Award  Symposium:  Materials Chemistry 

Landmark 6‐7 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Technical Session 2: Bio‐Environmental  Chemistry 

Portland 

Opening Reception 

Crystal 

.  6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m.    Tuesday,  April 14      7:15 a.m. ‐ 7:45 a.m. 

NPC Committee Meeting 

Lafayette 

7:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Teacherʹs Workshop I  

8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

Conference Registration 

Landmark 5  Landmark  Foyer/Reg Office 

8:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m.  

Plenary II ‐ Biotechnology  

Portland/Benton 

9:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

Corning Technical Sessions    Technical Session 3:  Biochemistry/Biotechnology I 

Portland/Benton 

9:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

Technical Session 4: Physical Chemistry 

Parkview 

9:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

Technical Session 5: Henry McBay  Outstanding Teacher Symposium ‐ STEM  Education 

Aubert 

  12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:30 p.m.  Percy Julian Symposium & Luncheon  Landmark 1‐4   (ticketed)  Speaker: Dr. Soni Oyekan, Reforming & Isomerization Technologist, Marathon Oil  sponsored by Corning, Inc.   

5


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE      The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Technical Sessions     1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m. 

1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:30 p.m. 

Technical 6: Biochemistry/Biotechnology II   Technical 7: Graduate Student Fellowship  Award Sci‐Mix   Forensic Workshop 

3:30 p.m. ‐ 4:30 p.m. 

Exhibitors Meeting 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Plenary III ‐ Health Symposium  sponsored by Eli Lilly Company 

Landmark 6‐7 

6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m. 

Exhibitorʹs Welcome Reception 

Convention  Center, Room 221 

Wednesday, April 15 

    

  

Student Planning Meeting 

Convention  Center,   Room 200 

1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:45 p.m. 

7:00 a.m. ‐ 7:30 a.m.    7:15 a.m. ‐ 7:45 a.m. 

Portland/Benton  Aubert  Pershing   Convention  Center, Room 221 

NPC Committee Meeting 

Lafayette 

 

 

 

7:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Teacherʹs Workshop II

9:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

Conference Registration 

9:00 a.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m.   

CAREER FAIR EXPO   

Landmark 5  Landmark  Foyer/Reg Office  Hall 1,  Convention  Center 

9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 10:30 a.m.  

Professional Development Workshop NSF Graduate Research Fellowship  Informational Session 

Pershing/Lindell 

9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m. 

Professional Development Workshop  Utilizing The STAR 

Kingsbury 

9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m. 

Professional Development Workshop Academia: What Are your Options (pt 1)   

Benton 

6


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE   10:00 a.m. ‐ 11:30 a.m. 

11:15 a.m. ‐ 12:15 p.m.    

12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. ‐ 3:00 p.m. 

Professional Development Workshop ACS: Managing An Effective Job Search (pt  Parkview  1)    Professional Development Workshop  Landmark 6  “Lets Talk Graduate School”    Convention  LUNCH ON YOUR OWN  Center  Professional Development Workshop  ʺUtilizing The STARʺ  Guest Speaker ‐ Carolyn Greco 

Kingsbury 

1:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Poster Setup for Science Fair 

Convention  Center Room 221 

1:00 p.m. ‐ 4:30 p.m. 

Professional Development Workshop ACS:  Managing An Effective Job Search  (pt 1 &2) 

Parkview 

1:30 p.m. ‐ 3:30 p.m. 

Professional Development Workshop “How To Find A Jobʺ,  Nick Nikolaides,  Ph.D., Manager, Doctoral Recruiting &  University Relations, The Procter & Gamble  Company  

1:00 p.m. ‐‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Poster setup for students 

1:00 p.m. ‐‐ 5:00 p.m. 

National Science Competition Registration 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.    5:30 p.m. ‐ 9:30 p.m.    4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Science Bowl/Fair Volunteers’  Meeting    Science Competition Registration Opening  Meeting        7

Portland 

Convention  Center   Room 228 and 229  Landmark 5&6  Convention  Center,   Room 223 and 221  Landmark 5&6    Hall 1, 


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE    

NOBCChE Scientific Exchange Poster  Session 

8:00 p.m. ‐ 9:00 p.m.   

Science Fair Poster setup   

Convention  Center   Convention  Center   Room 228 & 229 

  Thursday,  April 16   

  

  

  7:15 a.m. ‐ 7:45 a.m. 

NPC Committee Meeting 

7:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m. 

Science Fair Judging  

8:00 a.m. ‐ 8:30 a.m. 

Student Planning Meeting 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

9:30 a.m. ‐‐ 12:00 p.m. 

Conference Registration  Science Bowl Competitions: Junior  Division++  sponsored by Agilent Technologies and ACS  Department of Diversity Programs  Plenary V:  Alternate Energy Solutions  Plenary sponsored by The Johns Hopkins  Applied Physics Laboratory”  Technical Session 8: Alternative Energy  Solutions   Academia: What Are your Options (pt 2) ‐  Gregory Tew  Technical Session 9: Analytical Chemistry I  

Lafayette  Convention  Center   Room 228 and 229  Convention  Center,   Room 200  Landmark  Foyer/Reg Office  Convention  Center   Room 222, 223,  224 

10:00 a.m. ‐‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Science Fair Public Viewing 

10:00 a.m. ‐ 12:00 p.m. 

Rohm and Haas Competition  Pershing/Lindell  NOBCChE HBCU Panel “Increasing STEM  Institutional Capacity: HBCU/HSI Strategic  Aubert  Alliances” 

10:00 a.m. ‐ 12:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. ‐‐ 9:00 a.m.  9:00 a.m. ‐ 12:00 p.m.  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m. 

10:00 a.m. ‐‐ 12:00 p.m. 

8

Portland/Benton  Portland/Benton  Kingsbury  Parkview  Convention  Center   Room 228 & 229 


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE   1:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.  1:00 p.m. ‐ 3:30 p.m.  1:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Science Bowl Competitions: Senior  Division++  sponsored by Agilent Technologies and ACS  Department of Diversity Programs  Milligan Symposium  Technical Session 10:  Analytical Chemistry  II 

Convention  Center   Room 222, 223,  224  Pershing/Lindell  Portland/Benton 

1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m. 

Local Chapter Presidents Meetings (required) 

Aubert, Parkview,  Kingsbury, Lucas,  Hawthorne 

2:30 p.m. ‐ 3:30 p.m. 

  “GEM Workshop‐ Why Graduate School?”   

Kingsbury 

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Technical Session 11: Organic Chemistry 

Aubert 

3:00 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

Technical Session 12: Professional Chemical  Engineer Award Symposium 

Parkview 

5:00 p.m. ‐‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Science Fair Poster Removal 

7:00 p.m. ‐‐ 10:00 p.m.  

Student Dinner/Activity     Plenary VII  Awards Ceremony & Gala Dinner (ticketed)   

7:30 pm. ‐ 10:30 p.m. 

Convention  Center, Room 228  & 229  Convention  Center, Room 220  and 229  Landmark  Ballroom  

  Friday, April 17 

  

  

8:00 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

Science Bowl Finals ‐ Junior/Senior Division  Science Competition Awards Luncheon  ticketed 

Portland/Benton  Crystal Ballroom 

Science Competition Educational Trip 

St. Louis Science  Center 

12:00 p.m. ‐ 2:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 7:00 p.m.     

 

9


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND    

We wish to thank members and friends of the National Organization for the  Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers for their  support and confidence in the future of NOBCChE by making a $500.00 or more tax  deductible contribution to the NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund.    Mildred Allison  Denise Barnes  Iona Black*  Henry T. Brown  Winifred Burks‐Houck  Virlyn Burse*  Joseph N. Cannon  Callista Chukwunenye  Robert L. Countryman  Andrew Crowe*  Darrell Davis  Anthony L. Dent*  Lawrence E. Doolin*  Linneaus Dorman*  Fannie Posey Eddy  James Evans, Sr.  Lloyd Ferguson  Lonnie Fogel  Lloyd Freeman  Eddie Gay  Joseph Gordon*  William Guillory*  Jonathan K. Hale  James Harris  Bruce Harris*  Ivory Herbert  Kenneth W Hicks  Neville Holder  Isaac B. Horton, III  Donald A. Hudson  Charles R. Hurt   

  William M. Jackson*  Madeleine Jacobs*  Christopher Kinard  Anita Osborne‐Lee  George Lester, Jr.  William A Lester, Jr.  Mallinkrodt Chemical Inc.  Willie May  Jefferson McCowan*  Victor McCrary  Sidney McNairy  Lynn Melton  Philip Merchant  Reginald E. Mitchell  William V. Ormond*  James A. Porter  Cordelia M. Price*  Marquita Qualls*  Janet B. Reid  Leonard E. Small*  Florence P. Smith  Michael Stallings*  Clarence Tucker*  Benjamin  Wallace*  Charles Washington  Joseph  Watson  Billy  Williams   Keith B. Williams  Reginald  Willingham  Bobby Wilson  Andrea  Young*   

* Contributed more than $500.00 

  10


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND    

We wish to thank members and friends of the National Organization for the  Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers for  their support and confidence in the future of NOBCChE, and for their tax  deductible contribution to the NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund.   

 

Adegboye Adeyeno  Keith Alexander  Verlinda Allen  Eugene Alsandor  Roseanne Anderson  Victor Atiemo‐Obeng  Benny Askew, Jr.  Joseph Barnes  Sharon Barnes  Tegwyn L. Berry  Alfred Bishop  Jeanette E. Brown  Nora Butler‐Briant  James Burke  Jacqueline Calhoun  Lashanda Carter  Perry Catchings, Jr.  Aldene Chambles  John J. Chapman  Esteban Chornet  Reginald A. Christy  Regina V. Clark  James Clifton  Edward Coleman  George Collins  James E. Cotton  Garry S. Crosson  Reuben Daniel  Kowetha Davidson  Ella Davis  Thomas Davis  Thomas Dill  Gerald Ellis  Lisa Batiste‐Evans  Pat Fagbayi 

Edward Flabe  Edward E. Flagg  Joe Franklin  Russell Franklin  Issac Gamwo  John W. Garner  Cornelia Gilyard  Robert Gooden  Warren E. Gooden  Valerie Goss  Etta Gravely  Bernice Green  Garry Grossman  Keith V. Guinn  Everett B. Guthrie  Gene S. Hall  James Hamilton  Kinesha Harris  April Harrison  Isom Harrison  Rogers E. Harry‐Oruru  Lincoln Hawkins  Ronald Haynes  Ronald L. Henry  Leonard Holley  Sydana R. Hollins  Smallwood Holoman, Jr.  Brenda S. Holmes  Nikisha Hunter  Bernard Jackson  Donald Jackson  Evelyn P. Jackson  Kim Jackson  Kyle Jackson  Raymond James  11

Ganiyua Jaiyeola  Allene Johnson  Elijah Johnson   Harry Johnson   Paula Johnson  Saphronia Johnson  Emmett Jones  Evy Jones  Jennifer A. Jones  Jesse Jones  Timothy Jones  Thomas C. Jones  Verlinda Jordan  Jimmie Julian  Ella L. Kelly  Otis Kems  Kirby Kirksey  Rachel Law  Mia Laws  Lester A. Lee  Cynthia R. Leslie  Steve Lucas  Alex Maasa  Dale Mack  George S. Mack  Robert McAllister  Aliecia McClain  Gerald McCloud  Jefferson McCowan  Walter McFall  Saundra Y. McGuire  Dawn McLaurin  Linda Mead‐Tollin  Janice Meeks  Charles W. Merideth 


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND     M. P. Moon  Damon Mitchell  Robert Murff  Harvey Myers  Tina Newsome  James Nichols  Kenneth Norton  Bunmi Ogunkeye  Steven B Ogunwumi  Mobolaji O. Olwinde  Kofi Oppong  Beverly Paul  James Pearce  James Pearson  Tony L. Perry  Howard Peters  Mwita V Phelps  Walter G. Phillips  Louis Pierce  Sonya Caston Pierre  Wendell Plain   Charles A. Plinton  Melvin Poulson  Jamacia Prince                               

  Daniel Reuben  Mary Robinson  Press Robinson  Anne Roby   Tommie Royster  Albert E Russell  Franklin Russell  Clark Scales  Billy Scott  Melva Scott  Robert Shepard  James P Shoffner  Keroline M. Simmonds  Tiffany Simpson  Milton Sloan  Karen Speights ‐ Diggs  Oreoluwa Sofekun  Lucius Stephenson  Wilford Stewart  Grant St. Julian  Richard Sullivan   Albert Thompson  Dameyun Thompson                               

  12

  Ezra Totton  Jorge Valdes  Grant Venerable  Cheryl A. Vocking  Emmanuel Waddell  Samuel von Winbush  Gerald Walker  Leon C. Warner  Michael Washington  Odiest Washington  Ben Watson  Joseph W. Watson  Helen P. White  Ronald H. White  Thomas Whitt  Leonard Wilmen  Harold Lloyd Williams  Laura C. Williams  Joe Williams  Raymond Williams  Jeremy Willis   Sean Wright  Sandra Wyatt                               


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  DAY OF WEEK 

EVENT 

Sunday  

ROOM 

April 12 

 

 

    Conference Registration   

4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Landmark  Foyer/Reg Office 

   

  Monday,  April 13 

 

 

7:30 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

  Conference Registration   

Landmark  Foyer/Reg Office 

7:30 a.m. ‐ 8:00 a.m. 

NPC Committee Meeting 

Lafayette 

8:00 a.m. ‐‐ 10:00 a.m. 

NOBCChE Executive Board Meeting 

Pershing/Lindell 

 

 

  

  Henry Hill Lecture 

Monday, a.m. 

Landmark 6‐7.     .

10:45 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m 

Speaker – Dr. Richard Davis, Head, Bureau International des Poids  et Mesures Mass Section, Lyon, France  “Redefining the Kilogram Through a Fundamental Constant.”  Sponsored  by Northeast Section of ACS and MIT Chemistry Department   

 Monday, p.m. 

Luncheon Speaker 

  Opening Luncheon  12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:30 p.m.  (ticketed)  Dr. Mark S. Wrighton, Chancellor Washington  University in St. Louis   

    13

Landmark 5.      


PROGRAM SCHEDULE    Monday, p.m. 

        Welcome 

 Grand Opening Business Session  Landmark 6‐7…..     1:45 p.m. ‐ 2:45 p.m.    Ms. Sandra Parker, National Conference Chair 

          Greetings   From The City  St Louis  City Officials    

Executive Board  Dr. Bobby Wilson, Chairman of National Executive Board     State of the                       Dr. Victor R. McCrary, NOBCChE President  .          Organization     Ms. Lolita Grant, Treasurer   Financial Overview       Election Results   Mr.  Perry Catchings, Elections Chair    Closing Remarks &           Ms. Sandra Parker, National Conference Chair  .     Announcements   

Monday, p.m. 

Monday, p.m. 

  COACH Workshop ‐ registration required  1:45 p.m. ‐ 5:30 p.m.  “The Chemistry of Leadership”    Presented by Sandra Shullman   

Plenary 1  3:00 p.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.  New Developments in Dentistry Materials  Dr. Nathan Fletcher,   President of the National Dental Association   

14

Lindell 

Landmark 6‐7 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE      Monday, p.m. 

Technical Session 1   4:00 – 6:00 p.m.    Lloyd L. Ferguson Young Scientist Award Symposium:   Landmark 6‐7 Materials Chemistry    (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chair:  Sibrina Collins, Ph.D., The College of  Wooster   

4:15 p.m. –  4:55 p.m. 

Lloyd L. Ferguson Young Scientist Award Winner  “Synthesis Of Novel Conjugated Polymers Based On Benzobisoxazoles”  Jared F. Mike, Andrew J. Makowski and Malika Jeffries‐EL*  Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011   

  4:55 p.m. –  5:15 p.m. 

  “Novel Precursor Design For The MOCVD Of Metal Oxides And Metal  Nitrides”   Felicia A. McClary, Jason S. Matthews*   Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington DC, 20059,  USA     “Renewable Biomass Derived Polyolefins”   Rennisha R. Wickham, Jia Wei, Lawrence R. Sita*                                 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland,  College Park, MD 20742     “Crystal Engineering Of Metal‐Organic Frameworks”  Sibrina N. Collins 1*, Roland Falcon1, Jeanette A. Krause 2,3, and William  Connick2  1College of Wooster, Department of Chemistry, Wooster, OH 44691  2University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221  3Richard C. Elder X‐ray Crystallography Facility, University of Cincinnati,  Cincinnati, OH 45221   

5:15 p.m. –  5:35 p.m. 

5:35 p.m. –  6:00 p.m. 

15


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  Technical Session 2 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.  Bio‐Environmental Chemistry  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chair:  Murphy Keller, Ph.D., U.S. DOE 

    Monday,  p.m. 

    Portland   

  4:00 p.m. –  4:20 p.m. 

4:20 p.m. –  4:40 p.m. 

4:40 p.m. –  5:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. –  5:20 p.m. 

“Pharmacological Properties Of Plants Traditionally Used As Anti‐ Infectives And For Wound Healing”   Hamilton, Allison, Moshi, Mainen, M.D., Innocent, Ester Ph.D., Masimba,  Pax, PhD, Lynes, Maria, Meachem, Katrina.   Minority Health International Research Training; Department of Chemistry,  Hampton University Hampton, VA 23668, Summer 2008.     “Milby Park Community: Potential Exposure To Elevated Levels Of 1,3‐ Butadiene May Cause Higher Risks For Developing Adverse Biological  Effects”   Natalie Roberts, Dr. Renard Thomas*, Dr. Bobby Wilson, Dr. John Sapp, and  Dr. Andrew James  Texas Southern University, College of Science and Technology, Department  of Chemistry, Doctor of Philosophy Program in Environmental Toxicology,  Houston, TX, 77004     “Transformation Of Fluorotelomer‐Based Surfactants In Pure Fungal Cultures And Aerobic Soils”   Laurel A. Royer* and Linda S. Lee   Department of Agronomy, Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences,   Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907     “An Investigation Of Arsenic Compounds In Marine Samples”    Filomena Califano*1, Dr. Kathleen Nolan2   1Dept. of Chemistry & Physics, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY, 11201   2 Dept. of Bilogy and Health Promotion, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY, 

5:20 p.m. –  5:40 p.m. 

11201     “Formation of PCDD/Fs from the Copper Oxide Surface‐Mediated  Reactions of 1,2‐Dichlorobenzene under Pyrolytic Conditions”   Shadrack Nganai, Slawomir Lomnicki, Barry Dellinger   Louisiana State University, Chemistry Department Baton Rouge, LA     16


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  5:40 p.m. –  6:00 p.m. 

“Induced Fluorescence Enhancement: A Method For Identifying Bacterial  Species”   Marlon Thomas, Elizabeth Zielins and Valentine I. Vullev*   Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521    

   Monday, p.m. 

  Reception   6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m.   

Crystal 

 

 

 

    Tuesday,  April 14      7:15 a.m. ‐ 7:45 a.m. 

NPC Committee Meeting 

Lafayette 

Teachers Workshop I       7:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.  Landmark 5    “Teachersʹ Embracing Science through Education” 

  Tuesday, a.m. 

Sponsored by 3M, AAAS,  and Committee for Action Program Services  

Moderator 

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services   Cedar Hill, TX 

8:00 a.m.. – 8:45 a..m.  8:00 a.m.. – 8:45 a..m.  8:45 a.m. ‐ 9:00 a.m. 

Registration  Continential Breakfast  Welcome and Opening Remarks  Mrs. Linda Davis, Director,  Committee Chairperson and  Moderator   Dr. Victor McCrary, President National NOBCChE

9:00 A.M. ‐ 12:00 N 

ʺInspire Students to Excel at Science by Unveiling the Learning  Process!ʺ 

10:00 A.M. – 10:15 A.M. 

Dr. Saundra McGuire, Director of Center for Academic Success,  Adjunct Professor of Chemistry, and Associate Dean of  University College at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge,  LA  Break  17


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  12:00 N – 1:00 p.m.  1:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

Tuesday, a.m. 

Lunch   “Integrating Tools for hands‐on teaching in the Classroom ‐    K‐12”  Ms. Yolanda S. George, Deputy Director and Program Director  American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  Washington, DC    Landmark  Conference Registration  Foyer/Reg Office 

Plenary II ‐ Biotechnology  8:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m. 

Portland/Benton 

“Taking A Hit For The Team: Self‐Sacrifice As An Enzymatic Strategy   In The Biosynthesis Of Lipoic Acid”  Keynote Speaker: Dr. Squire Booker,  Associate Professor, Pennsylvania State University 

  Corning Technical Sessions        Tuesday, a.m. 

Technical Session 3 9:45 – 11:45 a.m.  Biotechnology and Biochemistry Applications I  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chair:  Alexis Campbell, Iowa State  University 

  Portland/Benton     

9:45 a.m. –  10:20 a.m. 

“Highlighted Speaker”  “Biophysical, Biochemical, And Bioanalytical Approaches To  Characterize Diverse Molecular Details Of Ras‐Related Proteins”   Paul D. Adams*   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas,  Fayetteville, AR 72701    

10:20 a.m. –  10:40 a.m. 

“Monolayers With Self‐Limiting Packing Densities For The Inhibition  Of Nonspecific Protein Adsorption”   Marlon L. Walker1*and David J.Vanderah2    1Surface and Microanalysis Science Division   2Biochemical Sciences Division   18


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

10:40 a.m. –  11:00 a.m. 

11:00 a.m. –  11:20 a.m. 

11:20 a.m. –  11:40 a.m. 

Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, National Institute   of  Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD  20899     “Determination Of Absolute Configurations Of 1,N‐Chiral Diols  Using The Fluorinated Porphyrin Tweezer Via Exciton Coupled  Circular Dichroism (ECCD)”   Sumira Y. Stein, Xiaoyong Li, Babak Borhan*   Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry, East Lansing MI  48824     “The Molecular Characterization Of Maize Fatty Acid Elongase”   Alexis A Campbell*, and Basil J Nikolau   Iowa State University, Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and  Molecular Biology Ames, IA, 50011     “Functional Analysis Of Maxi‐K Potassium Channels In Tethered  Bilayer Lipid Membranes On A GOLD SUBSTRATE”   George O. Okeyo*1, Daniel Fine2, Ananth Dodabalapur2, Rebecca B.  Price3, Peter A. V. Anderson3 and Randolph S. Duran1       1University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, Gainesville, FL 32611,  2University of Texas at Austin, Microelectronics Research Center, Austin,  TX 78712, 3University of Florida, Whitney Laboratory for Marine  Bioscience, St. Augustine, FL 32080        Technical Session 4 9:45 – 11:45 a.m.  Physical Chemistry  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chair:  Darlene K. Taylor, Ph.D.,   North Carolina Central University 

    Tuesday, a.m. 

    Parkview   

  9:45 a.m. –  10:05 a.m. 

“High Spectral Resolution Infrared Study Of Hydrocarbons In The  Jovian Atmosphere”   Ramsey L. Smith*1,2, Theodor Kostiuk1, Timothy A. Livengood1,3, Kelly  E. Fast1, Tilak. Hewagama1,3, Juan D. Delgado1,3, and William Blass4   1NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 693, Greenbelt, MD 20771   19


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  2Oak Ridge Associated Universities/ NASA Postdoctoral Program, Oak  Ridge, TN 37831   3Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD  20742   4Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996   10:05 a.m. –  10:25 a.m. 

10:25 a.m.‐  10:45 a.m. 

  “High‐Accuracy ab initio Studies Of Sn (n=1‐4) Electronic Structure”   John A.W. Harkless*   Department of Chemistry, Howard University,   525 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059   “Quantum Mechanical Prediction Of 1H And 13C NMR Chemical Shifts  In Large Protein Systems”   Duane Williams*1, Bing Wang1 and Kenneth M. Merz, Jr.1   1University of Florida, Department of Chemistry & Quantum Theory  Project, Gainesville, FL 32608    

10:45 a.m. –  11:05 a.m. 

“Gold Nanoparticle Based NSET Assay For Monitoring RNA Folding  Kinetics”   Jelani K. Griffin*, Uma S. Rai  and Paresh C. Ray   Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, 39217  

11:05 a.m. –  11:25 a.m. 

“Reactive Coatings: Neutralizing‐Decontaminating Coating For  Chemical Warfare Agents”   Dave A Jenkins* and H. Neil Gray   The University of Texas at Tyler, Department of Chemistry, Tyler, TX,  75799   “The Temporal Changes In The Emission Spectrum Of Comet 9P/  Tempel 1 After Deep Impact”   William M. Jackson1, XueLiang Yang1, Xiaoyu Shi1 and Anita L. Cochran2   Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis1 and McDonald  Obervatory, University of Texas at Austin2      

 

11:25 a.m. –  11:45 a.m. 

    Tuesday, a.m. 

Technical Session 5 9:45 – 11:45 a.m.  Dr. Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher   Award Symposium – STEM Education  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Michael Page, Ph.D., California State Polytechnic  University Pomona  20

         Aubert   


PROGRAM SCHEDULE    9:45 a.m. –  10:05 a.m. 

Dr. Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher Awardee  “Enhancing The Design Of Classical Physical Chemistry Laboratory  Experiment In Order To Appeal To Students:  Determining The Heat Of  Vaporization (∆Hvap) Of A Pure Liquid”  Shawn M. Abernathy*, Ph.D.* and Anwar D. Jackson  Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059 

10:05 a.m. –  10:25 a.m. 

“Affecting Science Motivation Of High School Students Through  Enrichment Programs And Peer Instruction”   George D. Howell, Edward Walton, Laurie Riggs, and Michael F. Z. Page*   Email: mfpage@csupomona.edu   Chemistry Department, California State Polytechnic University Pomona   3801 W. Temple Ave. Pomona, CA 91768    “Establishing Effective Summer Camp Programs In Nanoscale Science  For High School Students”   Sherine O. Obare*   Department of Chemistry and the Nanoscale Science Program   University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223     “Transitioning To College: Using Research To Bridge The Culture Gap”   Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy   Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry,  Baltimore, MD 21133     “Innovations In Science Outreach: The Importance Of  Legitimate Scientific Discovery”    Kenya T. Powell*1,2, Carolyn J. Anderson2, and Vicki L. May1   

10:25 a.m. –  10:45 a.m. 

10:45 a.m. –  11:05 a.m. 

11:05 a.m. –  11:25 a.m. 

1Science Outreach Office and the 2Departments of Chemistry and 

11:25 a.m. –  11:45 a.m. 

 

Radiology    Washington University in Saint Louis, Saint Louis, MO  63130      “Show Me The Money: Funding Opportunities For Chemical Scientists  (Students, Post‐Docs, Academicians, And Other Chemical Professionals)  At The National Science Foundation”   Chavon Renee Wilkerson*   National Science Foundation, Division of Chemistry,  4201 Wilson  Boulevard, Arlington VA, 22311      

21


PROGRAM SCHEDULE    Percy Julian Symposium & Luncheon  Landmark 1‐4   (ticketed)   12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:30 p.m.  Speaker: Dr. Soni Oyekan, Reforming & Isomerization Technologist, Marathon Oil  Sponsored  by Corning, Inc.   

Tuesday p.m. 

   The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Technical Sessions      

 

    Tuesday, p.m. 

Technical Session 6 1:45 – 3:30 p.m.  Biotechnology and Biochemistry Applications II  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Mo Hunsen, Ph.D., Kenyon College 

    Portland/Bento n   

  1:45 p.m. –  2:10 p.m. 

2:10 p.m. –  2:30 p.m. 

2:30 p.m. –  2:50 p.m. 

“Green Chemistry Via Catalytic Reactions”   Mo Hunsen*   Department of Chemistry, Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022     “Hyaluronic Acid Derivatives For Cellular Encapsulation”    TaNeshia Washington, Chris Highley, Sasha Bakhru, and Stefan Zappe*   Benedict College, Columbia, SC     “Peptide Targeting Of Platinum Anti‐Cancer Drug”   Margaret W. Ndinguri, Sita S. Aggarwal, Robert P. Gambrell and Robert  P.Hammer*.   Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA  70803    

2:50 p.m. –  3:10 p.m. 

“Assessing The Effectiveness Of Rhein As An Anti‐Angiogenic Agent In  The Treatment Of Breast Cancer”   Vivian E. Fernand1, Emily E. Villar1, Robert E. Traux2, Sayo O. Fakayode3,  Mark Lowry1, Jack N. Losso4, and Isiah M. Warner*1   1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA  70803   2Biotechnology Laboratories, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA  22


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  70803   3Department of Chemistry, Winston‐Salem State University, Winston‐ Salem, NC 27110   4Department of Food Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA  70803    

3:10 p.m. –  3:30 p.m. 

“Insights Into The Cellulose Hydrolysis Mechanism Of Cytophaga Hutchinsonii Based On Computer Modeling And Site‐Directed  Mutagenesis Of CEL9A”   Clifford Louime*1, Michael Abazinge2   (1)College of Engineering Sciences, Technology and Agriculture, Florida  A&M University, 6505 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32307   (2) Environmental Sciences Institute, FSH Science Research Center, Florida  A&M University, 1520 South Bronough Street, Tallahassee, FL 32307    

 

 

Technical Session 7 1:45 – 3:30 p.m.  Graduate Student Sci‐Mix Symposium  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chair:  Sharon Kennedy, Ph.D., Colgate‐ Palmolive Company 

    Tuesday, p..m. 

    Aubert   

  1:45 p.m. – 2:05  p.m. 

2:05 p.m. – 2:25  p.m. 

Eastman Kodak Dr. Theophilus Sorrell Fellowship Awardee  “Nanoparticle‐Based Selective Colorimetric Sensor For  Organophosphorus Pesticides”   Tova A. Samuels and Sherine O. Obare*   Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University,   Kalamazoo, MI 49008     Dow Chemical Company Fellowship Awardee  “Using Functionalized Nanoparticles To Study Intracellular Response  Central To The Progression Of Osteonecrosis”   Fedena Fanord1, Korie Fairbairn1, Harry Kim2, Venkat Bhethanabotla1,  Vinay K. Gupta*1   1University of South Florida, Department of Chemical & Biomedical  Engineering, Tampa, FL 33620   2Shriners Hospitals for Children, Tampa, FL 33612     23


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  2:25 p.m. – 2:45  p.m. 

2:45 p.m. –  3:05 p.m. 

3:05 p.m. – 3:25  p.m. 

Procter and Gamble Fellowship Awardee  “Next Generation Carbon Monoxide Gas Sensing”   Adedunni D Adeyemo*1, Prabir K Dutta1   The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry, Columbus, OH  43220     Lendon N. Pridgen, GlaxoSmithKline ‐ NOBCChE Fellowship Awardee “Overriding Diastereoselective Felkin Additions To Give Anti Felkin  Products”   Gretchen R. Stanton, Patrick J. Walsh*   University of Pennsylvania, Department of Chemistry, Philadelphia, PA  19104     E.I. Dupont Fellowship Awardee  “Inducer Effects On Lac Repressor‐Mediated DNA Loops: Single  molecule FRET Studies”   Kathy Goodson1*, Aaron R. Haeusler1, Doug English2, Jason D. Kahn1,   1University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD, 20742,   2Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, 67260 

  Tuesday, p.m.  

  3:30 p.m. ‐ 4:30 p.m.    Tuesday,  p.m. 

  The Chemistry of Forensic Science  1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:30 p.m   Hosted by DEA/South Central Laboratory   

  Pershing 

Exhibitors Meeting   

  

Plenary III ‐ Health Symposium 4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m.   Landmark 6‐7  “Diabetes Updates”  sponsored by Eli Lilly Company  Dr.  Ronald  D.  Lewis,  II,  Chair,  2009  NOBCChE  Health  Symposium  Local  representatives  of  the  ADA  (American  Diabetes  Association) 

Moderator:  Presenters:        Questions and Answers     Open to the Floor  Closing Remarks 

       Dr. Ronald D. Lewis, II  24

 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  6:00 p.m. ‐ 8:00 p.m. 

Exhibitorʹs Welcome Reception 

Landmark 4 

   

  Wednesday, April 15      7:00 a.m. ‐ 7:30 a.m. 

  Student Planning Meeting   

Convention Center,   Room 200 

  7:15 a.m. ‐ 7:45 a.m. 

NPC Committee Meeting 

Lafayette 

  Wednesday  a.m. 

Teachers Workshop II 7:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.  “Achieving Science Through Education”

Landmark 5 

Sponsored by 3M, AAAS,   and Committee for Action Program Services  

Moderator  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

10:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.  12:00 N – 1:00 p.m.  1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. 

2:45 p.m. ‐3:30 p.m.   

  9:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m. 

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services   Cedar Hill, TX  “The Future of Math Education”  Mr. Gerald W. McElvy, President, Exxon Mobil Foundation,  Dallas, Texas      Break  Lunch   “African Foundations of Western Math, Science & the  Global Context of Five River Civilizations”  Dr. James Grainger, Analytical/Environmental Chemist  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA    Roundtable Discussion ‐ Teachers & Presenters     

    Conference Registration    25

  Landmark  Foyer/Reg Office 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

Wednesday  a.m.  

  CAREER FAIR EXPO  9:00 a.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m.     

Hall 1,  Convention  Center 

Wednesday  a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:   9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  Utilizing The STAR  Guest Speaker ‐ Carolyn Greco   President and CEO    THE FACET GROUP   

Kingsbury 

Wednesday  a.m.  

  Professional Development Workshop:  9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 10:30 a.m.   NSF Graduate Research Fellowship  Informational Session  William Hahn, Ph.D.  National Science Foundation   

Pershing/Lindell 

Wednesday  a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:  9:00 am. ‐‐ 11:00 a.m.  ʺAcademia:  What Are Your Options,ʺ    Isiah Warner, Ph.D.,   Department of Chemistry  Louisiana State University   

Wednesday, a.m.  

  Professional Development Workshop:  10:00 a.m. ‐ 11:30 a.m.   Parkview  ACS: Managing An Effective Job Search (pt 1)    Presenter:  Patrick Gordon  26

Landmark 6 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

Wednesday, a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop  11:15 a.m. ‐ 12:15 6. p.m.   “Lets Talk Graduate School”

Landmark 6 

 

Presenter 

G. Dale Wesson, Ph.D., PE  Interim Vice President for Research  Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University   

    12:00 p.m. ‐ 1:00 p.m           

1:00 p.m. ‐3:00 p.m. 

Wednesday, p.m.   

1:00 p.m. ‐‐ 5:00 p.m.         

 Convention  Center 

LUNCH ON YOUR OWN 

 

 

  Professional Development Workshop:  Utilizing The STAR  Guest Speaker ‐ Carolyn Greco   President and CEO   THE FACET GROUP   

Kingsbury 

  ACS: Managing An Effective Job Search   (parts  1  & 2)   1:00 p.m. ‐ 4:30 p.m.    Presenter:  Patrick Gordon    Poster setup for students            27

 Parkview 

Convention  Center   Room 228 and 229 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE    Professional Development Workshop:     1:30 – 3:30 p.m.   Landmark 3  “What It Takes To Find A Job”    Nick Nikolaides, Ph.D. Manager, Doctoral Recruiting & University Relations  The Procter & Gamble Company 

  Wednesday, p.m.  

3:00 p.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.   

Science Fair  and Science Bowl   Judges Meeting  

Convention  Center,   Room 200 

5:30 p.m. ‐ 9:30 p.m. 

Science Competition Registration &  Opening Meeting 

Landmark 5&6 

  Wednesday, p.m.  

  1 

NOBCChE Scientific Exchange  Poster Session    4:00 – 6:00 p.m.   

  Convention Center Hall  1 

 

“Studies of Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) Model Lipid Membranes  Using Analytical Methods”     Janetricks N. Chebukati* and Gail E. Fanucci    University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, Gainesville, Fl, 32611  “Synthesis and Characterization of Dual Property Magnetic Ionic Liquid  Nanoparticles for Application in the Treatment of Various Forms of Cancer”     Stacie LeSure Gregory   Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA  70803    

“Use Of EDTA To Minimize Ionic Strength Frequency Shifting Effects In The 1H  NMR Spectra Of Urine”   Vincent Asiago, G. A. Nagana Gowda, Shucha Zhang, Narasimhamurthy Shanaiah,   Jason Clark, and Daniel Raftery*   Department of Chemistry, Purdue University,, West Lafayette, IN‐ 47905 

28


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  4 

10 

“Synthesis And Complexation Properties Of Aza‐Crown Ether Containing  Chromo‐ And Fluoroionophores”      Shihab D. Deiab_, Edikan Archibong, Marsha Boatwright, Michael M. Lebel, Jason  Caldwell, Nelly N. Mateeva*     Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307     “Epoxy Nanocomposites: Process Of Polymerization And The Effect Of Nanoclay  Percent Loading On Thermal Properties”    Abisola B. Ajayi*, Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy     Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore MD 21251     “Dual Atomic Absorption And Atomic Fluorescence Measurments Of Mercury In  Environmental And Biological Samples After A Single Combustion Event”   Candice Tolbert and Dr. James Cizdziel*    Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, Ms 38677  “Application Of Ratiometric Spectral Properties Of Salicylidene Derivatives In  The Analysis Of Selected Anions”     Dharendra Thapa, Richard Williams*, and Yousuf Hijji    Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry,  Baltimore, MD 21234     “An Investigation Of The Use Of Chitosan As A Substitute For 3‐(Amino‐Propyl)  Triethoxysilane (Aps) In The Fabrication Of Glass Surfaces For Use As  Substrates In Metal Enhanced Fluorescence Techniques”     Ichhuk Karki*, Richard Williams    Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, Maryland, 21251     “Investigation Of Ruthenium Complexes And Heptamethine Cyanine Near‐ Infrared Fluorophores As Donor/Acceptor Groups For Fluorescence Resonance  Energy Transfer (FRET) Analysis”     Isha Pradhan*, Richard Williams      Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, Maryland, 21251     “Antioxidant Potential Of Teas: Effect Of Adding Milk”   Jennifer Brown_ and Nixon Mwebi*   Jacksonville State University, Department of Physical & Earth Sciences,   Jacksonville AL 36265     29


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  11 

“Host‐Guest Chemistry Of Cyclodextrins And Labeled Drugs”  

12 

Marsha Boatwright_, Edikan Archibong, Shihab D. Deiab, Jonny Williams,    Kelly N. Mateeva*     Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307     “Chitosan‐Assisted Synthesis Of Silver Nanoparticles By Electrodeposition”  

13 

  Melissa A Pinard, Yongchao Zhang*     Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, MD, 21251     “High Density Fluidic Network With Integrated Embedded Waveguide For High  Throughput Screening: Application In Drug Discovery”     Paul I. Okagbare*1, Jost Gottert4, Proyag Datta4 and Steven A. Soper1,2,3     Department of Chemistry1, Department of Mechanical Engineering2, Center for  BioModular Multi‐Scale Systems3, and Center for Advanced Microstructures and  Devices,4  Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

14 

  “Electrodeposited Chitosan/Silver Nano Particle Composites Improve The  Sensitivity Of An Enzyme Based Phenol Sensor”  Yanique Thomas, Yongchao Zhang*  Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, MD, 21251   

15 

“Plasmon Resonance Behavior Of N‐Homocysteinylated Gold  Nanobioconjugates”     Christina M. Jones1, Isiah M. Warner*1, Arther T. Gates1, James W. Robinson1,  Robert M. Strongin2     1Department of Chemistry and College of Basic Sciences, Louisiana State  University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803   2Department of Chemistry, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon 97207  

16 

  “Aza‐Crown Ether Containing Spectrophotometric Reagents For Complexation  With Hg(II) Ions”   Edikan Archibong_, Shihab D. Deiab, Marsha Boatwright, Michael M. Lebel,  Mercedes Jackson, Nelly N. Mateeva*    Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307 

30


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  17 

“Synthesis Of Porphyrin‐Peptide Conjugates With Affinity For Epidermal  Growth Factor Receptor”     Alecia M. McCall, M. Graca H. Vicente*   Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803   

18 

19 

“Dynamics Of Repression By Native And Pre‐Assembled Cro Dimers In Living  Bacteria”   Jacqueline J. Harris, Michael C. Mossing*   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,   The University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677     “A Study Of The Self‐Assembly Of Water‐Soluble Porphyrins   In Aqueous Solution” 

20 

Javoris V. Hollingsworth, Paul Russo and M. Graca. H. Vicente*  Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803    “Testing A Model: Ca2+ Induced Exposure Of Tryptophan”  

21 

Chinelo Udemgba, Nagamani Vunnam, Yogini Bhavsar and Dr. Susan Pedigo*   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, MS 38677‐1848   “Spontaneous Rhythmic Contraction Of The Urinary Bladder”     Joseph Mburu3, Vikram Sabarwal1, Corey Johnson2, Adam Klausner2,   Paul Ratz1*   1Departments of Biochemistry and Pediatrics, and 2Department of  Surgery/Division of Urology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA,  and 3Department of Biochemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 

22 

  “Constructing A Reporter Vector For Evaluating Synthetic RNA Elements  Regulating Eukaryotic Translation In Vitro”    1Kofi Atta‐Boateng_, 2Stephen J. Goldfless, 2Jacquin C. Niles*   1Albany State University, Albany, GA 31705,   2Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,  Cambridge, MA 02139     

31


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  23 

“Nutritional Mechanisms That Promote A Healthy Circulatory System”  

24 

  Harbour MA, Caldwell JE   Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI     “Characterization Of Active Transporter Systems At Blood‐Brain Barrier”  

25 

Shanika N. Smith*, Johnmesha L. Sanders, Antonie H. Rice, PhD.      University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Chemistry, Pine Bluff, AR 71601.     “Anisomycin – Indueed Jnk Activation Via The Ribosomal Interaction”   Dara Phillips, Hee Kyong Bae, and James Pestka*   Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition,   East Lansing, MI 48825 

26 

“Preparation Of 5‐Aryl Pyrazole ‐3‐ Carboxylates For Ligand And Sphingosine  Kinase Inhibitor Syntheses”  

27 

Demetrius Miles and Christian Grattan*   Winthrop University     “Hollow Fiber Filtration Of Hemoglobin”   

28 

Frederick Smalls and Andre Crawford*    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH      “Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Ballistics: Low Level Tail‐Off Analysis”  

29 

30 

Leethaniel Brumfield, III* and Stanley Tieman   NASA, George C Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Arsenal Propulsion  Systems Dept, Huntsville, AL 35812     “Protection Against Chemically –Potentiated Liver Injury Is Detected By Cyanine  Fluorescence”   Evelyne Ntam, Tricia Charles1, Roxanne Howell, Michael Baker, Dwayne Hill*.   Department of Biology, Morgan State University, Baltimore MD 21251.     “Synthesis And Characterization Of Bimetallic Zintl Clusters”   Domonique O. Downing* and Bryan W. Eichhorn   University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College Park,  MD 20742     32


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  31 

“Ruthenium Polypyridine Bisthioethers For Use As Pdt Agents”  

32 

Robert N. Garner and Claudia Turro*   The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry,  Columbus, OH 43210         “Synthesis Of High Free Volume Acid For Proton Conducting Electrolytes” 

33 

LaRico Treadwell and Dr. Jason Ritchie *  Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, Ms 38677  “Electronic Conductive Polymers With Biospecific Binding Capacities: New  Materials For Nanoscale Biosensors”   1 Reuven Darkeyah*,  1 Sannigrahi Biswajit, 1 Khan Ishrat*, 2 Sil Dwaipayan, 2  Baird Barbara*   1Department of Chemistry, Clark Atlanta University   Atlanta GA 30314,   2Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University  

34 

Ithaca, NY 14853  “Quantum Electronic Stability In Noncovalent Functionalization Of Carbon  Nanotubes”     Olayinka O. Ogunro† and Xiao‐Qian Wang‡*  

35 

36 

Clark Atlanta University, Department of Chemistry†, Department of Physics‡,  Center for Functional Nanoscale Materials*, Atlanta, GA 30314    “Evaluating How The Slight Modification Of A Donor GROUP Substitutient  Effects Electron Transfer Efficiency In Paraphenylene Dimmers”   Jeremy Lipscomb and Darlene K. Taylor*     Department of Chemistry,  North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707    “The Effects Of Temperature On A Cross Linked Hyperbranched Polyglycerol‐ Drug Conjugate”  Melony A. Ochieng  and Darlene K. Taylor *  Department of Chemistry,  North Carolina Central University                    Durham, N.C. 27707   

33


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  37 

“Synthesis Of Thiophene Monomers Using The Grignard Reaction”    Stephen MaffettI, Robin LaskowskiII, Malika Jeffries‐ELII*   ILouisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803  

38 

IIIowa State University, Ames, IA 50011     “Mechanistic Studies Of Gold(I)‐Catalyzed Intramolecular Hydroamination And  Hydroalkoxylation With Allenes”  

39 

Alethea N. Duncan* and Ross A. Widenhoefer   Duke University, Chemistry Department, Durham, NC 27708  “Synthesis Of Novel Diruthenium Coupled Nucleobase Complexes”  

40 

  Darryl Anthony Boyd*, Tong Ren     Department of Chemistry, Purdue University,  West Lafayette, IN, 47907     “Studies On The Synthesis Of Spiroisoxazolines”

41 

  Erick D. Ellis, and Ashton T. Hamme II*     Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi,    “Self Assembly Of Halogenated Polycyclic Aromatic Carboxyl 

42 

  Josette Crout Seibles*    Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ     “Synthesis Of Novel Epoxy Gemini Surfactants From Vernonia Oil”

43 

 Nikki S. Johnson*, Folahan O. Ayorinde   Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC, 20059     “Selective, Stoichiometric Ligand‐Enabled Oxidation Of Sp2 And Sp3 C‐H Bonds  Via Palladacycles With Hydrogen Peroxide”  

44 

  Williamson Oloo, N. Zhang, Vedernikov Jing, and N. Andrei   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park,  Maryland     “Synthesis Of Spiro‐Isoxazolines Via Intramolecular Cyclization”   Brittny C. Davis, Ann O. Omollo, Eric McClendon, Lungile Sitole, and   Ashton T. Hamme II*   Department of Chemistry,  Jackson State University,  Jackson, MS, 39217    34


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  45 

“Progress Towards The Development of Potential Pathogen Biosensor”  

46 

Charlee K. McLean*, Dr. Angela Winstead*   Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251    “Microwave Assisted Conversion Of Aldoximes To Nitriles” 

47 

Chidi Anyanwutaku, Dr. Yousef Hijji*  Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251    “Approaches Toward The Atroposelective Synthesis Of Chiral Polyaryls”  

48 

Donovan Thompson, Alan McDonald, and Dr. Karelle Aiken*   Chemistry, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460    “A Simple Highly Efficient Method For The Synthesis Of Nitriles”  

49 

50 

Emmanuel Dowuona, Dr. Yousef Hijji*   Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251         “Understanding Why The Strongest Halide Binding Occurs With The Weakest  Hydrogen Bond Donors In Triazolophanes”  Esther O. Uduehi, Yuran Hua, Kevin P. McDonald, Jonathan A. Karty   and Amar H. Flood*   Chemistry Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405     “Microwave Assisted Synthesis Of Non‐Symmetric Near‐Infrared Dyes” Jamiece E. Johnson*, Dr. Angela Winstead*  Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, 21251   

51 

52 

“Synthesis And Photophysical Characterisation Of Hepthamethine Cyanine  Dyes”   Stanley N. Oyaghire*, Dr. Angela Winstead*, Dr. Richard Williams*   Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251     “Characterization Of Model Systems For The Development Of A   Single Molecule Trap”   Dominique A. Brooks, Christine A. Carlson, Jorg C. Woehl*   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Wisconsin‐Milwaukee   Milwaukee, WI 53201    35


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  53 

54 

55 

56 

57 

58 

59 

“Substituent  Effects On The Energetics Of Trans To Cis Isomerization In  Cyclohexene”    Jeffrey D. Veals* and Dr. Steven R. Davis   Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, MS 38677  “Probing Phenylalanine/Adenine Π‐Stacking Interactions In Protein Complexes  With Explicitly Correlated And CCSD(T) Computations”    Kari L. Copeland and Gregory S. Tschumper*   University of Mississippi, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,   University, MS 38677     “A Photoacoustic Calorimetry Investigation Of The Excited‐State Properties Of  The Oxygen‐Transport Protein Hemerythrin”     Shawna N. Lee*, Maurice Edington   Florida A&M University, Department of Chemistry, Tallahassee, FL 32304     “A Spectroscopic Investigation Of The Ultrafast Decay Dynamics Of The  Dioxygen Carrier Protein Hemocyanin”   Tarah A. Word and Maurice Edington*   Department of Chemistry, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee FL, 32307     “Identification Of Compact Basis Sets For The Reliable Characterization Of  Higher‐Order Correlation Effects In Π‐Type Interactions”     Brittney D. Smith and Dr. Gregory S. Tschumper*   The University of Mississippi,  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry   University, MS 38677     “Tunable Ag‐‐Nanoparticle Surface Plasmon Absorption And Its Effect On  Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Activity”   Christen M. Robinson, Dulal Senapati and *Paresh C. Ray   Jackson State University, Department of Chemistry Jackson, MS‐39216     “A Preliminary Photoacoustic Calorimetry Investigation Of The Nonradiative  Relaxation Processes Of Photoactive Yellow Protein”     Johnny Williams and Maurice Edington*   Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee FL, 32307    36


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  “Coupled Dielectric And Thermochemical Studies Of The Influence Of Curing Agent Structure On Epoxy-Amine Cure”

60 

Abdul-Rahman O. Raji*, Alvin P. Kennedy, and Solomon Tadesse Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251   “Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy In Biological Systems” 

61 

Marquis Gordon*, Tia Mitchell, Lewis Johnson, and Maurice Edington  Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee FL, 32307   

 

 

  Thursday,  April 16   

  

  

7:30 a.m. ‐ 9:30 a.m. 

Science Fair Judging  

Convention  Center   Room 228 and 229 

  7:15 a.m. ‐ 7:45 a.m. 

NPC Committee Meeting 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 8:30 a.m. 

Student Planning Meeting 

8:00 a.m. ‐ 4:00 p.m.         

Conference Registration 

Lafayette  Convention  Center,   Room 200  Landmark  Foyer/Reg Office 

  Plenary V:  Alternate Energy Solutions   Thursday, a.m.  8:00 a.m. ‐‐ 9:00 a.m.  Portland/Benton  “New Lithium Battery Technology”    Keynote Speaker:  Dr. Levi Thompson, Associate Dean of Chemical Engineering , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI    sponsored by The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory   

37


PROGRAM SCHEDULE    Academia: What Are your Options (pt 2)   9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 11:00 a.m.  Presenter : Gregory Tew, Ph.D.  UMass ‐ Amherst     

Thursday, a.m 

   

Kingsbury 

    Technical Session 8 9:30 – 12:00 N  Alternative Energy Solutions  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chair:  Issac Gamwo, U.S. DOE 

    Thursday, a.m. 

    Parkview   

  9:30 a.m. – 9:50  a.m. 

9:50 a.m. – 10:10  a.m. 

“Redox Relays To Enhance Charge Separation Efficiency Of  Photovoltaics”   Melody Kelley, Silas Blackstock*   University of Alabama Department of Chemistry, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487     “Reactivity Of Solvated And Presolvated “Dry” Electrons In The Ionic  Liquid N‐Methyl N‐Butylpyrrolidinium  Bis[(Trifluoromethyl)Sulfonyl]Imide”   Jockquin D. Jones*(1), Charlene Lawson(1), Shawn M. Abernathy(1), James  F. Wishart(2)   “(1)Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059,  (2)Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Upton, NY 

10:10 a.m. –  10:30 a.m. 

10:30 a.m. –  10:45 a.m. 

11972     “Continuous‐Flow And Enhancement Of Reaction Rates Of Biodiesel  Production Using A Slit‐Channel Reactor”  Egwu Eric Kalu1*, Ken S. Chen2, Tom Gedris3  1FAMU‐FSU COE, Chemical & Biomed. Dept., Tallahassee, FL 32310  2Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185  3Florida State University, Chemistry & Biochemistry Dept., Tallahassee, FL  32306    Break 

38


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  10:45 a.m. –  11:05 a.m. 

11:05 a.m. –  11:25 a.m. 

“Electroless Nickel‐Based Catalysts For Hydrogen Generation By  Hydrolysis Of Borohydride”  Shannon Anderson, Addisu Samuel, Egwu Eric Kalu*,  Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering  FAMU‐FSU College of Engineering  Tallahassee, FL 32310    “Fuel Reactor Behavior Of A Chemical Looping Combustion System:  Thermal Effects”   Isaac K. Gamwo1 and Jonghwun Jung2   1U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory  Pittsburgh, PA 15235‐094   2Technical Research Laboratory, POSCO, 1, Goedong‐dong, Nam‐gu,  Gyeongbuk 790‐785, Pohang, South Korea        

 

Technical Session 9 9:30 – 12:00 N  Tools and Technologies in Analytical Chemistry I  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chair: Emanuel Waddell, Ph.D.,   Oakwood University 

    Thursday,  a.m. 

    Portland/Benton   

  9:30 a.m –  9:50 a.m. 

9:50 a.m. –  10:10 a.m. 

“The Effects Of Varying Ionic Strengths Of Supporting Electrolytes On A  Spectroelectrochemical Sensor”   Eme E. Amba*, Laura K. Morris, Sara E. Andria, Chris Bowman, Carl J.  Seliskar and William R. Heineman.   Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221     “Novel Near Infra‐Red Dyes And Nanoparticles Derived From Ionic  Liquids”   David K. Bwambok1, Bilal El‐Zahab1, Mark Lowry1, Gabor Patonay2, Gary  A. Baker3, and Isiah M. Warner*, 1   1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA,  70803   2Department of Chemistry, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, 30302   3Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge,  TN, 37831   39


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  10:10 a.m. –  10:30 a.m. 

10:30 a.m. –  10:45 a.m.  10:45 a.m. –  11:05 a.m. 

  “Supercritical Fluid Chromatography Study Of Anion Influence On  Retention Mechanisms Using Surface‐Confined Ionic Liquids”   Nyote J. Oliver, David S. Van Meter, Thomas L. Chester, Apryll M. Stalcup*  University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 210172,  Cincinnati, OH, 45220   Break 

11:05 a.m. –  11:25 a.m. 

“Increased Light Extraction Of Inasgasb Led Through  Wet Chemical Etching”   Deandrea L. Watkins*, Jonathon T. Olesberg, Thomas F. Boggess, and Mark  A. Arnold   The University of Iowa Chemistry Department, Iowa City, IA, 52242     “Ters Of Quinolinium Tricyanoquinodimethanides On Silver”  Melissa Fletcher,† D. M. Alexson, § Sharka Prokes,§ Orest Glembocki,§ 

11:25 a.m. –  11:50 a.m. 

Alberto Vivoni,£ Charles Hosten†*   †Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington DC, 20059   §Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC, 20375   £ Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences, Inter  American University, San German, PR 00683‐9801     “Surface Modification Of Polymer Substrates By Excimer Radiation”   Holly Carrell1, Stephen Shreeves2, Christopher Perry3, and Emanuel  Waddell*2   1University of Alabama in Huntsville, Department of Chemistry,  Huntsville, AL 35899   2Oakwood University, Department of Chemistry, Huntsville, AL 35896   3Loma Linda University, School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, 

 

Loma Linda, CA 92350                     40


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

Thursday, a.m.  

10:00 a.m. –  10:20 a.m. 

2009 Rohm and Haas   Undergraduate Competition  Co‐sponsored by Colgate‐Palmolive  Company and Lubrizol Corporation  10:00 a.m. – 12:00 Non   

  Pershing/Lindell    

2009 Rohm and Haas Undergraduate Award Winner  “Novel Graphene Nanocutting Approach Through Controlled  Fracture”  Rhonda Jack*,§, Dipanjan Sen*, Markus J. Buehler*,†   * Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics, Department of  Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of  Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Room 1‐235A&B, Cambridge,  MA, USA   § Department of Chemical Engineering, Hampton University, Tyler 

10:20 a.m. –  10:40 a.m. 

10:40 a.m. –  11:00 a.m. 

11:00 a.m. –  11:20 a.m. 

11:20 a.m. –  11:40 a.m. 

Street, Hampton VA,     2009 Rohm and Haas Undergraduate Award Winner  “Coupled Dielectric And Thermochemical Studies Of The Influence  Of Curing Agent Structure On Epoxy‐Amine Cure”    Abdul‐Rahman O. Raji*, Alvin P. Kennedy, and Solomon Tadesse   Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD  21251     2009 Colgate‐Palmolive Undergraduate Award Winner  “Asymmetric Conjugate Addition: Synthesis Of (+)‐Kalkitoxin”  Everett W. Merling, Nina R. Collins and Richard J. Mullins  Department of Chemistry, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH     2009 Colgate‐Palmolive Undergraduate Award Winner  “Synthesis Of Chalcone Derivatives For Use As Anti‐Proliferative  Agents On Glioblastoma Cells”  Debra Ragland and Marion A. Franks, Ph.D.*   Department of Chemistry, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical  State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411.    2009 Lubrizol Corporation Undergraduate Award Winner  “The Effect Of Solvents On The Rheology Of Polymer Solutions”   Folorunso S. Adu and  Jude O. Iroh   41


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  11:40 a.m. –  12:00 a.m. 

University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio       2009 Lubrizol Corporation Undergraduate Award Winner  “The Synthesis Of Coumarins For Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention” B. Mills & M. A. Franks, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry, North Carolina A & T State University  Greensboro, NC 27411   

Thursday, a.m. 

  Science Bowl Competitions: Junior  Division++  10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.  sponsored by Agilent Technologies and ACS  Department of Diversity Programs   

Convention  Center,   Room 222, 223,  224 

Convention  Center   Room 228 & 229 

10:00 a.m. ‐‐ 5:00 p.m.   

Science Fair Viewing   

10:00 a.m. ‐‐ 12:00 p.m.   

NOBCChE ‐ HBCU Panel “Increasing STEM  Institutional Capacity: HBCU/HSI Strategic  Aubert  Alliances”     

12:00 

Lunch on own (Venders will be in  Convention Center     

Convention  Center    

 

Thursday, p.m.  Morerators:  Presenters: 

 

Milligan Symposium  Pershing/Lindell  1:00 p.m. ‐ 3:30 p.m.    Marlon L. Walker, Ph.D. ‐ NIST Janie Ruett‐Robey, Ph.D. ‐ University of Maryland  To  Be  Announced            42


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

Thursday, p.m. 

Science Bowl Competitions: Senior  Division++  1:30 p.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m.  sponsored by Agilent Technologies and ACS  Department of Diversity Programs   

Convention  Center   Room 222, 223,  224 

      Thursday, p.m. 

Technical Session 10   1:00 – 5:00 p.m.    Tools and Technologies in Analytical  Portland/Benton  Chemistry II  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chairs:  Aleeta Powe, Ph.D.,  University of Louisville and Charlotte Smith‐ Baker, Texas Southern University   

1:00 p.m. – 1:25 p.m. 

“Mass Spectrometric Studies Of Hyaluronic Acid In The  Vitreous Humor”   Aleeta M. Powe*   University of Louisville, Department of Chemistry, Louisville, KY  40208     “Sequencing Antimicrobial Polypeptides From The American  Alligator (Alligator Mississippiensis) Blood Using Mass  Spectrometry”   Lancia N.F. Darville*1, Mark E. Merchant2 and Kermit K. Murray1  

1:25 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. 

1Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803, USA and  2McNesse State University, Lake Charles, LA, 90455   1:45 p.m. – 2:05 p.m. 

2:05 p.m. – 2:25 p.m. 

  “The Potential Of Optically Gated Vacancy Capillary  Electrophoresis As An Innovative Technique To Study Enzymatic  Reactions”   Sherrisse A. Kelly, Rattikan Chantiwas, Douglass Gilman*   Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge,  LA 70803     “Protein Separations Using Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Coatings In  Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatography And Gradient  Elution Moving Boundary Electrophoresis”   43


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  Candace A. Luces1, David Ross2, Mark Lowry1, Bilal El Zahab1,  Laurie Locascio2, Isiah M. Warner*1   1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge,  LA 70803   2Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, National Institute of 

2:25 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. 

2:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.  3:00 p.m. – 3:25 p.m. 

3:25 p.m. – 3:50 p.m. 

3:50 p.m. – 4:10 p.m. 

Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. 20899     “Toward A Theory Of Achiral Molecular Micelle‐Protein  Complexation: Analysis Of The Interaction Of Proteins With Poly  (N‐Undecylenic Sulfate)”  Monica R. Sylvain*, Bilal El‐Zahab, Mark Lowry, Isiah M. Warner   Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge,  LA 70803     Break    “Fabrication With Chitosan For Biosensors”   Yongchao Zhang*   Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, MD,  21251     “The Development Of A Colorimetric Cyanide Anion Sensor In  Aqueous Solutions”   Yousef M. Hijji*, Belygona Barare   Chemistry Department, Morgan State University, Baltimore MD  21251   “Spectroscopic Investigations Of Heterogeneous Wetting And  Molecular Delivery From Nanoporous Silica Particles”   Reygan M. Freeney*1, Mark A. Lowry2, and M.Lei Geng1   1University of Iowa, Department of Chemistry and the Nanoscience  and Nanotechnology Institute, Iowa City, IA 52242   2Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, 

4:10 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. 

LA, 70803  “Near‐Infrared Spectroscopy And Imaging Investigation Of  Single‐Walled Carbon Nanotubes In Ionic Liquids”   Kristen E. Schexnayder1, Chieu Tran*2, Irena Mejac2, Simon Duri2   1Louisiana State University, Department of Biological Sciences, Baton  Rouge, LA 70803   44


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  2Marquette University, Department of Chemistry, Milwaukee, WI  4:30 p.m. – 4:50 p.m. 

53201   “Hair As An Indicator Of Exposure To Pesticides”   Charlotte A. Smith‐Baker*1, Momoh Yakubu2, James H. Nance1, and  Mahmoud A. Saleh1  1Texas Southern University, Department of  Chemistry, Houston, TX 77004   2 Texas Southern University, Department of Pharmacy, Houston, TX 

1:30 p.m. ‐ 2:30 p.m.   

    Local Chapter Presidents Meetings (required)       

Aubert, Parkview,  Kingsbury, Lucas,  Hawthorne 

Thursday, p.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:   2:30 p.m. ‐ 3:30 p.m.   “GEM Workshop‐ Why Graduate School?”    Marcus Huggans, Ph.D., Senior  Recruiter/Programming Specialist, The  National GEM Consortium     

Kingsbury   

Technical Session 11 3:00 – 5:15 p.m.  Organic Chemistry  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chair:  Alfred Williams, Ph.D.,   North Carolina Central University   

    Thursday,  p.m. 

    Aubert   

  3:00 p.m. –  3:15 p.m. 

“Improving The Physico‐Chemical Properties Of Anti‐Cancer Drugs Via  Co‐Crystallization”   Safiyyah Forbes, Christer B. Aakeröy*, and John Desper.   Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, Manhattan, KS 66502   45


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  3:15 p.m. –  3:30 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. –  3:45 p.m. 

3:45 p.m. –  4:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. –  4:15 p.m. 

4:15 p.m. –  4:30 p.m. 

4:30 p.m. –  4:45 p.m. 

  “Fluoresence Of Corannulene Based Enediynes”   Teresa L. Cook, Derek Jones and James Mack*   University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221     “A Novel Approach To The Synthesis Of Silylated 1,3‐Alternate  Calixarenes”   Prima R. Tatum*, Paul F. Hudrlik, and Anne M. Hudrlik    Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington, D. C. 20059    “Investigations Into Bacterial Communication Via Chemical Synthesis Of  Autoinducer‐2 (AI‐2)”   Jacqueline A.I. Smith and Herman O. Sintim*   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College  Park, MD 20742     “Reactivity Of A cis‐Pd(II) Ar F Complex Towards Aryl C–F Bond  Formation”   Nicholas D. Ball and Melanie S. Sanford*   Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 North University  Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109     “A Free Radical Cyclization Approach To The Polyandranes”   Valerie C. Cwynar, Mathew G. Donahue, David J. Hart*, Grace K. Mbogo, and  Dexi Yang   Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210     Synthesis of Some New Benzimidazole Carboxamides as Potential Anti‐ inflammatory Agents   Laine Le,1 Lygheia Lewis,1  Kinfe K. Redda2and Bereket Mochona*1   1Department of Chemistry, 2College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical 

4:45 p.m. –  5:00 p.m. 

 

Sciences,   Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307     “Matrix Isolation Investigation Of The Mechanism Of Tetramethylethylene  Ozonolysis”   Bridgett E. Coleman* and Bruce S. Ault   Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221       46


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  Technical Session 12 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.  NOBCChE Professional Chemical Engineer   Award Symposium  (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)  Session Chair:  Angela McIver, Ph.D.,   University of Iowa 

    Thursday,  p.m. 

    Parkview   

  3:00 p.m. –  3:45 p.m. 

NOBCChE Professional Chemical Engineer Awardee  “Calculations Of Wall Shear Stress In Left Coronary Artery For Pulsatile  Flow Using Three‐Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics”  Sahid Smith, Shawn Austin and G. Dale Wesson*  Department of Chemical Engineering, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee,  FL 

  3:45 p.m. –  4:10 p.m. 

  “Dendrimer‐Stabilized Fe2O3 Nanoparticles For The Growth Of Single‐

4:10 p.m. ‐ 4:30 p.m. 

Walled Carbon Nanotubes By Microwave Plasma CVD”   Placidus B. Amama*, Timothy D. Sands, Timothy S. Fisher   Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907     “Shear Flow In Entangled Polymers Investigated Using Confocal  Microscopy And Particle Image Velocimetry”  Keesha A. Hayes*1, Mark R. Buckley2, Itai Cohen2 and Lynden A. Archer1  1

School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, 

NY 14853  2

4:30 p.m. –  5:00 p.m. 

Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 

  “Biocatalytic Systems For Aromatic Oxidations: The Production Of  Naphthalene Dihydrodiol”  Angela M. McIver*,  Tonya L. Peeples   1University of Iowa, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering,  Iowa City, IA 52242  

5:00 p.m. ‐‐ 6:00 p.m. 

Science Fair Poster Removal 

47

Convention  Center, Room 228  & 229 


PROGRAM SCHEDULE  6:00 p.m. ‐‐ 8:00 p.m.     8:00 p.m. ‐‐ 10:00 p.m.    

Thursday p.m. 

National Science Competition  Dinner     National Science Competition  Social 

Convention Ctr,  Room 220 and 229  Convention Ctr,  Room 220 and 229 

    Plenary VII  Landmark  7:30 pm. ‐ 10:30 p.m.  Ballroom   Awards Ceremony & Gala Dinner (ticketed)     

    Friday, April 17   

  

  

8:00 a.m. ‐ 11:45 a.m. 

Science Bowl Finals –  Junior/Senior Division 

Portland/Benton 

Friday  p.m. 

4:00 p.m. ‐ 7:00 p.m. 

  Science Competition Awards Luncheon  ticketed  12:00 p.m. ‐ 2:00 p.m.   

Science Competition Educational Trip   

 

 

 

48

Crystal Ballroom 

St. Louis Science  Center 


NOBCChE 2009 EXHIBITORS 

2009 Exhibitors 3M  St. Paul, MN   

American Chemical Society  Washington, DC   

Auburn University  Auburn, AL   

Boehringer Ingelheim  Ridgefield, CT   

BP  Houston, TX   

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   Atlanta, GA   

Colgate‐Palmolive  Piscataway, NJ   

Corning Inc.  Corning, NY   

Drug Enforcement Administration  Arlington, VA     

 

The Dow Chemical Company  Midland, MI   49


NOBCChE 2009 EXHIBITORS   

DuPont  Pawtucket, RI 

 

Eli Lilly and Company   Indianapolis, IN   

Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University   Tallahassee, FL   

Georgia Institute of Technology  Atlanta, GA   

Howard University  Washington, DC   

Indiana University  Bloomington, IN   

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory  Laurel, MD   

The Ohio State University   Columbus, OH   

Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Cambridge, MA   

Merk & Company, Inc.  West Point, PA     

Monsanto  St. Louis, MO  50


NOBCChE 2009 EXHIBITORS   

National Institute of Standards and Technologies  Gaithersburg, MD   

National Organization of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers  Washington, DC   

NOAA Environmental Cooperative Science Center  Tallahassee, FL   

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education   Oak Ridge, TN   

Procter & Gamble Company  Cincinnati, OH   

Roche  Nutley, NJ   

University of California – Davis   Davis, CA   

University Illinois, Urbana – Champaign   Champaign, IL   

University of Maryland  College Park, MD   

University of Wisconsin – Madison   Madison, WI             

  51


NOBCChE 2009 EXHIBITORS   

University of Massachusetts Amherst  Amherst, MA     

Washington University in St. Louis  St. Louis, MO   

Western Michigan University  Kalamazoo, MI   

United States Environmental Protection Agency  Washington, DC   

United States Customs and Border Patrol   Washington, DC   

52


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS     Monday, a.m.  

Henry A. Hill Lecture 10:45 ‐ 11:50 

  Landmark 6‐7   Sponsored by the American Chemistry Society Northeast Section      Dr. Henry A. Hill  1977 ACS President 

       Dr. Henry Aaron Hill (1915 – 1979), the renowned African ‐ American chemist in whose memory  this  award  was  established,  was  a  former  Chairman  of  the  ACS  Northeastern  Section  (1963)  and  President  of  the  American  Chemical  Society  in  1977.  Dr.  Hill’s  outstanding  contributions  to  chemistry, particularly industrial chemistry, and to the professional welfare of chemists are legion.  Dr. Hill’s first concern and interest was in his fellow humans, and this was the driving force behind  all that he did both in the chemical community and the world at large.       Henry  Hill  was  a  native  of  St.  Joseph,  Missouri.  He  was  a  graduate  of  Johnson  C.  Smith  University in North Carolina and received the doctorate degree from M.I.T. in 1942, after getting the  highest grades in his class. He began a professional career in industrial chemistry in that year, with  North Atlantic Research Corporation of Newtonville, Massachusetts. He eventually rose to be vice  president while doing research on and development of water‐based paints, fire‐fighting foam, and  several  types  of  synthetic  rubber.  After  leaving  North  Atlantic  Research,  he  worked  as  a  group  leader in the research laboratories of Dewey and Almy Chemical Company before starting his own  entrepreneurial  venture—National  Polychemicals  in  1952.  Ten  years  later  he  founded  Riverside  Research Laboratories in Cambridge, Mass. The firm offered research, development and consulting  services  in  resins,  rubbers,  textiles  and  in  polymer  production.  Riverside  Research  Laboratory  introduced  four  successful  commercial  enterprises,  including  its  own  manufacturing  affiliate.  Dr.  Hill,  particularly  after  having  been  appointed  by  President  Lyndon  Johnson  to  the  National  Commission  on  Product  Safety,  became  active  in  research  and  testing  programs  in  the  field  of  product flammability and product safety.       The  American  Chemical  Society  was  always  very  close  to  Henry  Hill’s  heart.  His  active  career  with the ACS began in the middle 1950s in the Northeastern Section. Dr. Hill served on Northeastern  Section committees, became a councilor in 1961 and was Chairman of the Section in 1963. He served  the  ACS  in  important  National  positions  including  secretary  and  chairman  of  the  Professional  Relations  Committee,  the  ACS  Council;  Policy  Committee,  the  Board  of  Directors,  and  ultimately  president  in  1977.  He  made  an  especially  significant  impact  in  professionalism  by  pioneering  establishment of a set of guidelines defining acceptable behavior for employers in their professional  relations with chemists and chemical engineers. This effort resulted in the ACS landmark document  entitled ʺProfessional Employment Guidelines.ʺ       Dr. Henry Hill remains to date as the only African American to become President of the American  Chemical  Society.    In  recognition  of  his  many  outstanding  achievements,  NOBCChE  identifies  an  outstanding African – American chemist or chemical engineer to be designated as that year’s Henry  A. Hill Lecturer., Dr. Richard Davis, Head, Bureau International des Poids et Mesures Mass Section,  Lyon, France is this year’s honoree. Our award is sponsored by the ACS Northeast Section and the  MIT Chemistry Department.  53


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS       Monday, a.m.  

Henry Hill Lecture        10:45 – 11:45 a.m.   

  Landmark 6 & 7 

  Is the kilogram losing mass?    Richard S. Davis  International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM)  92312 Sevres cedex, France      The kilogram is the unit of mass in the International System of units (SI), sometimes referred to as  the modern metric system. Although the SI has always evolved with advances in science and  technology, the fact is that the definition of the kilogram (kg) has not changed since 1889. The kg is  defined by the mass of a particular object, the international prototype (IPK), which is conserved at  the BIPM. Is the IPK losing mass, as you may have read in the popular media? The question is  incomplete. A more useful question would have specified X in this statement: “Is kg losing mass  compared to X.” A good candidate for X turns out to be the mass of an atom of silicon‐28. If we  could compare the IPK to the mass of a single atom of silicon‐28, and if we could carry out this  experiment to a relative uncertainty of about 10‐8, we would soon have the answer to a meaningful  question. Even better, we would be able to redefine the kg so that it is no longer based on the mass  of a particular piece of metal, but rather on a fundamental physical constant.    There are two techniques that link the IPK to a fundamental constant with an uncertainty that is  within striking distance of what is required. One of these might be called the atomic kilogram,  because of its direct link to a single atom of silicon‐28. The second might be called the electronic  kilogram, because the direct link is to quantum electrical standards and, ultimately, to the Planck  constant. I will report on progress in both experiments, on the prospects for redefinitions of the kg  and related SI units as early as 2011, and on the impact of redefined SI units on science and  technology.     

  Monday, p.m. 

Opening Luncheon 12:00 ‐ 1:50 p.m.     Dr. Mark S. Wrighton, Chancellor Washington  University – St. Louis          54

  Landmark 1‐4 


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   COACh Workshop

  1:45 p.m. ‐ 5:30 p.m.  Lindell      “The Chemistry of Leadership”  Presented by Sandra Shullman 

Monday, p.m.  

 

This  workshop  is  open  to  women  academic  faculty/administrators  and  industry/other.    This  program is designed to give participants some basic concepts and tools to develop their leadership  skills.    Participants  will  learn  about  various  concepts  of  leadership  (including  their  own),  explore  what is known about issues that pertain to minority women and its role in leadership situations, and  reflect  on  their  own  leadership  challenges  whether  it  is  in  the  classroom/office,  working  with  committees or leading groups.           Monday, a.m.  

Plenary I:  Research in Oral Health        3:00 – 4:00 p.m.   

  Landmark 5 

“Have You Considered Research In Oral Health?”    Nathan Fletcher, D.D.S.  Immediate Past President  National Dental Association  Abstract      As  the  nation  considers  health  care reform  and  improvements  in  efficiency  in  delivery  and  system development, a key factor will be research in areas to maximize the health of the nation.  The  efforts  to  address  healthcare  disparities  will  involve  research  to  explore  the  relationship  of  oral  health  to  overall  health  and  how  factors  such  as  socioeconomics  and  ethnicity  impact  those  disparities.    Discussions  about  trial  studies  revolving  around  ethnicity  are  escalating  with  greater  visibility in pharmaceuticals and health care policy decisions.    The  biochemistry  of  diabetes,  periodontal  disease,  obesity,  the  inflammatory  process,  and  genetics  are  of  keen  interest  along  with  emerging  research  into  genomes,  biomarkers,  and  how  chemistry  is  involved  in  aspects  of oral  health.   We  need  to  understand  the  science  and  engage  in  translational research to bridge the gap between scientific discovery and clinical delivery to begin to  answer  questions  to  improve  oral  health  outcomes.    This  can  be  best  accomplished  by  bringing  together  the  scientists  and  clinical  researchers.    Underrepresented  minority  inclusion  is  essential  from  the  aspects  of  trust  and  cultural  competency  to  bridge  that  gap  in  the  interest  of  the  populations  most  in  need.    Reducing  disparities  in  health  care  is  in  the  best  interest  of  the  entire  population   

  .  

  55


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS       Teachers Workshop  Landmark 5        7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.    “Teachersʹ Embracing Science through Education” 

Tuesday, a.m./p.m.  Wednesday, a.m./p.m.   

Sponsored by 3M,  AAAS,   Abbott Laboratories, ACS, NASA/UCLA,  and NOBCChE         This  year’s  science  teachers’  workshop  will  assist  science  educators  at  the  elementary,  secondary,  and  high  school  levels  using  various  teaching  strategies  and  techniques.    The  2009  workshop  will  also  provide  resources  and  materials  that  will  assist  in  enhancing  your  curriculum.  In  addition,  educators  will  have  an  opportunity  to  discuss  issues  and  various  challenges  that  face  science  educators.      The  objective  for  this  2  day  workshop  is  to  assist  educators  in  improving  test  scores  among minority and underrepresented students.  This will further assist students to pursue careers  in science and technology.          

 Tuesday, a.m. 

  Plenary II ‐ Biotechnology and Biochemistry   8:30 a.m. ‐  9:30 a.m.    

Portland/Ben ton 

“Taking A Hit For The Team: Self‐Sacrifice As An Enzymatic Strategy   In The Biosynthesis Of Lipoic Acid” 

  Presenter: 

Squire Booker, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry,  Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA   

Lipoic acid is an eight‐carbon straight‐chain fatty acid containing sulfur atoms at carbons 6 and 8. In  addition to its antioxidant properties, its most notable function is as a key cofactor that is employed  by  several  multienzyme  complexes  that  are  involved  in  energy  metabolism  (pyruvate  dehydrogenase and  ‐ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes), or the catabolism of glycine (glycine  cleavage system), branch‐chain amino acids (branch‐chain amino acid dehydrogenase complex), and  acetoin (acetoin dehydogenase complex). In its role as a cofactor, it must be attached covalently in an  amide linkage to the epsilon nitrogen of a specific lysine residue on a lipoyl carrying protein of the  complex.  This  important  post‐translational  modification  can  be  achieved  via  two  different  mechanisms:  one  in  which  exogenous  intact  lipoic  acid  is  activated  and  then  appended  to a  lipoyl  carrying protein, and one in which lipoic acid is constructed de novo in its cofactor form onto a lipoyl  carrying protein.    56


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   This lecture will describe the characterization of lipoyl synthase, which catalyzes the terminal step in  the de novo pathway for the biosynthesis of the lipoyl cofactor, which is the insertion of sulfur atoms  at carbons 6 and 8 of an n‐octanoyl chain that is covalently bound to lipoyl carrying proteins.  Lipoyl  synthase is a member of the radical‐SAM superfamily of enzymes, wherein S‐adenosylmethionine is  used  to  generate  a  5’‐deoxyadenosyl  5’‐radical,  which  is  a  required  intermediate  in  catalysis.  A  working  hypothesis  for  the  role  of  the  5’‐deoxyadenosyl  5’‐radical  will  be  presented,  as  will  experiments  that  have  been  conducted  to  test  that  working  hypothesis.  Interestingly,  data  will  be  presented that indicate that the protein is both a catalyst and a substrate.       

 

PercyL Julian Luncheon Lecture  12:00 ‐ 1:30 p.m. 

Tuesday, p.m. 

Landmark 1‐4 

    Dr. Percy L. Julian (1899 – 1975)  National Academy of Sciences (Elected 1973) 

    The Percy L. Julian Award for significant contributions in pure and/or applied research in science or  engineering is our most prestigious award. Dr. Julian was an African‐American who obtained his BS  in  Chemistry  from  DePauw  University  in  1920.  Although  he  entered  DePauw  as  a  “substandard  freshman,” he graduated as the class valedictorian with Phi Beta Kappa honors. His first job was as  an  instructor  at  Fisk  University.  Julian  left  Fisk  and  obtained  a  masterʹs  degree  in  chemistry  from  Harvard in 1928, and his Ph.D. in 1931 from the University of Vienna, Austria. It was after his return  to DePauw in 1933 that Julian conducted the research that led to the synthesis of physostigmine, a  drug used in the treatment of glaucoma2. Julian left DePauw in 1936 to become director of research  of the Soya Products Division of the Glidden Company in Chicago. This position at Glidden made  Julian the world’s first African – American to lead a research group in a major corporation. Dr. Julian  rewarded Gliden’s faith in him by producing many new commercial products from soy beans. An  entrepreneur  as  well  as  a  scientist,  in  1953  he  founded  Julian  Laboratories  and  later  Julian  Associates, Inc. and the Julian Research Institute. Over the course of his career he acquired over 115  patents, including one for a fire‐extinguishing foam that was used on oil and gasoline fires during  World  War  II2.  Though  he  had  over  100  patents  and  200  scientific  publications,  his  most  notable  contribution was in the synthesis of steroids from soy and sweet potato products.  Dr. Julian’s life  and contributions were the subject of a recent biopic by NOVA/PBS entitled, “Forgotten Genius.”3 The  film was broadcast nationally on February 6, 2007 on PBS TV stations.    The table below summarizes the winners of the NOBCChE Percy L Julian Award:  57


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   Year 

  Award Recipients 

1975 

Dr. Arnold Stancel (1) Mobil Oil Company 

1977  1979 

Dr. W. Lincoln Hawkins, Bell Laboratories   Dr. William Lester, Lawrence Berkeley  Laboratory  

Year  Award Recipients  1995  Dr. Joseph Francisco, Purdue University   Dr. Edward Gay, Argonne National  1996  Laboratory   1997  Dr. James H. Porter , UV Technologies  1998  Dr. William A. Guillory, Innovations   Consulting  1999  Dr. Linneaus Dorman,  Dow Chemical   Company  2001  John E. Hodge (5) (1914–96), U.S. Department     of Agriculture, Peoria, IL   2001  James A. Harris (5) (1932–2000), Lawrence  Berkeley Laboratory   2002  Dr. Victor McCrary, Johns Hopkins Applied  Physics Laboratory  2003  Dr. Victor Atiemo‐Obeng, Dow Chemical  Company 

1981 

Dr. James Mitchell (2), Bell Laboratories 

1982 

Dr. K.M. Maloney, Allied Corporation 

1983 

Dr. B.W. Turnquest, ARCO Petroleum  

1985  1986 

Dr. William Jackson, (3) Howard University   Dr. George Reed,  Argonne National  Laboratory 

1987 

Dr. Reginald Mitchell, Stanford University 

1988  1989 

Dr. Isiah Warner (4), Emory University   Dr. James C. Letton, Proctor & Gamble  Company  Dr. Theodore Williams, College of Wooster  (Ohio) 

2005  Dr. James H. Wyche, University of Miami 

1991 

Dr. Bertrand Frazier‐Reed, Duke University  

2007  Dr. Kenneth Carter, UMass 

1992 

Dr. Willie May, NIST  

2008  Dr. Sharon Haynie, DuPont 

1993 

Dr. Joseph Gordon, IBM  

2009  Dr. Soni Olufemi Oyekan, Marathon Oil 

1994 

Dr. Dotsevi Y. Sogah, Cornell University  

1990 

2004  Dr. Gregory Robinson, University of Georgia 

2006  Dr. Jimmie L. Williams, Corning Incorporated  

 

 

  References and recommended reading 1 2 3

NOBCChE’s Percy L Julian Award, http://www.nobcche.org/index.cfm?PageID=50174597-757C-432EBA8C253625586175&PageObjectID=37 Percy Julian, Wikipedia Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Julian Julian – Trail Blazer, Peter Tyson, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/julian/civil.html

                              58


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   Tuesday, p.m. 

PercyL Julian Luncheon Lecture  12:00 ‐ 1:30 p.m. 

Landmark 1‐4 

“Catalytic Applications For Enhanced Production Of Transportation Fuels”   

Dr.  Soni Olufemi  Oyekan Marathon Oil 

 

  Oil  refining  companies  produce  clean  transportation  fuels  to  run  the  world’s  economies  via  continuous  use  of  innovative  and  efficient  refinery  processes.  The  reliable  generation  of  gasoline  blending components and hydrogen is a significant challenge for oil refiners. Hydrogen is required  as a co‐reactant in Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking processes to produce clean gasoline, diesel and  jet fuel. Fixed and moving bed catalytic reformers are key processes used by refiners to meet thirty  percent of the gasoline demand and to produce aromatic compounds for the chemical industry and  hydrogen for the production of low emission transportation fuels. A unique application of platinum  catalysis  for  enhancing  the  production  of  gasoline  and  hydrogen  will  be  discussed  as  well  as  overviews  of  an  activation  process  for  platinum  containing  catalysts  and  low  sulfur  naphtha  reforming. The platinum rhenium catalytic studies discussed led to staged platinum/rhenium combo  catalyst systems and a new platinum/rhenium catalysts nomenclature. Terms such as “equi‐molar”,  “balanced”  and  “skewed”  catalysts  have  become  standard  in  oil  refining.    The  novel  platinum  catalyst  activation  procedure  is  now  in  use  in  over  100  low  pressure  continuous  catalyst  regeneration units and the applications of the catalytic advancements discussed have possibly led to  two to three percent increase in the barrels of transportation fuels produced worldwide   

  Tuesday, p.m.  

The Chemistry of Forensic Science 1:45 p.m. ‐ 3:30 p.m   Hosted by DEA/South Central Laboratory 

  Pershing 

The DEA Forensic Laboratory System is one of the most respected crime laboratory systems in the  world  and  continues  to  improve  on  its  operations  for  of  controlled  substances,  fingerprint  and  digital  evidence.    Our  unique  insight  on  these  processes  helps  ensures  that  the  results  that  are  reported meet the scrutiny of the public and is scientifically correct.  The scientific use of chemistry  plays a very important role in the different disciplines within the DEA Forensic Laboratory System.   This panel discussion will focus on some of those uses and how chemistry is an important part of  our daily analysis. 

59


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   Tuesday, p.m. 

Plenary III ‐ Health Symposium 4:00 p.m. ‐ 6:00 p.m.   sponsored by Eli Lilly Company

Landmark 6‐7 

“Diabetes in the African – American Community”  Moderator:  Presenters: 

Dr. Ronald D. Lewis, II, Chair, 2008 NOBCChE Health Symposium  St.  Louis  representatives  from  the  ADA  (American  Diabetes  Association)    

As part of NOBCChE’s continuing effort to address health disparities within the African American  community  during  our  annual  conference,  we  will  focus  on  Diabetes  at  this  year’s  Health  Symposium in St. Louis.  Sadly, the numbers speak for themselves.  African Americans continue to  be  disproportionately  affected  by  this  debilitating  disease  and  the  many  complications  associated  with  diabetes.  In  2005,  African  Americans  were  2.2  times  than  non‐Hispanic  Whites  to  die  from  diabetes.  Currently, African Americans are almost twice (1.9) as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes  as  non‐Hispanic  whites  by  a  physician.    Additionally,  African  Americans  are  more  likely  to  suffer  complications from diabetes, such as end‐stage renal disease and lower extremity amputations.  Some additional facts:  In  2002,  African  American  men  were  2.1  times  as  likely  to  start  treatment  for  end‐stage  renal  disease related to   diabetes, as compared to non‐Hispanic white men.  In 2003, diabetic African Americans were 1.7 times as likely as diabetic Whites to be hospitalized.  Our  panel  will  focus  on  current  treatments,  clinical  advances,  and  advocacy  efforts  directed  at  eliminating this disparate disease.  * Sources: The Office of Minority  Health, Data and Statistics, Diabetes; http://www.omhrc.gov  and  references cited therein.       

                          60


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS  

   Wednesday, a.m.,  p.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:  Utilizing The STAR  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  Kingsbury  1:00 p.m. ‐ 3:00 p.m.  Guest Speaker ‐ Carolyn Greco   President and CEO of THE FACET GROUP   

Carolyn  Grecoʹs  presentation  will  expand  upon  career  development  as  an  organized  approach  to  match  employee  goals  with  the  business  needs  of  an  organization,  which  then  support  any  workforce  development  initiatives.   In  this  process,  career  development  enhances  each  employeeʹs  current  job  performance,  enables  individuals  to  take  advantage  of  future  job  opportunities,  and  fulfills the organizationʹs goals for a dynamic and effective workforce.  Managers are responsible��for  linking  the  organizationʹs  needs  to  employee  career  goals,  and  can  assist  employees  in  the  career  planning  process.   The  Human  Resources  function  is  responsible  for  designing  career  paths  and  employee  development  programs  that  help  employees  reach  their  goals,  while  each  employee  is  responsible for planning and managing his/her career. 

   

Wednesday, a.m. 

  NSF Graduate Research Fellowship  Informational Session  9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 10:30 a.m.  William Hahn, Ph.D.  Program Director  National Science Foundation   

Pershing/Lindell 

  This  workshop  will  discuss  information  on  the  NSF  Graduate  Research  Fellowship  Program,  NSFʹs  oldest  program  that  has  supported  over  43,000  STEM  graduate  students  since  1952.  More  descriptive  materials  may  be  found  at  our  operations  website,  www.nsfgrfp.org.  A question and answer session will follow the session.                  61


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS  

Wednesday, a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop  “Lets Talk Graduate School”  11:15 a.m. ‐ 12:15 6. p.m.    

 

 

Presenter 

Landmark 6 

G. Dale Wesson, Ph.D., PE  Interim Vice President for Research  Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University   

  Are you considering graduate school, but are concerned about the costs?  Is graduate school  the right choice for you?  Should you first go to work before going to graduate school?  How long  does graduate school really take?  How do I choose the right graduate school for me?    This entertaining presentation attacks some of the most common misconceptions concerning  graduate school for engineering and science majors.  After attending this presentation, you will have  straight  answers  to  these  and  many  other  questions  enabling  you  to  make  smart  graduate  school  choices. 

   

Wednesday, a.m. 

  “Academia:  What Are Your Options”  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.     Isiah Warner, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry  Louisiana State University   

Landmark 6 

Thursday, a.m. 

Gregory Tew, Ph.D., Associate Professor,   University of Massachusetts, Amherst   

 

  This workshop is designed to explore the various options for graduate students considering an  academic  career  and  faculty  already  in  the  early  stages  of  an  academic  career.      We  will  explore  various  job  opportunities  in  academia,  including  tenure‐track  and  non  tenure‐track  academic  positions.  In addition, we will discuss the “do’s and don’t’s” of working toward tenure in a tenure‐ track  position  in  small,  medium,  and  large  academic  institutions.    A  question  and  answer  session  will follow the presentations at this workshop.         62


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS    

Wednesday, p.m.     Presenter 

“What It Takes To Find A Job”   1:30 – 3:30 p.m.  Landmark 3    Nick Nikolaides, Ph.D.  Manager, Doctoral Recruiting & University Relations  The Procter & Gamble Company 

    In today’s competitive environment, looking for a job is quite often a full time job itself.  Along with  solid technical skills, employers are requiring that top candidates must also master many of the “soft”  skills including leadership, collaboration, and communication.  Attentive preparation of one’s resume,  cover  letters,  and  technical  presentations  to  highlight  these  collective  skills  is  absolutely  essential.   This presentation offers useful tips and suggestions to enhance one’s chances of “landing” that perfect  job.      

 

Thursday, a.m. 

  Plenary V:    Alternate Energy Solutions Plenary  Portland/Benton  8:00 a.m. ‐‐ 9:00 a.m.  “Beyond Fossil Fuels: Nanostructured  Materials For Hydrogen Production”    Professor Levi T. Thompson Department of Chemical Engineering,  Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Hydrogen Energy Technology Laboratory 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI    sponsored by The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory      Securing our nation’s energy supply is arguably the most important challenge we face.  The source  and  amount  of  energy  that  is  available  impacts  nearly  every  aspect  of  our  lives  including  our  mobility, health and welfare.  Presently, the U.S. depends heavily on foreign energy resources.  For  example,  in  2008,  nearly  60%  of  the  crude  oil  consumed  in  the  U.S.  was  imported;  approximately  one‐quarter  of  this  oil  comes  from  the  Persian  Gulf.    With  growing  demands  from  emerging  economies, declining environmental quality and potential for global conflict, there is a pressing need  to  develop  a  more  sustainable  energy  strategy.    Hydrogen  has  the  highest  energy  density  of  any  non‐nuclear fuel, can be easily converted to electrical and thermal energy via highly efficient, non‐ polluting  processes,  and  is  viewed  as  a  key  energy  carrier  for  the  future.   Hydrogen  is  also  an  63


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS   important reactant in the production of chemical and food products including fertilizers and is the  ideal reductant for the recycle of CO2 into chemicals and fuels.  Progress towards the production of  hydrogen from renewable and carbon‐neutral  sources will require the discovery and development  of better performing catalytic and electrocatalytic materials.  This presentation will briefly describe  our efforts to design and synthesize high performance, nanostructured materials for the production  of hydrogen using biomass derived products, water and solar energy. 

           

  Thursday, p.m.  

 

  “GEM Workshop:  Why Graduate School?”  2:30 – 3:30 p.m.  Marcus Huggans, Ph.D.,   Senior Recruiter and Programs Specialist,  The National GEM Consortium,   Notre Dame, IN    

  Kingsbury 

 

This workshop will prove the fundamental belief of the 21st century and beyond: all STEM  professionals should hold an advanced STEM degree. Particularly, the participants will gather  information about career and financial implications of NOT obtaining a graduate degree. If you  think all you need is a bachelors degree to competitive in the global society or that you should work  first then go back to graduate school, YOU CANʹT MISS THIS WORKSHOP! Come find out why  graduate school is not an option by necessity.        

64


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS       Monday, a.m. 

 Henry Hill Lecture         10:45 ‐ 11:50 a.m. 

  Landmark 6‐7   

     Richard S. Davis, Ph.D. 

     Head, BIPM Mass Section       International Bureau of Weights and Measures    Richard S. Davis received a bachelor’s degree in physics from Brown  University in 1967 and a doctorate in solid state physics from the  University of Maryland in 1972.    Upon finishing his academic training, he joined the National Institute of  Standards and Technology (NIST) as a post‐doc, where he helped to  achieve what is still the most accurate electrochemical determination of the Faraday constant. This  led to a permanent position in the mass calibrations group at NIST, where he remained until joining  the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) in 1990. Prior to leaving NIST, he  collaborated on a new determination of the universal gas constant. Almost 20 years later, this is still  the most accurate published result (though perhaps not for much longer).    In 1993 Davis became head of the BIPM Mass Section, which is his current position. The BIPM is  responsible for disseminating the kilogram unit to the Member States of the BIPM, as it has done  since 1875. The BIPM, taking advantage of improved technology, is heavily committed to  improving the definition and realization of the kilogram. This is reflected in the program of work  within the Mass Section and internationally, through collaborations with national metrology  institutes such as NIST.    Davis is the author or co‐author of numerous scientific papers and is a Fellow of the American  Physical Society. 

65


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS  

 Monday, p.m. 

  Plenary I – New Developments in Denistry  Materials  Symposium  3:00 p.m. ‐  4:00 p.m.    

Landmark 6‐7 

       Nathan Fletcher, D.D.S. 

     Immediate Past President        National Dental Association      Dr.  Fletcher  was  born  in  Washington,  D.C.  October  11,  1957.   His  family  moved  to  Rockville,  MD  in  1969  and  he  graduated  from  Magruder  High  School  of  the  Montgomery  County,  MD  school  system  in  1975.    He  matriculated  to  Morgan  State  University  that  same year.    Nathan  was  a  chemistry  major  and  Cooperative  Education  student working with Ford Motor Company in Dearborn, Michigan as  a  chemical  researcher  until  he  graduated  Cum  Laude  in  1980  with  a  Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry.  He is a Life Member of the  Morgan State University National Alumni Association.      He  was  employed  with  Ford  Motor  Company  for  three  years  before  entering  the  Howard  University  College  of  Dentistry  in  the  summer  of  1983.    He  earned  honors  while  there  on  the  College  of  Dentistry’s  Dean’s  List,  the  National  Dean’s  List,  Who’s  Who  Among  Students  in  American Universities and Colleges, and Outstanding Young Men of America. In 1987 Dr. Fletcher  was bestowed the Doctor of Dental Surgery degree graduating 10th in his class.      Dr. Fletcher is currently in private practice with his wife Dr. Alison Riddle‐Fletcher.  He has  been  a  Consultant  in  the  Philadelphia  Prison  System  as  the  Vice  President  for  Operations  with  Mumby & Simmons Dental Consultants.  He has also been a Consultant evaluating the statewide  Pennsylvania  Division  of  Corrections  dental  operations.    He  was employed  as  the Regional  Chief  Dentist  for  the  Division  of  Corrections  in  Baltimore  as  well  as  the  Baltimore  County  Detention  Center totaling sixteen years in correctional dentistry.  Dr. Fletcher is involved in organized Dentistry with the Maryland Dental Society, which is a  component of the National Dental Association, serving as its President from 2003 through 2004.  He  is also a member of the Hispanic Dental Association.    He was the 84th National President of the National Dental Association (NDA) serving for the  year 2008.  In that capacity he served as its spokesperson and the face of the NDA.   He has been  recognized  as  one  of  the  Ebony  Power  150  as  an  Organizational  Leader  in  May  2008  and  was  featured in the July 2008 issue of Ebony with an article entitled “Taking Care of Your Smile Means a  Better Healthier You.”   He is included in the Baltimore Urban League’s 2008 publication The State  of  Black  Baltimore  writing  on  “The  State  of  Oral  Health  Care  of  Baltimore  City.”    He  has  been  interviewed for radio and several newspapers across the nation regarding the status of oral health  66


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   care  in  the  black  community  and  representing  the  NDA  and  its  position  on  critical  issues  in  dentistry.  He  testified  for  the  NDA  before  the  U.S.  Food  and  Drug  Administration  Committee  on  Medical Devices in 2006.  He was on the 2008 Congressional Black Caucus Health Braintrust Panel  discussing  the  top  five  healthcare  issues  facing  the  Black  community  today.    Dr.  Fletcher  also  presented  during  the  2008  National  Medical  Association  Colloquium  on  the  Role  of  Dentists  in  Addressing  Obesity  in  America.    He  was  a  panelist  at  the  “NDA  on  the  Hill”  in  2006  discussing  Public  Policy  Advocacy  and  has  testified  before  committees  in  the  House  and  Senate  of  the  Maryland State Legislature. 

Monday, p.m.  

Opening Luncheon 12:00 – 1:30 

Landmark 1‐4

 

   

Dr. Mark S. Wrighton  Chancellor  Washington  University in St. louis  St. Louis, MO 

  Mark S. Wrighton, Ph.D., was elected the 14th Chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis in  1995, and serves as its chief executive officer. In the years following his appointment, the University  has  made  significant  progress  in  student  quality,  campus  improvements,  resource  development,  curriculum, and international reputation.  Born  in  Jacksonville,  Florida  in  1949,  Wrighton  received  his  B.S.  degree  with  honors  in  chemistry  from Florida State University in 1969. While at Florida State, he studied under Professor Jack Saltiel  and  upon  graduation  received  the  Monsanto  Chemistry  Award  for  outstanding  research.  He  did  his  graduate  work  at  the  California  Institute  of  Technology  under  Professors  Harry  B.  Gray  and  George  S.  Hammond,  receiving  his  Ph.D.  there  in  1972.  His  doctoral  dissertation  was  on  ʺPhotoprocesses  in  Metal‐Containing  Molecules.ʺ  He  was  named  the  first  recipient  of  the  Herbert  Newby McCoy Award at Caltech based on his research accomplishments. He received an Honorary  Doctor of Science Degree from the University of West Florida in 1983 and an Honorary Doctorate of  Humane Letters from Florida State University in 2007. Chancellor Wrighton was the recipient of the  Distinguished Alumni Award from Caltech in 1992. In 2002, he was named an Honorary Professor  at Shandong University in Jinan, China. He has delivered commencement addresses at Caltech in  1995 and Florida State University in 2007.  Wrighton started his career at MIT in 1972 as Assistant Professor of Chemistry. He was appointed  Associate  Professor  in  1976  and  Professor  in  1977.  From  1981  until  1989  he  held  the  Frederick  G.  Keyes  Chair  in  Chemistry.  In  1989  he  was  appointed  the  first  holder  of  the  Ciba‐Geigy  Chair  in  67


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   Chemistry. He was Head of the Department of Chemistry from 1987‐1990 and became Provost of  MIT in 1990, a post he held until the summer of 1995.  Wrighton  is  the  author  or  co‐author  of  more  than  300  articles  published  in  professional  and  scholarly journals, and he holds 14 patents. He has research interests in the areas of transition metal  catalysis,  photochemistry,  surface  chemistry,  molecular  electronics,  and  in  photoprocesses  at  electrodes.  Principal  objectives  of  his  research  have  been  to  elucidate  the  basic  principles  underlying the conversion of solar energy to chemical fuels and electricity, to discern new catalysts  and  ways  of  making  them,  to  understand  chemistry  at  interfaces,  and  to  provide  the  knowledge  base  for  development  of  new  electro‐chemical  devices.  Wrighton  has  lectured  widely  on  his  research  work  and  has  given  more  than  40  named  lectureships  at  distinguished  colleges  and  universities  in  the  United  States  and  other  countries.  About  70  individuals  received  the  Ph.D.  degree under his supervision at MIT.   

  1:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.  Lindell    “The Chemistry of Leadership”  Presented by Sandra Shullman 

Monday p.m.  

COACh Workshop

SANDRA L. SHULLMAN, Ph.D.  S      Dr.  Shullman  is  Managing  Partner,  Columbus  Office  of  the  Executive  Development  Group,  an  international  leadership  development  and  consulting  firm.    She  received  her  Ph.D.  in  counseling  psychology  from  The  Ohio  State  University.    During  that  same  time,  Sandy  was  a  co‐founder  of  the  Women’s  Studies  Program at Ohio State.     Dr.  Shullman  is  a  nationally  known  organizational  consultant  and  has  written  and  presented  extensively  on  the  topics  of  performance  appraisal,  performance  management,  strategic  succession  planning,  career  development,  management  of  self‐esteem  and  motivation,  team  building,  diversity  management,  and  the  management  of  individual,  organizational  and  systems  change  strategies.    She  is  well  known  for  her  work  related  to  executive assessment and development and co‐authored Performance Appraisal on the Line.    

        68


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS           Monday, p.m. 

Technical Session 1 1:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.  2009 Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Award Winner  

  Landmark 6‐7     

     Malika Jeffries‐EL, Ph.D.       Assistant Professor       Iowa State University      Malika  Jeffries‐EL  took  an  interest  in  science  after  taking  her  first  chemistry  class  at  Brooklyn  Technical  High,  an  honors  public  high  school  in  New  York  City.  She  then  attended  Wellesley  College,  where  she  completed  a  Bachelors  degree  in  chemistry  and  the  George  Washington  University  (Washington,  D.C.)  where  she  obtained  Masters  and  Doctorate  degrees  in  organic  and  polymer  chemistry,  respectively.  After  a  post‐doctoral  fellowship  under  the  supervision  of  Dr.  Richard  D.  McCullough  (Carnegie  Mellon  University), she joined the faculty in the Chemistry Department at Iowa State University.   Her  research  efforts  focus  on  the  design  and  synthesis  of  conjugated  polymers  and  the  investigation  of  these  materials  for  use  in  a  number  of  applications  (e.g.  photovoltaic  cells,  field  effect  transistors  and  organic  light  emitting  diodes).  She  has  received  two  NOBCChE  awards  previously the Eastman Kodak Dr. Theophilus Sorrell Award in 2000 and the Agilent Professional  Development  Award  in  2008.  In  addition,  Malika  has  also  received  the  Emerald  Honors  for  most  promising minority scientist (Science Spectrum Magazine), the Untenured Faculty Award (3M), the  Gregory L. and Kathleen C. Geoffroy Faculty Fellowship, 2005‐2009 and NSF‐CAREER 2009‐2014.      

 

 

  Tuesday, a.m.  Wednesday, a.m. 

Teachers Workshop       7:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m. 

  Landmark 5 

“Teachersʹ Embracing Science through Education”  Sponsored by 3M AAAS,  Roche Pharmaceuticals, and Committee for Action Program Services 

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services  Linda  L.  Davis  is  founder  and  executive  director  of  the  Committee  for  Action  Program  Services  (CAPS).    CAPS  is  a  non‐profit  organization  specializing  in  teacher’s  professional  development  in  science  and  technology.  In  addition,  she  provides  science  enrichment  program  for  students  in  grades  4  through  12,  such  as  field  trips  to  Johnson  Space  Center ‐ Houston; facilitate overnight camps to Science Place, Fair Park in  69


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   Dallas,  Texas.  CAPS  has  collaborated  with  the  Luna  Planetary  and  Institute  (LPI)  and  the  Genesis  Mission  Program,  a  space  science  educational program through  NASA on professional development workshops for science educators in Dallas, Texas .  Mrs. Davis  is  the  Administrator  at  Inspired  Vision  Academy  I  in  Dallas,  Texas.  Her  responsibilities  include  special program coordinator for science curriculum and enrichment programs; elementary advisor  for  test  required  programs;  grant  writer  for  the  science  department  and  community  outreach  programs, and coordinator/facilitator for staff development.  Mrs. Davis holds a Bachelor of Science  in Organizational Management from Paul Quinn College in Dallas, Texas.     

  DR. SAUNDRA YANCY McGUIRE  Dr.  Saundra  Yancy  McGuire  is  the  Director  of  the  Center  for  Academic  Success,  Adjunct  Professor  of  Chemistry,  and  Associate  Dean  of  University  College  at  Louisiana  State  University  in  Baton  Rouge, Louisiana.  She received her B.S. degree, magna cum laude,  from Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA; her M.A. from Cornell  University,  Ithaca,  NY;  and  her  Ph.D.  in  Chemical  Education  from  the  University  of  Tennessee  at  Knoxville,  where  she  received  the  Chancellor’s Citation for Exceptional Professional Promise.  Prior to  joining   LSU   in   August  1999,  she  spent  eleven  years at  Cornell   University,  where  she  served  as  Director  of  the  Center  for  Learning  and  Teaching  and  Senior  Lecturer  in  the  Department  of  Chemistry,  and  received  the  coveted  Clark  Distinguished  Teaching  Award.      Dr.  McGuire  is  the  author  of  numerous  publications,  including  the  Problem  Solving  Guide  and  Workbook,  Study  Guide,  and  Instructorʹs  Teaching Guide for Russo/Silverʹs Introductory Chemistry, Third Edition. She is the recipient  of numerous awards.  Her most awards include the 2007 Diversity Award from the Council  on Chemical Research; the 2006 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics,  and Engineering Mentoring, awarded by President Bush in an Oval Office Ceremony; the  2005  National  Service  Award  and  the  2002  Dr.  Henry  C.  McBay  Outstanding  Chemistry  Teacher  Award,  both  presented  by  the  National  Organization  for  the  Professional  Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE); and the 2003, 2004,  2005,  and  2007  Teaching  in  Higher  Education  Conference  Outstanding  Presentation  Award.  Additionally,  she  was  designated  a  2003  YWCA  Woman  of  Achievement  in  the  City of  Baton  Rouge, Louisiana.    She is  married  to Dr.  Stephen  C. McGuire, and they are  the parents of Dr. Carla Abena McGuire Davis and Dr. Stephanie Niyonu McGuire, and the  grandparents of Joshua Bolurin, Ruth Anaya, Daniel Tabansi, and Joseph Olufemi Davis.   

Ms. Yolanda George, American Association for the Advancement of Science  Yolanda S. George is Deputy Director and Program Director for the Directorate for Education and  Human  Resources  Programs  (EHR)  at  the  American  Association  for  the  Advancement  of  Science  (AAAS).    Her  responsibilities  include  conceptualizing,  developing,  implementing,  planning,  and  70


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   directing  multi‐year  intervention  and  research  projects  related  to  increasing  the  participation  of  minorities, women, and disabled persons in science and engineering.  Her recent K‐12 mathematics  and science reform work includes contributing to the development of materials for infusing equity  into systemic reforms and conducting research on how state departments of education and school  districts  are  aligning  equity  and  science  and  math  initiatives.    Also,  she  has  conducted  equity  reviews  for  textbooks  and  software  publishers  and  test  developers,  including  New  Standards  Science.    She  serves  as  a  consultant  to  numerous  federal  and  state  agencies,  foundations  and  corporations,  and  colleges  and  universities  including  the  National  Science  Foundation,  the  U.S.  Department of Education, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the New Jersey State Department of  Education,   and   the   Louisiana   State   Department  of Education, and serves on several advisory  boards  including  the  National  Academy  of  Engineering  Committee  on  Women  in  Engineering,  California State University, Los Angeles Access Project, and WGBH Instructional Television Science  Project and others.  

  Mr. Gerald W. McElvy, President, Exxon Mobil Foundation, Dallas, Texas      Gerald  W.  McElvy  is  President  of  the  ExxonMobil  Foundation,  the  primary  philanthropic  arm  of  Exxon  Mobil  Corporation.  The  Foundation’s  focus  areas  include  math  and  science  education,  fighting  malaria  and  other  infectious  diseases,  empowering  women  and  girls  in  developing countries, public policy, and civic and community programs  in regions where ExxonMobil has significant operations.     Mr.  McElvy  has  been  employed  by  ExxonMobil  for  more  than 31  years  and has extensive financial and general management experience. Prior to  assuming  his  current  responsibilities,  he  served  as  Europe  downstream  planning  manager  for  Exxon  Company  International,  finance  director  and  controller  of  Esso  Australia, upstream controller of Exxon Mobil Production Company, U.S.A., and general auditor of  Exxon Mobil Corporation.    Mr.  McElvy  is  a  Trustee  of  the  Eisenhower  Fellowships,  which  sponsors  U.S.  internships  for  emerging  global  leaders.  He  also  serves  on  the  Executive  Advisory  Council  at  the  University  of  Houstonʹs Bauer College of Business and is a board member of the University of Houston Alumni  Association.  He  is  a  board  member  of  Reasoning  Mind,  an  innovative,  web‐based  middle  school  math  program  focused  on  improving  math  education  and  closing  the  achievement  gap;  and  was  recently appointed to the Board of the Texas Academy of Math and Science based at the University  of  North  Texas.  He  is  a  member  of  Financial  Executives  International,  the  American  Institute  of  Certified Public Accountants, and the Executive Leadership Council. He has previously served as a  board  member  of  several  education  and  community  service  organizations  including  the  Texas  Business  and  Education  Coalition,  Kappa  Alpha  Psi  Foundation,  the  United  Way  of  Texas  Gulf  Coast,  Save  the  Tiger  Council,  Friends  of  Hermann  Park,  and  Odyssey  House,  a  chemical  dependency  recovery  program  for  adolescents  in  Houston.  Mr.  McElvy  is  a  native  of  Ft.  Worth,  Texas.    He  earned  a  BBA  degree  in  Economics  and  Accounting  in  1975  from  the  University  of  Houston and completed an MBA in Finance from UCLA in 1977.    71


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS      

JAMES GRAINGER, PhD, Analytical/Environmental Chemist,  Center for Disease Control and Preventive  Dr  James  Grainger  is  an  analytical/environmental  chemist  at  the  Centers  for  Disease  Control  and  Prevention  in  Atlanta,  currently  responsible for the PAH Adducts Group in the National Center for  Environmental  Health.    Primary  projects  include  development  of  new analytical methods for extending analytical exposure windows  for  organic  environmental  toxicants  through  human  exposure  profiles  of  DNA,  serum  albumin  and  hemoglobin  adducts.    Born  in  South  Carolina,  he  received  a  BS  in  chemistry  from  South  Carolina  State  College,  a  MS  degree  in  physical/organic  chemistry  from  Atlanta  University,  and  a  PhD  in  polymer/organic  chemistry from Atlanta University.  Dr Grainger has developed and presented a variety of  talks  on  African  origins  of  mathematics,  science  and  technology,  developing  a  multidisciplinary  course  on  a  chemistry  platform  entitled  Prehistoric  Future  Chemistry  I.   The course examines the development of art, mathematics, science and technology in five  river  civilizations  from  the  Stone  Age  to  the  Iron  Age  and  was  taught  for  two  years  at  Spelman  College.    Dr  Grainger  currently  serves  as  NOBCChE  Southeast  Regional  Chair.   Central  to  his  variety  of  interests  are  family  interactions  with  wife,  Barbara,  daughter  Adrienne, son Daren and grandchildren AJ and Ari. 

 Tuesday, a.m. 

  Plenary II ‐ Biotechnology Symposium  8:30 a.m. ‐  9:30 a.m.    

Portland/  Benton 

 

Squire J. Booker, Ph.D.  Associate Professor  Pennsylvania State University      Squire  J.  Booker  was  raised  in  Beaumont,  Texas,  where  he  got  excited  about  science  during  frequent  trips  as  an  elementary  school student to NASA in Houston with his Uncle, Albert J. Price.  He  received  a  BA  degree  with  a  concentration  in  Chemistry  from  Austin College (Sherman, Texas) in 1987. In the summer of 1986 he  participated  in  the  first  MIT  Minority  Summer  Science  Research  Program, where he worked in the laboratory of the late Dr. William  H.  Orme‐Johnson  in  the  Department  of  Chemistry.  He  earned  his  Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with Professor JoAnne Stubbe (1994),  72


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   and  was  supported  by  NSF–NATO  and  NIH  Fellowships  for  postdoctoral  studies  in  the  laboratories  of  Dr.  Daniel  Mansuy  (Université  René  Descartes,  Paris,  France)  and  Professor  Perry  Frey  (Institute  for  Enzyme  Research,  University  of  Wisconsin–Madison),  respectively.  In  1999  he  moved to The Pennsylvania State University as an independent investigator, where he is currently  an  Associate  Professor  of  Chemistry,  and  an  Associate  Professor  of  Biochemistry  and  Molecular  Biology.     Dr.  Booker  is  a  former  Minnie  Stevens  Piper  Fellow,  and  has  received  numerous  other  awards,  which  include  the  George  T.  Landolt  Memorial  Fellowship  in  Chemistry,  the  P.  S.  Wharton  memorial  Fellowship  in  Chemistry,  the  American  Chemical  Society  Outstanding  Student  Award  (local  chapter),  NSF  Faculty  Early  Career  Award,  and  the  Presidential  Early  Career  Award  in  Science and Engineering. In addition to other national service, Dr. Booker served as co‐chair for the  Gordon  Conference  on  Enzymes,  Co‐enzymes,  and  Metabolic  Pathways  (2007),  and  is  currently  serving on the Minority Affairs Committee for the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular  Biology,    Dr.  Booker’s  research  is  concerned  with  novel  mechanisms  and  pathways  for  the  biosynthesis  of  natural  products  and  metabolites,  as  well  as  the  involvement  of  metal  ions  and  metal  clusters  in  enzyme  catalysis.  One  pathway  of  particular  focus  is  the  biosynthesis  of  the  cofactor  and  antioxidant, lipoic acid.       

    Tuesday, a.m. 

Technical Session 5 9:45 – 11:45 a.m.  Dr. Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher   Award Winner   

         Aubert   

 

Shawn Abernathy, Ph.D.   Associate Professor  Howard University          Dr.  Shawn  M.  Abernathy  is  an  Associate  Professor  in  Chemistry  at  Howard  University.    He  is  a  physical  chemist  and  currently  teaches  undergraduate and graduate courses in physical chemistry.  His area of  expertise is in experimental NMR spectroscopy and Dr. Abernathy uses  numerous NMR techniques in his research.  He has successfully utilized  conventional NMR and a NMR micro‐probe to elucidate the dioxin 2, 3,  7,  8  –  tetrachlorodibenzo‐p‐dioxin  (TCDD)  spiked  into  the  oil  and  fat  salmon  and  meat  products;  this  work  was  done  in  collaboration  with  Dr.  Roberto  Gill  the  director  of  Carnegie  Mellon  University  (CMU)  Department of Chemistry NMR facility.  He has used NMR to perform  T1  and  T2  relaxation  experiments  on  transition  metal  complexes  with  73


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   spins  S=1  and  S=3/2.    Over  the  past  two  years,  Dr.  Abernathy  has  been  conducting  collaborative  research  with  Dr.  James  Wishart  of  Brookhaven  National  Laboratory  Department  of  Chemistry  performing  NMR  diffusion  measurements  on  various  ionic  liquids  (IL’s)  and  has  prepared  IL  samples for kinetic studies on BNL Laser Electron Accelerator Facility (LEAF).  During the summer  of  2007,  Shawn  provided  his  expertise  in  NMR  to  make  available  the  capability  to  perform  NMR  diffusion experiments on BNL 400 MHz NMR.  Dr. Abernathy is the director of Howard University  Department of Chemistry NMR user facility.  In 2002, he supervised the renovation, upgrade of the  NMR laboratory, installation of a 400 MHz NMR spectrometer, and wrote an instruction manuel for  operating the instrument.  He is the first Howard University faculty member to participate in the  BNL faculty student team (FAST) program.  Recently, Shawn has worked along with BNL Office of  Educational Programs (OEP) in conducting their 2009 Mini‐semester Program that focused on ionic  liquids (IL) research.  Dr.  Abernathy  has  offered  his  professional  service  on  a  board  and  several  committees  as  well  as  in  the  community.    He  is  a  member  of  the  Howard  University  BWHR  (Baltimore  Washington Hampton Roads) LS‐AMP (Louis‐Stokes‐Alliance for Minority Participation) Program  Board  of  Governors  under  the  directorship  of  Dr.  Clarence  M.  Lee.    He  is  on  the  advisory  committees of the Benjamin Banneker Institute for Science and Technology and Howard University  Black Excellence in Science/Math Teaching (BEST) Education Research Project, which is part of the  Historically  Black  Colleges  and  Universities  Program  (HBCU‐UP)  sponsored  by  NSF.    He  has  taught  pre‐freshmen  chemistry  in  the  Howard  University  Science  Engineering  and  Mathematics  (HUSEM)  Program.    He  has  served  as  a  judge  for  NOBCChE  poster  and  undergraduate  oral  presentation  competition.    Shawn  has  served  as  an  NSF  panel  reviewer  of  NMR  proposals  (2002  and 2006) and a reviewer of general chemistry textbooks for the Wiley Publishing Co., Inc.  He is a  member of NOBCChE, ACS, Sigma Xi honor society, and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.   Shawn is  also  on  the  football  coaching  staff  at  Springbrook  High  School  in  Silver  Spring,  Maryland.    He  coaches receivers and outside linebackers for the junior varsity football team.       Dr. Abernathy is a graduate of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.  He received his BS in  chemistry, MS in inorganic chemistry (Dr. BJ Evans), and Ph.D. in physical chemistry (Dr. Robert  Sharp).  He was a postdoctoral research associate in the Biomedical NMR Laboratory of Dr. Paul C.  Wang  of  the  Department  of  Radiology  in  Howard  University  Cancer  Center.    Shawn  also  conducted  research  at  the  Howard  University  Beltsville  Research  Laboratory  conducting  x‐ray  diffraction and synchrotron radiation experiments on plastics at Argonne National Laboratory.                                   74


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS     Tuesday, p.m.    

Percy L. Julian Luncheon 12:00 – 1:15 p.m. 

Landmark 1‐4 

 

 

      Dr. Soni Olufemi Oyekan 

     Reforming and Isomerization Technologist       Marathon Oil     

Dr.  Soni  Olufemi  Oyekan  is  the  Reforming  &  Isomerization  Technologist  for  Marathon  Oil  with  wide  ranging  technical,  engineering  and  management  responsibilities  for  Marathon’s  seven  oil  refineries.    Soni  Oyekan holds 2 US patents and 8 foreign patents earned in the  first  7  years  of  research  and  development  work  in  catalytic  reforming technologies before moving into refining technology  support and management for DuPont, Sunoco, Amoco, BP and  Marathon.  A  most  significant  innovation,  in  collaboration  with  George  Swan,  led  to  Exxon’s KX‐160 and KX‐120/KX‐160 catalytic reforming catalyst systems in the early 1980s  and the concept of staging reforming catalysts to maximize gasoline blending component  and hydrogen production in semi and cyclic regenerative reforming units. Staged catalyst  systems  are  now  used  widely  in  the  oil  refining  industry  for  achieving  high  gasoline  component and hydrogen production in semi and cyclic regenerative reformers. Oyekan’s  second  significant  invention  of  two  stage  reduction  of  platinum/promoter  catalysts  has  been  incorporated  into  two  major  continuous  catalyst  regenerative  reforming  processes.  This is now used in over 100 continuous catalyst regeneration reforming units worldwide  for  maximizing  the  production  of  gasoline  and  hydrogen.    In  addition  to  catalytic  reforming, Dr. Oyekan has contributed extensively in oil refining processes such as paraffin  isomerization,  xylene  isomerization,  selective  hydrogenation,  toluene  disproportionation,  fluid catalytic cracking, hydrotreating, hydrocracking and sulfur guard bed technology. He  is  also  an  expert  in  the  management  of  precious  metal  systems.    He  led  precious  metals  programs for platinum and silver management for Sunoco and Amoco leading to savings  of millions of dollars for the companies in the 1990s.     Soni received the BS degree in Engineering and Applied Sciences in 1970 at Yale University.   He earned the MS at Carnegie Mellon University in 1972 and a Ph.D in chemical engineering from  Carnegie Mellon University in 1977.  He was made a member of Sigma Xi and Phi Kappa Phi honor  societies  in  1977.    He  was  also  given  a  North  American  Catalysis  Society  award  for  outstanding  graduate students in 1977.  Dr. Oyekan has worked in a variety of university academic programs  for underprivileged students where he had special opportunities to teach and mentor hundreds of  students.  He  taught  physical  sciences  in  the  University  Community  Education  Programs  (UCEP)  and chemistry in the Pittsburgh Engineering Impact Program (PIP) at the University of Pittsburgh  75


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   between 1972 and 1977. Dr Oyekan taught organic chemistry at the Allegheny Community College  in  Pittsburgh  in  1974  and  a  petroleum  refining  course  in  1984  at  the  New  Jersey  Institute  of  Technology  in  1984.    He  collaborated  with  Dr.  Stuart  Shih  and  Peter  Kokayeff  to  teach  the  “Catalytic  Processes  in  Petroleum  Refining”  course  between  1992  and  1997  in  the  AIChE  Continuing  Education  Program.  Dr.  Oyekan  is  a  member  of  the  National  Organization  of  Black  Chemists  and  Chemical  Engineers  (NOBCChE)  and  an  AIChE  Fellow.  He  is  a  past  chair  of  Fuels  and  Petrochemicals  Division  (F&PD)  and  the  Minority  affairs  Committee  (MAC).  He  has  been  recipient of the distinguished services awards from MAC and F&PD.  He is the 2008 recipient of the  AIChE  MAC  William  Grimes  award  and  was  chosen  as  one  of  nine  “Black  Eminent  Chemical  Engineers” at the AIChE Centennial in 2008. He is a past member of the AIChE Board of Directors  and a member of the AIChE Foundation Board of Trustees. He is married to Priscilla and they have  three daughters, one son and two grandsons.         

   

Wednesday, a.m. 

  “Academia:  What Are Your Options”  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.     Isiah Warner, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry  Louisiana State University   

Landmark 6 

  Isiah M. Warner was born in DeQuincy, Louisiana on July 20, 1946.   He graduated as Valedictorian of his high school class in 1964. He  graduated  Cum  Laude  from  Southern  University  with  a  B.S.  Degree  in  1968.  After  working  for  Battelle  Northwest  in  Richland,  Washington  for  five  years,  he  attended  graduate  school  in  chemistry  at  the  University  of  Washington,  receiving  his  PhD  in  analytical chemistry in June 1977.  He was an assistant professor of  chemistry  at  Texas  A&M  University  from  1977  to  1982.   He  was  awarded  tenure  and  promotion  to  associate  professor  in  1982.   However,  he  elected  to  join  the  faculty  of  Emory  University  as  associate professor and was promoted to full professor in 1986.  Dr.  Warner  was  named  to  an  endowed  chair  at  Emory  University  in  1987, and was the Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Chemistry  until he left in 1992.  During the 1988/89 academic year, he was on  leave  to  the  National  Science  Foundation  (NSF)  as  Program  Officer  for  Analytical  and  Surface  Chemistry.   In  August  1992,  Dr.  Warner  joined  Louisiana  State  University  as  Philip  W.  West  Professor  of  Analytical  and  Environmental  Chemistry.  He  was  Chair  of  the  Chemistry 

76


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   Department from July 1994‐97, and was appointed Boyd Professor of the LSU System in July 2000.  In April 2001, Dr. Warner was appointed the Vice Chancellor for Strategic Initiatives.  The primary research emphasis of Dr. Warnerʹs research group is the development and application  of  improved  methodology  (chemical,  mathematical,  and  instrumental)  for  studies  of  complex  chemical  systems.   His  research  interests  include  (1)  fluorescence  spectroscopy,  (2)  guest/host  interactions,  (3)  studies  in  organized  media,  (4)  spectroscopic  applications  of  multichannel  detectors,  (5)  chromatography,  (6)  environmental  analyses  and  (7)  mathematical  analyses  and  interpretation of chemical data using chemometrics (chemical data analysis techniques).    Dr. Warner has more than 230 published or in‐press articles in refereed journals since 1975.  He has  given more than 400 invited talks since 1979.  He also has 5 US patents, and he has one other patent  pending.  He has chaired thirty‐one doctoral theses since 1982 and is currently supervising thirteen  Ph.D.  theses.   Over  the  years,  he  has  received  many  awards  recognizing  his  scientific  and  mentoring efforts, including the NOBCChE Percy L. Julian Award in 1988, NOBCChE Outstanding  Teacher  Award  in  1993,  and  the  ACS  Award  for  Encouraging  Disadvantaged  Student  into  the  Sciences in 2003   

Wednesday, a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop:  Utilizing The STAR  9:00 a.m. ‐ 11:00 a.m.  1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.  Guest Speaker ‐ Carolyn Greco   President and CEO of THE FACET GROUP   

Kingsbury 

Carolyn Greco, President and CEO of THE FACET GROUP, has over 20  years  of  comprehensive  experience  in  workplace  consulting,  career  development and leadership training in a variety of applied settings.  She  earned a B.A. in Education with honors from Slippery Rock University in  Pennsylvania  in  1970  and  an  M.A.  from  the  University  of  Louisiana  in  1976.   Prior to starting FACET in 1979, Carolyn began her professional career in  secondary and university level education.  She served as Project Director to  a Fortune 50 energy company with P & L and operations responsibility for a network of nationwide  career  centers.   She  directed  project  sites  in  Atlanta,  Seattle  and  Houston  as  well  as  a  corporate  headquarter  site  in  San  Francisco.   She  has  extensive  experience  in  the  energy  industry  with  a  comprehensive  background  consulting  to  health  care,  finance,  chemical,  telecommunications  and   manufacturing. In 1990, she received the Governor Small Business Award for the State of Louisiana.  Carolyn  specializes  in  working  with  corporate  clients  who  have  achieved  success  and  are  now  focusing on fulfillment.  She is highly recognized for her expertise and innovation in the creation,  delivery  and  administration  of  career  management  and  workplace  programs  and  services.   Her  77


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   current  practice  includes  individualized  career  strategies  and  refocusing,  management  intervention/coaching and leadership training.  Specialized  training  is  from  New  York  Columbia  University,  in  Organizational  Development,  the  John F. Kennedy Institute for Career Development in Orinda, CA and the NTL Institute for Applied  Behavioral  Science  in  Bethel,  ME.   Carolyn  is  certified  in  the  Birkman  Method,  Strong  Interest  Inventory and the Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator.  Carolyn is a Board Member of the Association of Career Firms, North America Chapter.    

Wednesday, a.m. 

  NSF Graduate Research Fellowship  Informational Session  9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 10:30 a.m.  William Hahn, Ph.D.  Program Director  National Science Foundation   

Pershing/Lindell 

               William Hahn, Ph.D. 

     Program Director       National Science Foundation    William Hahn received his BA in Biology from Washington University in  St. Louis, then after a stint in the Peace Corps (Paraguay), received an MSc  in  Botany  from  Cornell  University.  After  that  he  spent  two  years  in  the  Guianas  working  for  the  Smithsonian  Institution  before  pursuing  his  PhD  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin,  Madison.  Following  an  NSF  Postdoctoral  Fellowship  at  the  Smithsonian,  he  was  Assistant,  then  Associate  Professor  of  Environmental  Biology  at  Columbia  University  until  2003.  From  there  he  moved  to  Georgetown  University  as  Associate  Dean  and  is  currently  on  leave  to  the  National  Science  Foundation where he is the Program Director for the Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Dr.  Hahnʹs  research  considers  plant  molecular  evolution  and  conservation  biology  with  special  emphasis on the palms.                78


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS      

  Professional Development Workshop  “Lets Talk Graduate School”  11:15 a.m. ‐ 12:15 6. p.m.    

Wednesday, a.m. 

Landmark 6 

 

  Presenter 

G. Dale Wesson, Ph.D., PE  Interim Vice President for Research  Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University    See Technical Session 12 for Biographical information 

   

       

Wednesday, p.m.    

“What It Takes To Find A Job” 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.   

  Landmark 3 

 

Nick Nikolaides, Ph.D.  Manager, Doctoral Recruiting and University  Relations  The Procter and Gamble Company    Dr.  Nikolaides  received  his  Ph.D.  in  Synthetic  Organic  Chemistry  in  1989  from  Cornell  University  under  the  direction of Professor Bruce Ganem.  After a Postdoctoral  Fellowship  with  Professor  Gary  H.  Posner  at  The  Johns  Hopkins University, Dr. Nikolaides accepted employment  at  3M  Pharmaceuticals  in  their  Drug  Discovery  group.   While  at  3M,  he  contributed  towards  the  design and synthesis of immune response modifiers as antiviral agents.  He then moved to Procter  &  Gamble  Pharmaceuticals  in  1994,  where  he  spent  the  better  part  of  14  years  in  drug  discovery  targeting  cardiovascular  indications,  creating  and  leading  a  late  discovery/early  development  custom  chemistry  &  scale‐up  group,  and  more  recently  establishing  a  Competitive  &  Technical  Intelligence  function  for  P&G  Global  Health  Care.   He  currently  manages  Procter  &  Gamble’s  Doctoral  Recruiting  &  University  Relations  efforts  and  is  a  key  player  in  expanding  P&G’s  open  innovation “Connect + Develop” business model.  

    79


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS    

Thursday, a.m. 

  Plenary V:    Alternate Energy Solutions Plenary  8:00 a.m. ‐‐ 9:00 a.m.  “New Lithium Battery Technology”   

Portland/Benton 

  Levi T. Thompson, Ph.D.  Richard E. Balzhiser Professor of   Chemical Engineering  Professor of Mechanical Engineering  Director, Hydrogen Energy   TechnologyLaboratory  The University of Michigan 

    Professor Thompson is the Richard E. Balzhiser Professor of  Chemical Engineering, Professor of Mechanical Engineering  and  Director  of  the  Hydrogen  Energy  Technology  Laboratory.    He  earned  his  B.ChE.  from  the  University  of  Delaware,  and  M.S.E.  degrees  in  Chemical  Engineering  and  Nuclear  Engineering,  and  a  Ph.D.  in  Chemical  Engineering  from  the  University of Michigan. Research in his group focuses primarily on the design, characterization and  development  of  nanostructured  catalytic,  electrocatalytic  and  adsorbent  materials.  Technological  applications  for  the  work  include  hydrogen  production  from  carbon  neutral  resources,  fuel  cells  and batteries. From 2001 to 2005, he served as Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education in the  College of Engineering and presently is Director of the Michigan‐Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority  Participation.    Professor  Thompson  is  recipient  of  a  2006  Michiganian  of  the  Year  Award  for  his  research, entrepreneurship, and recruitment and mentoring of minority students, National Science  Foundation  Presidential  Young  Investigator  Award,  Engineering  Society  of  Detroit  Gold  Award,  Union  Carbide  Innovation  Recognition  Award  and  Dow  Chemical  Good  Teaching  Award.    He  is  also  co‐founder,  with  his  wife,  of  T/J  Technologies,  a  developer  of  nanomaterials  for  advanced  batteries and subsidiary of A123Systems.  Professor Thompson is Consulting Editor for the AIChE  Journal, and member of the External Advisory Committee for the Center of Advanced Materials for  Purification  of  Water  with  Systems  (NSF  Science  and  Technology  Center  at  the  University  of  Illinois),  National  Academy’s  Chemical  Sciences  Roundtable,  and  AIChE  Chemical  Engineering  Technology Operating Council. 

              80


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS  

Thursday a.m. 

  Professional Development Workshop  9:00 a.m. ‐‐ 11:00 a.m.  Academia: What Are your Options (pt 2)    

Kingsbury 

       Gregory Tew, Ph.D., Associate Professor,        University of Massachusetts, Amherst    Greg  was  born  in  North  Carolina  and  attended  North  Carolina  State  University  where  he  earned  a  B.S.  in  Chemistry  in  1995,  graduating  with honors.  During this time he worked at the University with Prof.  D.  A.  Shultz  performing  undergraduate  research  on  self‐assembled  monolayers  containing  stable  free  radicals  and  at  Glaxo,  formerly  Burroughs‐Wellcome  working  on  cardiovascular  therapies.    Upon  graduation,  he  attended  the  University  of  Illinois‐Urbana  to  pursue  graduate  studies  with  Prof.  Sam  Stupp.  His  work  on  self‐assembling  rod‐coil  molecules  lead  to  an  understanding  of  the  important  molecular structures and association energies governing nanostructure  formation.  While in graduate school, his work was recognized by two  fellowship  awards  including  the  Beckman  Research  fellowship  and  American  Chemical  Society  Organic  Division  Fellowship  in  1998  and  1999,  respectively.    After  graduating in 2000, he  joined Prof. William DeGrado’s laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania  in Biochemistry and Biophysics were he spent one year studying biomimetic principles leading to  several publications and the formation of a new company.  In 2001, he started his faculty position in  Polymer  Science  and  Engineering  at  the  University  of  Massachusetts,  Amherst.    His  research  interests include Supramolecular polymer science, bioinspired and biomimetic structures, polymers  for  biomedical  science,  self  organization,  well  defined  macromolecular  architectures,  functional  materials, novel biomaterials, hydrogels. 

  Thursday, p.m.  

GEM Workshop 2:30 – 3:30 p.m.  ʺ Why Graduate School?ʺ  

  Kingsbury 

           Marcus Huggans, Ph.D. 

     Senior Recruiter/Programming Specialist       The National GEM Consortium       Notre Dame, IN    Marcus Huggans, Ph.D., is a native of St. Louis, Missouri.  He was educated  in the University City and Lutheran Parochial school systems.  He graduated  81


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS   in 1991 from Lutheran High School North.   Marcus  completed  his  engineering  studies  at  the  University  of  Missouri‐Rolla.  He  received  a  BS  degree  in  Electrical  Engineering  in  96,  an  MS  in  Engineering  Management  in  97  and  a  Ph.D.  in  Engineering Management in 98.  He was one of the first African‐American males to earn a Ph.D. in  this  discipline  from  the  University.  For  his  Ph.  D.  dissertation,  Huggans  conducted  a  study  to  determine if different Internet‐based study aids helped students of different learning styles under  the  advisors  Dr.  Halvard  E.  Nystrom  and  Dr.  Harvest  L.  Collier.  The  title  of  his  dissertation  was  “The  Impact  of  Learning  Styles  Using  Web‐based  Asynchronous  Distance  Learning  to  Enhance  Instruction by Electrical Engineering Students.” His findings indicate that not everyone thinks and  learns  in  the  same  way  and  being  aware  of  the  variations  in  learning  styles  can  help  professors  improve their teaching environment and students test scores.  Marcus conducted his research as a  GEM fellow through the National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering  and Science Inc, sponsored by Texas Instruments.     Dr. Huggans has had a variety of job opportunities.  He has worked for 3M Company, AT&T Bell  Laboratories,  Department  of  Justice‐Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation  (FBI),  and  Texas  Instruments  Inc (TI).  He began his professional career at TI in 1996 as an intern in the Digital Light Processing  Group  where  he  was  a  software  engineer.   Marcus  developed  C  algorithms  to  test  the  color  integrity of DMD projectors to enable them to handle hue transitions.  In December of 1998, Marcus  joined  TI  full‐time  as  a  member  of  the  Technical  Sales  Associate  program.   He  has  worked  in  Technical  Training  Organization  (TTO)  developing  technical  workshops  for  Digital  Signal  Processors (DSP) customer and catalog products.  He has also worked as a Technical Information  Specialist in the Product Information Center (PIC) supporting customers worldwide.   Dr. Huggans transitioned from Technical Sales to Strategic Marketing/New Product Development  for the PanelBus Division in May 2000 where he helped evaluate and influence TI’s next generation  features  that  will  power  display  technologies  like  HDTVʹs,  LCD  Monitors,  and  Digital  CRTs.   Finally  at  TI,  he  worked  in  an  applications  engineering  role  for  four  years  evaluating  consumer  electronics and multi‐media IEEE 1394 products and supporting US and international customers.   Dr.  Huggans  ran  his  own  real  estate  company  while  teaching  Marketing,  Management,  and  Mathematics at the University of Phoenix. Dr. Huggans also worked at the University of Missouri‐ Rolla (UMR) as the Director of the Student Diversity and Academic Support Program.  Under his  leadership, UMR  has  experienced  unprecedented  growth  in  the  recruitment  of  under‐represented  minorities’ students in the areas of science and engineering.   Currently, he works for the National  GEM  Consortium  (GEM)  under  the  direction  of  Ms.  Michele  Lezama.   At  GEM,  Dr.  Huggans  recruits  and  conducts  programming  to  encourage  under‐represented  minority  students  to  pursue  their  graduate  degrees  in  science,  technology,  engineering,  and  applied  mathematics  (STEM)  fields.     Currently,  Dr.  Huggans  resides  in  Dallas,  TX  where  he  is  happily  married  to  his  lovely  wife  Melanie, and he is a proud father of his daughter Hannah and son Ellis.  In his spare time, he enjoys  attending  church,  working  with  elementary,  high  school,  and  college  students,  and  studying  various  investment  vehicles.   He  also  enjoys  real  estate  investing,  stocks  and  options,  and  entrepreneurship.  Dr. Huggans believes that all individuals need to take control of their financial  future.  It is not the vehicle that will make you financially independent; it is the dedication to it.   

    82


CONFERENCE  SPEAKERS     Thursday, p.m.  

Technical Session 12 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.  NOBCChE Professional Chemical  Engineering Awardee   

  Parkview     

   

G. Dale Wesson, Ph.D., PE       Interim Vice President for Research       Florida A&M University    Dr. Wesson is currently the Interim Vice President for Research  at Florida A&M University. His is also has a joint appointment  as  Associate  Professor  in  the  Biological  and  Agricultural  Systems  Engineering  (BASE)  Program  at  Florida  A&M  University  and  an  Associate  Professor  in  the  Department  of  Chemical  Engineering  at  the  FAMU‐FSU  College  of  Engineering. Dr. Wesson received his Bachelor of Science degree  from the Illinois Institute of Technology, his Masters of Science degree from the Georgia Institute of  Technology  and  his  Doctor  of  Philosophy  from  Michigan  State  University,  all  in  the  area  of  chemical  engineering.  He  has  over  nine  years  of  industrial  experience  at  the  Dow  Chemical  Company and is a registered professional engineer in the states of Michigan and Florida.      Dr. Wesson’s research interests are in the area of computational fluid dynamics of confined swirling  flows.    His  current  research  projects  include  modeling  of  blood  flow  through  heart  valves  and  coronary  arteries  and  the  heat  transfer  within  graphite  foam  matrixes.  Dr.  Wesson  has  over  50‐ combined  research  publications  and  presentations  and  over  $3.0  million  of  funded  research  projects.     In December of 2001, Dr. Wesson graduated the first Chemical Engineering Ph.D. student at Florida  A & M University – Dr. Shannon Grady.  Dr. Wesson was also awarded the “Dr. Henry C. McBay  Outstanding  Teacher  Award”  by  the  National  Organization  for  the  Professional  Advancement  of  Black  Chemists  and  Chemical  Engineers  (NOBCChE).    Dr.  Wesson  was  a  GEM  fellow  while  pursuing his Masters of Science in chemical engineering at Georgia Tech. The American Institute of  Chemical Engineering (AIChE) honored Dr. Wesson as an Eminent Black Chemical Engineer at the  100th anniversary annual meeting in November 2008. 

 

   

83


Claflin University The World Needs Visionaries DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY Claflin University’s Department of Chemistry offers undergraduate students stateof-the-art research and instrumentation and courses in all major areas of chemistry. The department boasts many distinctions which are nationally recognized. Our eminent faculty holds outstanding teaching and research credentials from America’s top research institutions. The department’s students are the recipients of national research and outreach awards. Upon graduation 85% of the Claflin University’s chemistry students attend graduate school or join STEM workforce.

Majors Chemistry (ACS approved) Biochemistry Environmental Science

THE #1 HBCU IN THE NATION

Forbes.com

Student Opportunities Departmental Book Scholarships HBCU-UP Tutoring SC AMP Summer Bridge/Tutoring NNSA Boot camp Laboratory assistants Supplemental Instruction Conference presentations GRE awards/Graduate School Preparation Distinguished Seminar Series Award winning student organizations (ACS) CU Research experiences funded by: HBCU-UP (NSF); SC-AMP; UNCF-MERCK; DOD; EPSCoR; HHI; SC Space Grant Consortium

WWW.CLAFLIN.EDU Claflin University ~ 400 Magnolia Street, Orangeburg SC 29115 ~ 1-800-922-1276


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     Monday, a.m.  

Technical Session 1    4:00 – 6:00 p.m.    Landmark 6‐7  Lloyd Ferguson Young  Scientist Award Symposium  – Materials Chemistry   

Sibrina Collins, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry, The College of Wooster  Presenters       4:15 p.m. – 4:55  Lloyd Ferguson Young Scientist Awardee  “Synthesis Of Novel Conjugated Polymers Based On Benzobisoxazoles”  p.m.    Jared F. Mike, Andrew J. Makowski and Malika Jeffries‐EL*  Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011    Abstract     Polybenzobisoxazoles posses many exceptional electronic, optical and thermal properties and thus  are ideally suited for diverse organic semiconducting applications, yet these materials have found  limited  utility  due  their  lack  of  solubility  in  organic  solvents.  A  promising  approach  for  the  synthesis of soluble organic semiconductors is the combination of the benzobisoxazole moiety with  substituted  aromatic  rings.  However,  the  harsh  conditions  required  for  the  synthesis  of  benzobisoxazoles  has  prevented  the  synthesis  of  benzobisoxazoles  bearing  reactive  handles.  Typically, benzobisoxazoles are synthesized via condensation reactions, in acidic mediums at high  temperatures.  Recently  we  have  developed  a  new  approach  for  the  synthesis  of  optoelectronic  building  blocks  based  on  benzo[1,2‐d;4,5‐dʹ]  bisoxazoles  (trans‐BBO)  and  benzo[1,2‐d;5,4‐dʹ]  bisoxazoles  (cis‐BBO)  via  the  Lewis  acid  catalyzed  reaction  of  various  orthoesters  with  2,5‐  diamino‐ hydroquinone and 4,6‐diaminoresorcinol respectively. In all cases the target compounds  were obtained cleanly and in high yield. Subsequent transformations yield several building blocks  suitable  for  coupling  with  aryl  compounds  via  a  variety  of  methods.  The  utility  of  these  compounds  as  building  blocks  for  the  synthesis  of  novel,  soluble  polybenzobisazoles  is  demonstrated.  The  impact  of  structural  modification  on  the  optical,  electronic  and  physical  properties of the resulting polymers will be presented.   

Session Chair 

R N

N Y

Y O

O

O cis-BBO

Ar

Z

Y

Z

O

trans-BBO

N

O

O

Ar

R Ar

+ Z

N

n

R

N

Y N

+ Z

O

N

N

O

Ar n

R

85


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS         4:55 p.m. – 5:15  p.m. 

“Novel  Precursor  Design  For  The  MOCVD  Of  Metal  Oxides  And  Metal  Nitrides”  

Felicia A. McClary, Jason S. Matthews*  Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington DC, 20059, USA  Abstract  Careful  precursor  selection  allows  for  the  growth  of  high  purity  thin  films  via  MOCVD.   We  previously  utilized  a  novel  zinc  bis‐β‐enaminoesterate  to  grow  ZnO  films  which  contained  significantly  less  carbon  than  that  which  was  grown  from  the  analogous  zinc‐β‐ketoiminates.   More  recently;  we  have  developed  new  precursors  for  indium  and  gallium  nitride  by  reacting  a  series of primary amines with chlorosilanes to afford the desired silylamine.  The isolated products  were  purified  via  distillation  and  subsequently  reacted  with  butyllithium  to  afford  the  lithium  silylamide.  The metathesis reaction of the lithium silylamide with chlorides of gallium and indium  resulted in the formation of the precursors suitable for the MOCVD growth of metal‐nitrides.  In  addition, precursors utilizing secondary amines with triethylgallium were prepared.  The isolated  products  were  characterized  via  NMR,  and  FT‐IR  and  the  X‐ray  crystal  structure  deduced.   Precursor volatility will be assessed via TGA.     5:15 p.m. – 5:35  p.m. 

“Renewable Biomass Derived Polyolefins”   Rennisha R. Wickham, Jia Wei, Lawrence R. Sita*  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 

  Abstract     The  synthesis  of  new  polymeric  materials  through  the  living  homopolymerization,  copolymerization  and  coordinative  chain  transfer  copolymerization  (CCTP)  of  (‐)‐β‐citronellene  has  been  investigated  in  the  presence  of  {Cp*Zr(Me)2‐[N(tBu)C(Me)N(Et)]}[B(C6F5)]4  (1)   {Cp*Hf(Me)2[N(Et)C(Me)N(Et)]}[B(C6F5)]  (2),  or  {CpZr(Me)2[N(Cy)C(Me)N(Cy)]}[B(C6F5)]4  (3)  where (Cp* = η5‐C5Me5; Cp = η5‐C5;  Cy = dicyclohexyl) catalysts as a function of temperature.  β‐ citronellene is a non‐conjugated diene derived from the hydrogenation and cracking of α‐pinene; a  diterpene,  available  at  an  industrial  scale.   The  resulting  polymers  were  characterized  via  GPC,  DSC, 1D and 2D 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy.  Catalyst dependent changes in the melting  point and the molecular weight of homopolymers were observed.  Copolymerization and CCTP of  β‐citronellene  with  ethylene  produced  plastomers  with  percent  incorporations  of  β‐citronellene  ranging from 2‐11 mol%.      86


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Finally, this work has explored the utility of CCTP, employing multiple equivalents of diethylzinc  as a means to scale production of these novel copolymers.  This newly gained control coupled with  the  use  of  renewable  non‐conjugated  polyolefins  can  enable  the  expansion  and  versatility  of  the  range  of  plastics,  plasticizers,  oils,  and  elastomers  derived  from  monomers  derived  from  renewable biomass feedstock.     “Crystal Engineering Of Metal‐Organic Frameworks”  5:35 p.m. – 6:00    p.m.  Sibrina N. Collins 1*, Roland Falcon1, Jeanette A. Krause 2,3, and William Connick2   

College of Wooster, Department of Chemistry, Wooster, OH 44691  University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221  3Richard C. Elder X‐ray Crystallography Facility, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221  1

2

  Abstract    Metal‐organic  frameworks  (MOFs)  remain  a  popular  area  of  interest  for  potential  applications  of  fuel storage. Three metal salts, FeCl2.6H20, MnCl2.4H20, and La(CF3SO3)3.xH20 were reacted with p‐ phenylenebis(picolinaldimine)  (pbp)  at  room  temperature  using  crystal  engineering  techniques.  Single  crystal  X‐ray  analysis  reveals  that  [FeCl2(pbp)].2CH3OH  is  a  1‐dimensional  coordination  polymer. Little interaction between the parallel zigzag chains is observed, the separation distance  is  8.2Å.  As  a  result,  a  relatively  open  framework  is  adopted  with  cavity  sizes  suitable  for  small  guest  molecule  (e.g.  methanol)  incorporation.  Intermolecular  interactions  with  the  methanol  stabilize the open supramolecular framework.   

  Figure 1. Crystal structure of [FeCl2(pbp)].2CH3OH.  87


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS    

  Monday, p.m.  

Technical Session 2    4:00 – 6:00 p.m.  Portland   Bio‐Environmental Chemistry  Session Chair  Murphy Keller, Ph.D.  US Department of Energy    Presenters       “Pharmacological Properties Of Plants Traditionally Used As Anti‐Infe 4:00 p.m. –  And For Wound Healing”   4:20 p.m.    Hamilton, Allison*, Moshi, Mainen, M.D., Innocent, Ester Ph.D., Masimba, Pax, PhD, Lyn Maria, Meachem, Katrina    Minority Health International Research Training; Department of Chemistry, Hampton Univ Hampton, VA 23668, Summer 2008    Abstract     The root of Pterocarpus tinctorius and the leaf of  Whitfieldia Elongate T.anders were collected Traditional Healers located in the western region of Tanzania . Dried and extracted with so dichloromethane,  ethyl  acetate,  and  ethanol  to  yield  6  extracts[1].  The  extracts  were  test their antimicrobial activity against eight bacteria (Bacillus Cereus, Proteus mirabilis , Staphylo aureus,  Salmonella  typhi,  Shigella  flexineri,  Escherichia  coli,  Pseudomonas  Aeruginosa,   and  Cholerae)   and  two  fungi(Candida  Albicans  and  Cryptococcus  Neoformans)  using  agar  dif method[2].  The  extracts  were  also  tested  for  their  toxicity  on  Artermia  nauplii  brine  sh Minimal  Inhibition  Concentration  (MIC)  was  performed  on  the  extracts  which  exh antimicrobial  activity.  The  dichloromethane  and  ethyl  acetate  extracts  of  Whitfieldia  El T.anders and Pterocarpus inctorius showed promising antimicrobial activity. The remaining  extracts  exhibited  minimal  antimicrobial  activity.  All  extracts  exhibited  minimal  toxic  Further analysis and research is encouraged for both plants.   References:   [1]  P.M.  Kilima,  I,  Ostermayer,  M.  Shija,  M.M.  Wolff,  and  P.J.  Evans.  DUHP,  Swiss  Tr Institute, Basel. 1993, p19   [2]  Moshi, Mainen, Mbwambo, Zakaria, Ramadhani, S. O. Nondo, Masimba, Pax, Kamuh Appolinary,  Kapingu,  Modest,  Thomas,  Pascal,  Richard,  Marco.  “Evaluation  of  Ethnom Claims  and  Brine  Shrimp  Toxicity  of  Some  Plant  Used  in  Tanzania  as  Traditional  Hea African Journal of Traditional, 2006, 3, 48‐58.   [3] Singh B, Sahu PM, Sharma MK: Anti‐inflammatory and antimicrobial activity of triterpe from Strobilanthes callosus Nees. Phytomedicine. 2002, 9 (4): 355‐359.     88


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   “Milby  Park  Community:  Potential  Exposure  To  Elevated  Levels  Of  1,3‐  Butadiene  May  Cause  Higher  Risks  For  Developing  Adverse  Biological  Effects”     Natalie Roberts1, Dr. Renard Thomas*1, Dr. Bobby Wilson1, Dr. John Sapp1, Dr. Andrew James1,

4:20 p.m. –  4:40 p.m. 

1Texas Southern University, College of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry,  Doctor of Philosophy Program in Environmental Toxicology, Houston, TX, 77004    Abstract    Of the top 50 most produced chemicals in the United States, 1,3 – Butadiene is the 36th ranked  largest  commodity  chemical  that  is  produced  in  the  United  States  (Butadiene,  2008).  Statistics  show that The United States produces about three billion pounds of butadiene every year, where  approximately  12  billion  pounds  of  this  chemical  is  produced  globally  (Butadiene,  2008).  However in Houston alone, in 2004, the largest amount of 1,3 – Butadiene produced in the U.S.  was released right in the Milby Park Community of Houston, Texas with a concentration of 4 ppb  (Clements et. al., 2006). Previous studies suggest that many drugs and environmental agents of  this concentration can cause DNA damage (Shuga, 2007).     The  purpose  of  this  research  study  is  to  better understand what  biological  adverse  effects 1,3 –  Butadiene  may  have  on  potentially  exposed  residents  living  in  the  Milby  Park  community  of  Houston,  Texas  between  the  years  2001‐2006.  In  this  study,  an  in  vitro  rat  epithelial  lung  cell  culture system. Using a controlled environment, I plan to expose an epithelial cell line to similar  doses experienced by individuals living in the Milby Park Community between the years 2001‐  2006 over a 24 hour period. After 24 hours of exposure, each sample will be carefully analyzed  for cell viability and any signs of early apoptosis or cell cycle interruption to determine if there  are any occurrences of DNA damage.     The  adverse  effects  of  this  chemical  on  the  rat  lung  epithelial  cell  culture  will  be  analyzed  by  conducting the two assays, Guava ViaCount® assay and Guava TUNEL assay, using the Guava®  EasyCyteTM Plus System. In conclusion, the data collected after analysis will allow researchers to  determine whether or not potential exposure to elevated levels of 1,3 butadiene may have put the  Milby Park community at higher risk for developing adverse affects relating to early apoptosis,  cell viability, interruption of cell cycle progression and DNA damage.     This  research  will  help  improve  the  air  quality  in  the  Milby  Park  Community,  as  well  as  help  develop  strategies  to  avoid  over  exposure  to  1,3  –  Butadiene  that  could  possibly  cause  irreversible health effects.               89


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   4:40 p.m. –  5:00 p.m.   

“Transformation Of Fluorotelomer‐Based Surfactants In Pure Fungal Cultures  And Aerobic Soils”   Laurel A. Royer* and Linda S. Lee  Department of Agronomy, Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences,  Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907    Abstract 

    Poly  and  perfluorinated  alkyl  compounds  (PFCs)  represent  a  unique  class  of  currently  irreplaceable  synthetic  chemicals  that  have  distinctive  properties  including  being  oleophobic  as  well  as  hydrophobic,  stable  under  strongly  acidic,  alkaline  and  oxidizing  conditions,  and  exceptionally  heat  stable.  These  favorable  product  characteristics  present  reasons  for  environmental  concern  including  prolonged  persistence  and  a  high  bioaccumulative  potential.  Our  present  work  focuses  on  the  biotransformation  of  one  sub‐class  of  PFCs  referred  to  as  fluorotelomer‐based  surfactants.  These  chemicals  upon  release  into  the  environment  have  been  suspected  to  be  potential  sources  of  fluorotelomer  alcohols  (FTOH)  and  subsequently  perfluorinated  carboxylic  acids  (PFCAs)  that  pose  probable  mammalian  health  threats.  We  hypothesize  that  (1)  the  common  ester  linkages  present  in  these  molecules  are  susceptible  to  microbial  attack  resulting  in  the  release  of  the  corresponding  FTOH;  and  (2)  FTOHs  produced,  will  follow  a  known  degradation  pathway  leading  to  PFCA  terminal  products.  The  microbial  degradation  of  a  1H,1H,2H,2H‐perfluorodecyl  acrylate  (PFA)  monomer  and  8:2  fluorotelomer  stearate (FTS) were monitored over time in month long incubation studies with moist silty clay  loam soil and pure fungal mycelia microcosms, respectively. LC/MS/MS was used to analyze and  identify  the  degradation  products.  PFA  degraded  to  fluorotelomer  alcohols  (FTOHs)  and  some  PFCAs  as  well  as  fluorotelomer  carboxylic  acids  (FTCAs).   Maximum  levels  of  8:2  FTOH  were  observed by day, 4 followed by decreasing concentrations due to secondary metabolism. PFCAs  of  varying  fluorinated  chain  lengths  (C‐5  to  C‐8)  however,  increased  over  the  first  18‐days  of  incubation before appearing to plateau for the duration of the experiment. The estimated half‐life  for the parent PFA was determined to be ~ 3 days. The Trametes versicolor fungi species showed  some potential to release FTOH from FTS but showed no ability to further transform the FTOH  product to PFCAs. Degradation studies to compare and contrast transformation rates of PFA in  different soils types and to further probe the role of T. versicolor to hydrolyze FTS are currently  being explored.   5:00 p.m. –  5:20 p.m. 

“An Investigation Of Arsenic Compounds In Marine Samples”  Filomena Califano*1, Dr. Kathleen Nolan2  1Dept. of Chemistry & Physics, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY, 11201 

2 Dept. of Bilogy and Health Promotion, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY, 11201    Abstract    A procedure is outlined for the extraction of water‐soluble arsenic in freeze‐dried marine animal  90


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   tissues.  Quantitative  extraction  of  arsenic  in  the  water‐soluble  fraction  of  scallops,  shrimp,  and  Silver  Side  (also  known  as  Atheriniform)  is  consistent  with  that  reported  in  the  literature  for  these marine samples. Our results indicate that when samples are prepared in a similar manner,  the  efficiency  to  extract  arsenic  will  depend  on  the  marine  animal  species  and  tissue  analyzed.  The  robustness  of  this  extraction  procedure  to  identify  and  quantify  arsenic  species  in  freeze‐ dried marine animal tissues was determined using high performance liquid chromatography and  the certified reference materials. Arsenic species determined in our samples were AsB and DMA.    “Formation Of PCDD/Fs From The Copper Oxide Surface‐Mediated Reactions  5:20 p.m. –  Of 1,2‐Dichlorobenzene Under Pyrolytic Conditions”  5:40 p.m.    Shadrack Nganai, Slawomir Lomnicki, Barry Dellinger  Louisiana State University,Chemistry Department, Baton Rouge    Abstract    It has been clearly demonstrated by multiple researchers that polychlorinated dibenzo‐p‐dioxins  (PCDDs) are formed by the surface‐mediated reactions of chlorinated phenols.  In this study, we  investigated the potential contribution of chlorinated benzenes. 50 ppm of 1,2‐dichlorobenzene in  a  nitrogen  carrier  gas  was  reacted  over  a  packed  bed  of   5  %  CuO/silica.  Reaction  products  included  chlorobenzene,  trichlorobenzenes,  tetrachlorobenzenes,  pentachlorobenzenes,  phenol,  2‐monochlorophenol,  and  dichlorophenols  with  yields  ranging  form  0.01  to  1%  for  the  phenols  and  0.01  to  10  %  for  chlorinated  benzenes.  4,6‐dichlorodibenzofuran  (4,6‐DCDF)  and  dibenzofuran (DF) were observed in maximum yields of 0.2 % and 0.5 %, respectively, from 300‐ 500 C.  In previous studies of 2‐MCP under identical reaction conditions, 4,6‐DCDF and dibenzo‐ p‐dioxin  were  observed  with  maximum  yield  of  ~0.15  %  along  with  trace  quantities  of  1‐ monochlorodibenzo‐p‐dioxin  (1‐MCDD).   When  combined  with  the  fact  that  measured  concentrations  of  chlorinated  benzenes  are  10‐100x  that  of  chlorinated  phenols  in  combustion  systems,  the  data  suggests  that  surface‐mediated  reactions  of  chlorinated  benzene  are  possibly  the predominant precursor of PCDD/Fs.  In contrast to data for chlorophenols, the low PCDD to  PCDF ratio of 0.07 observed in these experiments is in general agreement with the results of full‐ scale  measurements.   A  mechanism  in  which  chlorinated  benzenes  react  on  the  copper  oxide  surface to form chemisorbed chlorophenolates and chlorophenoxyl radicals is proposed based on  agreement  with  product  distributions  and  previous  studies  of  persistent  free  radical  (PFR)  formation on copper oxide surfaces.     “Induced  Fluorescence  Enhancement:  A  Method  For  Identifying  Bacterial  5:40 p.m. – 6:00  Species”   p.m.    Marlon Thomas, Elizabeth Zielins and Valentine I. Vullev*  Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521    Abstract    The  virulence  and  increasing  antibiotic  resistance  of  certain  bacterial  strains  creates  a  need  for  91


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   efficient  and  timely  detection  of  environmental  pathogens.  We  evaluated  the  kinetics  of  the  fluorescence  enhancement  of  cationic  dyes  as  an  assay  for  differentiation  between  bacterial  specie.  For  several  benzothiazole  cationic  dyes,  such  as  3‐3’‐diethylthiacyanine,  we  observed  fluorescence  enhancement  in  the  presence  of  vegetative  bacteria  and  bacterial  spores.  Different  bacterial species manifested different rates of emission enhancement. Although staining has been  a  broadly  used  technique  for  the  identification  of  bacterial  species,  the  kinetics  of  the  staining  process has not previously been examined. We hypothesized that the kinetic parameters can be  utilized  as  “fingerprints”  for  detection  and  identification  of  bacterial  species.  We  used  three  different vegetative bacteria and three different bacterial spores as model organisms to test our  hypothesis.  Kinetic  emission  assays  with  various  concentrations  of  bacteria  and  fluorophores  allowed  us  to  determine  the  diffusion  constants  of  the  fluorescence  enhancement  of  the  dye  diffusing into the bacteria cell wall. These diffusion constants reflect the velocity of the migration  of the dye from the surrounding media to the fluorogenic microenvironment within the bacterial  cell wall. Development of this assay breaks a century old tradition of identifying bacteria using  differential staining techniques. In addition it allows us to move us away from obtaining strictly  Boolean outcomes.            

  Tuesday, a.m.  

Technical Session 3    9:45 – 11:45 a.m.  Portland/Benton Biotechnology and Biochemistry  Applications I  Session Chair  Alexis Campbell  Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biol Iowa State University  Presenters       9:45 a.m. –  “Highlighted Speaker”  “Biophysical,  Biochemical,  And  Bioanalytical  Approaches  To  Char 10:20 a.m.  Diverse Molecular Details Of Ras‐Related Proteins”   Paul D. Adams*  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas,  Fayetteville, AR 72701  Abstract  Structure‐function  relationships  among  proteins  underlie  the  chemical  and  molecular  b many  biological  processes.  The  Ras  super  family  of  proteins  are  important  in  regulat growth,  and  have  served  as  model  prototypes  for  understanding  protein  structure‐f relationships  vital  for  normal  biological  activity  in  cells.  In  addition,  Ras  (Ras  sarcoma)  p were  among  the  ‘first’  human  oncogenic  proteins  to  be  identified.  Abnormal  expression  o proteins, leading to altered effector/regulator interactions, has been found in up to 30% of cell types, and they have also been shown to be involved in stresses such as diabetic nephr 92


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   These Ras proteins are controlled via cycling between active Guanosine Triphosphate (GTP)‐ and  inactive  Guanosine  Diphosphate  (GDP)‐bound  states.  The  cycle  of  binding,  hydrolysis  and  rebinding of the nucleotide are controlled by interactions with regulatory proteins. Therefore, this  class  of  GTP‐binding  signaling  proteins  has  provided  excellent  models  to  probe  the  structure‐ function relationships of cell‐signaling processes. Our research focuses on the use of biophysical,  biochemical,  and  bioanalytical  techniques  to  examine  molecular  features  of  constructs  of  Ras‐ related proteins in order to interpret the roles these proteins’ have in cell signalling activities. The  Ras proteins presently being studied in the laboratory include Cdc42Hs (Cell division cycle 42 Homo  Sapiens) and Rheb (Ras homology enriched in brain), both of which are involved in a wide range of  cellular  processes  including  cell  cycle  progression,  cytoskeletal  organization,  protein  trafficking,  and secretion. Studies of Cdc42Hs have shown mechanisms that can facilitate abnormal activity by  the  protein  including:  1)  mutations  that  alter  the  internal  GTP  hydrolysis  activity  of  the  protein  leading to an “over‐active” state, and 2) altered interactions with important proteins that regulate  normal  function  of  the  protein.  Functional  studies  of  Rheb,  however,  suggest  that  it  behaves  different from other Ras proteins, i.e., mutations that convert Ras proteins (e.g. Cdc42Hs) into over‐ active proteins, do not have the same effect in Rheb. In addition, some biological functions of Rheb  have  been  recently  determined,  and  an  important  interaction  between  Rheb  and  the  tumor  suppressor  complex  proteins  (TSC1  and  2)  stimulates  cell  growth  by  mediating  the  mammalian  Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, which regulates cell growth, energy and nutrient levels.  However, molecular details of this important Ras protein‐effector protein interaction are unknown.  We wish to understand molecular details of mechanisms that underlie specific functions of these  proteins that can be translated into meaningful insights into the structure‐function relationship of  these proteins in the cell.   Another  objective  of  our  research  is  the  development  of  new  bioanalytical  methods  to  facilitate  large‐scale  production  and  purification  of  pure  recombinant  proteins,  as  this  is  the  first,  and  perhaps, the most important step towards elucidation of in‐vitro structure‐function relationships.  Presently,  we  are  developing  new  strategies  to  prevent  degradation  of  recombinant  proteins  caused by non‐specific cleavage by specific proteases. We have demonstrated that degradation due  to  non‐specific  cleavage  of  recombinant  protein  mediated  by  the  protease  thrombin  can  be  completely  prevented  by  exploiting  thrombin’s  affinity  for  heparin  to  separate  it  from  the  recombinant  protein  during  purification.  This  method  is  generally  applicable  to  all  recombinant  proteins that require thrombin for the cleavage of affinity tags for purification.     10:20 a.m. –  10:40 a.m. 

“Monolayers  With  Self‐Limiting  Packing  Densities  For  The  Inhibition  Of  Nonspecific Protein Adsorption”  

Marlon L. Walker1*and David J.Vanderah2  1Surface and Microanalysis Science Division, 2Biochemical Sciences Division  Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, National Institute  of  Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD  20899      Abstract     We  have  created  a  molecule,  utilizing  the  ethylene  oxide  (EO)  motif,  that  forms  self‐assembled  monolayers  (SAMs)  on  Au  and  possesses  the  capability  for  inhibition  of  nonspecific  protein  93


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   adsorption  

The 

bipodal 

molecule 

CH3O(CH2CH2O)5CH2CON(CH2CH2CH2SCOCH3)2 

[nomenclature:  N,N‐(bis  3’‐thioacetylpropyl)‐3,6,9,12,15,18‐hexaoxanonadecanamide,  BTHA]  adsorbs  onto  polycrystalline  Au,  forming  layers  similar  in  optical  thickness  to  monothio  (EO)5‐ 6CH3  SAMs  at  the  projected  optimal  coverage  for  non‐specific  protein  adsorption  resistance.   Spectroscopic  ellipsometry  (SE)  measurements  confirm  excellent  resistance  of  these  monolayer  films to the adsorption of proteins such as fibrinogen, bovine serum albumin, and mixtures of the  two, suggesting uniform EO surface coverage on a length scale at least comparable to the smallest  dimension of these proteins.       “Determination  Of  Absolute  Configurations  Of  1,N‐Chiral  Diols  Using  10:40 a.m. –  The  Fluorinated  Porphyrin  Tweezer  Via  Exciton  Coupled  Circular  11:00 a.m.  Dichroism (ECCD)”     Sumira Y. Stein, Xiaoyong Li, Babak Borhan*  Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry, East Lansing MI 48824    Abstract    Chiral 1,n‐diols are widely present in biological active molecules. The biological activity of chiral  1,n‐diols  is  affected  by  the  absolute  configurations  of  the  substrate.  Therefore,  methods  that  determine absolute stereochemistry are significant. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and X‐ray  crystallography  are  among  methods  that  exist  to  determine  stereochemistry.  However,  to  use  NMR, chemical derivatizations are required, and is applicable for chiral alcohols and amines. X‐ray  crystallography  also  has  setbacks  because  most  componds  are  hard  to  cystallize  and  the  crystallized compound must contain a heavy atom (Br, I) for stereochemical determination. Exciton  Coupled  Circular  Dichroism  (ECCD)  is  a  non‐empirical  method  for  absolute  stereochemical  determination  of  chiral  compounds.  It  is  based  on  the  throuugh  space  interaction  of  the  electric  dipole transition moment of two or more non‐conjugated chromophores. This interaction leads to  the observed bisignate CD spectrum. The fluorinated porphyrin tweezer 1 has been used as a tool  to determine absolute stereochemistry of erythro and threo diols, amino alcohols and diamines in a  nonempirical fashion. Reported is a method to determine the absolute configuration of chiral 1,n‐ diols. The fluorinated porphyrin tweezer binds strongly to hydroxy groups due to its high Lewis  acidity. The host‐guest complex formed between the chiral 1,n‐diols (containing 6‐12 carbons) and  fluorinated  porphyrin  tweezer  exhibit  an  electron‐coupled  CD  spectrum.  This  bisignate  curve  is  based  on  the  through  space  interaction  of  electric  dipole  transition  moment  of  the  porphyrin  chromophores,  which  adopt  a  unique  helicity  due  to  steric  differentiation  of  substituents  of  the  chiral center. Consequently, the stereochemistry of chiral diols is reflected by the observed ECCD  signal.  

94


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   F

F

F

F

F

F

F N

 

F

N Zn

F F

F

N

F N

F F

F F

F

F

F

F

F

F N

F O

N

F

F

Zn N

F N

F

F

O

TPFP Tweezer 1

11:00 a.m. –  11:20 a.m.   

 

F

F

O

O

“The Molecular Characterization Of Maize Fatty Acid Elongase” 

Alexis A Campbell*, and Basil J Nikolau  Iowa State University, Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology Ames, IA,     Abstract      Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are fatty acids comprised of greater than 18 carbon atoms in  chain length.  VLCFAs play an important role in protein trafficking, membrane stabilization, and  are precursors for lipid second messengers.  In plants, VLCFAs are components of several classes  of  molecules  including  cuticular  waxes,  suberin,  sphingolipids,  phospholipids,  seed  oils,  and  glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors.       Such  fatty  acids  are  synthesized  by  two  enzyme  systems,  fatty  acid  synthase  (FAS,  synthesizes  fatty acids up to 16 or 18 carbon units in chain length) and fatty acid elongase (elongase, elongates  preexisting  fatty  acid  primers  stemming  from  FAS  to  produce  VLCFAs).   These  two  systems  are  thought to be analogous to each other with regard to the biochemical reaction series each catalyze.   Both systems carry out a cyclic reiterative series of reactions catalyzed by four enzymatic reactions:  3‐ketoacyl  synthesis,  3‐ketoacyl  reduction,  3‐hydroxyacyl  dehydration,  and  an  enoyl  reduction.   Much is known about FAS, however, the nature of elongase has proven difficult to characterize via  traditional biochemical approaches.        Our  interest  in  elongase  stemmed  from  the  identification  of  the  first  Ketoacyl‐CoA  Reductase  (KCR),  glossy8  and  its  paralog  glossy8b  of  maize.   Over  the  past  decade  each  of  the  four  genes  encoding  elongase  components  have  been  elucidated.   The  identification  of  archetypal  proteins  encoding the three other components has allowed for in silico identification of maize homologs (24  KCS, 1HCD & 1ECR).  To understand this complex system we have elected to use both in vivo and  in vitro expression systems.       The goal of building these expression systems is to gain a greater understanding of how VLCFAs  are  synthesized.  With  this  knowledge  comes  the  ability  to  specifically  bioengineer  VLCFA  metabolism and their derivatives, which further provides a need for understanding the enzymatic  components of the elongase system and how these enzymes work in cooperation and coordination  95


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   with  each  other.   In  addition,  this  research  provides  a  deeper  appreciation  for  how  lipid  compositions  and  asymmetries  are  created  and  maintained  within  a  cell  that  allow  lipids  to  perform a variety of different functions.     11:20 a.m. –  “Functional  Analysis  Of  Maxi‐K  Potassium  Channels  In  Tethered  Bilayer  Lipid  Membranes On A Gold Substrate”   11:40 a.m.    George O. Okeyo*1, Daniel Fine2, Ananth Dodabalapur2, Rebecca B. Price3,   Peter A. V. Anderson3 and Randolph S. Duran1  1University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, Gainesville, FL 32611, 2University of Texas at  Austin, Microelectronics Research Center, Austin, TX 78712, 3University of Florida, Whitney  Laboratory for Marine Bioscience, St. Augustine, FL 32080    Abstract      In recent years, ion channels have generated enormous interest for their  viability as drug targets  and their potential for use in applications such as development of biosensors for analyte detection.  High conductance calcium‐activated (maxi‐K) potassium channels are an excellent choice to study  because of their ubiquity in cells. Additionally, their inherently high conductance, ease of genetic  manipulation  and  expression  in  Xenopus  laevis  oocyte  membranes,  as  well  as  their  well‐known  pharmacological  profile  make  them  ideal  for  biosensor  development.  Several  membrane  systems  under  varied  experimental  configurations  have  been  considered  for  functional  studies  of  ion  channels, however most of these tend to be electrically unstable and/or labile to mechanical shock.       We  have  successfully  incorporated  maxi‐K  channels  in  a  tethered  membrane  on  a  gold  microelectrode  array  device  and  have  been  able  to  demonstrate  functional  reconstitution,  with  significantly greater stability. The measured ionic currents associated with gating events are in the  picoampere  range,  showing  sensitivity  necessary  for  stochastic  sensing  of  analytes.  Within  this  setup,  we  can  probe  the  pharmacological  response  of  the  channel  using  quaternary  ammonium  compounds  known  to  influence  gating  properties  and  peptidyl  toxins  such  as  charybdotoxin  (ChTX)  known  to  potently  inhibit  the  maxi‐K  channel.  There  is  channel  blockade  on  exposure  to  derivatives  of  tetraethylammonium  at  micromolar  concentrations  manifested  by  inhibition  of  the  flow  of  ionic  currents.  This  reflects  the  potential  of  this  experimental  configuration  for  use  in  applications  such  as  biosensor  development  and  for  the  fundamental  study  of  pore‐forming  proteins.           

96


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     Tuesday, a.m.  

Technical Session 4    9:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.  Parkview  Physical Chemistry  Session Chair  Darlene Taylor, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry, North Carolina Central University    Presenters       “High  Spectral  Resolution  Infrared  Study  Of  Hydrocarbons  In  The  Jovian  9:45 a.m. –  Atmosphere”   10:05 a.m.    Ramsey L. Smith*1,2, Theodor Kostiuk1, Timothy A. Livengood1,3, Kelly E. Fast1, Tilak.  Hewagama1,3, Juan D. Delgado1,3, and William Blass4    1NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 693, Greenbelt, MD 20771  2Oak Ridge Associated Universities/ NASA Postdoctoral Program, Oak Ridge, TN 37831  3Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742  4Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996    Abstract  Infrared  heterodyne  spectroscopy,  IRHS,  is  a  high‐resolution  spectroscopic  technique  used  to  measure  the  spectra  of  molecular  atmospheric  constituents  in  both  laboratory  spectroscopy  and  remote  sensing,  with  a resolution  of  107.  During  our  observational  campaign  in  June  2008,  we collected infrared heterodyne spectra of the Jovian atmosphere using the Goddard Heterodyne  Instrument  for  Planetary  Wind  and  Composition,  HIPWAC,  which  was  interfaced  with  the  3‐ meter  telescope  at  the  NASA  Infrared  Telescope  Facility.  Auroral  and  stratospheric  emission  features of hydrocarbons, such as ethane (C2H6), have been identified in the spectra we collected  from  Jupiter’s  atmosphere.  The  GSFC  Laboratory  Infrared  Heterodyne  Spectrometer  has  the  capability  to  resolve  the  shape  of  individual  rotational‐vibrational  transitions,  discriminate  transitions  from  each  other,  and  accurately  measure  the  strength  of  weak  transitions  in  order  to  identify molecular species in astronomical spectroscopy and deduce atmospheric properties.     10:05 a.m. –  10:25 a.m. 

“High‐Accuracy ab initio Studies of Sn (n=1‐4) Electronic Structure”   John A.W. Harkless*  Department of Chemistry, Howard University,  525 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059    Abstract 

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are applied to the problem of conformer energetics of Sn, n=1‐4.  97


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   The  results  presented  here  add  to  the  estimate  of  the  energy  gap  between  the  C2V  and  D4h  conformers  of  S4,  an  important  species  in  interstellar  chemistry.  VMC  and  DMC  estimates  of  symmetric and asymmetric dissociation of S4, electronic excited states and dissociation energies of  S3 and S2, and excitations of S atom are also reported. The overall effectiveness and accuracy of the  method is compared against available theory and experiment.       10:25 a.m. –  “Quantum  Mechanical  Prediction  of  1H  and  13C  NMR  Chemical  Shifts  in  Large  10:45 a.m.  Protein Systems”     Duane Williams*1, Bing Wang1 and Kenneth M. Merz, Jr.1  1University of Florida, Department of Chemistry & Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, FL     Abstract  We  have  implemented  a  methodology  for  qualitative  description  Nuclear  Magnetic  Resonance  (NMR)  chemical  shift  tensors  at  the  semiempirical  AM1  level  and  have  generated  the  associated  1H  and  13C  NMR‐specific  AM1  parameters.  Using  our  linear‐scaling  divide‐and‐conquer  algorithm  to  perform  the  quantum  mechanical  calculations,  we  carried  out  this  parameterization  using a series of globular protein systems with a variety of secondary structure as the training set.  Our approach can be employed using semiempirical (AM1/PM3) geometries and can be executed  at a fraction of the cost of ab initio methods, thus providing an attractive option for the quantum  mechanical studies of NMR on large protein systems.         10:45 a.m. –  11:05 a.m.   

“Gold Nanoparticle Based NSET Assay For Monitoring RNA Folding Kinetics”  

Jelani K. Griffin*, Uma S. Rai  and Paresh C. Ray  Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, 39217    Abstract    RNAs  play  critical  functional  roles  in  metabolism,  replication,  regulation,  and  development  of  cells. How RNA molecules fold into functional structures is a problem  of great significance given  the expanding list of essential  cellular RNA enzymes and the increasing number of applications  of  RNA  in  biotechnology  and  medicine.  RNA  is  the  key  enzymatic  component  in  a  number  of  essential  cellular  processes,  such  as  translation  and  splicing.  Steady‐state  FRET  measurements  in  solution allow one to measure the kinetics and requirements of docking of its two independently  folding domains; time‐resolved FRET reveals the relative thermodynamic stability of the undocked  (extended,  inactive)  and  docked  (active)  ribozyme  conformations.  However,  the  length  scale  for  98


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   detection  using  FRET‐based  methods  is  limited  by  the  nature  of  the  dipole‐dipole  mechanism,  which effectively constrains the length scales to distances on the order of <100 Å (R0≈60 Å).Here  we  want  to  demonstrate  that  gold  nanoparticle  based  NSET  can  be  used  to  track  the  folding  of  RNA. As a model system,  the conformational changes two‐helix junction  RNA molecules induced  Mg2+  ions  is  studied  by  measuring  time  dependent  fluorescence  signal.  The  transition  from  an  open  to  a  folded  configuration  changed  the  distance  between  gold  nanoparticles  and  the  dye  molecule attached to the ends of two helices  in the RNA junction. So the folding process has been  monitored from the change of fluorescence intensity.     “Reactive  Coatings:  Neutralizing‐Decontaminating  Coating  For  Chemical  11:05 a.m. –  Warfare Agents”   11:25 a.m.  Dave A Jenkins* and H. Neil Gray  The University of Texas at Tyler, Department of Chemistry, Tyler, TX, 75799  Abstract  A  reactive  coating  was  developed  to  facilitate  cleanup  after  a  terrorist  attack  involving  chemical  and/or  biological  warfare  agents  (CBWAs).  Though  only  in  initial  development,  the  goal  is  a  coating that will both sequester and neutralize CBWAs. Our prior work involved the development  of  coatings  for  the  chemical  warfare  agents  plutonium  and  uranium.  Our  current  research  deals  with  coating  for  phosphorus  based  nerve  agents.  We  desired  coatings  with  high  elasticity,  durability,  wet  tack,  reactivity,  and  longevity.  Poly(ethylene  oxide),  PEO,  was  used  as  the  foundation of the coating. Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) was added to increase strength, durability, and  wet tack. Glycerin was added as a plasticizer in water. The destruction of the biological or chemical  warfare  agent  would  be  accomplished  using  an  SN2  reaction.  Since  SN2  is  a  fast  one  step  mechanism  that  has  been  reported  in  the  chemical  destruction  of  organophosphorus  warfare  agents, we investigated it ability to do so in our decontaminating coatings. The initial results are  very  promising.  The  SN2  reactions  have  successfully  reacted  with  the  substrates  benzylbromide,  pentylbromide, and cyclohexylbromide. The next step is working with mimic agents, agents which  mimic the structure but not toxicity of the CBWAs. We also plan to work toward the creation of  sensors that will detect CBWAs    11:25 a.m. –  “The Temporal Changes In The Emission Spectrum Of Comet 9P/ Tempel 1 After  Deep Impact”  11:45 a.m.    William M. Jackson*1, XueLiang Yang1, Xiaoyu Shi1 and Anita L. Cochran2  1Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis  2McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin    Abstract    The  time  dependence  of  the  changes  in  the  emission  spectra  of  Comet  9P/Tempel  1  after  Deep  Impact  are  derived  and  discussed.   This  was  a  unique  event  because  for  the  first  time  it  gave  99


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   astronomers the opportunity to follow the time history of the formation and decay of O(1S),  OH,  CN, C2, C3,  NH, and NH2.  Least squares fits of a modified Haser model with constraints using  known  rate  constants  were  fit  to  the  observed  data.   In  the  case  of  OH  a  simple  two‐step  Haser  model provides a reasonable fit to the observations.  Fitting the emissions O(1S),  CN, C2, C3, NH,  and  NH2  requires  the  addition  of  a  delayed  component  to  a  regular  two  or  three  step  Haser  model.  From this information a picture of the Deep Impact encounter emerges where there is an  initial  formation  of  gas  and  dust,  which  is  responsible  for  the  prompt  emission  that  occurs  right  after  impact.   A  secondary  source  of  gas  starts  later  after  impact  when  the  initial  dust  has  dissipated  enough  so  that  solar  radiation  can  reach  the  surface  of  freshly  exposed  material.   The  implications  of  this  and  other  results  are  discussed  in  terms  of  the  implications  on  the  structure  and composition of the comet’s nucleus.     

  Tuesday, a.m.  

Technical Session 5    9:45 – 11:45 a.m.  Aubert  Dr. Henry McBay Outstanding  Teacher Award Symposium –   STEM Education  Session Chair  Michael Page, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry  California State Polytechnic University Pomona    Presenters       9:45 a.m. – 10:05  Dr. Henry McBay Outstanding Teacher Awardee  “Enhancing The Design Of Classical Physical Chemistry Laboratory  a.m.  Experiment In Order To Appeal To Students:  Determining The Heat O Vaporization (∆Hvap) Of A Pure Liquid”    Shawn M. Abernathy, Ph.D.* and Anwar D. Jackson  Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059    Abstract         Physical chemistry is typically deemed by undergraduate chemistry majors as the most d field of chemistry to grasp.  One of the most vocalized reasons is that “To much calculus and is required to understanding understand the chemical concepts.” Many students struggle to coal quantum  mechanics  and  thermodynamics  taught  in the  lecture  course,  i.e.  in textbooks,  w real  world  around  them.  The  challenge  confronting  the  physical  chemistry  professo formulate  a  pedagogical  approach  that  makes  the  most  important  laws  and  theoretical  c understandable to undergraduate students.  One approach is to upgrade and enhance som traditional  experiments  in  the  physical  chemistry  laboratory  course  with  more  sophi equipment  as  well  as  digital  and  portable  devices  in  order  to  stay  in  step  with  modern  p chemistry.    A  well‐known  phase  equilibrium  experiment  in  the  physical  chemistry  lab 100


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   “Vapor  pressure  of  a  pure  liquid”  has  been  upgraded  and  the  design  enhanced.    The  upgraded  experimental  apparatus  was  used  to  determine  the  heat  of  vaporization  (∆Hvap)  of  water  and  toluene.  The empirical results and the effectiveness of this improved experimental design on the  class  impression  of  physical  chemistry  will  be  discussed.   The  integration  of  digital  and  portable  devices into classical physical chemistry experiments is a must in order to heighten student interest  and appeal.  It is also imperative for the development of our student’s research aptitude, and the  next generation of research chemist.    10:05 a.m. – 10:25  “Affecting  Science  Motivation  Of  High  School  Students  Through  Enrichment Programs And Peer Instruction”   a.m.    George D. Howell, Edward Walton, Laurie Riggs, and Michael F. Z. Page*  Email: mfpage@csupomona.edu  Chemistry Department, California State Polytechnic University Pomona  3801 W. Temple Ave. Pomona, CA 91768    Abstract    At Cal Poly Pomona, we have developed an innovative teacher/student program that couples high  school science teachers with trained student laboratory teaching assistants; thereby increasing the  teaching capacity of the instructor, and allowing the class to perform more hands‐on activities and  laboratory  experiments.  We  feel  that  this  innovative  approach  of  involving  both  the  teacher  and  students  (as  peer  instructors)  in  the  educational  design  of  science  lessons  is  critical  if  the  United  States is to meet the bold goal of science literacy for all students. (Research Council 1996) This/Our  innovative summer‐enrichment program has been successfully piloted for the past two years. Over  this  time,  34  teachers  from  Southern  California  (representing  15  schools  and  11  school  districts)  have  participated  in  two‐week  teacher  workshops  along  with  concurrent  one‐week  summer‐ enrichment  programs  for  42  high  school  students.  Student  participants  completed  evaluations  before  and  after  our  summer  programs  and  after  serving  as  a  teaching  assistant  in  their  local  classroom for one academic quarter. This data allowed us to analyze and identify changes in the  participants’  personal  feelings  of  a.  motivation,  b.  confidence,  c.  social  encouragement,  d.  self‐ esteem,  and  e.  attitudes  towards  pursuing  a  career  in  the  STEM  disciplines.  The  results  of  these  studies  and  affects  on  the  quality  of  classroom  instruction  will  be  discussed  during  this  presentation.                         101


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     10:25 a.m. – 10:45  “Establishing  Effective  Summer  Camp  Programs  In  Nanoscale  Science  For  High School Students”   a.m.    Sherine O. Obare*  Department of Chemistry and the Nanoscale Science Program  University of North Carolina at Charlotte  Charlotte, NC 28223    Abstract      The twenty‐first century requires the training of scientists and engineers in interdisciplinary fields  to enable them to address evolving challenges in science and technology. The ability to train future  scientists  at  an  early  age  provides  significant  promise  toward  increasing  the  number  of  trained  students that can tackle various scientific and technological problems. An excellent way to educate  students  and  get  them  excited  about  chemistry  and  materials  science  is  organizing  effective  summer camps on university campuses. By careful selection of exciting experiments that are life‐ related,  students  are  able  to  relate  scientific  concepts  to  everyday  matters.  We  have  developed  a  number  of  significant  projects  for  high  school  students  to  help  them  understand  how  chemistry  and materials science can lead to significant advances in alternative energy, environmental science  and  biology.  The  projects  provide  an  opportunity  for  young  students  to  have  hands‐on  learning  experiences  with  instruments  used  in  research  laboratories  while  increasing  their  skills  and  understanding of modern scientific technology. These projects not only stimulate studentsʹ interest  in chemistry, but further demonstrate the relevance of chemistry in everyday life.     10:45 a.m. – 11:05  “Transitioning to College: Using Research to Bridge the Culture Gap”   a.m.    Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy*  Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry,  Baltimore, MD 21133    Abstract      Freshman  can have a difficulties adjusting to the university environment because of the cultural  differences between high school and the university. The transition to college places a different set  of  demands  on  a  student  in  terms  of  time  management,  study  habits,  and  basic  critical  and  analytical  thinking  skills  that  are needed  to  be successful  at  a  university.  Some  of  the  issues  that  affect  a  freshmen  successfully  transitioning  into  the  university  culture  can  be  addressed  through  early  research  experiences.  Morgan  has  developed  a  Continuous  Undergraduate  Research  Experience  (C.U.R.E.)  in  an  effort  to  address  these  issues.  The  potential  impact  of  early  research  experiences on student success and retention will be presented.           102


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     11:05 a.m. – 11:25  a.m. 

“Innovations  In  Science  Outreach:  The  Importance  Of  Legitimate Scientific Discovery”   

Kenya T. Powell*1,2, Carolyn J. Anderson2, and Vicki L. May1  1Science Outreach Office and the 2Departments of Chemistry and Radiology  Washington University in Saint Louis, Saint Louis, MO  63130  *Corresponding author: ktpowell@artsci.wustl.edu    Abstract      As a result of the scientific community’s efforts to diversify the science landscape, there have been  marked shifts over the past two decades in all aspects of science education, including pedagogy,  culture, methodology, and assessment.  Owing to these endeavors has been a rise in the level and  promotion  of  science  outreach  programs.   Once  thought  to  encompass  only  isolated  demonstrations  of  an  abstract  science  concept,  science  outreach  has  grown  such  that  short‐lived  demonstrations  have  become  long‐lived  “programs”,  with  multi‐million  dollar  annual  funding  from  organizations  like  the  National  Science  Foundation  and  the  National  Institutes  of  Health,  among others.  These investments have propelled the recent renaissance in science education and  continue to undergird its growth and influence its direction.        The  Washington  University‐centered  Program  of  Excellence  in  Nanotechnology  Skills  Development  Component  has  investigated  the  effect  of  science  outreach  innovations,  activities,  and  programs  on  the  short  and  long‐term  engagement  of  emerging  scientists  at  all  levels.   Furthermore,  we  have  a  keen  interest  in  practices  that  best  promote  excitement  and  curiosity  in  science students.  In order to examine educational phenomena, collaborations between researchers  and community educators are vital.  Moreover, new models must be constructed that allow us to  better  understand  and  classify  what  is  being  observed  and  what  components  or  combinations  thereof constitute a successful program.  Thus, our outreach events are designed to (1) be modular,  i.e.  capable  of  targeting  several  age  groups;  (2)  employ  actual  chemical  research  and  include  interactions  with  science  researchers;  (3)  be  hands‐on;  and  (4)  enhance  the  curricula  of  teacher  partners.   They  are  also  designed  to  employ  the  tools  of  informal  inquiry,  including  surveys,  interviews, and observations.  Herein we report the design, implementation, and characterization  of  three  polymer  chemistry‐centered,  nanotechnology‐based  outreach  activities  performed  with  different  age  groups,  and  the  development  of  an  “emotionality”  matrix  as  an  observation  and  evaluation model.                  103


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     11:25 a.m. – 11:45  “Show  Me  The  Money:   Funding  Opportunities  For  Chemical  Scientists  (Students,  Post‐Docs,  Academicians,  And  Other  Chemical  Professionals)  At  a.m.  The National Science Foundation”     Chavon Renee Wilkerson*  National Science Foundation  Division of Chemistry  4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington VA, 22311    Abstract        Both  the  House  of  Representatives  and  the  Senate  have  agreed  to  a  substantial  increase  (13%) in  the  budget  to  NSF  because  they  believe  that  ʺcontinued  excellence  in  fundamental  research  and  education  is  important  to  sustain  innovation  and  sharpen  the  Nationʹs  competitive  edge.ʺ   Learn  what  opportunities  are  available  for  Federal  funding  to  support  your  plans  and  ideas  in  science  research,  education,  and  outreach  activities.   This  presentation  will  highlight  some  of  the  many  funding opportunities available from the National Science Foundation (NSF) that are focused on or  place a key emphasis on Broadening Participation activities (e.g. Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority  Participation‐LSAMP,  American  Competitiveness  in  Chemistry  Fellowships‐ACCF,  Historically  Black  Colleges  and  Universities  Undergraduate  Program‐HBCU‐UP,  Robert  Noyce  Scholarship  Program for teachers, etc.).  The talk will also discuss new NSF funding mechanisms that seek to  support high‐risk, exploratory and potentially transformative research.      

  Tuesday, p.m.  

Technical Session 6    Portland/Benton 1:45 – 3:30 p.m.  Biotechnology and Biochemistry  Applications II  Session Chair  Mo Hunsen, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry, Kenyon College    Presenters       “Green Chemistry Via Catalytic Reactions”   1:45 p.m. –  2:10 p.m.    Mo Hunsen*  Department of Chemistry, Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022    Abstract    Green  chemistry  has  come  to  the  forefront  of  science  research  in  the  last  two  decades.   W been  active  in  pursuing  green  chemistry  by  way  of  catalytic  reactions.   Our  lab  investigat green oxidation reactions and enzyme catalyzed organic reactions.   Chromium reagents ha 104


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   proven to be powerful oxidizing reagents and are important in organic transformations.  Notable  chromium reagents include the Jones Oxidation reaction where chromic acid is used and the Corey  reagent where the milder pyridinium chlorochromate is used.  The chromium waste generated in  these  reactions  makes  these  reactions  less  advantageous,  especially  for  large  scale  and  industrial  applications,  due  to  the  carcinogenicity  of  chromium.   We  have  developed  new  reactions  for  preparation  of  aldehydes,  ketones,  and  carboxylic  acids  from  alcohols  where  the  chromium  reagents  are  used  as  catalysts  as  opposed  to  being  used  as reagents.  A secondary  oxidant  that  is  recyclable or that does not generate toxic waste is used to regenerate the chromium catalyst.  As a  secondary oxidant we have used periodic acid that is recyclable by electrolysis.  We also show that  oxone® as a cheap secondary oxidant is an excellent reagent to regenerate the chromium reagent.   When  oxone  is  used  as  the  secondary  oxidant,  the  byproduct  is  a  simple  potassium  sulfate  salt.   Hence, using the chromium reagents as catalysts, we are able to reduce the amount of chromium  waste  generated  by  a  100  fold  while  maintaining  the  advantages  of  chromium  oxidations  .   It  is  even more interesting to note that the ‘chromium waste’can be reused as a catalyst by using fresh  secondary  oxidant.  This  presentations  focuses  on  green  oxidations  reactions  but  we  will  also  briefly share some of our recent results in enzyme catalyzed organic reactions if time allows.       “Hyaluronic Acid Derivatives For Cellular Encapsulation”   2:10 p.m. –  2:30 p.m.    TaNeshia Washington*, Chris Highley, Sasha Bakhru, and Stefan Zappe  Benedict College, Columbia, SC  Abstract               Cellular  encapsulation  has  been  studied  as  a  way  to  immunoisolate  implanted  cells  and,  more  recently,  as  a  means  of  expansion  and  phenotype  maintenance  of  cell  lines,  such  as  embryonic  and  neural  stem  cells.  Polyelectrolytic  materials  are  often  used  for  encapsulation  via  complex coacervation. Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural, mammalian biomaterial, has been shown  to positively affect cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. It is negatively charged, and can  be  modified  using  N‐(3‐dimethylaminopropyl)‐Nʹ‐ethylcarbodiimide  (EDC)  and  N‐ hydroxysuccinimide  (NHS)  chemistry  to  link  adipic  acid  dihydrazide  (ADH)  to  the  backbone,  replacing the hydroxyl groups with amino groups to introduce positive charge. In this study, HA  is  treated  with  sodium  periodate  to  cleave  the  ring  in  D‐glucuronic  acid  and  form  dialdehyde  residues,  which  are  oxidized  to  create  additional  carboxyl  groups.  An  HA‐derivative  has  been  developed with increased negative charge, which can be used in encapsulation or further modified  using EDC/NHS chemistry to link ADH, creating positive charge.  Similarly, the increased number  of  carboxyl  groups  can  allow  the  incorporation  of  bioactive  molecules  while  still  maintaining  an  overall  negative  charge  necessary  for  polyelectrolytic  complexation.  Varying  reaction  conditions  allows  for  control  over  the  amount  of  charge,  and  the  engineering  of  the  material  for  specific  applications.  HA may thus be used as the base material for cellular encapsulation, imparting both  natural and engineered properties to the system depending on a controllable synthesis.     105


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   “Peptide Targeting Of Platinum Anti‐Cancer Drug”   2:30 p.m. –  2:50 p.m.      Margaret W. Ndinguri*, Sita S. Aggarwal, Robert P. Gambrell and Robert P.Hammer*  Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803    Abstract      Several platinum compounds have been approved by FDA for treatment of many form of cancers.  While  these  drugs  are  effective,  they  have  very  serious  side  effects  and  also  certain  cancer  can  develop resistance to drugs like cisplatin. Our overall goal is to target tumor cells using a conjugate  of  cisplatin  and  it’s  analogues  with  the  tumor  homing  cyclic  peptide  CNGRC.  The  key  aspect  to  this  novel  peptide  sequence  is  that  it  has  been  identified  as  a  unique  peptide  that  homed`  specifically  to  solid  tumors  in  murine  breast  carcinoma  models.  Various  Peptide  drug  conjugate  containing  the  same  sequence  have  been  shown  to  be  more  effective  than  the  drug  alone.  For  instant,  recently  doxorubicin  (DOX)‐peptide  conjugate  was  shown  to  deliver  DOX  to  cancerous  cells  more  effectively  than  free  DOX.  The  specificity  of  this  conjugate  drug  can  be  enhanced  by  efficient delivery of cisplatin and it’s analogues to the nucleus of the cancer cells. In this study we  present  novel  peptide–platinum  conjugate  to  investigate  the  biological  effect  of  the  linker,  tumor  cell selective localization and cell uptake. Recent results on synthesis peptide‐platinum conjugate  and viability studies will be presented.     “Assessing  The  Effectiveness  Of  Rhein  As  An  Anti‐Angiogenic  Agent  In  The  2:50 p.m. –  Treatment Of Breast Cancer”   3:10 p.m.    Vivian E. Fernand1, Emily E. Villar1, Robert E. Traux2, Sayo O. Fakayode3, Mark Lowry1,   Jack N. Losso4, and Isiah M. Warner*1    1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803  2Biotechnology Laboratories, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803  3Department of Chemistry, Winston‐Salem State University, Winston‐Salem, NC 27110  4Department of Food Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803    Abstract      Rhein (4,5‐dihydroxyanthraquinone‐2‐carboxylic acid) is the primary anthraquinone in the roots of  Cassia  alata  Linn  (Leguminoseae).  This  phenolic  compound  has  been  reported  to  inhibit  cell  proliferation, induce apoptosis, and reduce the glucose metabolism of neoplastic cells. The genes  that  encode  for  these  processes  as  well  as  for  angiogenesis  are  primarily  mediated  through  the  hypoxia  inducible  factor‐1  (HIF‐1),  which  is  in  turn  stimulated  by  hypoxia.  This  transcription  factor is responsible for increasing the invasion capacity, angiogenesis, and proliferation of breast  cancer cells. Therefore, the focus of this study was to evaluate the effect of rhein on the inhibition  of  hypoxia‐induced  tumor  angiogenesis  in  hormone‐dependent  (MCF‐7)  and  hormone‐ 106


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   independent (MDA‐MB‐435s) breast cancer cell lines.   Rhein  inhibited  endothelial  cell  tube  formation,  MCF‐7  and  MDA‐MB‐435s  cell  viability,  MDA‐ MB‐435s cell invasion and migration under in‐vitro normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In order to  determine  rhein’s  mechanism  of  action,  an  in‐depth  biochemical  analysis  of  its  anti‐angiogenic  activity was performed. The effect of rhein on levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)  and epidermal growth factor (EGF), secreted by MCF‐7 and MDA‐MB‐435s cells under normoxic  and hypoxic conditions, was determined by use of ELISA. Rhein significantly reduced VEGF and  EGF levels of supernatant fractions in both cell lines. In addition, nuclear extracts of rhein‐treated  MCF‐7 and MDA‐MB‐435s cell lines were analyzed using ELISA to determine the levels of HIF‐1  activity. Results indicate that rhein significantly inhibited CoCl2‐stimulated HIF‐1 activities in both  cell  lines.  HIF‐1  inhibition  was  associated  with  decreased  nuclear  translocation  of  this  factor  as  well  as  decreased  VEGF  and  EGF  levels  in  cell  culture  supernatants.  These  data  indicate  that  targeting HIF‐1 with rhein as a therapeutic agent has the potential to inhibit VEGF expression, and  hence, suppress MCF‐7 and MDA‐MB‐435s tumor growth.     3:10  p.m.  –  “Insights  Into  The  Cellulose  Hydrolysis  Mechanism  Of  Cytophaga  Hutchinsonii  Based  On  Computer  Modeling  And  Site‐Directed  Mutagenesis  3:30 p.m.  Of CEL9A”     Clifford Louime*1, Michael Abazinge2  (1)College of Engineering Sciences, Technology and Agriculture,   (2) Environmental Sciences Institute, FSH Science Research Center,   Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307    Abstract      An  analysis  of  the  recently  published  genome  of  Cytophaga  hutchinsonii  revealed  an  unusual  collection  of  genes  for  an  organism  capable  of  degrading  crystalline  cellulose.   Based  on  current  literature, all known cellulolytic bacteria of industrial importance have the following structure: an  N‐terminal catalytic domain, an adjacent cellulose binding domain (CBD), a Pro/Ser/Thr rich linker  and another C‐terminal CBD. Cytophaga hutchinsonii cellulases differs from other cellulase enzymes  by structurally not having a linker region or any CBD domains. The CBD is known to maintain a  high concentration of the enzyme near the insoluble substrate, and to disrupt crystalline cellulose  to  aid  hydrolysis.  CBD  has  been  considered  as  the  limiting  factor  in  hydrolysis.  In  the  case  of  Cytophaga, since there is no CBD present, questions were being raised by cellulase scientists as to  what  mechanism  this  organism  uses  to  degrade  its  insoluble  substrates.  A  reliable  model  of  Cytophaga  β1‐4  Endoglucanase  (Cel9A)  was  obtained  by  homology  modeling  based  on  a  bacteria  E4 X‐ray structure using the Swiss‐Model server. Conserved residues at the dimer interface were  identified,  of  which  the  functional  roles  of  two  residues,  namely  Asp358  and  Asp361,  were  determined by site‐directed mutagenesis. Four mutants were successfully generated and purified,  three  of  which  (D358A,  D358B,  D361A,  D361B)  were  found  to  be  inactive  under  various  assay  conditions.  These  results  increase  our  understanding  of  the  role  of  aspartate  residues  in  protein  function, and also help guide the choice of sites for other mutations in cellulase enzymes.   107


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS    

  Tuesday, p.m.  

Session Chair 

  1:45 p.m. –  2:05 p.m. 

Technical Session 7 1:45 – 3:30 p.m.  Graduate Student Sci‐Mix  Symposium  Sharon Kennedy, Ph.D.  Colgate‐Palmolive Company    Presenters 

  Aubert 

 

Eastman Kodak Dr. Theophilus Sorrell Fellowship Awardee  “Nanoparticle-Based Selective Colorimetric Sensor For Organophosphorus Pesticides” Tova A. Samuels* and Sherine O. Obare Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI 49008 Abstract

Colorimetric sensors that selectively detect environmental pollutants in real time are becoming increasingly important areas of research. In particular, the design of materials that detect and discriminate between pollutants with similar molecular structures are in high demand. We have developed a series of colorimetric sensors based on silver (Ag), and gold (Au) metallic nanoparticles, and Ag/Au bimetallic nanoparticles. Particle size and shape were controlled through either photochemical or wet-chemical methods. The quality and the structure of the surface of the nanoparticles were found to play an important role in the detection process. The interaction of the nanoparticles with the pesticides ethion, malathion, parathion, fenthion and paraoxon was examined. We found that with proper control of particle size, these nanoparticles are highly selective toward OP pesticides, giving specific changes in optical signal. The sensors can be tuned to have up to ppb detection limits. The presentation will demonstrate the rational choices in substituent selection for selective discrimination between organophosphorus compounds.       108


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   2:05 p.m. –  2:25 p.m. 

Dow Chemical Company Fellowship Awardee “Using Functionalized Nanoparticles To Study Intracellular Response Central To The Progression Of Osteonecrosis”

Fedena Fanord1, Korie Fairbairn1, Harry Kim2, Venkat Bhethanabotla1, Vinay K. Gupta*1 1University of South Florida, Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering, Tampa, FL 2Shriners Hospitals for Children, Tampa, FL Abstract Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, a juvenile form of osteonecrosis, is a disorder of the femoral head that causes loss of the structural integrity of bone and deformity, often resulting in premature end-stage osteoarthritis. Current treatments are limited to high risk surgical procedures for young patients. Studies have shown that inhibiting osteoclastic resorption can prevent the development of the femoral head deformity; but much remains to be discovered about the molecular targets, uptake, and intracellular trafficking of the biochemicals that inhibit the osteoclastic resorption. We have focused on using functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNP) and exploiting the optical properties of the GNP for visual imaging of the progression of biochemical action on osteoblast and osteoclast cells. In vitro studies have been conducted to model in vivo cellular interactions and observe cellular response to functionalized GNP. Characterization of the functionalized GNP and cellular response with UV-Vis and infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), optical microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) will be presented.   2:25 p.m. –  Procter and Gamble Fellowship Awardee  2:45 p.m.  “Next Generation Carbon Monoxide Gas Sensing” Adedunni D Adeyemo*1, Prabir K Dutta1 The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry, Columbus, OH 43220 Abstract A large variety of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) based sensors for the detection of carbon monoxide (CO) have been developed over the last few decades. These devices can only be been used at elevated temperatures (300-600oC), even for room temperature gas monitoring. The opportunity for a MOS device that does not require heating will lead to a low temperature and low cost device. A room temperature carbon monoxide sensor has been developed based on thin films of a ruthenium compound. The sensing properties are observed to be of a p-type “semiconducting” material in nature. The sensor material synthesis, optimization and sensing mechanism will be discussed. The ruthenium oxide sensors are sensitive to CO concentrations as low as 32ppm.

        109


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   2:45 p.m. –  3:05 p.m. 

Lendon N. Pridgen, GlaxoSmithKline ‐ NOBCChE Fellowship  Awardee 

“Overriding Diastereoselective Felkin Additions To Give   Anti Felkin Products”   Gretchen R. Stanton, Patrick J. Walsh*  University of Pennsylvania   Department of Chemistry, Philadelphia, PA 19104    Abstract    Diastereoselective additions to chiral aldehydes have been widely utilized in the synthesis of small  molecules  and  natural  products.    In  general,  additions  to  silyl‐protected  α  and  β‐hydroxy  aldehydes  proceed  through  a  non‐chelation  (Felkin)  controlled  pathway.    Chelation  controlled  (anti‐Felkin)  additions  to  these  aldehydes  are  uncommon  due  to  the  steric  demands  of  the  silyl  group;  the  few  examples  in  the  literature  employ  a  chiral  ligand  to  achieve  high  selectivity.1,  2  There  are  limited  examples  of  using  organozinc  reagents  in  additions  to  chiral  aldehydes.    In  previous  studies,  we  found  that  the  addition  of  (Z)‐disubstituted  vinyl  zinc  reagents  to  TBS‐ protected α and β‐hydroxy aldehydes give rise to the anti‐Felkin product in the presence of a Lewis  acid (BF3⋅OEt), thus overriding the expected selectivity.3  More recently, we have shown that (Z)‐ trisubstituted vinyl zinc reagents add to various silyl‐protected α and β‐hydroxy aldehydes to give  the anti‐Felkin addition product in high diastereomeric ratios.  An equivalent of ethyl zinc bromide  is a byproduct from the in‐situ formation of the vinyl zinc reagent (Figure 1).    Figure 1  O TBSO

n-Bu

Br

i) Et2BH ii) Et2Zn, -78 oC -EtZnBr

H n-Bu

Et

OH Me

n-Bu

TBSO

ZnEt

H Me

Et

dr >20:1

    After obtaining this unexpected addition product with reversed diastereoselectivity, we wanted to  determine  if  the  alkyl  zinc  halide  byproduct  plays  a  role  in  diastereoselection.    In  addition,  we  wanted  to  determine  whether  this  is  a  more  general  procedure  that  could  provide  the  synthetic  community  with  a  new,  powerful  tool.    Preliminary  results  show  that  (S)‐2‐(tert‐ butyldimethylsilyloxy)‐propanal  undergoes  ethyl  addition  with  excellent  diastereoselectivity  to  give the anti‐Felkin addition product in the presence of ethyl zinc chloride (Figure 2).     Figure 2  O TBSO

+ Me

Et2Zn

EtZnCl toluene, 0 oC to rt

OH

OH

TBSO

TBSO Me

Me

dr >20:1 anti-Felkin product obtained

  110

product predicted by Felkin model


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   The  goal  of  this  project  is  to  create  a  general  method  for  the  generation  of  anti‐Felkin  addition  products from silyl‐protected α and β‐hydroxy aldehydes with a variety of zinc nucleophiles using  an alkyl zinc halide additive.  Further studies are underway to gain mechanistic insight.    References  (1) Williams, D. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 1258‐1262.  (2) Eidam, P.; Marshall, J. Org. Lett. 2004, 6, 445‐448.  (3) Jeon, S.; Fisher, E.; Carroll, P.; Walsh, P. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 9618‐9619.   

  3:05 p.m. –  3:25 p.m. 

E.I. Dupont Fellowship Awardee  “Inducer Effects On Lac Repressor‐Mediated DNA Loops: Single molecule  FRET Studies”     Kathy Goodson1*, Aaron R. Haeusler1, Doug English2, Jason D. Kahn1,     1University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD, 20742,   2Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, 67260  Abstract 

    The  Escherichia  coli  LacI  protein  represses  the  lac  operon  by  blocking  transcription.  Tetrameric  LacI  binds  simultaneously  to  a  promoter‐proximal  DNA  operator  and  an  auxiliary  operator,  andthe  resulting  DNA  loop  increases  the  efficiency  of  repression.  A  hyperstable  closed‐form  LacIDNA  loop  was  previously  shown  to  be  formed  on  a  DNA  construct  (9C14)  that  includes  a  sequence‐ directed  bend  flanked  by  operators.  Previous  bulk  and  single  molecule  fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM‐ FRET)  experiments  on  dual  fluorophore‐ labeled  9C14‐LacI  loops  demonstrate  that  LacI‐9C14 adopts a single, stable, rigid DNA  loop  conformation,  despite  the  presence  of  flexible linkers in LacI. Here, we characterize  the  LacI‐9C14  loop  by  SM‐FRET  as  a  function  of  inducer  isopropyl‐ ,D‐ thiogalactoside  (IPTG)  concentration.  Energy transfer measurements reveal partial  but  incomplete  destabilization  of  loop  formation  by  IPTG,  with  no  change  in  the  energy  transfer efficiency of the remaining looped population.           111


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS       Models  for  the  regulation  of  the  lac  operon  often  assume  complete  disruption  of  LacI  operator complexes upon inducer binding to LacI. Our work shows that even at saturating  IPTG  there  is  still  a  significant  population  of  LacI‐DNA  complexes  in  a  looped  state,  in  accord with previous in vivo experiments that show incomplete induction.      Thursday, a.m.   Session Chair 

  9:30 a.m. – 9:50  a.m.   

Technical Session 8    9:30  ‐ 11:30 a.m.  Parkview  Alternative Energy Solutions  Issac Gamwo, Ph..D.  US Department of Energy    Presenters     “Redox  Relays  To  Enhance  Charge  Separation  Efficiency  Of Photovoltaics”  

Melody Kelley, Silas Blackstock*  University of Alabama Department of Chemistry, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487    Abstract      We are preparing redox relay dendrons (RRDs) as electron shuttle components of Grätzel type1 dye sensitived solar cells (DSSCs).  The DSSC is a low cost alternative to solid‐state devices that convert sunlight to electricity.  The RRD structures will improve solar energy capture by (a) preventing energy‐wasting charge recombination at the dye/semi‐conductor interface  and  (b)  rapidly  regenerating  the  dye  component  to  its  ground  state  to  accep another photon.  The structure, synthesis, and application of the RRDs are presented.   1.        1 OʹRegan ; Grätzel, M.  Nature, 1991, 353, 737.     “Reactivity Of Solvated And Presolvated “Dry” Electrons In The  Ionic Liquid N‐Methyl N‐Butylpyrrolidinium  Bis[(Trifluoromethyl)Sulfonyl]Imide”  Jockquin D. Jones*(1), Charlene Lawson(1), Shawn M. Abernathy(1), James F. Wishart(2)

9:50 a.m. – 10:10  a.m. 

(1)Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059, (2)Brookhaven  National Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Upton, NY 11972    Abstract    Ionic liquids (ILs) are defined as salts with melting points below 100ºC.  Because of their diverse  properties,  ILs  have  attracted  widespread  attention  as  promising  alternatives  to conventional (i.e., molecular) organic solvents.  ILs are comprised entirely of cations and 112


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   anions‐‐typically, a heterocyclic nitrogen‐containing cation and an inorganic anion.  They  are  non‐volatile,  non‐flammable,  and  highly  conductive,  which  makes  them  attractive  solvents  for  implementation  in  the  Green  Chemistry  movement  and  improved  chemical  transformations.  In  order  to  fully  evaluate  their  potential  in  new  applications,  it  is  imperative  to  study  and  understand  their  reaction  kinetics  using  ionizing  radiation.   In  this  investigation,  ultra‐fast  pulse  radiolysis  was  used  to  study  the  reactivity  of  the  solvated  electron  in  the  ionic  liquid  N‐methyl  N‐butylpyrrolidinium  bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide  (P14NTf2)  with  selenate,  cadmium,  nitrate,  and  benzophenone  scavengers.   Using  the  Brookhaven  National  Laboratory  (BNL)  Laser‐ Electron  Accelerator  Facility  (LEAF),  we  were  able  to  directly  observe  the  behavior  of  transient species on a pico‐ and nanosecond timescale.  We analyzed ultrafast single shot  traces  of  solvated  electron  absorbance  for  different  scavenger  concentrations  at  wavelengths of 680 and 800 nm.  Reaction kinetics were obtained and it was determined  that the nitrate ion is not an efficient dry electron scavenger in comparison to the cadmium  and benzophenone scavengers.       10:10 a.m. – 10:30  “Continuous‐Flow and Enhancement of Reaction Rates of Biodiesel  Production Using a Slit‐Channel Reactor”  a.m.  Egwu Eric Kalu1*, Ken S. Chen2, Tom Gedris3    1FAMU‐FSU COE, Chemical & Biomed. Dept., Tallahassee, FL 32310  2Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185  3Florida State University, Chemistry & Biochemistry Dept., Tallahassee, FL 32306    Abstract    Slit‐Channel  reactors  are  reactors  whose  active  surface  areas  are  orders  of  magnitude  higher  than  those  of  micro  reactors  but  have  low  fabrication  costs  relative  to  micro  reactors.  We  successfully  produced  biodiesel  with  different  degree  of  conversion  using  liquid‐phase  catalyst  in  the  slit‐channel  reactor.  The  slit‐channel  reactor  conversion  performance  shows  that  percent  conversion  of  soybean  oil  to  biodiesel  increases  with  channel  depth,  as  expected,  due  to  more  efficient  mixing.  As  the  channel  becomes  shallower,  the  reaction  becomes  faster.  Results  will  be  presented  to  show  that  the  slit‐ channel  reactor  provides  an  improved  performance  over  traditional  batch  reactors  using  NaOH liquid catalyst. In the present work, the slit‐channel reactors were developed with  the  objective  to  couple  the  reactors  with  solid  catalysts  in  converting  soybean  oil  to  biodiesel and discussion will be given on methods of implementation.       10:30 a.m. – 10:45  Break  a.m.  10:45 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.      113


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     10:45 a.m. – 11:05  “Electroless Nickel‐based Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation by   Hydrolysis of Borohydride”  a.m.  Shannon Anderson, Addisu Samuel, Egwu Eric Kalu*,  Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering  FAMU‐FSU College of Engineering  Tallahassee, FL 32310    Abstract    Catalysts  based  on  electroless  nickel  nanoparticles  were  developed  for  the  hydrolysis  of  sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation. The Ni‐based catalysts were synthesized by  polymer‐stabilized Pd nanoparticle‐catalyzation and activation of Al2O3  or TiO2 substrate  and electroless Ni or Ni‐Mo plating of the substrate for selected time lengths. Catalytic  activity  of  synthesized  catalysts  was  tested  for  the  hydrolyzation  of  alkaline‐stabilized  NaBH4 solution for hydrogen generation. The effect of palladium loadings on the substrate  and electroless plating time lengths on hydrogen generation rates is analyzed and discussed.  Compositional  analysis  and  surface  morphology  were  done  for  metallized  Al2O3  or  TiO2  particles using SEM and EDAX.     Apparently,  for  the  conditions  studied,  two‐stage  hydrogen  evolution  rates  describe  the  hydrogen‐time curves – the high catalytic activity stage that is followed by the low catalyst  activity  stage.  Further,  within  the  limited  range  of  variables  investigated,  85μg  Pd/g  substrate loading and nickel plating time of 5 minutes yielded the best hydrogen generation  rates.  Suggestions  are  provided  for  further  work  needed  prior  to  using  the  catalyst  for  portable hydrogen generation from alkaline‐stabilized NaBH4 solution.       “Fuel  Reactor  Behavior  Of  A  Chemical  Looping  Combustion  11:05 a.m. – 11:25  System: Thermal Effects”   a.m.  Isaac K. Gamwo1 and Jonghwun Jung2  1U.S. Department of Energy  National Energy Technology Laboratory  Pittsburgh, PA 15235‐094  2Technical Research Laboratory,  POSCO, 1, Goedong‐dong,  Nam‐gu, Gyeongbuk 790‐785,  Pohang, South Korea    Abstract      Energy source forecasts show that fossil fuels will remain the primary energy source  worldwide leading both renewable and nuclear energy sources at short or medium term.  114


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   However, fossil fuel combustion for power generation increases atmospheric CO2  concentration. Hence, it is important to develop new technologies during this decade that  will reduce the impact of continued fossil energy use while cleaner energy sources are being  developed. Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a good candidate for fossil fuel  combustion with negligible atmospheric CO2 emissions. CLC produces a relatively pure  stream of CO2 ready for compression and storage in geological settings. Furthermore, CLC  also minimizes NOx emissions since the fuel combustion is flameless in the absence of  nitrogen.    Our previous studies simulated the fuel reactor behavior of a chemical looping combustion  process. Here, we report on the thermal effects on the fuel reactor behavior. We found that  unburned fuel weight fraction was reduced by nearly half when the temperature increased  from 700 0C to 900 0C indicating a substantial increase in the fuel conversion rate. The  simulations also showed that the bubble size in the fuel reactor increases with temperature.               Thursday, p.m.  

Session Chair 

  9:30 a.m. – 9:50  a.m. 

Technical Session 9    Portland/Benton 9:30 – 12:00 N  Tools and Technologies in   Analytical Chemistry I    Emanuel Waddell, Ph.D.  Department of Chemistry, Oakwood University    Presenters     “The  Effects  Of  Varying  Ionic  Strengths  Of  Supporting  Electrolytes On   A Spectroelectrochemical Sensor”  

  Eme E. Amba*, Laura K. Morris, Sara E. Andria,  Chris Bowman, Carl J. Seliskar and William R. Heineman.  Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati,  301 Clifton Court, Cincinnati, OH 45221‐0172                                                          Abstract       The effects of varied ionic strengths of supporting electrolytes on a spectroelectrochemica sensor were studied. The spectroelectrochemical sensor is an optically transparent indium tin  oxide  (ITO)  electrode  coated  with  a  charge  selective  thin  film  that  contacts  a  sample solution.   To  be  detected,  the  analyte  partitions  into  this  ion  exchange  film  where  i undergoes  a  modulated  change  in  absorbance  upon  reversible  oxidation‐reduction  at  the ITO  electrode.   The  change  in  absorbance  is  measured  using  attenuated  total  reflectance 115


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   (ATR) spectroscopy and is related to the concentration of analyte which has partitioned into  the  film.  The  model  system  was  tris  (2,2‐bipyridyl)  ruthenium  (II)  dichloride  hexahydrate  ([Ru(bpy)3]2+)  partitioning  into  a  sulfonated  polystyrene‐block‐poly  (ethylene‐ran‐ butylene)‐block  polystyrene  (SSEBS),  an  ion  exchange  thin  film.   Analyte  solutions  were  prepared with either potassium nitrate, sodium nitrate or calcium nitrate as the supporting  electrolyte.   The  analyte  was  kept  at  a  constant  concentration  of  10‐4 M  and  supporting  electrolyte concentrations were varied from 0 M to 1 M.  The performance of the sensor was  evaluated  using  cyclic  voltammetry  to  repeatedly  cycle  between  [Ru(bpy)3]2+,  which  absorbs  at  450 nm,  and  non‐absorbing  [Ru(bpy)3]3+  (700 mV  to  1300 mV   vs.  Ag/AgCl).  Both  the  optical  response  ( A)  and  electrochemical  peak  currents  (Ip)  were  affected  by  changing the concentration of supporting electrolyte. At high concentrations of supporting  electrolyte,  both  A  and  Ip  were  decreased.  The  optimal  ionic  strength  of  the  supporting  electrolyte for the three electrolytes were: 0.001M for NaNO3, 0.01M for KNO3 (0.01M) and  0.003M  for  Ca(NO3)2  (0.001M).  At  concentrations  of  supporting  electrolyte  near  zero,  the  sensor’s optical response decreases by approximately 37%. The optical response signal was  plotted against concentration, ionic strength and conductivity, a parameter of all ions that is  dependent on concentration.     9:50 a.m. – 10:10  “Novel  Near  Infra‐Red  Dyes  And  Nanoparticles  Derived  From  Ionic  Liquids”   a.m.    David K. Bwambok1, Bilal El‐Zahab1, Mark Lowry1, Gabor Patonay2,   Gary A. Baker3, and Isiah M. Warner*, 1    1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803  2Department of Chemistry, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, 30302  3Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831    Abstract      Dyes that fluoresce in the NIR region have enormous potential applications in areas such as  laser  dyes,  organic  light‐emitting  diodes  (OLED),  invisible  printing  inks,  probes  for  photodynamic  therapy  and  contrast  agents  for  in  vivo  imaging.  We  have  synthesized  and  investigated  spectral  properties  of  novel  near  infra‐red  (NIR)  dyes  and  NIR  dye  nanoparticles  derived  from  ionic  liquids  (ILs).  The  ionic  liquid  NIR  (IL  NIR)  dyes  were  synthesized using an anion exchange metathesis reaction��between the cationic dye halides  such as iodide or chloride and different anions. A simple reprecipitation method was used  to prepare the IL NIR dye nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles as determined using  dynamic  light  scattering  as  well  as  electron  microscopy  suggests  that  particles  of  around  100  nm  in  diameter  were  obtained.  The  IL  NIR  dyes  and  their  respective  nanoparticles  studied have absorbance and fluorescence emission in the NIR wavelength region. These IL  116


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   NIR  dyes  offer  the  capability  of  tuning  the  absorption  and  fluorescence  properties  by  varying the anion. In addition to other applications associated with common NIR dyes, we  envision that these IL NIR dye nanoparticles may have potential application in biomedical  imaging because body tissues have a low absorption coefficient in the long NIR wavelength  region allowing light to penetrate deep into the tissues. In addition, the dye nanoparticles  are  derived  from  ILs  which  are  generally  considered  as  a  non‐toxic  class  of  compounds  consisting  of  only  ions;  a  crucial  requirement  for  dyes  to  be  used  for  in  vivo  imaging.  In  addition, the possibility of tuning the properties of the IL NIR dyes by varying the anion is  a tremendous advantage for this new class of nanomaterials.       “Supercritical  Fluid  Chromatography  Study  Of  Anion  10:10 a.m. – 10:30  Influence  On  Retention  Mechanisms  Using  Surface‐Confined  a.m.  Ionic Liquids”     Nyote J. Oliver, David S. Van Meter, Thomas L. Chester, Apryll M. Stalcup*  University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 210172, Cincinnati, OH, 45220    Abstract      Mass  spectrometry  is  increasingly  important  in  the  analysis  of  biological  samples,  such  as  proteins,  lipids  and  oligonucleotides.  However,  the  chromatographic  conditions  required  for  the  separation  can  have  a  deleterious  effect  on  the  mass  spectrometer.  For  that  reason,  this  project  investigates  the  use  of  surface‐confined  ionic  liquids  (SCIL)  stationary  phases  on  supercritical  fluid  chromatography  (SFC)  platforms,  to  compliment  ongoing  studies  using  high  performance  liquid  chromatography (HPLC), to offer an alternative approach to complex biomolecular  separations.  SCILs  are  emerging  as  a  potential  answer  to  the  challenges  of  biomolecular separations because these types of compounds have many interaction  modes,  thus  making  them  capable  of  separations  through  electrostatic,  dispersive  and proton acceptor‐ donor interactions. Previous studies of SCILs have shown that  the  anion  seems  to  play  a  role  in  the  retention  of  various  analytes  through  its  exchange with adventitious ions in the mobile phase. The use of SFC for this study  is  necessary  because  the  anion  remains  on  the  column  and  its  contribution  to  the  retention  properties  of  the  column  can  be  studied  more  closely.  Therefore,  use  of  SCILs  with  SFC  would  address  the  shortfalls  in  separations  of  complicated  biological mixtures introduced to the mass spectrometer.     10:30 a.m. – 10:45  Break  a.m.                      117


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   10:45 a.m. – 11:05  “Increased Light Extraction Of Inasgasb Led Through   Wet Chemical Etching”  a.m.    Deandrea L. Watkins*, Jonathon T. Olesberg, Thomas F. Boggess, and Mark A. Arnold  The University of Iowa Chemistry Department, Iowa City, IA, 52242    Abstract    Near  infrared  spectroscopy  is  under  development  for  measuring  glucose  and  other  bio‐ molecules in biological fluids at wavelengths between 2.0 and 2.5 μm. High quality spectra  are  needed  to  successfully  extract  analytical  information  from  near  infrared  spectra  collected from clinical samples.  A solid‐state near infrared spectrometer would advance the  field  by  providing  a  means  for  collecting  high  quality  spectra  under  non‐laboratory  conditions.  We are developing solid‐state light emitting diode (LED) sources from unique  GaInAsSb  semiconductor  materials.  Physical  geometry  of  the  LED  region  is  a  critical  parameter and the physical geometry depends on many factors associated with the etching  process, such as composition of the etching solution, relative concentrations of the etching  components,  and  time  of  the  etching  reaction.   This  presentation  will  focus  on  the  optimization  of  the  etching  solution  to  produce  LED’s  with  high  radiant  powers.   Results  indicate that the depth of etching and the angle of the etched sidewalls can be optimized by  controlling the etching conditions.  Through this optimization of etch solution composition  there was an increase in etch depth from 18.20 μm to 60.4 μm and an increase in etch rate  from 0.61 μm/min. to 2.01 μm/min. when etched for a period of 30 minutes.     11:05 a.m. – 11:25  “Ters Of Quinolinium Tricyanoquinodimethanides On Silver”     a.m.    Melissa Fletcher,1 D. M. Alexson,2 Sharka Prokes,2 Orest Glembocki,2   Alberto Vivoni,3   and Charles Hosten1*    1Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington DC, 20059  2Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC, 20375  3Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences, Inter American   University, San German, PR 00683‐9801    Abstract      The alkylquinolinium tricyanoquinodimethanide class of compounds has been studied and  classified  as  molecular  rectifiers.  The  extended  ‐ring  system  allows  for  facile,  unidirectional  electron  transport,  i.e.  rectification.  The  alkyl  tails  attached  to  the  quinolinium ring aid in Langmuir‐Blodgett film formation. Tip‐enhanced Raman scattering  (TERS)  spectroscopy  has  been  used  to  study  the  orientations  of  monolayers  of  N‐ methylquinolinium  tricyanoquinodimethanide  and  6‐thioacetyl‐N‐hexylquinolinium  118


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   tricyanoquinodimethanide.  The  results  indicate  that  both  of  the  monolayers  are  adsorbed  through the lone pairs on the nitrogen atoms. However, upon removal of the acetyl group,  leaving a free sulfur, some of the monolayer tends to reorient itself, adsorbing to the surface  via a S–Ag bond.     11:25 a.m. – 11:45  “Surface Modification Of Polymer Substrates By Excimer Radiation”   a.m.    Holly Carrell1, Stephen Shreeves2, Christopher Perry3, and Emanuel Waddell*2    1University of Alabama in Huntsville, Department of Chemistry, Huntsville, AL 35899  2Oakwood University, Department of Chemistry, Huntsville, AL 35896  3Loma Linda University, School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry,  Loma Linda, CA 92350    Abstract    Surface  modification  of  polymer  substrates  is  typically  achieved  by  “wet‐  chemical”  treatments that involve a number of time‐consuming steps. Previously we investigated the  ability  to  pattern  polymer  substrates  via  laser  ablation  under  different  chemical  atmospheres.  In  this  one‐step  process,  polymers  were  micro‐machined  while  simultaneously chemically modifying the surface. As an extension of this research, we have  exposed  various  polymer  substrates  to  narrow  band  excimer  radiation  under  inert  atmospheres  and  the  resultant  surface  is  characterized  by  attenuated  total  reflectance  infrared  spectroscopy,  contact  angle  goniometry,  atomic  force  microscopy,  and  scanning  electron  microscopy.  Finally,  some  of  the  polymer  substrates  as  characterized  by  electroosmotic  flow.  In  this  presentation,  the  modification  of  polydimethylsiloxane  and  polymethylmethacrylate  will  be  discussed.  The  modification  of  polydimethylsiloxane  (PDMS)  by  narrow  band  254  nm  excimer  radiation  under  a  nitrogen  atmosphere  is  characterized  and  it  is  determined  that  the  UV  irradiation  results  in  the  formation  of  the  carboxylic acids that influences the wettability of the surface. Continued exposure results in  the  formation  of  an  inorganic  surface  (SiOx,  (1  <  x  <  2))  which  hinders  the  ability  to  continually  increase the wettability. These results have implications in  the fabrication and  chemical modification of microfluidic or micro‐electro‐mechanical systems. The application  in microfluidics is observed with the modification of PMMA by 222 nm excimer radiation  that  results  in  the  formation  of  hydroxyl  groups  which  in  turn  contribute  to  increased  electroosmotic flow.                 119


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS      

 

  Thursday, a.m.  

2009 Rohm and Haas Undergraduate  Competition  Co‐sponsored by Colgate‐Palmolive  Company and Lubrizol Corporation  10:00 – 12:00 N 

  Pershing/Lindel l 

Session Chair    Presenters       10:00 a.m. – 10:20  2009 Rohm and Haas Undergraduate Award Winner  a.m.  “Novel  Graphene  Nanocutting  Approach  Through  Controlled  Fracture”    Rhonda Jack*,§, Dipanjan Sen*, Markus J. Buehler*,†  * Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics, Department of Civil and  Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA,  USA  § Department of Chemical Engineering, Hampton University, Hampton VA, USA  † Corresponding author, electronic address: mbuehler@MIT.EDU    Abstract      The  recent  discovery  of  single  graphene  sheets  and  the  remarkable  technologies  envisioned  for  graphene‐based  materials  necessitate  the  ability  to  assemble  and  reproduce  nano‐precise  graphene  structures.  We  demonstrate  the  possibility  of  creating  atomically  precise  graphene  structures  by  applying  tensile  load  to  single  sheets of graphene, using atomistic models of single graphene sheets. These models  are generated by the Reactive Force Field potential (ReaxFF) which was incorporated  into the General Reactive Atomistic Simulation Program (GRASP). It is observed that  the direction and behavior of graphene fracture are controlled to a significant extent  by  the  presence  of  atomistic  defects  in  the  form  of  atom  vacancies  throughout  the  sheet. These vacancies produce varied effects according to the patterns in which they  occur  throughout  the  2D  structure.  This  overall  realization  engenders  novel  possibilities with methods either currently employed or proposed, that are aimed at  producing  atomically  precise  graphene  structures,  and  thereupon  brings  great  promise in advancing new applications predicated on graphene nano technology.     10:20 a.m. – 10:40  2009 Rohm and Haas Undergraduate Award Winner  a.m.  “Coupled Dielectric And Thermochemical Studies Of The Influence  Of Curing Agent Structure On Epoxy‐Amine Cure”    120


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Abdul‐Rahman O. Raji*, Alvin P. Kennedy, and Solomon Tadesse  Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251    Abstract      Dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry have been used to monitor  the  isothermal  cure  of  Diglycidyl  Ether  of  Bisphenol  A  with  3,  3ʹ‐DDS  and  4,  4ʹ‐DDS.  Combination  of  both  methods  provides  a  powerful  technique  for  understanding  the  morphology  of  network‐forming  epoxy‐amine  during  cure.   It  is  interesting  that  though  the  only  difference  in  the  structure  of  both  curing  agents  is  the  location  of  their  amine  groups, there is a significant difference in their final glass transition temperature. Their in‐ situ  dielectric  properties  also  showed  huge  distinctions.  The  result  of  the  experiments  revealed that although the rate of reaction or the rate of network formation is higher for  the  3,  3ʹ‐DDS,  it  is  not  directly  responsible  for  the  disparity  in  the  final  glass  transition  temperature.         10:40 a.m. – 11:00  2009 Colgate‐Palmolive Undergraduate Award Winner  a.m.  “Asymmetric Conjugate Addition: Synthesis Of (+)‐Kalkitoxin”    Everett W. Merling, Nina R. Collins and Richard J. Mullins*  Department of Chemistry, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH    Abstract      The  lipopeptide  (+)‐kalkitoxin,  a  metabolite  produced  by  a  member  of  the  Lyngbya  majuscula  family  of  cyanobacteria,  has  been  shown  to  exhibit  several  antiproliferative  biological  properties.   The  most  noteworthy  of  these  properties  is  its  cytotoxicity  to  an  array of aquatic creatures as well as toxicity to rat neurons and human colon cancer cell  lines.  On the basis of this interesting bioactivity profile, we have embarked on a quest to  better  understand  the  manner  by  which  it  prevents  the  growth  of  tumor  cells.   To  accomplish this goal, our efforts have focused on the total synthesis of kalkitoxin, utilizing  the  conjugate  addition  of  an  allylic  stannane  for  preparation  of  the  aliphatic  core.   Our  progress,  which  has  thus  far  resulted  in  preparation  of  the  aliphatic  core  of  the  parent  molecule, will be presented.     11:00 a.m. – 11:20  2009 Colgate‐Palmolive Undergraduate Award Winner  a.m.  “Synthesis Of Chalcone Derivatives For Use As Anti‐Proliferative   Agents On Glioblastoma Cells”    Debra Ragland and Marion A. Franks, Ph.D.*   Department of Chemistry, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University,  Greensboro, North Carolina 27411.    121


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Abstract    Chemoprevention  explores  the  use  of  natural  and  synthetic  agents  that  can  reduce  the  incidence of cancer. The goal of our chemoprevention research is to synthetically produce  chemopreventive compounds that can halt or reverse the development of cancer in people  that  are  exposed  to  carcinogens  on  a  daily  basis.  Chalcones  which  are  the  biogenetic  precursors  for  flavones  have  been  investigated  in  many  experiments  for  their  anti‐ proliferative and chemopreventive effects.  Chalcones and their derivatives are useful as  angiogenesis inhibitors, anti‐tumor, and anti‐cancer agents and are used to treat a number  of  conditions  or  disease  states  in  which  angiogenesis  is  a  factor.  We  hypothesize  that  based  on  their  anti‐angiogenic  nature,  chalcone  derivatives  formulated  by  synthetic  means will have anti‐proliferative effects on glioblastoma cells.  Chalcones were prepared  by  Claisen‐Schmidt  condensation  of  primarily  3’  and  4’  methoxy‐acetophenone  and  substituted  aldehydes.    The  reactions  produced  several  crystalline  solids  in  medium  to  high yields ranging from 60% to 98%. The solid products were tested for purity using Gas  Chromatography  –  Mass  Spectroscopy  (GC‐MS)  and  1H  and  13C  NMR.    Each  purified  products  were  tested  for  their  anti‐proliferative  effects  on  glioblastoma  cells  (U‐251)  in  varying  concentrations.  The  tested  chalcones  showed  low  to  moderate  anti‐proliferative  effects on the U‐251 Glioblastama cell line.  This  work  was  generously  supported  by  the  Agilent  Technologies  Diversity  Grant  ID#:   [08US‐827FD].      11:20 a.m. – 11:40  2009 Lubrizol Corporation Undergraduate Award Winner  a.m.  “The Effect Of Solvents On The Rheology Of Polymer Solutions”    Folorunso S. Adu and  Jude O. Iroh  University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio    Abstract      The  polymer  used  in  this  study  is  poly(dimethysiloxane)‐ethermide  (PSEI).  Films  were  made with this polymer buy dissolving it in the appropriate solvents. The solvents used  are NMP and THF. To study for the rheological behavior of the polymer solutions, their  viscosities  were  measured.  Viscosity  measurement  was  done  using  the  simple  shear  method  with  the  Brookfield  viscometer,  which  consists  of  a  concentric  cylinder  system.  The measured viscosity was shown to be dependent on the temperature, shear rate, shear  stress, and concentration of the solution. Our preliminary results, showed that generally  for  the  polymer‐NMP  solutions,  as  the  temperature  increased  the  viscosity  decreased.  While  for  the  polymer‐THF  solutions  the  viscosity  decreased  initially  with  increased  temperature  up  to  the  boiling  point  of  the  solvent  followed  by  a  drastic  increase  in  viscosity  for  any  additional  increase  in  temperature.  These  observations  gave  us  a  powerful  insight  into  how  processing  temperature  affects  the  processing  of  thin  films,  membranes, and coatings.     122


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS             11:40 a.m. – 12:00  2009 Lubrizol Corporation Undergraduate Award Winner  N  “The Synthesis Of Coumarins For Prostate Cancer  Chemoprevention”    B. Mills & M. A. Franks, Ph.D.*    Department of Chemistry, North Carolina A & T State University  1601 E. Market Street, Greensboro, NC 27411    Abstract    Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by the growth of uncontrolled abnormal cells  leading  to  the  impairment  of  normal  bodily  functions.  A  total  of  1,437,180  new  cancer  cases and 565,650 deaths from cancer are projected to occur in the United States in 2008.  One of the most promising avenues for controlling cancer is through “chemoprevention”.   Chemoprevention is the use of natural, synthetic, or biological chemical agents to reverse,  suppress, or prevent carcinogenesis.  It has been shown that coumarins and boronic acids  are effective chemopreventive treatments when used to treat carcinogenic prostate cancer  cells.  I  hypothesize  that  through  the  use  of  coumarins  and  boronated  derivatives  of  coumarins,  prostate  cancer  will  be  prevented.    I  synthesized  numerous  coumarin  derivatives for chemopreventive testing using a green chemistry, solventless preparation  technique,  and  indium  chloride  as  the  catalyst.    Thus  far,  we  have  characterized  and  purified  several  coumarins  and  derivatives  using  IR,  GC‐MS,  and  NMR  spectroscopy.   The  compounds  that  are  synthesized  and  purified  will  be  assayed  for  chemopreventive  activity against prostate cancer cell lines.  We are currently in the process of synthesizing  the  boronic  acid  analogs  of  selected  coumarins,  which  will  be  tested  for  their  chemopreventive activity against prostate cancer cell lines as well.   

  Thursday, p.m.  

Technical Session 10    1:00 – 5:00 p.m.  Portland/Bento Tools and Technologies in Analytical  n  Chemistry II  Session Chair  Aleeta Powe, Ph.D., University of Louisville  Charlotte Smith‐Baker, Texas Southern University    Presenters       “Mass Spectrometric Studies Of Hyaluronic Acid In The   1:00 p.m. –  Vitreous Humor”   1:25 p.m.  123


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     Aleeta M. Powe*  University of Louisville, Department of Chemistry, Louisville, KY 40208    Abstract      Hyaluronic acid, a sugar polymer, is the predominant macromolecule of the transparent,  gel‐like  vitreous  humor,  which  is  80%  of  the  volume  of  the  mammalian  eye.   The  liquification  of  vitreous  occurs  with  age,  in  a  variety  of  ocular  disease  states,  and  is  important  in  the  pathogenesis  of  retinal  tears  and  detachments.   In  this  study,  we  investigate and identify saccharides in the vitreous and regionally map the occurrence of  the saccharides, with particular focus on Hyaluronic acid.  Saccharides of Hylauronic acid  were identified from 4 different regions (anterior, posterior, middle and rear) of porcine  vitreous  using  FTICR‐MS.   Specific  saccharides’  structures  (disaccharides,  tetrasaccharides,  hexasaccharides)  were  identified  using  Tandem  MS.   Saccharides’  masses were compared before and after depolymerization of hyaluronic acid.  Changes in  hyaluronic acid saccharides possibly can be correlated to specific syndromes or diseases  of the eye.        “Sequencing  Antimicrobial  Polypeptides  From  The  American  1:25 p.m. –  Alligator (Alligator Mississippiensis) Blood Using Mass Spectrometry”  1:45 p.m.    Lancia N.F. Darville*1, Mark E. Merchant2 and Kermit K. Murray1  1Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803, USA and   2McNesse State University, Lake Charles, LA, 90455    Abstract    Significant anecdotal evidence exists to suggest that alligators and crocodiles are resistant  to  microbial  infection.  These  animals  typically  live  in  environments  with  large  concentrations of pathogenic microbes, yet their wounds typically heal without infection.  Alligator leukocytes contain cationic peptides that are believed to be responsible for the  strong antimicrobial activity against bacteria, virus and fungi. To begin to understand the  structure  and  function  of  the  peptides  within the  alligator’s blood  that  contribute  to  the  antimicrobial  activity  we  sequenced  polypeptides  from  their  leukocyte  using  de  novo  sequencing.  Alligators  were  captured  and  blood  was  drawn  from  internal  jugular  vein.  Leukocytes  were  collected  from  the  whole  blood  by  homogenizing,  centrifuging  and  diluting the supernatant in 0.1% acetic acid. Alligator leukocyte was separated using a 1D  gel  format.  Gels  were  stained  with  Coomassie  blue  and  low  molecular  weight  protein  bands  were  excised  and  enzymatically  digested.  The  masses  of  the  peptides  from  the  enzymatic digest were measured using LC‐MS/MS. Predictions of polypeptide sequences  were  determined  using  automated  and  manual  de  novo  sequencing  analysis.  Predicted  peptide sequences were also searched using MASCOT with NCBInr and MSDB database  124


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   to  identify  any  peptides  that  are  closely  homologous.  The  study  and  characterization  of  these  polypeptides  will  lead  us  to  the  specific  peptide(s)  that  contribute  to  the  innate  immune system in the American alligator. These peptides will potentially offer a route to  new antifungal and antibacterial drugs.    “The  Potential  Of  Optically  Gated  Vacancy  Capillary  Electrophoresis  1:45 p.m. –  As An Innovative Technique To Study Enzymatic Reactions”   2:05 p.m.    Sherrisse A. Kelly, Rattikan Chantiwas, Douglass Gilman*  Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803    Abstract      It  is  well  known  that  enzymes  are  vital  to  the  function  of  our  bodies.   Enzymes  are  proteins that serve as catalysts for important biological reactions to take place however,  improper functioning of certain enzymes can lead to illness and disease.  Enzymes react  with substrates to produce specific reaction products.  The analytical technique, optically  gated  vacancy  capillary  electrophoresis  (OGVCE),  will  be  developed  to  analyze  such  reactions.  For the initial studies, the enzyme adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4) has been  examined  as  a  model  system  to  demonstrate  this  technique.   A  fluorescent  substrate  for  the  enzyme,  2ʹ,  3’‐O‐(2,  4,  6  trinitrophenyl)  adenosine  (TNP‐adenosine),  has  been  successfully synthesized and characterized.  The ability of the substrate to react with the  enzyme  and  form  a  fluorescent  product  was  confirmed  using  capillary  electrophoresis  with laser‐induced fluorescence detection.  The OGVCE technique  is very promising for  allowing researchers to study the activity and inhibition of enzymes.  This will lead to a  better  understanding  of  certain  enzyme  systems  and  has  the  potential  of  assisting  researchers in the drug discovery process in the future.        “Protein  Separations  Using  Polyelectrolyte  Multilayer  Coatings  In  2:05 p.m. –  Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatography And Gradient Elution  2:25 p.m.  Moving Boundary Electrophoresis”    Candace A. Luces1, David Ross2, Mark Lowry1, Bilal El Zahab1,   Laurie Locascio2, and Isiah M. Warner*1    1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803  2Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and  Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. 20899    Abstract      In  this  study,  polyelectrolyte  multilayer  coatings  were  constructed  using  molecular  micelles in open tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT‐CEC) and gradient elution  125


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   moving  boundary  electrophoresis  (GEMBE)  for  protein  separations.   In  OT‐CEC,  the  proteins were detected using both ultra violet (UV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF)  detection,  while  only  LIF  detection  was  used  in  the  GEMBE  technique.   PEM  coatings  were constructed using the cationic polymer, poly‐L‐ornithine and the molecular micelles  sodium  poly(N‐undecanoyl‐L‐leucyl‐alaninate)  (poly‐L‐SULA)  and  sodium  poly(N‐ undecanoyl‐L‐leucyl‐valinate) (poly‐L‐SULV), for the enhancement of protein separations  in  OT‐CEC.   Poly‐L‐SULA  was  the  only  molecular  micelle  used  in  PEM  coatings  for  GEMBE.   The  effects  of  bilayer  number,  type  of  molecular  micelle  used  in  the  PEM  coatings as well as pH of the background electrolyte on acidic proteins (α‐lactalbumin, β‐ lactoglobulin  A,  β‐lactoglobulin  B,  albumin,  myoglobin,  and  deoxyribonuclease  I)  were  analyzed using ultra violet (UV) detection in OT‐CEC.  In addition, a comparison of the  electropherograms  of  native  proteins  to  those  of  fluorescently  labeled  proteins  was  completed using PEM coated capillaries in OT‐CEC with UV detection.  Furthermore, the  influence of pH of the background electrolyte, internal diameter and the effective length  of the capillary were studied to investigate their influence on protein separations with LIF  detection.   For  LIF  detection,  the  proteins  were  fluorescently  labeled  using  5‐ (Iodoacetamido)  fluorescein  (5‐IAF).  High  resolution  protein  separations  were  achieved  in OT‐CEC using PEM coatings constructed with 2 bilayers of poly‐L‐ornithine and poly‐ L‐SULA as well as a 40 mM phosphate, pH 8.0 buffer.  These conditions were also used  for protein separations with the GEMBE technique. Different voltages and step intervals  were  applied  to  a  3cm,  30μm  capillary  to  investigate  their  influence  on  protein  separations using PEM coatings and GEMBE.  As expected, the results showed that lower  voltages and step intervals produced higher resolution protein separations.    2:25  p.m.  –  “Toward  A  Theory  Of  Achiral  Molecular  Micelle‐Protein  Complexation: Analysis Of The Interaction Of Proteins With Poly (N‐ 2:45 p.m.  Undecylenic Sulfate)”     Monica R. Sylvain*1, Bilal El‐Zahab1, Mark Lowry,1 Isiah M. Warner1  1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803    Abstract      Routinely, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) uses sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)  to  determine  the  polypeptide  composition  of  proteins.   In  this  technique  the  SDS‐ polypeptide  complexes  formed  are  subjected  to  an  electric  field,  migrate  toward  the  anode, and are separated according to molecular weight.  At the molecular level, several  types  of  hydrophobic  and  ionic  interactions  are  involved  in  protein‐SDS  association.  Under certain conditions, the type of interaction primarily responsible for association has  been  shown  to  depend  on  surfactant  concentration  as  well  as  other  system  parameters  such  as  ionic  strength  and  pH.   In  our  laboratory,  a  novel  variation  of  SDS‐PAGE  has  been developed wherein the molecular micelle, poly (N‐undecylenic sulfate) [poly‐SUS],  functions as the denaturing surfactant.  We proposed that the efficacy of the separations  126


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   with poly‐SUS will be defined by the interaction mechanism involved with the proteins.     Herein, we report on the analysis of the effect of poly‐SUS on the conformation, stability,  and hydrodynamic radius of proteins separated in PAGE.          Break  2:45 p.m. –  3:00 p.m.    “Fabrication With Chitosan For Biosensors”   3:00 p.m. –  3:25 p.m.      Yongchao Zhang*  Morgan State University, Chemistry Department,  Baltimore, MD, 21251    Abstract    Chitosan  as  a  biocompatible  and  bio‐degradable  polymer  which  has  excellent  film‐ forming  abilities  has  attracted  much  attention  recently,  for  promising  applications  in  biosensors. In this study we developed new techniques in fabricating chitosan matrix for  immobilizing biomolecules and metal nanoparticles. A non‐toxic crosslinker was used to  effectively  crosslink  chitosan  and�� the  enzyme;  an  innovative  electrode‐induced  crosslinking  method  was  also  developed  which  provided  simple,  fast,  precise  and  controllable fabrication of chitosan/enzyme films on electrode surface. Chitosan was also  found  to  be  crucial  in  assisting  and  regulating  the  electrochemical  synthesis  of  metal  nanoparticles  such  as  Ag  NP;  the  Ag  nanoparticles  showed  excellent  ability  to  enhance  the  sensitivity  of  the  electrochemical  biosensor  based  on  the  chitosan/silver  NP/enzyme  composite  material.  Other  properties  of  the  chitosan/silver  NP  composites  are  currently  under investigation.  Supported by NSF HRD‐0627276.    3:25  p.m.  –  “The  Development  Of  A  Colorimetric  Cyanide  Anion  Sensor  In  Aqueous Solutions”   3:50 p.m.    Yousef M. Hijji*, Belygona Barare  Chemistry Department, Morgan State University,   Baltimore MD 21251    Abstract      Cyanide is one of the most toxic anions around us. It can contaminate our water sources  and  environment.   Cyanide  contamination  is  usually  caused  by  industrial  waste  from  gold  extraction  process  and  as  fishing  agent.  Due  to  the  serious  threat  of  cyanide  127


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   contamination,  the  development  of  efficient  sensitive  method  for  its  monitoring  and  determination  is  of  urgent  need.   We  have  developed  a  visual  colorimetric  method  for  qualitative and quantitative determination of cyanide in aqueous solution at micro‐molar  levels. The detection process and the method of evaluation will be discussed.       Support was provided by NSF‐RISE Award No. HRD‐0627276.           “Spectroscopic  Investigations  Of  Heterogeneous  Wetting  And  3:50 p.m. –  Molecular Delivery From Nanoporous Silica Particles”   4:10 p.m.    Reygan M. Freeney*1, Mark A. Lowry2, and M.Lei Geng1  1University of Iowa, Department of Chemistry and the Nanoscience and   Nanotechnology Institute, Iowa City, IA 52242  2Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803    Abstract           With  the  broad  applications  of  nanomaterials  in  science  and  technology,  there  is  an  increased  interest  in  the  understanding  of  transport  and  dynamics  at  the  nanometer  dimensions.    Recently,  much  discussion  has  occurred  regarding  the  diffusion  and  sorption processes of a variety of silica‐based materials, which have broad applications in  many  fields  such  as  drug  delivery,  catalysis,  and  chemical  separations.   The  interest  in  mesoporous silica is due to its ability to offer tunable diameters, pore sizes, volumes, and  surface  modifications.   These  silica  particles  are  also  strong  and  stable,  offer  a  large  surface  area,  do  not  shrink  or  swell,  resist  pH  changes  and  yield  highly  reproducible  results.   The  porous  silica  particles  are  durable,  inert,  and  compatible  to  biological  applications.         To better understand the process of diffusion out of nanopores, an investigation of the  transport  of  Rhodamine  6G,  a  fluorescent  cationic  dye,  is  used  as  a molecular  probe  for  the  nanostructured  silica  material.   Through  surface  modification,  the  mesoporous  silica  beads contain a monolayer of octadecylsilane and possess a nominal diameter of 10 μm  with  an  average  pore  size  of  10  nm.   These  particles  were  loaded  with  R6G  through  a  method  of  immersion;  molecular  diffusion  of  the  dye  was  monitored  using  confocal  microscopy  and  UV‐Vis  spectrophotometry  to  measure  the  change  in  fluorescent  intensity or absorbance over time.     Solvent  compositions  were  varied  to  determine  how  the  diffusion  rate  is  influenced  by  the  organic  content.   Preliminary  results  show  that  the  higher  the  organic  content,  the  faster  the  diffusion  rate.   A  comparison  between  different  surface  modifications  is  also  included in this study.   4:10 p.m. – 

“Near‐Infrared  Spectroscopy  And  Imaging  Investigation  Of  128


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   4:30 p.m. 

Single‐Walled Carbon Nanotubes In Ionic Liquids”     1 Kristen E. Schexnayder , Chieu Tran*2, Irena Mejac2, Simon Duri2 

1Louisiana State University, Department of Biological Sciences, Baton Rouge, LA 70803  2Marquette University, Department of Chemistry, Milwaukee, WI 53201    Abstract      Single‐walled carbon nanotubes have become an explosive research interest among many  areas of chemistry including analytical chemistry during recent years. They will provide  numerous technological advances in several different realms of research. Ionic liquids are  also  of  much  interest  during  recent  years  because  they  have  many  unique  properties  allowing  for  widespread  use  and  development  as  a  ʺGreen  and  Recyclable  Solvent.ʺ  Single‐walled carbon nanotubes are known to be soluble in only a few selected solvents.  Ionic  liquids  with  their  high  solubility  power  may  serve  as  possible  solvents  for  single‐ walled carbon nanotubes. This would lead to the development of many new applications  for  the  carbon  nanotubes  which  are  not  possible  otherwise.  To  test  this  possibility,  we  initially  dissolved  single‐walled  carbon  nanotubes  in  dimethylformamide  and  characterized  the  solution  using  near‐infrared  spectroscopy  and  near‐infrared  multispectral  imaging  techniques,  similar  to  procedures  used  previously  in  our  laboratory. We found that the DMF solution of carbon nanotubes exhibits an absorption  band  at  around  1862nm  which  is  in  good  agreement  with  those  reported  in  literature.  Single‐walled  carbon  nanotubes  were  then  mixed  with  a  small  volume  of  a  room  temperature  ionic  liquid  and  sonicated  using  a  bath  sonicator.  After  a  few  hours  of  sonication,  an  additional  amount  of  ionic  liquid  was  added  to  create  a  1:1  ratio.  The  sample continued to sonicate for a few hours until a thorough dispersion was visible. A  small volume of this solution was transferred to ionic liquid to create a diluted solution  with  a  concentration  of  0.02mg/mL.  Near‐infrared  spectroscopy  and  imaging  systems  were used to characterize the ionic liquid solution. Preliminary results are encouragement  and with the use of various different types of ionic liquids, it will be possible to dissolve  single‐walled  carbon  nanotubes  in  some  room  temperature  ionic  liquids.  These  possibilities are currently under investigation.     “Hair As An Indicator Of Exposure To Pesticides”   4:30 p.m. –  4:50 p.m.      Charlotte A. Smith‐Baker*1, Momoh Yakubu2, James H. Nance1, and Mahmoud A.  Saleh1  1Texas Southern University, Department of Chemistry, Houston, TX 77004  2 Texas Southern University, Department of Pharmacy, Houston, TX 77004    Abstract      129


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Environmental  toxicants  such  as  pesticides  pose  a  significant  risk  to  human  health.    Pesticides  are  persistent  organic  compounds  and  are  ubiquitous  in  our  environment.   They are used daily in our homes, work places, and school environments.  They are found  in air, water, soil, food sources, and biological materials.  Pesticides are used extensively  and  are  dispersed  into  the  environment  in  great  quantities.     Therefore,  analysis  of  pesticides  as  a  biomarker  is  relevant  and  is  needed  for  easy  assessment  of  exposure.   Analyses  of  pesticides  in  biological  samples  such  as  blood  and  urine  have  their  limitations.  They are invasive and non‐cumulative.  Hair can accumulate pesticides and  because of ease of sampling hair can be a good biomarker for analysis of pesticides and  pesticide exposure.  This study consists of developing an effective method for extracting  pesticides from hair.  Also, develop a sensitive method for the determination of pesticides  in hair using gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC‐ECD).           This  work  was  funded  by  RCMI  Grant  #  R003045‐17  and  NASA  /  TSU‐URC  Grant  #  NCC9165.             Technical Session 11    Thursday, p.m.   3:00 – 5:00 p.m.  Aubert  Organic Chemistry  Session Chair  Al fredWilliams, Ph.D.  North Carolina Central University    Presenters       “Improving the physico‐chemical properties of anti‐cancer drugs via  3:00 p.m. – 3:15  co‐crystallization”   p.m.    Safiyyah Forbes, Christer B. Aakeröy*, and John Desper.  Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, Manhattan, KS 66502    Abstract    Co‐crystallization has become an important method for improving the physico‐chemical  properties (i.e. stability, solubility) of solid drug candidates. Crystal engineering is being  used as a strategy for understanding and predicting hydrogen bonding interactions. The  complementary  pairing  of  two  molecules  held  together  by  hydrogen  bonding  promotes  the formation of a stable crystalline complex that contains both the active pharmaceutical  ingredient (API) and the non‐toxic co‐crystallizing agent, Fig.1.    

130


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Figure  1:    Cocrystal  of  API  and  secondary  co‐crystallizing  agent  held  together  via  hydrogen bonding.    Co‐crystallization  synthesis  of  a  family  of  anti‐tumor  API’s  was  carried  out  using  dicarboxylic  acids  generally  regarded  as  safe  by  the  FDA.    Cocrystals  were  prepared  in  order  to  study  the  pharmacokinetic  properties  as  well  as  the  intermolecular  interaction  preferences  between  common  binding  sites  in  anti‐cancer  drugs.  From  the  studies  conducted  we  were  able  to  demonstrate  a  positive  correlation  between  structural  properties and physical properties of resulting pharmaceutical cocrystals. Therefore, it is  possible to fine‐tune the thermal stability of API’s using cocrystals as new solid forms.    “Fluoresence Of Corannulene Based Enediynes”   3:15 p.m. – 3:30  p.m.    Teresa L. Cook, Derek Jones and James Mack*  University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemistry, Cincinnati, OH 45221    Abstract  The  development  of  new  organic  materials  is  crucial  to  the  development  of  nanotechnology.  Corannulene, which is 1/3 of fullerene [60], potentially can be used as a  building  block  to  spearhead  this  development.  Due  to  its  unique  fluorescent  and  electrochromatic  properties,  corannulene  has  the  potential  to  advance  organic  light  emitting  diode  (OLED)  technology.  We  are  in  the  process  of  synthesizing  various  corannulene based alkenes and linear acenes in order to cause a significant red shift in the  absorbance  spectra  and  increased  luminescence  of  the  molecules.  To  this  end  we  have  begun  the  synthesis  of  2,3‐dibromoanthracene,  cis‐1,6‐Bis(trimethylsiyl)hex‐3‐ene‐1,5‐ diyne  and  6,13‐diethynylcoranulenylpentacene.   We  will  report  the  synthesis  and  characterization of these molecules.      3:30 p.m. – 3:45  p.m.   

“A  Novel  Approach  To  The  Synthesis  Of  Silylated  1,3‐Alternate  Calixarenes”  

Prima R. Tatum, Paul F. Hudrlik, and Anne M. Hudrlik  Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington, D. C. 20059, USA  E‐mail: prima.tatum@gmail.com    Abstract      Silylated calixarenes are of potential interest in molecular recognition.  Recently a number  of  C‐silylated  cone  calix[4]arenes  [Me3Si,  PhMe2Si,  Ph2MeSi,  (allyl)Me2Si]  have  been  prepared  in  this  research  group.   We  are  now  investigating  the  synthesis  of  C‐silylated  calixarenes  in  the  1,3‐alternate  conformation.   p‐tert‐Butylcalix[4]arene  was  dealkylated,  and  the  1,3‐alternate  conformation  was  established  via  the  two‐pot  procedure  of  131


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   sequential treatment with propyl iodide/K2CO3 followed by propyl tosylate/CsCO3.  The  corresponding  bromocalixarene  was  prepared  using  NBS.   Silylation  was  carried  out  using  the  previous  conditions  via  halogen‐metal  exchange  using  tert‐BuLi,  followed  by  silylating  agents  (Me3SiCl  and  PhMe2SiCl)  giving  the  silylated  1,3‐alternate  calixarenes.   As before, a mixture of chlorosilane with triethylamine was used for the silylations.      We  are  currently  investigating  novel  ways  to  synthesize  silylated  compounds.   We  are  studying  the  use  of  Grignard  reagents  to  make  the  silylated  compounds.   We  use  the  monocyclic  compound  bromoanisole  as  a  template  for  the  novel  reactions  before  trying  them  on  the  calixarene.   Although  the  monocyclic  products  are  known,  the  methods  in  which they are synthesized are new.     3:45 p.m. – 4:00  p.m. 

“Investigations  Into  Bacterial  Communication  Via  Chemical  Synthesis Of Autoinducer‐2 (Ai‐2)”     Jacqueline A.I. Smith and Herman O. Sintim*  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland,   College Park, MD   Abstract 

    Quorum sensing is a phenomenon which allows bacteria to coordinate processes such  as virulence, antibiotic production and biofilm formation.  Since biofilm is involved in  65%  of  infectious  diseases,  an  effective  way  to  inhibit  quorum  sensing  is  a  good  strategy to combat bacterial infections.  Autoinducer‐2 (AI‐2) is a universal signaling  molecule  which  exists  in  gram‐negative  and  gram‐positive  bacteria.   In  enteric  bacteria, a phosphorylated AI‐2 species plays a key role in the expression of quorum  sensing‐controlled genes and undergoes a unique degradation process.  The lack of a  facile  synthesis  of  AI‐2  has  hampered  the  development  of  AI‐2  chemical  probes  required  to  investigate  the  E.  coli  system.   We  report  a  new  synthesis  of  AI‐2  which  provides  access  to  a  variety  of  analogues  as  well  as  phosphorylated  AI‐2.   We  also  show the effect of these analogues on biofilm formation in E. coli.     4:00 p.m. – 4:15  p.m.  

“Reactivity Of  A  Cis‐Pd(II)  Ar  F  Complex  Towards  Aryl  C–F  Bond  Formation” 

Nicholas D. Ball and Melanie S. Sanford*  Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109  Abstract  Direct  carbon–fluorine  reductive  elimination  from  aryl  PdII  fluorides  going  through  a  PdII/Pd0  transformation  has  proven  to  be  extremely  challenging.   Directed  palladium‐ catalyzed  oxidative  fluorination  of  C–H  bonds  has  been  previously  reported  by  our  132


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   laboratory  and  has  been  proposed  to  proceed  through  an  unusual  Pd(II)/Pd(IV)  mechanism.  Key  to  the  proposed  mechanism  is  the  existence  of  a  monocyclometalled  Pd(II)  intermediate,  which  undergoes  oxidative  addition  to  a  Pd(IV)  species  and  subsequent  reductive  elimination.  This  presentation  will  discuss  the  synthesis  of  similar  cyclometallated  (L–L)PdII(p‐XPh)(F)  complexes  where  X=  CF3,  F,  OMe  and  L–L  =  t‐ BuBipy  and  their  reactivity  with  stoichiometric  quantities  of  electrophillic  fluorinating  agents.  The  reactivity  of  these  complexes  with  XeF2  will  demonstrate  the  viability  of  oxidative fluorination to create both electron rich and electron poor aryl fluorides in good  yields.  In  addition,  discussion  of  19F  NMR  spectroscopy  studies  will  highlight  the  reactivity  of  an  isolated  ‐aryl  PdIV  species  towards  C–  F  bond  formation.  These  stoichiometric studies will emphasize the viability of Pd(II)/Pd(IV) C–F bond formation in  catalytic systems.     4:15 p.m. – 4:30  p.m. 

“A Free Radical Cyclization Approach To The Polyandranes”  

Valerie C. Cwynar, Mathew G. Donahue, David J. Hart*, Grace K. Mbogo, and Dexi Yang  Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210  Abstract  This  poster  presents  an  approach  to  the  synthesis  of  quassionoid  natural  products  known  as  the  polyandranes  (3).  The  key  reaction  involves  free  radical  cyclization  of  allenyl alcohol 1 to trans‐perhydroindan product 2.       The poster will first present a synthesis of 1 via a reaction sequence that involves (a) Birch  reduction  of  methyl  3‐methoxy‐5‐methylbenzoate,  followed  by  alkylation  of  the  intermediate enolate with iodomethyl pivalate, (b) reduction of the resulting diester with  lithium  aluminum  hydride,  (c)  bromoetherification  of  the  resulting  diol  followed  by  Swern  oxidation  of  the  resultant  alcohol  to  give  an  aldehyde,  and  (d)  reaction  of  the  aldehyde with a propargyl titanium reagent to give 1. The  synthesis of allenyl alcohol 1  will  be  followed  by  its  conversion  to  trans‐perhydroindan  2  (along  with  some  related  model studies).  Finally, plans for proceeding from 2 (or related compounds) towards the  polyandranes (3) will be discussed.     “Synthesis  Of  Some  New  Benzimidazole  Carboxamides  As  Potential  4:30 p.m. –  Anti‐Inflammatory Agents”   4:45 p.m.    Laine Le,1 Lygheia Lewis,1  Kinfe K. Redda2and Bereket Mochona*1  1Department of Chemistry, 2College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences,  Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307    133


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   Abstract  Research  efforts  towards  the  discovery  of  cyclooxygenase‐2  (COX‐2)  selective  inhibitors  has been made because of the potential therapeutic interest in inflammatory processes as  well as in cancer proliferation, especially prostate and pancreatic cancer. In the course of  research devoted to the development of new classes of anti‐inflammatory agents we have  been interested in the modification of the well known nonselective COX‐2 inhibitors with  benzimidazole  moiety.  The  Benzimidazole  moiety  fulfils  the  minimum  structural  requirements  that  are  common  for  anti‐inflammatory  compounds.  This  is  further  confirmed  by  the  conclusion  that  the  derivatives  of  1‐phenyl‐2‐styryl‐1H‐benzimidazole  have  been  disclosed  as  anti‐inflammatory  agents  with  COX‐2  inhibition.  However,  benzimidazole‐5‐caroxamides have not been studied towards anti‐inflammatory activity.  Therefore,  it  was  thought  worthwhile  to  explore  the  anti‐inflammatory  potential  of  carboxamide  derivatives  of  2‐hetero  substituted  benzimidazoles.  The  synthesis  and  characterization  of  21  derivatives  of  benzimidazole  carboxamides  as  potential  anti‐ inflammatory agents will be presented.     4:45 p.m. –  5:00 p.m.   

“Matrix  Isolation  Investigation  Tetramethylethylene Ozonolysis”  

Of 

The 

Mechanism 

Of 

Bridgett E. Coleman* and Bruce S. Ault  Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati  Cincinnati, OH 45221    Abstract    The  matrix  isolation  technique,  combined  with  infrared  spectroscopy  and  twin  jet  codeposition has been used to characterize intermediates formed during the ozonolysis of  tetramethylethylene  (TME).  Literature  and  experimental  spectral  comparisons  provide  evidence  for  the  formation  of  the  primary  ozonide  (POZ)  for  this  system  while  other  possible intermediates include the secondary ozonide (SOZ) and the unobserved Criegee  intermediate  (CI).  TMEPOZ  absorptions  observed  in  the  twin  jet  experiments  grew  slightly upon annealing to 35K. These methods have previously identified formaldehyde  and acetaldehyde as major products formed during the ozonolysis of propene merged jet  (flow  reactor)  experiments.  Likewise,  merged  jet  experiments  are  expected  to  generate  “late”  stable  oxidation  products  of  TME.  Identification  of  intermediates  formed  during  the  ozonolysis  of  TME  is  further  supported  by  18O  isotopic  labeling  experiments  and  theoretical density functional calculations at the B3LYP/6‐311++G(d,2p) level.    

134


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     Thursday, p.m.  

Technical Session 12    3:00 – 5:00 p.m.  Parkview  NOBCChE Professional Chemical  Engineer Award Symposium  Angela McIver, Ph.D.  Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Iowa   Presenters    

Session Chair 

  3:00 p.m. – 3:45  p.m. 

NOBCChE Professional Chemical Engineer Awardee  “Calculations Of Wall Shear Stress In Left Coronary Artery For  Pulsatile Flow Using Three‐Dimensional Computational Fluid  Dynamics”   

Sahid Smith, Shawn Austin and G. Dale Wesson*  Department of Chemical Engineering, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL      Abstract    The  onset  of  coronary  heart  disease  may  be  governed  by  distribution  and  magnitude  of  hemodynamic  shear  stress  in  the  coronary  arteries.    This  study  numerically  examines  three‐dimensional pulsatile blood flow through the left coronary artery system. A triphasic waveform  is  employed  to  simulate  pulsating  flow.  The  Generalized  Power  law,  non‐ Newtonian  rheological  model,  is  used  to  describe  the  viscous  shear‐thinning  behavior  of  blood.    The results are reported in two separate sections of work.  The first section contains results  of  the  three‐dimensional  simulation  that  includes  curvature  in  the  LAD  and  LCX.    It  is  assumed that theses are the most realistic of the three flow domains studied.  The second  section  presents  the  results  of  the  two‐dimensional  and  three‐dimensional  without  curvature and compares them to those of the three‐dimensional with curvature.    A major finding from the comparison of the results from the two‐dimensional predictions  and the three‐dimensional predictions was:  the WSSs predicted in this three‐dimensional  investigation  without  curvature  and  the  three‐dimensional  investigation  with  curvature  were greater than the WSSs predicted in the two‐dimensional investigation.  A find from  the  comparison  of  the  simulation  with  curvature  and  simulation  without  curvature  was  the  predicted  WSSs  were  greater  in  the  simulation  with  curvature  than  the  simulation  without curvature.     

135


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS     3:45 p.m. – 4:10  p.m. 

“Dendrimer‐Stabilized  Fe2O3  Nanoparticles  For  The  Growth  Of  Single‐Walled Carbon Nanotubes By Microwave Plasma CVD”     Placidus B. Amama*, Timothy D. Sands, Timothy S. Fisher 

Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907  Abstract    Even though single‐walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are known to possess outstanding  material properties, their technological impact thus far has been low largely because of the  difficulty associated with the control of their growth properties such as chirality, diameter,  purity,  and  alignment.  The  growth  of  SWNTs  via  CVD  offers  one  of  the  most  attractive  ways  of  controlling  their  properties  because  of  the  key  role  played  by  the  catalytic  nanoparticles. Although, the growth mechanism of SWNTs is still unclear, several studies  have  demonstrated  the  direct  correlation  between  the  nanoparticle  size  and  the  eventual  diameter of the grown SWNT.[1] It is therefore necessary to precisely control the particle  size distribution of the catalyst nanoparticles within the range selective for SWNT growth  and  to  ensure  the  stabilization  of  these  nanoparticles  at  high  growth  temperatures  characteristic of CVD systems.       In this work a fourth‐generation (G4) poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer (G4‐NH2)  has been used as a “nanotemplate” to deliver nearly monodispersed catalyst nanoparticles  to  Si/SiO2,  sapphire  and  porous  anodic  alumina  (PAA)  substrates.  Fe2O3  nanoparticles  obtained  after  mild  calcination  of  the  immobilized  Fe3+/G4‐NH2  composite  served  as  catalytic  “seeds”  for  the  growth  of  SWNTs  by  microwave  plasma‐enhanced  CVD  (PECVD).  The  PECVD  is  suited  to  producing  graphitized,  vertically  aligned  high‐quality  multi‐wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and carbon nanofibers at low temperatures.[2] The  growth of SWNTs by PECVD has proved to be difficult based on previous reports[3] and  our experience mainly because it is difficult to maintain a low carbon supply in the PECVD  growth environment. In order to surmount the difficulty associated with SWNT growth in  the  PECVD,  reaction  conditions  that  promote  the  stabilization  of  Fe  nanoparticles,  resulting in enhanced SWNT selectivity and quality, have been identified. In particular, in  situ annealing of Fe catalyst supported on Si/SiO2, and sapphire in an N2 atmosphere was  found  to  improve  SWNT  selectivity  and  quality  as  presented  in  figure  1.  The  SWNT  selectivity  and  quality  are  indicated  by  the  low  frequency  peak  (radial  breathing  mode)  occurring ~100‐350 cm‐1 and the integrated intensity of the G‐band relative to the D‐band,  respectively.         The application of DC bias voltage (+200 V) during SWNT growth was shown to be very  effective  in  removing  amorphous  carbon  impurities  completely  while  enhancing  graphitization, SWNT selectivity, and vertical alignment. The results of  this study would  136


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS   promote  the  use  of  exposed  Fe  nanoparticles  supported  on  different  substrates  for  the  growth of SWNTs, thereby utilizing some of the unique advantages offered by PECVD.[4]     References:  1) Dai, H. J.; Rinzler, A. G.; Nikolaev, P.; Thess, A.; Colbert, D. T.; Smalley, R. E. Chem. Phys.  Lett. 1996, 260, 471. (b) Sinnott, S. B.; Andrews, R.; Qian, D.; Rao, A. M.; Mao, Z.; Dickey, E.  C.; Derbyshire, F. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1999, 315, 25. (c) Cheung C. L.; Kurtz, A.; Park, H.;  Lieber, C. M. J. Phys Chem B 2002, 106, 2429.  2) Meyyappan, M.; Delzeit, L.; Cassell, A.; Hash, D. Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 2003, 12, 205.   3) (a) Kato, T.; Jeong, G.; Hirata, T.; Hatakeyama, R.; Tohji, K.; Motomiya, K. Chem. Phys. Lett.  2003, 381, 422. (b) Kato, T.; Jeong, G.; Hirata, T.; Hatakeyama, R.; Tohji, K. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys.  2004, 43, L1278. (c)  Li, Y.; Mann, D.; Rolandi, M.; Kim, W.; Ural, A.; Hung, S.; et al. Nano  Lett. 2004, 4, 317. (d) Delzeit, L.; Nguyen, C. V.; Stevens, R. M.; Han, J.; Meyyappan, M.  Nanotechnology 2002, 13, 280.   4) Amama, P. B.; Maschmann, M. R.; Sands, T. D.; Fisher, T. S. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110,  10636. 

  4:10 p.m. – 4:30  p.m. 

“Shear Flow In Entangled Polymers Investigated Using Confocal  Microscopy And Particle Image Velocimetry” 

  Keesha A. Hayes*1, Mark R. Buckley2, Itai Cohen2 and Lynden A. Archer1  School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853  2Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 

1

  Abstract    We use confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry to visualize flow of entangled  polymers in a custom‐built, planar‐Couette rheometer. Polybutadiene solutions spanning a  range of molecular weights (Mw=200K, 788K) and entanglement densities (8 ≤ N/ Ne  ≤ 56)  are  seeded  with  250‐300  nm  particle  tracers.  When  compared  to  traditional  couette  and  cone & plate geometries, our narrow gap (~ 35 μm), small aspect ratio (as < 1/143) shear cell  is  a  more  rigorous  setting  for  exploring  banding  in  entangled  polymers.  With  increasing  imposed shear rate, violations of the boundary no‐slip condition become more severe and  the  difference  between  the  imposed  and  measured  shear  rates  increases.  Despite  these  observations,  importantly,  the  measured  velocity  profiles  are  generally  linear,  even  for  rates  in the non‐Newtonian  shear  regime.  This finding  disagrees  with  recent  reports  that  shear banding is a characteristic flow response of entangled polymers, and instead points  to interfacial slip as an important source of strain loss. The measured shear rates and shear  stresses are used to characterize slip. We find two slip regimes; the transition to the highly  non‐linear  second  regime  occurs  at  stresses  comparable  to  the  elastic  modulus  of  the  entangled  polymer  network.  These  results  are  consistent  both  with  polymer  slip  theories  and published data obtained using other techniques.      137


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS       4:30 p.m. – 5:00  p.m.   

“Biocatalytic  Systems  for  Aromatic  Oxidations:  The  Production  of  Naphthalene Dihydrodiol”  Angela M. McIver*,  Tonya L. Peeples  1University of Iowa, Department of Chemical and   Biochemical Engineering, Iowa City, IA 52242    Abstract 

    The purpose of this research is to engineer a biocatalytic system to facilitate the production  of oxidation products in an economic and environmentally benign fashion. Oxygenases are  powerful  stereoselective  and  regioselective  catalysts  that  are  useful  in  the  preparation  of  valuable  pharmaceutical  and  specialty  chemical  intermediates.  The  need  for  cofactor  regeneration necessitates the use of whole‐cells in such bioprocesses. We have selected to  work with organisms carrying dioxygenases. Immobilization of these microorganisms will  result in more stable biocatalysts that will be more amenable to meet process requirements.  Specifically,  retention  of  the  immobilized  catalyst  will  facilitate  isolation  of  valuable  products.  This effort is critical to producing environmentally beneficial biotransformation  systems  by  providing  an  environmentally  benign  oxidation  process  with  reaction  and  separation  of  products.  This  work  highlights  some  results  comparing  the  effectiveness  of  naphthalene  and  toluene  dioxygenases  expressed  in  Escherichia  coli  for  the  oxidation  of  naphthalene  to  naphthalene  dihydrodiol.   The  use  of  biphasic  reaction  media  is  used  to  increase productivity and enhance the reaction.  The productivity is increased even more  by  using  a  small  scale  bioreactor.  We  will  show  methods  of  creating  an  environmentally  benign system.        

 

 

 

   

 

   

138


POSTER ABSTRACTS    NOBCChE Scientific Exchange  Wednesday, p.m.   Poster Session 

  Convention Center Hall 1 

      4:00 – 6:00 p.m.       

  Posters (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co‐Author(s), Affiliation)   

 “Studies of Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) Model Lipid Membranes  Using Analytical Methods”    

Janetricks N. Chebukati* and Gail E. Fanucci     University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, Gainesville, Fl, 32611‐7200     Abstract   Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate  (BMP)  is  an  unusually  shaped,  negatively  charged  phospholipid  found  in  elevated  concentrations  in  the  late  endosomes.   The  unusual  structure  and  stereochemistry  of  BMP  are  thought  to  play  important  roles  in  the  endosome,  including  structural  integrity,  endosome  maturation,  and  lipid/protein  sorting and trafficking.   We  have  utilized  dynamic  light  scattering  and  transmission  electron  microscopy  to  characterize  the  morphology  and  size  of  BMP  hydrated  dispersions  and  extruded  vesicles. We find that the morphology of hydrated BMP dispersions varies with pH,  forming highly structured, clustered dispersions of 500 nm in size at neutral pH 7.4.  However, at acidic pH 4.5, spontaneous hydrolysis of BMP occurs, altering the vesicle  morphology to spherically shaped dispersions.   BMP  vesicles  are  also  significantly  smaller  in  diameter  than  phosphatidylcholine  (POPC) and phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) vesicles. In a stability assay using dynamic  light  scattering  measurements  to  compare  and  monitor  30  nm  extruded  vesicles  of  BMP, POPC, and POPG over a 5 week period, we find that BMP vesicles do not fuse  to  form  larger  structures.  These  results  shed  light  on  the  possibility  that  the  biosynthesis of BMP and the increasing acidity during the maturation process of late  endosomes  play  an  important  role  in  the  formation  of  intraendosomal  vesicular  bodies.       139


POSTER ABSTRACTS  2 

“Synthesis and Characterization of Dual Property Magnetic Ionic Liquid  Nanoparticles for Application in the Treatment of Various Forms of Cancer”       Stacie LeSure Gregory   Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University    Baton Rouge, LA  70803   sgrego1@lsu.edu     Abstract      Due  to  their  unique  physical  properties  and  ability  to  function  at  the  cellular  and  molecular  level,  magnetic  nanoparticles  (MNPs)  have  been  explored  for  various  biomedical  applications  including,  contrasts  agents  for  magnetic  resonance  imaging  (MRI),  local  hyperthermia  induction  to  selectively  destroy  cancer  cells,  and  as  magnetically targeted carrier systems in drug delivery applications.  However, there  is  significant  interest  in  recent  years  in  developing  MNPs  having  multifunctional  characteristics  with  complementary  roles.   I  am  proposing  the  synthesis  of  MNPs  utilizing  room‐temperature  ionic  liquids  (RTILs)  that  display  superparamagnetic  behavior, while simultaneously having the ability to fluoresce.   Utilizing simple ionic  exchange & taking advantage of their inherent tunability, I will synthesize a diverse  array of ILs containing biocompatible fluorescent dyes as the cationic species and at  the  same  time  varying  the  anionic  species,  while  maintaining  magnetic  properties.  Upon the successful synthesis of dual property magnetic ILs, I will use a facile aerosol  technique  to  fabricate  MNPs.    A  variety  of  techniques,  including  UV‐Vis,  Raman  Spectroscopy,  NMR,  SEM,  TEM  and  SQUID,  will  be  utilized  in  an  effort  to  fully  characterize  the  properties  of  both  the  synthesized  ILs  and  the  magnetic  nanooparticles.    A proof of concept synthesis has already been completed for an IL  containing  a  near  IR  dye  as  the  cation  and  FeCl3  as  the  anion.   Preliminary  data  supports the viability of the proposed work.   These dual property MNPs will have a  significant  impact  on  the  treatment  of  many  forms  of  cancer.   The  supermagnetic  property will allow these MNPs to be used as viable drug delivery systems, while the  characteristic fluorescence will afford real‐time tracking of administered drugs.  This  research  will  take  advantage  of  the  unique  physico‐chemical  properties  of  RTILs  coupled  with  the  facile  synthesis  technique  employed  to  fabricate  low‐cost,  environmentally  friendly,  and  biocompatible  MNPs.   Due  to  the  interdisciplinary  nature  of  this  work,  it  is  anticipated  that  collaborations  with  faculty  in  engineering,  physics and other areas of chemistry are highly probable.    

140


POSTER ABSTRACTS  3   “Use Of EDTA To Minimize Ionic Strength Frequency Shifting Effects In The 1H  NMR Spectra Of Urine”     Vincent Asiago, G. A. Nagana Gowda, Shucha Zhang, Narasimhamurthy Shanaiah,   Jason Clark, and Daniel Raftery*     Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, 560 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN‐  47905, USA       Abstract    The 1H NMR spectrum of urine exhibits a large number of detectable metabolites and  is, therefore, highly suitable for the study of perturbations caused by disease, toxicity,  nutrition or environmental factors in humans and animals. However, variations in the  chemical  shifts  and  intensities  due  to  altered  pH  and  ionic  strength  present  a  challenge  in  NMR‐based  studies.  With  a  view  towards  understanding  and  minimizing the effects of these variations, we have extensively studied the effects of  ionic strength and pH on the chemical shifts of common urine metabolites and their  possible reduction using EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid).  1H NMR chemical  shifts  for  alanine,  citrate,  creatinine,  dimethylamine,  glycine,  histidine,  hippurate,  formate and the internal reference, TSP (trimethylsilylpropionic acid‐d4, sodium salt)  obtained  under  different  conditions  were  used  to  assess  each  effect  individually.  EDTA  minimizes  the  frequency  shifts  of  the  metabolites  that  have  a  propensity  for  metal binding. Chelation of such metal ions is evident from the appearance of signals  from  EDTA complexed  to  divalent  metal ions  such  as calcium and  magnesium. Not  surprisingly, increasing the buffer concentration or buffer volume also minimizes pH  dependent  frequency  shifts.  The  combination  of  EDTA  and  an  appropriate  buffer  effectively  minimizes  both  pH  dependent  frequency  shifts  and  ionic  strength  dependent intensity variations in urine NMR spectra.    

141


POSTER ABSTRACTS  4 

“Synthesis And Complexation Properties Of Aza‐Crown Ether Containing  Chromo‐ And Fluoroionophores”      Shihab D. Deiab_, Edikan Archibong, Marsha Boatwright, Michael M. Lebel, Jason  Caldwell, Nelly N. Mateeva*       Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, 1530 M. L. King, Jr. Blvd., 219  Jones Hall, Tallahassee, FL 32307       Abstract       Several  novel  chromo‐  and  fluoroionophores  incorporating  aza‐18‐crown‐6,  aza‐15‐ crown‐5  and  diaza‐18‐crown‐6  ligands   were  synthesized  utilizing  modified  published  procedures  and  identified  by  1H‐NMR  and  IR  spectra.  The  compounds  were  purified  by  recrystallization  and  column  chromatography.  The  chromophores  are  linked  to  the  crown  ethers  via  the  nitrogen  atoms  which  causes  significant  changes of the absorption and emission properties of the ligands upon complexation.  In presence of metal ions (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Ba2+) as well as amino acids at different pH  a  hypsochromic  shift  was  observed  combined  with  a  hypochromic  effect.  The  complexation  properties  of  these  compounds  were  investigated  by  UV/Vis  and  fluorescence  methods.  A  significant  solvatochromic  effect  on  the  long‐wavelength  charge  transfer  absorption  was  observed  in  solvents  of  different  polarity.   The  latter  provides  information  about  the  structure  and  geometry  of  the  ground  and  excited  state  of  the  species.   Upon  addition  of  different  analytes,  fluorescence  quenching  or  fluorescence  enhancement  was  observed  depending  on  the  structure  of  the  chromophore. The observed fluorescence and absorption changes were  proportional  to the concentration of the species.      

142


POSTER ABSTRACTS  5  “Epoxy Nanocomposites: Process Of Polymerization And The Effect Of Nanoclay  Percent Loading On Thermal Properties”       Abisola B. Ajayi*, Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy       Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore MD 21251       Abstract       The  study  of  epoxy  nanocomposites  has  acquired  enormous  attention  in  the  recent  years because it has been proved to make plastic materials suitable for different uses,  such as automotive parts. The focus of this research is to monitor the polymerization  process  of  epoxy  nanocomposites  in  real  time.  The  thermal  properties  of  analysis  include  the  Tg  (the  glass‐transition  temperature)  and  polymerization  exotherm.  Materials  used  include  the  diglycidal  ether  of  bisphenol  A  (DGEBA),  the  following  curing  agents,  4,  4‐  diaminodiphenylmethane  (DDM),  ortho‐Phenylenediamine  (o‐ PDA), and nanoclay (I.28E). Cure properties are measured using the TA Instruments  Q‐100 Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter (MDSC) and results are analyzed  by  TA  Universal  Analysis  software.  Only  epoxy  resin  828  was  used  to  retain  consistency  with  previous  research,  even  though  several  others  are  known  and  available.  Prepared  samples  contained  stoichiometric  ratios  of  epoxy  resin  to  curing  agent  and  1,  3,  and  5%  loading  of  nanoclay  in  order  to  investigate  differences  in  thermal properties. Thermosets were made prior to nanocomposites in order to better  analyze the effect of nanoclay in the samples. My goal is to monitor the trend of the  final  Tg  values  in  using  o‐Phenylenediamine  as  the  curing  agent,  instead  of  4,4‐  diaminodiphenylmethane,  which  was  used  in  previous  research.  Overall,  we’ve  discovered  that  the  increase  in  percent  loadings  decreases  the  final  glass  transition  temperature.  This  trend  was  observed  with  both  DDM  and  o‐PDA.  It  was  also  observed  that  the  highest  final  Tgs  were  obtained  from  DDM  samples  and  nanocomposites.              

143


POSTER ABSTRACTS  6  “Dual Atomic Absorption And Atomic Fluorescence Measurments Of Mercury In  Environmental And Biological Samples After A Single Combustion Event”       Candice Tolbert and Dr. James Cizdziel*       Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, Ms 38677‐1848       Abstract       Methylmercury  (MeHg)  is  a  neurotoxic  compound  that  is  produced  in  the  environment by biotic and abiotic methylation of inorganic mercury (Hg); the species  readily biomagnifies up the aquatic food chain. Because MeHg is almost completely  absorbed  into  the  gastrointestinal  tract  and  transported  throughout  the  body.   Humans,  particularly,  unborn  fetuses  and  young  children  are  affected.   Wildlife  consuming  fish  are  potentially  affected,  as  well.   Combustion‐atomic  absorption  spectrometry  is  a  commercially  available  analytical  technique  that  has  been  widely  used to measure Hg in environmental and biological Samples, and the technique does  not  require  sample  pretreatment.  Atomic  fluorescence  spectroscopy  is  inherently  more  sensitive  and  has  a  lower  detection  capability  than  atomic  absorption  spectrometry,  however,  combustion‐AFS  is  not  commercially  available,  and  to  our  knowledge there are not any reports in the literature evaluating the technique. In this  study  we  will  couple  an  instrument  based  on  combustion‐AAS  with  an  online  AFS  system.  The  system  will  be  optimized  and  tested  with  standard  reference  materials.  Figures of Merit will be established to compare the dual measurement techniques. It  is expected that the AFS technique will yield lower detection limits which could open  up the possibility of direct analysis of Hg in samples that are below the AAS detection  limits, and that have previously required digestion followed by AFS.   

144


POSTER ABSTRACTS  7  “Application Of Ratiometric Spectral Properties Of Salicylidene Derivatives In The  Analysis Of Selected Anions”       Dharendra Thapa, Richard Williams*, and Yousuf Hijji       Morgan State University,   Department of Chemistry, 1700 E. Coldspring Lane, Baltimore, MD 21234       Abstract       Intermolecular  proton  transfer  in  the  ground  and/or  excited  states  contributes  to  changes in spectral properties that can be correlated to the intermolecular hydrogen  bonding  between  the  salicylidene  derivatives  and  selected  anions  (fluoride,  acetate,  and  phosphate)  in  an  aprotic  environment.  The  three  derivatives  of  salicylidene  family being investigated can be used as spectral probes to detect and quantitate the  presence of anions on the degree of anion basicity. The absorbance and fluorescence  properties  were  observed  in  the  presence  of  varying  concentrations  of  fluorine,  acetate and phosphate anions in order to identify wavelengths that could effectively  be  utilized  in  the  ratiometric  analysis  of  selected  anions.  A  plot  of  fluorescence  intensity  against  anion  concentration  was  used  to  obtain  binding  constants  of  derivatives  with  anions  in  acetonitrile.  The  absorbance  ratiometric  analysis  for  the  three derivatives shows good correlation between their acidity and ability to complex  with fluoride ions. The shift in the absorbance wavelength after addition of different  concentrations of anions suggests the change in spectral properties of the derivatives.  The  fluorescence  intensity  of  the  derivatives  increases  as  we  increase  the  concentrations of anions added into it. The anion‐sensor hydrogen‐bonding complex  is  responsible  for  the  change  in  spectral  properties.  Basicity  of  anions  and  intermolecular  transfer  play  an  important  role  in  anion  recognition.  Fluorescence  intensity and binding constants for anions correlate with the basicity of anions as they  complex  with  derivative  1  and  3.  Determination  of  fluorescence  and  binding  constants  of  anions  for  derivative  2  is  currently  being  investigated.  Moreover,  the  absorbance  ratiometric  analysis  for  acetate  and  phosphate  anions  will  be  studied.  Also, Job plot for varying concentrations of anions and the three derivatives is being  done.  The  correlation  of  anion  basicity  in  ratiometric  analysis  and  fluorescence  intensity provides evidence to support that these derivatives can be used as spectral  probes for anion sensing and recognition.           145


POSTER ABSTRACTS  8 

“An Investigation Of The Use Of Chitosan As A Substitute For 3‐(Amino‐ Propyl) Triethoxysilane (Aps) In The Fabrication Of Glass Surfaces For Use As  Substrates In Metal Enhanced Fluorescence Techniques”       Ichhuk Karki*, Richard Williams    Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, Maryland, 21251       Abstract       Metal Enhanced Fluorescence is a promising analytical technique that offers several  advantages  in  overall  detection  sensitivity.  The  current  preparation  on  glass  surfaces  calls  for  time  consuming  and  corrosive  colonization  step  before  the  application  of  APS  as  a  precursor  for  the  deposition  of  silver  onto  the  glass  substrate. APS is expensive and is harmful to environment. Therefore, this research  is  to  investigate  the  use  of  chitosan  as  a  substitute  of  APS  in  metal  enhanced  fluorescence  techniques.  Chitosan  is  a  relatively  inexpensive,  friendly  to  environment, and readily available biopolymer which contains amino groups that  allow it to form stable complexes with silver metal. The main aim of this research is  to  examine  the  Chitosan  as  a  substitute  for  the  silanization  step  and  to  deposit  silver on the glass substrates, in order to investigate their potential use in the metal  Enhanced  Fluorescence  techniques.  The  silver  coated  glass  slides  silanized  with  Chitosan and APS were compared. All absorption measurements were performed  using  UV‐vis  spectrophotometer.  The  fluorescence  of  a  glass  slides  coated  with  ICG‐HSA were measured using spectrofluorimeter. The glass slides silanized with  chitosan had better metal enhanced fluorescence than others.        

   

146


POSTER ABSTRACTS   “Investigation Of Ruthenium Complexes And Heptamethine Cyanine Near‐ Infrared Fluorophores As Donor/Acceptor Groups For Fluorescence Resonance  Energy Transfer (FRET) Analysis”  

    Isha Pradhan*, Richard Williams        Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, Maryland, 21251       Abstract       There has been increasing interest in the use of infrared (IR) and near infrared (NIR)  dyes  as  biological  micro‐sensors  due  to  their  unique  spectral  characteristics.   Two  essential characteristics are the ability to minimize background interference from less  useful biological components and the ability to exhibit optimal detection sensitivity  and  chemical  stability.  Fluorescence  Resonance  Energy  Transfer  (FRET)  is  an  important  technique  for  characterizing  biological  phenomena  that  are  associated  with  changes  in  intermolecular  distances.   In  this  study,  micelles  were  used  to  identify  potential  acceptor/donor  pairs  with  luminescent  properties  in  the  far  red  and near infrared region of the visible spectrum for use in FRET analyses.  A library  of  microwave  synthesized  heptamethine  cyanine  dyes  were  incorporated  onto  micellular surfaces along with Ru(bpy)32+ compounds (bpy = 2,2¢‐bipyridine).  This  mixture  was  excited  at  the  maximum  absorbance  wavelength  of  the  Ru(bpy)32+  compound and evidence for FRET  was searched for at the fluorescence wavelengths  of  the  near‐IR  cyanine  fluorophores.  Time  resolved  lifetime  measurements  of  the  donor  compound  were  obtained  and  used  to  calculate  the  Förster  distance  for  acceptor compounds in the presence of the micelles. An immunoassay utilizing near‐ infrared  cyanine  fluorophores  and  the  FRET  phenomena  was  also  developed.  The  results are reported.        

 

147


POSTER ABSTRACTS  10 

“Antioxidant Potential Of Teas: Effect Of Adding Milk”     Jennifer Brown_ and Nixon Mwebi*     Jacksonville State University, Department of Physical & Earth Sciences,   Jacksonville AL 36265     Abstract       Apart  from  water,  tea  is  the  next  most  consumed  beverage  in  the  world.  The  beverage  is  generally  made  from  the  leaf  and  bud  of  the  plant  camellia  sinessis.  Depending  on  the  processing  technique  the  resulting  product  may  be  black  tea  (fermented), oolong tea (semi‐fermented) or green tea (non‐fermented). Studies have  linked tea consumption with increased health benefits which is mainly attributed to  the antioxidant potential of the various compounds such as polyphenols in the tea.   In  many  parts  of  the  world,  tea  is  drunk  with  milk  where  the  milk  is  added  after  brewing. In this case, whole milk, reduced percent milk, skimmed milk or powdered  non  dairy  milk  is  used. Several studies have looked at the effect of adding milk  on  the  antioxidant  potential  of  tea;  in  a  bid  to  safeguard  and  promote  the  healthful  benefits  of  drinking  tea.  These  studies  have  been  inconclusive  and  differed  widely;  with  some  studies  indicating  that  addition  of  milk  has  minimal  or  no  effect  on  the  antioxidant  potential  of  tea;  other  studies  indicate  that  milk  addition  enhances  the  antioxidant  potential  of  tea,  yet  others  argue  that  the  milk  addition  inhibits  the  antioxidant  potential  of  tea.  This  controversy  forms  the  basis  of  this  study  which  systematically addresses the effect of adding milk on black and green tea under the  optimized conditions used in other studies. The study employs the FRAP technique  which  involves  the  reducing  of  the  ferric  complex  to  the  ferrous  complex  by  the  reductant  (antioxidant  in  the  teas).  Our  results  indicate  that  milk  addition  has  an  effect  on  the  antioxidant  potential  of  tea  and  the  effect  depends  on  several  factors  including the fat content of the milk added.    

 

148


POSTER ABSTRACTS  11                                   

 

“Host‐Guest Chemistry Of Cyclodextrins And Labeled Drugs”     Marsha Boatwright_, Edikan Archibong, Shihab D. Deiab,   Jonny Williams, Nelly N. Mateeva*   Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307       Abstract       Cyclodextrins are popular hosts because of their ability to incorporate different species into  their  cavities.  They  are  also  good  candidates  for  drug  carriers  due  to  the  binding  with  biologically  active  substances.  Cyclodextrins  however,  do  not  absorb  in  the  visible  area  which complicates the detection of the complexation process. Labeling the guest molecules  with  appropriate  chromophores  is  a  convenient  solution  of  this  problem.  The  host‐guest  chemistry  of  the  interaction  between  cyclodextrins  and  chromophore‐linked  drugs  was  investigated using UV/Vis and fluorescence methods. The non‐binding interactions with the  cyclodextrins changes the spectral properties of the chromophore included in the cavity. The  spectral  changes  indicate  the  strength  and  the  type  of  the  interactions  taking  place  in  the  complexation  process.  A  significant  blue  shift  of  the  charge‐transfer  complex  of  the  chromophore was observed indicating the interruption of the donor‐acceptor interaction in  the host molecule.  

12   

“Chitosan‐Assisted Synthesis Of Silver Nanoparticles By Electrodeposition”       Melissa A Pinard, Yongchao Zhang*   Morgan State University, Chemistry Department,   Baltimore, MD, 21251       Abstract       In  this  study  silver  nanoparticles  were  prepared  by  electrodeposition  in  the  presence  of  chitosan, a polysaccharide polymer with glucosamine as its building block. Indium tin oxide  (ITO) coated glass was used as the base electrode. The ITO electrode was inserted in 0.1 M  KNO3  solutions containing different concentrations of AgNO3  and chitosan, and a potential  of ‐0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) was applied.  Ag+ ions were reduced and Ag nanoparticles deposited  on the electrode surface. It was found that chitosan regulated the size of the Ag particles and  prevented further aggregation of the Ag particles; with chitosan, Ag particles with diameters  of several hundred nanometers were found uniformly distributed on the electrode surface,  while  in  the  absence  of  chitosan  Ag  clusters  on  the  order  of  microns  were  found.  Further  investigations  in  regard  to  the  control  of  the  size  of  the  nanoparticles  and  nanoparticle‐ enhanced fluorescence are underway. 

      149


POSTER ABSTRACTS  13 

“High Density Fluidic Network With Integrated Embedded Waveguide For High  Throughput Screening: Application In Drug Discovery”       Paul I. Okagbare*1, Jost Gottert4, Proyag Datta4 and Steven A. Soper1,2,3       Department of Chemistry1, Department of Mechanical Engineering2, Center for  BioModular Multi‐Scale Systems3, and Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices4  Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana     Abstract    High Throughput Screening (HTS) of elements from combinatorial libraries represents the  first step in the drug discovery pipeline.  Microfluidics is a viable platform for performing  HTS due to its ability to automate fluid handling and generate fluidic networks with high  numbers  of  processors  over  small  footprints  appropriate  for  optical  imaging.  Unfortunately,  few  efforts  have  been  invested  into  developing  microfluidic  platforms  to  generate  high  information  content  systems  appropriate  for  HTS.  While  most  HTS  campaigns  depend  on  fluorescence,  readers  typically  use  point  detection  and  serially  address the assay results, significantly lowering throughput. To address these challenges,  we present here the fabrication of high density microfluidic vias packed into the imaging  area  of  a  large  field‐of‐view  (FoV)  ultrasensitive  fluorescence  detection  system.  Two  different  fluidic  architectures  were evaluated  for  providing  an  optical  system  with  single  molecule sensitivity, (1) High density fluidic network using epi‐illumination interrogation  with  beam  shaping  optics  to  provide  a  wide  FoV.   The  fluidic  channels  are  1  μm  (width  and depth) with a pitch of 1 μm. A 40X objective (numerical aperture = 0.75) creates a FoV  of  200  μm  providing  the  ability  to  interrogate  ~100  vias.   A  charge  couple  device  (CCD)  operated in a frame transfer mode is used for tracking fluorescent molecules as they pass  through the irradiating field.  (2) Embedded waveguide situated orthogonal to the fluidic  vias,  which  defines  the  excitation  volume.   Fluorescence  sampling  is  accomplished  using  an evanescent field with extremely shallow channels to keep the sampling efficiency high  (~60%  for  500  nm  deep  channels)  due  to  the  small  penetration  depth  (~300  nm)  of  the  evanescent  field.   The  fluidic  structures  were  fabricated  using  UV‐LIGA  to  produce  Ni  electroforms. Embossing of the structures was accomplished with a JenOptik HEX02 high‐ precision hot embossing system to create high fidelity in the features over large areas. The  utility  of  these  multichannel  networks  for  HTS  with  an  optical  system  for  producing  the  prerequisite sensitivity was demonstrated by performing high throughput single molecule  fluorescence  detection  with  epi‐illumination.   Single  fluorescent  dyes  (AlexaFluor  660)  were  identified  using  a  test  high  density  fluidic  device  (5  μm  x  1  μm;  pitch  =  5  μm)  fabricated in PMMA. The fluidic system for HTS will be evaluated by screening potential  therapeutic agents for AP‐Endonuclease (APE1), a target that generates a strand break in  DNA and has been linked to radio‐ and chemo‐resistance in human tumors.       KEYWORDS: HTS, Microfluidics, CCD and Ultrasensitive Detection     150


POSTER ABSTRACTS    14 

“Electrodeposited Chitosan/Silver Nano Particle Composites Improve The  Sensitivity Of An Enzyme Based Phenol Sensor”    Yanique Thomas, Yongchao Zhang*    Morgan State University, Chemistry Department, Baltimore, MD, 21251    Abstract    Amperometric biosensors for phenols were fabricated by (1) electrodepositing Ag nano  particles on��a glassy carbon electrode together with the bio‐polymer chitosan, (2) followed  by subsequent immobilization of mushroom tyrosinase in the chitosan/Ag NP matrix. It  was found that the presence of chitosan regulated the electrodeposition of Ag NP from  Ag+ in the solution, prevented the aggregation of the Ag particles, and led to uniform  distribution of Ag NP of ~500 nm. Immobilized tyrosinase catalyzed the oxidation of  phenols to o‐quinones which were then directly reduced at the electrode to catechols,  which were then oxidized to o‐quinones again by the enzyme, thus regenerating the redox  active species, o‐quinones. The cycling of phenols (and catechols) to o‐quinones and back  to catechols provided an amplified electroreduction current which was used to quantify  the phenols. Compared with sensors made without Ag NP the sensitivity was improved  ca. 25‐fold.      Supported by NSF HRD‐0627276.   

 

151


POSTER ABSTRACTS  “Plasmon Resonance Behavior Of N‐Homocysteinylated Gold  Nanobioconjugates”       Christina M. Jones1, Isiah M. Warner*1, Arther T. Gates1,  

15 

James W. Robinson1, Robert M. Strongin2       1Department of Chemistry and College of Basic Sciences,   Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803   2Department of Chemistry, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon 97207       Abstract       Recent  reports  suggest  that  homocysteine  thiolactone  (HTL)  may  be  pathogenic  because it can readily modify proteins, a process known as N‐homocysteinylation,  to  yield  protein  homocystamide  (N‐Hcy‐protein),  an  emergent  biomarker  for  cardiovascular  disease.    For  this  reason,  the  development  of  rapid  and  direct  detection methods for this emergent protein biomarker is of interest.        Our  laboratory  has  recently  demonstrated  the  use  of  plasmon  resonant  gold  nanoparticles  (GNPs)  for  N‐Hcy‐protein  detection.   In  this  work,  we  further  investigate  the  underlying  physicochemical  processes  that  mediate  the  plasmon  resonance  behavior  of  GNPs  in  the  presence  of  N‐Hcy‐protein  using  gold  nanobioconjugates  prepared  from  cytochrome  c,  human  serum  albumin,  and  human  serum  proteins.   Citrate‐capped  GNPs  were  synthesized  and  incubated  with  the  desired  protein  solution  in  order  to  produce  GNPs  with  physically  adsorbed protein‐passivation layers.  Each gold nanobioconjugate was evaluated to  determine  its  respective  susceptibilities  to  N‐homocysteinylation.   Time  course  dynamic  light  scattering  (DLS)  spectroscopy  studies  were  conducted  in  order  to  monitor  the  growth  of  modification‐directed  nanoparticle  assemblies.   UV‐vis  spectroscopy was also employed to monitor the effect of N‐homocysteinylation on  SPR  bands  of  the  gold  nanobioconjugates.   Interestingly,  our  data  suggest  that  modification‐induced  denaturation  of  protein  on  the  surfaces  of  the  GNPs  may  contribute to the nanoparticle assembly process.  The DLS studies indicate that the  modification‐directed  nanoparticle  assemblies  form  and  remain  associated.   Modification‐directed  assembly  growth  approached  300,  70,  and  135nm  for  cytochrome c, human serum albumin, and human serum gold nanobioconjugates,  respectively.   Corresponding  trends  in  the  SPR  band  intensity  were  observed  in  visible absorption studies.  This work provides valuable mechanistic insight that is  immediately applicable to our efforts to develop a sensor for cardiovascular disease  screening.      

 

152


POSTER ABSTRACTS  16                                            17 

“Aza‐Crown Ether Containing Spectrophotometric Reagents For Complexation With  Hg(II) Ions”     Edikan Archibong_, Shihab D. Deiab, Marsha Boatwright,   Michael M. Lebel, Mercedes Jackson, Nelly N. Mateeva*     Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, 1530 M. L. King, Jr. Blvd., 219 Jones  Hall, Tallahassee, FL 32307       Abstract       Several novel compounds containing aza‐18‐crown‐6, aza‐15‐crown‐5 and diaza‐18‐crown‐ 6  were  synthesized  and  their  complexation  ability  toward  Hg(II)  was  investigated.  The  compounds  were  obtained  via  modified  published  procedures  and  their  structure  was  confirmed by proton NMR and IR spectra. The ligands contain appropriate links connected  via  the  nitrogen  atom  which  provide  additional  binding  sites  and  also  serve  as  a  chromophore thus enabling the spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric determination  of  the  complexes.  The  complexation  was  initially  studied  in  acetonitrile  and  the  process  was  investigated  by  the  absorption  and  emission  changes.  In  addition  extraction  studies  were  performed  where  the  mercury  salts  were  dissolved  in  water,  the  pH  was  adjusted  using  an  acetate  buffer  and  the  complexes  were  extracted  in  chloroform.  The  method  allows for reliable determination of micromolar amounts of mercury.   “Synthesis Of Porphyrin‐Peptide Conjugates With Affinity For Epidermal Growth  Factor Receptor”       Alecia M. McCall, M. Graca H. Vicente*   Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803     Abstract   The  early  diagnosis  of  aggressive  cancerous  growths  is  still  a  difficult  challenge.   It  is  pertinent,  then,  to  develop  new  methods  for  early  cancer  detection.   Colon  cancer  is  one  such malignancy that is being studied extensively.  New methods for in vivo imaging have  been  proven  to  be  successful  in  uncovering  colorectal  tumors.   In  this  study,  peptide  derivatives  of  meso‐tetraphenylporphyrin  were  designed  and  synthesized  with  structural  features  that  can  potentially  make  them  selective  for  Epidermal  Growth  Factor  Receptor  (EGFR),  as  it  is  known  that  EGFR  is  overexpressed  in  colorectal  cancers.  The  porphyrin‐ peptide conjugates are highly fluorescent and therefore will assist in delineating colorectal  cancers  via  fluorescence‐based  techniques.  The  conformation  of  these  porphyrin  conjugates have been investigated using Gaussian 03 software; previous research suggests  that porphyrin‐peptide conjugates bearing a 20‐atom PEG‐based linker prefer an extended,  over  a  contracted  conformation,  which  might  favor  EGFR  binding.   We  will  discuss  the  design  and  synthesis  of  new  porphyrin‐peptide  conjugates,  their  characterization  and  biological investigation. Our results have impact in the design of new molecules to be used  for in vivo imaging.    153


POSTER ABSTRACTS  18                                                  19 

“Dynamics Of Repression By Native And Pre‐Assembled Cro Dimers In Living  Bacteria”     Jacqueline J. Harris, Michael C. Mossing*   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,   The University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677     Abstract      Upon  induction  of  a  gene  several  events  (transcription,  translation,  protein  folding,  multimer  assembly)  take  place  before  the  induced  gene  is  expressed.  The  speeds  of  each  step  will  have  an  effect  on  the  rate  of  gene  expression.   Cro  repressor  is  a  dimer,  which  helps  regulate  the  master  switch  of  lambda  phage  development.   Its  assembly  is  slow  in  vitro (in a test tube). We would like to know whether the rate of assembly is similar in vivo  (in  living  cells).  We  have  constructed  simplified  control  circuits,  which  contain  either  no  Cro gene (OPO), a wtCro gene (CRO), or a single‐chain Cro gene (scCRO) to measure the  effects of dimer assembly on the dynamics of repression. In these circuits a promoter under  the dual control of lac and lambda operators drives expression of Cro in tandem with the  lac  Z  reporter  gene.  Upon  addition  of  IPTG,  lac  repression  is  released  and  Cro  starts  to  accumulate  along  with  β‐galactosidase  (β‐gal).  As  Cro,  folds,  assembles  and  binds  to  the  lambda operator lac Z will again be subject to repression. The time course and steady state  expression levels of lac Z have been monitored as a function of the Cro gene included in  the circuit.  Our goal is to fit in vivo lac Z expression profiles to a set of ordinary differential  equations and compare them to in vitro data.     “A Study Of The Self‐Assembly Of Water‐Soluble Porphyrins   In Aqueous Solution”    Javoris V. Hollingsworth, Paul Russo and M. Graca. H. Vicente*  Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803    Abstract     In  nature,  self‐assembly  processes  of  biologically  active  organic  molecules  often  occur,  resulting  in  the  formation  of  dimers  and  higher  oligomers  of  various  and  sometimes  complex  structures.  This  natural  occurrence  of  self‐organization  has  been  subject  of  research,  with  the  aim  to  understand  and  possibly  modulate  the  aggregation  behavior  of  biological  molecules.  The  meso‐tetrakis(4‐phosphonatophenyl)‐porphyrin,  H2TPPP  was  synthesized,  purified,  characterized,  and  its  self‐assembly  was  studied  in  aqueous  solutions as a function of pH and time. The variations on the  max and shape of the Soret  band of this porphyrin in the absorption spectra when altering the pH indicated the pH‐ dependency  in  the  hierarchical  self‐assembly  of  H2TPPP  in  aqueous  solution.  Time  dependency of the aggregation is also examined and reported.       154


POSTER ABSTRACTS    20 

“Testing A Model: Ca2+ Induced Exposure Of Tryptophan”     Chinelo Udemgba, Nagamani Vunnam, Yogini Bhavsar and Dr. Susan Pedigo*       Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, MS 38677‐1848       Abstract       Cadherins  are  transmembrane  cell  adhesion  proteins  that  are  critical  for  tissue  formation  and  maintenance.  Cell  adhesion  by  cadherin  requires  binding  of  3  calcium  ions  at  the  interfaces  between  the  ectodomain  modules.   Recent  data  suggest  a  model  in  which  calcium induces a relatively large conformational change in the first ectodomain module,  domain 1, by causing the detachment of the ƒʺA‐strand from the core of domain 1 and the  exposure  of  a  tryptophan  in  the  second  position,  W2.   The  exposure  of  W2  is  crucial  for  formation  of  a  strand‐crossover  structure  that  is  believed  to  be  the  adhesive  dimer  interface. In order to establish direct experimental evidence for this model, a construct of  Neural‐cadherin comprised of the first two ectodomain modules, NCAD12, and its single  tryptophan  mutants,  W2A  and  W113A,  were  examined.  While  the  W113A  mutation  did  not affect the stability of the protein, the W2A mutation dramatically increased the stability  of  the  protein.   The  calcium‐dependent  characteristics  of  the  proteins  were  analyzed  separately with fluorescence spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. Regardless  of the calcium level in solution, W2A was monomeric.  W113A behaved like the wild type  protein  in  that  calcium  allowed  exchange  between  the  monomer  and  dimer.  We  envisioned  that  a  red  shift  in  the  fluorescence  signal  would  confirm  exposure  of  W2.  In  contrast to the model above, there was no observable shift in the fluorescence signal. It is  possible that the ʺopenʺ conformation, in which W2 is exposed, is transient and difficult to  monitor. We are currently exploring the kinetics of the fluorescence signal change.    

 

155


POSTER ABSTRACTS  “Spontaneous Rhythmic Contraction Of The Urinary Bladder”  

21     

Joseph Mburu3, Vikram Sabarwal1, Corey Johnson2, Adam Klausner2, Paul Ratz1*     1Departments of Biochemistry and Pediatrics, and 2Department of Surgery/Division of  Urology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, and 3Department of  Biochemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC    Abstract       Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine whether isolated strips of detrusor  smooth muscle (DSM) of the urinary bladder produce prostaglandins (PGs) responsible for  spontaneous  rhythmic  contractions  (SRC).  Introduction:  PGs  are  endogenous  signaling  molecules  and  have  been  suggested  to  cause  SRC  in  the  DSM  of  the  bladder.  PGs  are  produced  by  the  transformation  of  arachidonic  acid  into  PGs  by  cyclooxygenase  (COX).  We  recently  determined  that  bladder  interstitial  cells  of  Cajal  (ICC)  express  COX.  The  clinical relevance is that elevated SRC in the human bladder is associated with a disorder  referred  to  as  overactive  bladder.   Method:  Longitudinal  strips  of  the  detrusor  smooth  muscle  (DSM)  free  from  underlying  urothelium  were  dissected  from  rabbit  bladder  and  either  incubated  in  a  physiological  salt  solution  (PSS)  for  1,  5  and  15  minutes  with  or  without  (control)  the  non‐  selective  COX  inhibitor,  ibuprofen  (IBU)  30  μM,  the  selective  COX  1  inhibitor,  SC‐560  (0.1  μM),  and  the  selective  COX  2  inhibitor,  NS‐398  (0.1 μM),  to  measure PG production using EIA, or attached to an isometric force transducer to measure  the  ability  of  the  COX  inhibitors  to  attenuate  SRC.   Results:  EIA  analysis  showed  that  strips of DSM in PSS produced 0.55 ρg/mg/min PGs, and that both selective COX inhibitors  (NS 398 and SC 560) reduced PG production to 0.31 ρg/mg/ min PGs and 0.27 ρg/mg/min  PGs, respectively. The non selective COX inhibitor, IBU, also reduced PGs production (0.26  ρg  /mg  /  min  PGs).The  force  experiment  showed  that  SRC  was  decreased  by  all  3  COX  inhibitors.   Conclusion:   Our  data  showed  that  PGs  were  produced  by  strips  of  bladder  free  from  urothelium,  and  that  PGs  were  responsible  for  SRC.  Enhanced  SRC  in  human  bladder  is  associated  with  symptoms  of  overactive  bladder,  a  disorder  that  affects  many  people as they age. These results could be a step forward in discovering rational therapies  that will target the overactive bladder.          

156


POSTER ABSTRACTS  22                                                        23 

“Constructing A Reporter Vector For Evaluating Synthetic RNA Elements Regulating  Eukaryotic Translation In Vitro”        1Kofi Atta‐Boateng_, 2Stephen J. Goldfless, 2Jacquin C. Niles*   1Albany State University, Albany, GA 31705,   2Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,  Cambridge, MA 02139       Abstract       Despite  significant  advances  in  understanding  the  mechanisms  regulating  eukaryotic  translation,  more  research  is  needed  to  effectively  utilize  this  knowledge  for  controlling  translation in biological systems. Our objective is to construct a luciferase reporter vector  for  evaluating  synthetic  RNA  elements  regulating  eukaryotic  translation  in  vitro.  We  amplified  Renilla  reniformis  luciferase  gene  by  PCR  and  cloned  it  into  pET24(a)+  vector.  Next, we inserted an aptamer cloning site into the intermediate construct, transformed and  confirmed it with electrophoresis and colony PCR. Results show that we have successfully  amplified  the  Renilla  reniformis  luciferase  gene  and  cloned  it  into  the  pET24(a)+  vector.  Additionally, we have succeeded in cloning a linker region that simultaneously facilitates:  (i) insertion of DNA sequence encoding specific RNA aptamers upstream of the luciferase  gene; and (ii) transcription of the putatively aptamer‐regulated luciferase mRNA by the T7  RNA polymerase. Next, we will insert one control oligonucleotide and two test aptamers  into  our  reporter  construct,  after  which  we  can  proceed  with  in  vitro  transcription  and  capping to yield the reporter mRNA needed for in vitro translation studies. The presence  and absence of aptamer‐binding protein and the distance between the cap and the aptamer  will be studied to give information on their effect on translation.   “Nutritional Mechanisms That Promote A Healthy Circulatory System”       Harbour MA, Caldwell JE   Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI     Abstract      Epidemiological  evidence  has  established  that  ingestion  of  Omega‐3  fatty  acids,  has  a  profound effect on combating many cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Here we investigated  on  a  molecular  level,  the  effects  of  omega‐3  acids,  docosahexaenoic  acid  (DHA)  and  eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on CVD’s. Data is reported from two different dietary studies  that  incorporated  different  sources  and  amounts  of  EPA  and  DHA  in  post  Myocardial  Infarction (MI) patients diet. In both studies these patients were followed for at least two  years following their MI. The patients that ingested larger doses of EPA and DHA showed  a trend of decreased recurring MI’s and less cardiovascular incidents than those including  small amounts or none at all in their diet. EPA has been shown to directly inhibit two key  enzymes that are responsible for the synthesis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL).   157

 


POSTER ABSTRACTS    24 

“Characterization Of Active Transporter Systems At Blood‐Brain Barrier”       Shanika N. Smith*, Johnmesha L. Sanders, Antonie H. Rice, PhD.        University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Chemistry, Pine Bluff, AR 71601.       Abstract       The  delivery  of  therapeutic  drugs  to  the  brain  continues  to  be  a  challenge  for  the  pharmaceutical industry.  The blood‐brain barrier (BBB) regulates the influx and efflux of a  wide variety of substances, and remains the major obstacle in the delivery of drugs to the  central nervous system (CNS). Various strategies have been devised to circumvent the BBB  in  order  to  increase  drug  delivery  to  CNS.   The  purpose  of  this  work  was  to  assess  the  potential  mechanistic  pathways  present  at  the  Blood‐brain  barrier  in  bovine  microvessel  endothelial cells (BBMECs).  The following transporters were characterized in the BBMEC  cell  culture  system:  a)  the  monocarboxylic  acid  transporter  (MCT),  b)  the  organic  anion  transporter (OAT), and the c) Na+dependent dicarboxylate transporter (NADC).       Western  Blot  analysis  was  employed  to  demonstrate  the  presence  of  each  transporter.  These transporters were characterized by assessing the uptake and permeability properties  of  known  substrates.  To  assess  the  functionality  of  each  transporter  uptake  experiments  were performed in the presence/absence of known metabolic inhibitors of the transporters.  Competitive  uptake  and  permeability  experiments  were  also  performed  for  each.  The  experiments demonstrate that all of the transporters are present and actively functional in  the BBMEC system. These transporters offer alternative routes for delivering therapeutics  to the brain that may exhibit poor brain/CNS bioavailability.      

158


POSTER ABSTRACTS  25                                                  26 

“Anisomycin – Indueed Jnk Activation Via The Ribosomal Interaction”       Dara Phillips, Hee Kyong Bae, and James Pestka*       Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition,   East Lansing, MI 48825     Abstract      ‘Trichothecene mycotoxins are a family of toxic sesquiterpenoids produced by foodborne  and environmental fungi that are of concern to human and animal health. Trichothecenes  rapidly diffuse through the cell membrane, bind to the eukaryotic ribosomes, and inhibit  translation  by  interacting  with  peptidyl  transferase.  Additionally,  trichothecenes  activate  mitogen‐activated  protein  kinases  (MAPKs),  which  are  mediated  signaling  cascades  that  drive   critical  cellular  processes  such  as  gene  expression,  differentiation,  mitosis,  and  apoptosis’  (Bae  and  Pestka  2008).  Ribotoxic  stress  response  is  a  phrase  coined  for  the  mechanism by which translation inhibitors such as trichothecenes, induce phosphorylation  of  MAPKs  such  as  p38,  c‐Jun  N‐terminal  kinases  (JNKs),  and  exxtracellular  signal‐ regulated kinases (ERKs). Thus, this study will focus on the anisomycin‐induced ribotoxic  stress  response,  specifically  as  it  relates  to  JNK  phosphorylation,  in  order  to  test  the  hypothesis  that  the  ribosome  acts  as  a  common  sensor  for  Strepomyces  (a  natural  compound in anisomycin that is common in the environment). Analytical data has yet to  be collected for the stated hypothesis due to the recent beginnings of experimentation and  previous focus on Deoxynivalenol (DON)‐induced ribotoxic stress.   “Preparation Of 5‐Aryl Pyrazole ‐3‐ Carboxylates For Ligand And Sphingosine Kinase  Inhibitor Syntheses”       Demetrius Miles and Christian Grattan*   Winthrop University       Abstract       An  investigation  into  the  synthesis  of  5‐arylpyrazole‐3‐carboxylates  has  been  initiated.   Multiple  applications  for  pyrazole  chemistry,  including  ligand  and  novel  sphingosine  kinase  inhibitor  synthesis,  have  been  investigated  and  developed  to  examine  the  bioorganic impact of these novel structures.      Tris(pyrazolyl)methane and bis(pyrazolyl)methane ligands, shown below, were originally  developed  by  Trofimenko  as  the  neutral,  isoelectonic  analogues  to  tris(pyrazolyl)borates  and bis(pyrazolyl)borates.  Although the borate ligands have been extensively studied, the  methane  derivatives  have  received  much  less  attention,  partly  because  of  their  synthetic  challenges.   Since  these  pathways  have  been  improved,  interest  has  rapidly  expanded.   These  methane  ligands  are  now  widely  used  in  nanomolecular  polymers  and  metalloprotein studies.         

159


POSTER ABSTRACTS    26  Another  bioorganic  application  for  these  pyrazole  compounds  involves  the  synthesis  of  new sphingosine kinase‐1 inhibitors.  By reducting the carboxylate group to an alcohol, we  have  developed  a  new  area  for  synthetic  modification  within  our  lead  compound  structure.    Subsequent  oxidation  to  form  the  aldehyde,  will  allow  for  a  more  thorough  study  of  how  these  derivatives  will  interact  and  ultimately  impact  the  inhibition  of  sphingosine kinase enzyme.  Future work includes refining the synthesis for all reactions,  converting  the  pyrazole  alcohols  to  pyrazole  aldehydes,  and  coming  up  with  additional  derivatives for the sphingosine kinase‐1 inhibitors for collaborative testing.       The  project  described  was  supported  by  NIH  Grant  Number  P20  RR‐16461  from  the  National  Center for Research Resources for support of the program entitled ʺSouth Carolina IDeA Networks  of Biomedical Research Excellence (SC‐INBRE)  and  by a NSF Research Initiation Grant  Number  MCB05‐5810542242  to TFS.             27 

“Hollow Fiber Filtration Of Hemoglobin”        Frederick Smalls and Andre Crawford*    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH   

    Abstract        Blood transfusions have been helpful for a lot of people because it helped to restore much  needed  oxygen  derived  from  hemoglobin  found  in  red  blood  cells.  Hemoglobin  purification  methods  came  about  because  hemoglobin  forms  a  basis  to  red  blood  cell  alternatives  =  st1  ns  =  ʺisiresearchsoft‐com/cwywʺ  />(Hemoglobin‐Based  Oxygen  Carriers).Chromatography  is  the  most  common  method  used  but  it  is  known  for  autoxidizing  the  hemoglobin  samples.  As  a  result,  Tangential  Flow  Filtration  is  a  newer  method that is used to purify hemoglobin through multistage hollow fibers and a filtration  pump. Diafiltration is a method that accompanies tangential flow filtration because it helps  to  get  rid  of  impurities  in  the  third  stage  retentate.  After  the  stages  of  hemoglobin  purification are complete the impurities, protein concentration, methemoglobin percentage  and  oxygen  affinity  is tested.  The  purified  samples  maintained  the  properties  needed  for  hemoglobin purification.           

160


POSTER ABSTRACTS  “Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Ballistics: Low Level Tail‐Off Analysis”     Leethaniel Brumfield, III* and Stanley Tieman     NASA, George C Marshall Space Flight Center,   Redstone Arsenal Propulsion Systems Dept, ER 50 Building 4205, Huntsville, AL 35812     Abstract 

28 

  Tail‐off,  the  earliest  time  to  the  latest  action  time,  was  defined  for  the  newly  designed  06907 reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) model as 20 seconds of motor operation after the  time the motor reached 50 psia measured head‐end pressure. Low pressure tail‐off thrust  model  enveloped  solid  rocket  booster  (SRB)  performance  from  thrust  tail‐off  through  separation  from  the  shuttle  to  ensure  no  contact  would  occur.  RSRM  ballistics  was  performed  to  analyze  whether  the  flight  operation  pressure  from  the  06907  model  was  comparable to that of the new five segment RSRMV. An adjusted RSRM shape term was  used to calculate low level σ  tail‐off traces. The RSRM shape term scaled during the first  1.4 seconds to match the dispersion peak times for the RSRMV dispersions, which suggests  that  the  new  shape  term  allows  for  more  variation  than  the  trace  projects.  Low  pressure  SRM/HPM data appropriate for RSRM characterization was performed, which proved that  mean  and  variation  of  low  pressure  data  for  RSRMV  was  very  similar  to  RSRM.  In  addition, burn rate was calculated as 0.368 in/sec nominal, ± 0.005 in/sec variations, while  propellant  mean  bulk  temperature  (PMBT)  variation  ranged  from  50‐82  ºF.  Uncertainty  equaled 1% on thrust and scale factor uncertainty was 2.6% on thrust, which were both the  same  as  the  loads  equation.  Low  level  tail‐off  data  cut  off  at  ~7  seconds  after  50  psi  and  there  was  no  data  beyond  this  point.  The  upper  3‐σ  limit  after  cut‐off  was  extrapolated  from  last  value  and  followed  similar  shape  to  RSRM.  In  conclusion,  flight  operation  pressure from the 06907 model was 4486 lbf/psia (versus 4088 for RSRM) and the updated  performance nominal and dispersed values corresponded to the RSRMV.     *To whom correspondence should be addressed: Telephone: 405.269.6868; Mail: 601 S  Washington Street #293, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74074; E‐Mail: leleethaniel@yhaoo.com      

161


POSTER ABSTRACTS  29  “Protection  Against  Chemically  –Potentiated  Liver  Injury  Is  Detected  By  Cyanine  Fluorescence”       Evelyne Ntam1, Tricia Charles1, Roxanne Howell1, Michael Baker1, Dwayne Hill*1.       1Department of Biology, Morgan State University, Baltimore MD 21251.       Abstract                                                                                         Retinoids are essential for the normal homeostasis of tissues and organ systems.  Retinoids  can  also  be  used  in  the  therapeutic  treatment  of  certain  adverse  health  conditions  including  dermatological  alterations,  visual  anomalies  and  selected  cancers.   Conversely,  retinol  has  been  shown  to  potentiate  the  hepatotoxicity  compounds  including  bromotrichloromethane  (BrCCL3),  galactosamine  and  carbon  tetrachloride  (CCL4).   Bromotrichloromethane  is  an  industrial  degreasing  agent  and  can  undergo  toxic  potentiation that produces severe hepatotoxicity.  The mechanism(s) of this potentiation is  not completely understood. Studies have suggested that retinol potentiation of liver injury  may  involve  increased  activation  of  hepatic  macrophages  (Kupffer  Cells).   Polyphenolic  flavinoids have been shown to reduce macrophage activity, inhibit inflammatory response  and protect against liver injury. In addition, the application of cyanine fluorescence may  be useful in analyzing flavinoid activity.  Therefore, the current study was designed to test  the  hypothesis  that  pretreatment  with  polyphenolic  flavinoids  can  alter  the  ability  of  retinol  to  potentiate  bromotrichloromethane‐induced  liver  injury  by  increasing  kupffer  cell  activity.   In  addition,  the  study  will  determine  if  fluorescent  cyanines  can  verify  the  protective effects of the flavinoids.  Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with 50mg/kg  of polyphenolic flavinoid for seven days prior to the potentiation of hepatotoxicity using  75mg/kg  of  retinol  and  100‐200mg/kg  of  bromotrichloromethane.   The  markers  of  hepatotoxicity  included  aminotransferase  (AST),  alanine  aminotransferase  (ALT),  and  gamma glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) levels.  An increase in plasma levels and activity of  the  markers  were  indicative  for  liver  injury.   This  study  demonstrated  a  significant  elevation  of  AST,  ALT  and  GGT activity  levels  in  the  plasma  of  rats  treated  with retinol  and  BrCCL4.   Pretreatment  with  silymarin  protected  against  the  elevations  of  plasma  markers of hepatotoxicity. The reduction of kupffer cell activity also decreased the plasma  levels of hepatotoxicity markers.  In addition, fluorescent cyanines verified the protective  effects of the flavinoids. (DOE Grant ER63580)            

 

162


POSTER ABSTRACTS  30 

“Synthesis And Characterization Of Bimetallic Zintl Clusters”       Domonique O. Downing* and Bryan W. Eichhorn       University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College Park, MD  20742       Abstract       The  synthesis  and  characterization  of  bimetallic  Zintl  clusters  with  main  group  and  transition  metal  atoms  has  been  of  particular  interest  to  the  growing  field  of  nanotechnology.  Nanotechnology is driving much of current technology advances and is  already impacting the everyday lives of nearly everyone.  Nanomaterials are at the core of  advances  in  electronic  technology,  information  storage,  optical  biosensors,  and  drug  delivery vehicles to name a few.  Despite their importance, much is still unknown about  the  structure,  stability,  and  dynamic  properties  of  small  nanoparticles;  especially  containing  two  or  more  elements.   The  synthesis,  characterization,  and  applications  of  very  large  bimetallic  nanoclusters  may  address  these  critical  issues.   Studies  in  this  area  can  lead  to  an  understanding  of  how  big  nanoclusters  or  small  nanoparticles  behave  in  applications such as heterogeneous catalytic reforming in the oil and gas industry, fuel cell  electrocatalysis, or advancements in high temperature superconductors.     Cluster  anions  Sn9Ir(cod)3‐,  Pb9Ir(cod)3‐,  and  Rh2H(PPh2)2(PPh3)31‐  have  been  synthesized and characterized.  The former two are the first known examples of Sn‐Ir and  Pb‐Ir  bimetallics  and  may  provide  new  insight  into  structure  and  bonding  of  these  bimetallic  systems.   All  complexes  have  been  studied  via  X‐ray  crystallography  and  nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.  This work involves moving to the next level of  bare cluster anions, which serves an important role of relating gas phase clusters to those  in  the  solid  state.   New  binary  clusters  which  will  lead  to  the  next  generational  size  of  nanoclusters are to be targeted.          

 

163


POSTER ABSTRACTS  31 

“Ruthenium Polypyridine Bisthioethers For Use As Pdt Agents”       Robert N. Garner and Claudia Turro*       The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry, 100 W 18th Ave. Columbus, OH  43210       Abstract       [Ru(bpy)2(L)]2+  (bpy  =  2,2’‐bipyridine;  L  =  1,2‐bis(phenylthio)ethane,  3,6‐dithiaoctane,  eythlenediamine,  and  1,2‐dianilinoethane)  complexes  were  synthesized  to  study  their  ligand  loss  photochemistry  for  potential  use  as  photodynamic  therapy  (PDT)  agents.  Computational  studies  of  the  complexes  examined  excited  state  bond  distances  and  showed  a  greater  elongation  of  the Ru‐L  bonds  for  complexes  containing  bisthioether  as  compared  to  bidentate  nitrogens.  These  studies  also  showed  the  sulfur  containing  complexes  have low‐lying dd states, that have been implicated in ligand loss. Photolysis  experiments show that the bisthioether ligands are easily photosubtituted by Cl‐, bpy, and  H2O. In addition, these complexes show photoinduced binding to nucleic acids and DNA.  The  same  activity  is  not  observed  in  the  nitrogen  complexes.  The  ability  of  sulfur  complexes to undergo photoinduced ligand loss will aid in the ability to use monoclonal  antibodies to direct the PDT agents to cancerous cells.  

   

32 

 

“Synthesis Of High Free Volume Acid For Proton Conducting Electrolytes”     LaRico Treadwell and Dr. Jason Ritchie *    Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, Ms 38677‐1848       Abstract       Proton  conducting  electrolytes  composed  of  mixture  of  MePPG3BzSO3H  acids  in  a  polymer  MePEG7  were  prepared  with  two  different  concentrations  of  the  acid.  The  solutions  displayed  anhydrous  proton  conductivity  at  55  degrees  Celsius.  The  acidity  of  the acid (MePPG3BzSO3H) was measured to be 98%. The percent of the final product was  calculated  to  be  92%.  The  conductivity  measured  for  MePPG3BzSO3H  was    1.51x10‐ 5(s/cm) at low concentration of the acid and 1.74 x10‐6(s/cm) at the high concentration of  the acid 

  164


POSTER ABSTRACTS  “Electronic Conductive Polymers With Biospecific Binding Capacities: New Materials  For Nanoscale Biosensors”       1 Reuven Darkeyah*,  1 Sannigrahi Biswajit, 1 Khan Ishrat*, 2 Sil Dwaipayan, 2 Baird Barbara*  

33 

    1Department of Chemistry, Clark Atlanta University   Atlanta GA 30314, USA   2Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University   Ithaca, NY 14853, USA     Abstract      A series of DNP (2,4‐dinitrophenyl)functionalized polypyrrole polymers that are specific  to antibodies and immune receptors on cell have been synthesized and characterized (See  Figure).  This  is  a  terpolymer  composed  of  three  monomers;  monomer  1  (M1,  pyrrole),  macromonomer 2 (M2, pyrrole with pendant ethylene glycol) and macromonomer 3 (M3,  pyrrole  with  pendant  DNP).  These  polymers  are  expected  to  be  useful  for  controlling  receptor  binding  and  cell  activation,  and  with  eventual  application  in  biosensors.   Conductivity measurement indicate that the terpolymers are conductive, without adding  external  doping  agents   conductivity  values  of  5  x  10‐6  S  cm‐1  (at  25  oC)  were  obtained.  Binding  studies  with  anti‐DNP  IgE  studies  are  promising,  fraction  of  binding  sites  occupied  vs.  concentration  indicates  specific  and  efficient  binding  at  nanomolar  concentration.   Therefore,  DNP  functionalized  polypyrrole  are  excellent  materials  for  preparing  nanowires  in  biosensors  for  detecting  biomarkers.   We  have  also  determined  that these polymers are biocompatible. Nanowires are currently being fabricated using the  functionalized conductive polymers.      In  addition  to  synthesis  and  characterization,  the  thermal  properties  of  the  functional  polymers  will  be  discussed  with  regards  to  the  fabrication  of  nanowires  for  biosensing  applications.          

165


POSTER ABSTRACTS  34 

“Quantum Electronic Stability In Noncovalent Functionalization Of Carbon  Nanotubes”       Olayinka O. Ogunro† and Xiao‐Qian Wang‡*    Clark Atlanta University, Department of Chemistry†, Department of Physics‡, Center  for Functional Nanoscale Materials*, Atlanta, GA 30314‐4391     Abstract      Noncovalent  interactions  are  at  the  heart  of  many  biological  processes  that  nature  utilizes  to  from  complex  structures.  The  success  with  which  we  can  predict  how  an  assembly  of  molecules  spontaneously  adheres  to  homogenous  surfaces  depends  on  our ability to mimic this process, both experimentally and theoretically. Single‐walled  carbon  nanotubes  (SWNTs)  produced  from  laser  ablation  and  chemical  vapor  deposition  techniques  aggregate  into  bundles  held  by  van  der  Waals  forces.  These  interactions  have  hindered  separation  methodologies  that  aim  to  produce  chiral  specific  carbon  nanotubes,  from  a  broad  diameter  based  sample  distribution.  The  selectivity  of  SWNT  by  free‐base  porphyrin  has  been  demonstrated  to  remove  semiconducting nanotubes from a mixture containing the later in addition to metallic  nanotubes.  This  technique  affords  poor  yields  of  semiconducting  SWNTs.  An  improvement  on  this  is  the  chiral  selectivity  of  (8,6)  tube  with  an  efficiency  of  85%.   With  the  help  of  molecular  dynamics  and  first‐principles  calculations  we  investigate  this interaction in various molecular assemblies that spontaneously self‐assemble onto  the sidewalls of single‐walled carbon nanotubes.    

 

166


POSTER ABSTRACTS  35 

  36 

“Evaluating How The Slight Modification Of A Donor GROUP Substitutient Effects  Electron Transfer Efficiency In Paraphenylene Dimmers”       Jeremy Lipscomb and Darlene K. Taylor*     Department of Chemistry, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707       Abstract   Is  there  a  way  to  make  a  more  efficient  solar  energy  conversion  device?   The  answer  is  intimately connected to scientists’ ability to design the next generation of materials that are  energy efficient transfer agents, robust, and economically viable. Polymers are one of many  materials  being  extensively  investigated.  The  first  experiments  will  concentrate  on  the  effects of altering the donor groups attached as a side chain to paraphenylene dimer model  compounds followed by .  Results on the synthesis and classification of three dimers will  be  presented.  Gaussian  B3LYP  calculations  will  be  presented  to  show  that  the  band  gap  decreases within the dimer series as a function of the donor group efficiency. Presentation  of our most recent results on the electrochemical and optical properties of the dimers will  be  included.   The  results  from  this  study  should  enable  us  to  better  understand  donor  group effects on electron transfer in substituted paraphenylenes and ultimately lead to the  design of novel materials for solar energy conversion devices.     “The Effects Of Temperature On A Cross Linked Hyperbranched Polyglycerol‐Drug  Conjugate”    Melony A. Ochieng  and Darlene K. Taylor *    Department of Chemistry, 3179 MT Science Complex,  North Carolina Central University     Durham, N.C. 27707    Abstract    The efficacy of drugs can be greatly improved by delivering the drug to the target site with  minimal systemic exposure. Broad degrees of enhanced and targeted drug delivery vectors  are now possible due to the significant advancement in polymer chemistry which has  made hyperbranced polymers an attractive drug delivery vehicle.  This project focuses on  developing a temperature sensitive linker to assist in the delivery of drugs to cancerous  breast tissue cells. We will present our most recent results on the development of this  temperature sensitive linker and its conjugation to the hyperbranched polyglycerol  platform.    

 

167


POSTER ABSTRACTS  “Synthesis Of Thiophene Monomers Using The Grignard Reaction” 

37     

Stephen MaffettI, Robin LaskowskiII, Malika Jeffries‐ELII*   ILouisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803   IIIowa State University, Ames, IA 50011       Abstract            Since  the  discovery  of  conductivity  in  polyacetylene  over  30  years  ago,  conjugated  or  conductive  polymers  have  been  explored  for  use  as  organic  semiconductors.  The  advantages  that  conjugated  materials  possess  over  conventional  inorganic  semi‐ conducting and conducting materials include ease of fabrication and the ability to modify  the  electronic  properties  of  the  material  through  chemical  synthesis.  Of  all  conducting  polymers,  thiophene  polymers  are  among  the  most  widely  studied  as  a  result  of  their  environmental  stability  and  high  conductivity.  Regioregular  poly(3‐alkylthiophene)s  (rr‐ P3ATs)  are  among  the  most  widely  studied  conducting  polymers.  It  has  also  been  established that modification of monomers’ chemical structure is a useful approach toward  tuning the polymers properties. Affordable and efficient synthesis of thiophene monomers  is a step toward making conducting polymers marketable.         Our goal is to synthesize monomers based on 2‐2’‐bithiophene (2‐BT, a step in the  synthesis  of  novel  monomer)  and  3‐hexylthiophene  (3‐HT,  a  common  monomer)  efficiently.  Using  a  Ni(dppp)Cl2  catalyzed  cross‐coupling  method  between  3‐ bromothiophene  and  Grignard  reagents  derived  from  alkyl  halides  or  a  Ni(dppp)Cl2  catalyzed  cross‐coupling  between  2‐bromothiophene  and  its  Grignard  reagents  we  produced good yields of 3‐HT and 2‐BT, respectively.       38 

“Mechanistic Studies Of Gold(I)‐Catalyzed Intramolecular Hydroamination And  Hydroalkoxylation With Allenes”       Alethea N. Duncan* & Ross A. Widenhoefer     Duke University, Chemistry Department, Durham, NC 27708       Abstract       Kinetic  studies  and  deuterium  labeled  experiments  were  completed  to  determine  the  mechanism of gold(I)‐catalyzed intramolecular hydroamination and hydroalkoxylation of  1,2‐butadiene  (1)  with  benzyl  carbamate  (2)  and  1‐phenyl‐1‐propanol  (3).  The  proposed  mechanism  involves  generation  of  the  active  catalyst  Au(NHC)+  followed  by  reversible  coordination to 1 to form a gold  ‐allene complex. Subsequent nucleophilic attack of 2 or 3  on  the  activated  olefin  is  followed  by  proton  transfer  by  the  NH2  or  OH  group  to  the  unsaturated  carbon.  Protonolysis  of  the  Au—C  bond  releases  the  N‐allylic  carbamate  or  alkyl allylic ether and regenerates the cationic Au(I) catalyst.   168


POSTER ABSTRACTS    39 

“Synthesis Of Novel Diruthenium Coupled Nucleobase Complexes”       Darryl Anthony Boyd*, Tong Ren   Department of Chemistry, Purdue University  560 Oval Dr, West Lafayette, IN, 47907       Abstract       The  synthesis  and  characterization  of  transition  metal  complexes  that  are  coupled  to  nucleobases  is  a  burgeoning  area  of  research.   It  has  been  well  established  that  metal  complexes, such as cis‐platin, can be very beneficial in disease prevention.  Recently, it has  been  shown  that  dinuclear  complexes  can  likewise  have  therapeutic  benefits.1,  2   In  the  work presented here, two routes to synthesizing biologically relevant dinuclear complexes  will  be  explored  using  diruthenium  paddlewheel  complexes.   The  first  method  uses  the  Sonogashira  coupling  method  to  couple  the  diruthenium  complex  Ru2(D(3,5‐ Cl2Ph)F)3)(DMBA‐4‐C2TMS)Cl to 5‐iodouracil.3‐7  The second method takes advantage of  the  discovery  that  some  common  chelating  ligands,  such  as  bipyridine,  can  mimic  the  chelating effect seen with nucleos(t)ides.1, 2, 8  Bipyridine will serve as a chelating ligand  to  the  diruthenium  complex  Ru2(D(3,5‐Cl2Ph)F)2)(OAc)2Cl.   The  ultimate  goal(s)  of  this  work  is  to  explore  the  possibility  that  single‐nucleotide  polymorphisms  (SnPs)  can  be  detected  using  nucleotide‐bound  diruthenium  complexes.   An  alternative  goal  is  to  determine  if  nucleotide‐bound  and/or  ligand‐bound  diruthenium  complexes  can  serve  as  viral inhibitors and/or DNA intercalators.2, 8       References:   (1)  Chifotides, H. T.; Catalan, K. V.; Dunbar, K. R., Inorganic Chemistry 2003, 42, 8739.   (2)  Chifotides, H. T.; Dunbar, K. R., Accounts of Chemical Research 2005, 38, 146.   (3)  Ren, T., Organometallics 2005, 24, 4854.   (4)  Robins, M. J.; Barr, P. J., Journal of Organic Chemistry 1983, 48, 1854.   (5)  Chen, W. Z.; Ren, T., Inorganic Chemistry 2006, 45, 8156.   (6)  Rose, E., Organometallics 2007, 26, 5727.   (7)  Seela, F.; Sirivolu, V. R.; Chittepu, P., Bioconjugate Chemistry 2008, 19, 211.   (8)  Chifotides, H.; Dunbar, K. R., Biochemistry 2003, 42, 8606.  

 

169


POSTER ABSTRACTS  “Studies On The Synthesis Of Spiroisoxazolines” 

40     

Erick D. Ellis, and Ashton T. Hamme II*       Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Engineering and Technology,  Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 17910, Jackson, Mississippi, USA    Abstract      A  series  of  natural  products  isolated  from  the  sponge  of  Verongida  have  been  intensively  studied due to the presence of alkaloids with one, or more bromotyrosine residues.  Many  of these alkaloid metabolites show interesting bioactivity and cytotoxic properties in tumor  cell lines.  11‐Deoxyfistularin‐3 is cytotoxic against human breast carcinoma cell line MCF‐ 7.   Many  of  these  bromotyrosine  natural  products  possess  the  spiroisoxazoline  moiety.   The purpose of this project was to find a synthetic methodology towards the synthesis of  the  spiroisoxazoline  ring  core.   The  synthesis  of  the  4,5‐dihydroisoxazole  precursor  to  an  analogue  of  11‐deoxyfistularin‐3  was  accomplished  by  using  1,3‐dipolar  cycloaddition  with a functionalized alkene.  The synthesis of 4‐methylene‐5‐oxo‐hexanoic acid ethyl ester  was  accomplished  through  the  addition  of  4‐acetyl‐5‐oxo‐hexanoic  acid  ethyl  ester,  30%  aqueous  formaldehyde  and  aqueous  potassium  carbonate.   The  cycloaddition  of  4‐ methylene‐5‐oxo‐hexanoic  acid  ethyl  ester  with  phenyl  hydroximoyl  chloride  using  triethylamine  in  dichloromethane  and  heat  afforded  only  the  5,5  disubstituted  4,5‐ dihydroisoxazole regioisomer.  The synthesis of the spiroisoxazoline, 8‐methoxy‐3‐phenyl‐ 1‐oxa‐2‐aza‐spiro[4.5]deca‐2,7‐dien‐6‐one,  was  accomplished  through  the  intramolecular  cyclization  and  methylation  of  the  isoxazoline  precursor,  5‐acetyl‐3‐phenyl‐4,5‐dihydro‐ isoxazol‐5‐yl‐propionic acid ethyl ester.  In order to improve and accelerate our process of  forming  the  spiroisoxazoline,  4‐acetyl‐5‐oxo‐hexanoic  acid  ethyl  ester,  30%  aqueous  formaldehyde and aqueous potassium carbonate were used to form 5‐acetyl‐3‐phenyl‐4,5‐ dihydro‐isoxazol‐5‐yl‐propionic  acid  ethyl  ester.   Next,  the  1,3‐dipolar  cycloadditon  of  5‐ acetyl‐3‐phenyl‐4,5‐dihydro‐isoxazol‐5‐yl‐propionic  acid  ethyl  ester  with  the  analogous  nitrile oxide formed 5‐acetyl‐3‐phenyl‐4,5‐dihydro‐isoxazol‐5‐yl‐propionic acid ethyl ester.   Finally,  8‐methoxy‐3‐phenyl‐1‐5‐acetyl‐3‐phenyl‐4,5‐dihydro‐isoxazol‐5‐yl‐propionic  acid  ethyl  ester  oxa‐2‐aza‐spiro[4.5]deca‐2,7‐dien‐6‐one  was  synthesized  by  intramolecular  cyclization,  and methylation of 5‐acetyl‐3‐phenyl‐4,5‐dihydro‐isoxazol‐5‐yl‐propionic acid  ethyl ester.        Key words:  11‐Deoxyfistularin‐3, Breast Cancer, and Natural Products.       Acknowledgments:  This research was financially supported by:  NSF‐RISE HRD‐0734645,  NIH‐SCORE  Grant  Award  Number  2S06GMOO7672‐29,  and  the  NIH‐RCMI  supported  NMR Core Laboratory.    

170


POSTER ABSTRACTS  “Self Assembly Of Halogenated Polycyclic Aromatic Carboxylic Acids”  

41 

                    Josette Crout Seibles*                        Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ                           ABSTRACT   While  formation  of  aromatic  carboxylic  acid  dimers  by  carboxyl‐to‐carboxyl  hydrogen  bonding  is  a  well‐studied  and  much  reported  phenomenon  for  benzoic  acid  and  other  monocyclic  aromatic  carboxylic  acids,  the  formation  of  analogous  polycyclic  aromatic  carboxylic acid dimers by hydrogen bonding has received scant attention in the chemical  literature.  Polycyclic aromatic carboxylic acid dimers have been reported for 9‐anthracene  carboxylic acid, 2‐anthracene carboxylic acid, 6‐methoxy‐2‐anthracene carboxylic acid and  9‐acridine  carboxylic  acid.  The  author  (jcs)  has  observed  the  formation  of  carboxylic  acid  dimers  for  10‐chloro‐9‐anthracene  carboxylic  acid  in  dilute  chloroform‐methanol  solution  (10‐5  M)  at  room  temperature  using  UV‐visible  spectroscopy.   In  a  strong  hydrogen  bonding  solvent  such  as  100%  methanol  the  carboxylic  acid  is  hydrogen  bonded  to  the  solvent and dimer formation is suppressed.  The addition of chloroform, however, favors  the  formation  of  the  dimer.   The  structure  of  the  dimer  is  such  that  the  plane  of  the  anthracene  rings  is  orthogonal  to  the  plane  of  the  six  hydrogen‐bonded  atoms.  This  ring  dimer  structure  is  the  same  as  that  reported  for  the  parent  compound  9‐anthracene  carboxylic acid. The mechanism of formation of this dimer involves the very slow rotation  of  the  anthracene  rings  and/or  plane  of  the  six  hydrogen  bonded  atoms  around  the  essential single bond joining the two. Steric strain due to the peri hydrogens is the driving  force for rotation to orthogonal dimers and aggregates.  Peri hydrogen steric strain is well  known  in  anthracene  derivatives.  This  rotation  results  in  a  decolorization  of  10‐chloro‐9‐ anthracene  carboxylic  acid  due  to  the  uncoupling  of  the  carbonyl  pi  system  from  the  aromatic ring pi system.  Higher even‐numbered aggregates such as the tetramer, hexamer  and  octamer  are  also  formed  either  via  halogen  bonding  with  the  chlorine  in  the  10  position to form linear arrays or via π‐π  stacking to form multiple decker sandwiches or  via a combination of halogen bonding and π stacking. The ring dimer is the repeating unit.   Higher  aggregates  of  anthracene  itself  at  77  K  have  been  alluded  to  in  the  literature.  However,  the  tetracarboxylic  acid,  hexacarboxylic  acid  and  octacarboxylic  acid  are  novel  aggregates not  previously  reported.   Halogen  bonding  and  π  stacking  are  both  relatively  weak  noncovalent  bonding.  These  types  of  weak  noncovalent  bonding  and  the  stronger   O—H · · ·O hydrogen bonding are important in molecular recognition such as occurs in the  formation  of  biological  structures  and  biological  aggregates  and  in  biological  processes.   The four isosbestic points in the UV spectrum of 10‐chloro‐9‐anthracene carboxylic acid in  methanol‐chloroform represent monomer to dimer, dimer to tetramer, tetramer to hexamer  and hexamer to octamer equilibria.  Preliminary fluorescence and low temperature HPLC  data support the presence of multiple species.        

171


POSTER ABSTRACTS    42 

43 

“Synthesis Of Novel Epoxy Gemini Surfactants From Vernonia Oil”     Nikki S. Johnson*, Folahan O. Ayorinde     Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC, 20059     Abstract     Vernonia  galamensis  is  a  new  potential  industrial  oilseed  crop  found  in  Africa.   It  is  the  source  of  a  naturally  epoxidized  oil  called  vernonia  oil  (VO)  which  is  extracted  from  the  seed  of  the  plant.   It  is  this  epoxy  functionality  that  makes  vernonia  oil  unique  in  comparison  to  all  other  vegetable  oils  such  as  coconut  oil,  palm  kernel  oil,  soybean  oil,  sunflower oil, etc., of which none contain the level of epoxy acid found in VO.  Generally,  vegetable  oils,  which  are  biorenewable  resources,  are  good  starting  materials  for  surfactants,  which  are  surface  active  molecules  containing  both  hydrophobic  and  hydrophilic  groups.   They  are  used  as  wetting agents  because  they  lower  surface  tension  and  interfacial  tension.   Surfactants  can  be  found  in  paints,  fabric  softeners,  dyes,  cosmetics,  and  detergents  as  well  as  many  other  materials.   In  these  applications  surfactants aid in lubrication, catalysis, tertiary oil recovery, drug delivery, etc.       Classically,  there  are  four  main  types  of  surfactants:  anionic,  cationic,  nonionic,  and  zwitterionic.   However,  a  new  type  of  surfactant,  called  gemini  surfactants,  has  recently  evolved.   Gemini  surfactants  have  shown  superior  surface  activity  in  comparison  to  the  others.  For this reason, we have chosen these surfactants to be the focus of our research.   The  purpose  of  my  research  is  to  synthesize  surfactants  more  specifically  gemini  surfactants, from vernonia oil, that are more efficient and economical in their applications.   “Selective, Stoichiometric Ligand‐Enabled Oxidation Of Sp2 And Sp3 C‐H Bonds Via  Palladacycles With Hydrogen Peroxide”       Williamson Oloo, N. Zhang, Vedernikov Jing, and N. Andrei   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland,   College Park, Maryland       Abstract       The use of environmentally friendly oxidants dioxygen (air) and hydrogen peroxide is of  great  practical  importance.   Selective,  stoichiometric  ligand‐enabled  oxidation  of  various  palladacyclic  complexes  with  C(sp2)‐Pd,  and  C(sp3)‐Pd  bonds  was  performed  at  room  temperature  using  hydrogen  peroxide  as  a  mild  oxidant.  The  oxidation  is  only  possible  when chelating pyridine‐derived ligands: di(2‐pyridyl)methanesulfonate (dpms), and di(2‐ pyridyl)ketone  (dpk)  are  used.  Solvents  can  also  be  involved  in  these  Pd‐C  bond  functionalization reactions leading to products with various C‐X bonds (X= OH, OMe, and  OAc).   172


POSTER ABSTRACTS    “Synthesis Of Spiro‐Isoxazolines Via Intramolecular Cyclization”       Brittny C. Davis, Ann O. Omollo, Eric McClendon, Lungile Sitole, and   Ashton T. Hamme II*     Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Engineering and Technology,  Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 17910, Jackson, MS, 39217, USA    Abstract 

44 

  Psammaplysins  A‐E  are  a  family  of  natural  products  that  were  isolated  from  marine  sponges  of  the  order  Verongida.   Many  of  these  natural  products  display  antiviral  and  antineoplastic activities.  The most interesting structural motifs of the psammaplysins are  the  oxipin  and  isoxazoline  ring  systems  which  are  connected  in  a  spirocyclic  array.   The  synthesis  of  this  type  of  ring  system  was  accomplished  in  two  steps.   These  synthetic  processes  involve  a  1,3‐dipolar  cycloaddition  and  an  intramolecular  ring  closure  of  a  pendant  alkoxide  or  carboxylate  ion  onto  an  activated  isoxazole.   The  1,3‐dipolar  cycloaddition  of  an  alkyne  with  a  nitrile  oxide  from  the  analogous  alpha‐ chlorobenzaldoxime  afforded  the  desired  isoxazole.   Intramolecular  cyclization  was  achieved  through  the  reaction  of  the  isoxazole  ring  with  pyridinium  tribromide.   The  proposed  mechanism  of  intramolecular  cyclization  involves  the  activation  of  the  isoxazoline ring with bromine to form a bromonium ion.  Neighboring group participation  of the oxygen can cause an opening of the bromonium ion intermediate thereby giving rise  to  an  oxonium  ion.   Intramolecular  attack  of  the  alkoxide  or  carboxylate  ion  onto  the  oxonium  ring  system  then  affords  the  spiro‐isoxoline.   More  specific  information  pertaining to the synthesis, mechanistic details, and isolated yields for the synthesis of our  spiro‐isoxoline compounds will be discussed.         Key words:  Spiro‐isoxazolines, Cycloaddition, Regioselectivity, and Heterocycles.       Acknowledgments:  This research was financially supported by:  NSF‐RISE HRD‐0734645,  NIH‐MARC  Grant  Award  Number  5T34GMOO7672‐29,  NIH‐SCORE  Grant  Award  Number 2S06GMOO8047‐35, and the NIH‐RCMI supported NMR Core Laboratory.     “Progress Towards The Development of Potential Pathogen Biosensor”   45      Charlee K. McLean*, Dr. Angela Winstead*   Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD       Abstract       Near  infrared  (NIR)  cyanine  dyes  have  been  used  over  the  years  in  various  biological  applications,  such  as,  fluorescence  labeling  probe.  Unsymmetric  cyanine‐5  (Cy‐5)  dyes  173


POSTER ABSTRACTS  have been used over the years as biosensor for the detection of smallpox and various other  pathogens.  The  Cy‐5  dyes  exhibits  emission  spectra  between  the  regions  of  670���710  nm.  This is a problem as biological molecules, such as, heme and other molecules like visible  fluoro  probes  also  fluoresce  in  this  same  region.  The  objective  of  this  research  is  to  synthesize NIR dyes that will be used to detect smallpox, using a more efficient method; a  dye that will fluoresce at a longer wavelength than the Cy‐5 dyes.   Initial studies have been done towards optimizing the synthesis of various  heptamethine  dyes;  in  an  efficient  time  using  Microwave  Assisted  Synthesis.  The  heterocyclic  salt,  bisimine, and sodium acetate and minimal ethanol are combined in a vial and subjected to  microwave  radiation.  The  five  NIR  symmetric  dyes:  ethyl  dye,  methyl  dye,  propyl  dye,  carboxylic dye and alcohol dye, have been synthesized with percentage yield of 79.0, 70.5,  81.0, 83.5, and 64.5 respectively. The dyes fluoresce between the regions of 780‐790nm. The  analysis of the H1  NMR concludes that the dyes have been successfully synthesized. The  NIR‐dyes  are  significantly  pure  compared  to  dyes  synthesized  using  previous  methods.  The  synthesis  of  the  ethyl‐hexanoic  unsymmetric  dye  used  in  the  detection  of  smallpox,  using MAOS has been synthesized with a percentage yield of 78.8. The conversion of the  carboxylic  acid  to  the  active  NHS  ester  to  the  ethyl‐hexanoic  dye  is  currently  under  investigation.       46 

“Microwave Assisted Conversion Of Aldoximes To Nitriles”    Chidi Anyanwutaku, Dr. Yousef Hijji*,  Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251    Abstract      Nitriles  are  useful  precursors  for  the  synthesis  of  amines,  amides,  amidines,  ketones,  carboxylic  acids,  esters,  and  a  host  of  other  compounds.  They  have  wide  applications  in  industries  such  as  textile  and  other  industries.  Preparation  of  nitriles  from  the  corresponding aldehydes is therefore, a highly valued reaction because of the versatility of  nitriles.  The  aim  of  this  project  is  efficiently  synthesize  nitriles  in  one  step  under  the  microwave.  A  typical  synthetic  method  will  first  be  used  in  which  an  aldehyde  will  be  converted to an oxime using hydroxylamine Hydrochloride. The oxime then forms a nitrile  after dehydration. Following the typical approach, the nitrile will  be synthesized directly  in one step under the microwave using the aldoxime. Temperature and time will then be  evaluated to determine the optimal conditions to produce the highest yield.        

174


POSTER ABSTRACTS    “Approaches Toward The Atroposelective Synthesis Of Chiral Polyaryls”       Donovan Thompson, Alan McDonald, and Dr. Karelle Aiken*       Chemistry, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460       ABSTRACT  

47 

    Approaches  toward  the  atroposelective  synthesis  of  chiral  polyaryl  compounds  using  “Lactone  Concept”  (LC)  methodology  will  be  reported.   The  LC  approach  was developed by Dr. Gerhard Bringmann and colleagues for the atroposelective  synthesis  of  biologically  active,  chiral  biaryls.   Potential  applications  for  the  chiral  polyaryl  targets  in  this  study  involve  use  of  the  compounds  (i)  as  glycomimetic  inhibitors  of  enzymes  and  (ii)  as  ligands  or,  chiral  auxiliaries  in  asymmetric  reactions.  The LC synthesis of a model triaryl lactone will be reported:         48 

“A Simple Highly Efficient Method For The Synthesis Of Nitriles”       Emmanuel Dowuona, Dr. Yousef Hijji*       Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251       Abstract       Nitrile  chemistry  has  become  a  very  crucial  aspect  to  organic  synthesis.  Because  of  their  unusual  properties,  nitriles  serve  as  synthetic  intermediates  for  pharmaceuticals,  agricultural chemicals, and even dyes.  They can be converted to ketones, carboxylic acids,  amines,  esters,  and  amides,  and  their  polarity  makes  them  ideal  aprotic  solvents.   This  project  is  aimed  at  converting  methyl  aldoximes  to  nitriles  under  microwave  conditions.   By  changing  the  temperature  and  time  of  heating,  the  conditions  and  yields  will  be  optimized.   The  compatibility  of  the  conditions  will  be  evaluated  by  using  aromatic,  aliphatic, and conjugated aldehydes and compounds with sensitive groups as alkenes.  The  mechanism and reaction conditions will be discussed.                 175


POSTER ABSTRACTS    49 

“Understanding Why The Strongest Halide Binding Occurs With The Weakest  Hydrogen Bond Donors In Triazolophanes”    Esther O. Uduehi, Yuran Hua, Kevin P. McDonald, Jonathan A. Karty and Amar H. Flood*  Chemistry Department, Indiana University, 800 East Kirkwood Avenue,   Bloomington, IN, 47405     Abstract    Triazolophanes are a family of shape‐persistent macrocyclic compounds that are known to  bind anions solely through C–H hydrogen bond donors. A number of triazolophanes have  been studied previously and their high binding affinities (K > 106 M–1) were attributed to 

the high degree of pre‐organization of eight traditionally‐weak hydrogen bond donors. In  this  work,  a  series  of  triazolophanes  incorporating  propylene  linkages,  instead  of  phenylenes,  were  synthesized  and  characterized  to  further  investigate  pre‐organization.  The rigidity of the macrocycle is weakened with the introduction of flexible propylene(s),  and  the  triazolophanes  therefore  show  reduced  binding  affinities.  Compared  to  a  rigid  triazolophane 1, the binding constants with chloride are decreased by two and four orders  of magnitude in 2 and 3, respectively. This study, as a negative control of pre‐organization,  helps to elucidate the anion binding nature of shape‐persistent macrocycles.     “Microwave Assisted Synthesis Of Non‐Symmetric Near‐Infrared Dyes”  50    Jamiece E. Johnson*, Dr. Angela Winstead*  Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, 21251    Abstract      Near  Infrared  dyes  are  important  sensitizers,  from  their  strong  spectral  properties  in  the  longer  wavelength  region  with  minimal  background  from  biomolecules  and  high  sensitivity. Heptamethine cyanine dyes are useful as fluorescent tags in DNA sequencing,  immunoassay and flow cytometry. Non‐symmetrical dyes are important when changes in  the  spectral  and  physical  properties  of  the  dyes  are  preferred  when  using  specific  applications and compatibility with instrumentation.   Our  approach  uses  microwave  assisted  organic  synthesis  to  synthesize  non‐symmetric  dyes  with  faster  times,  comparable  yields  and  without  toxic  solvents.  The  first  step  is  to  combine  one  equivalent  of  Salt  A,  sodium  acetate,  bisimine  and  ethanol  in  a  microwave  vial,  in  a  radiator  for  15  min.  at  100ºC.  After  cooling  to  room  temperature,  Salt  B  and  sodium acetate is added to the vial for an additional 15 minutes at 100º C. The synthesized  cyanine dyes have been successfully synthesized and in good yields. Current investigation  involving benzenethiazol salt derived cyanine dyes.     176


POSTER ABSTRACTS  51 

“Synthesis And Photophysical Characterisation Of Hepthamethine Cyanine Dyes”       Stanley N. Oyaghire*, Dr. Angela Winstead*, Dr. Richard Williams*   Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251     Abstract     Heptamethine  cyanine  dyes  are  currently  used  as  fluorescence  labels  and  sensors  of  biomolecules in vivo because their spectra reach into the near infrared (NIR) region, where  auto  fluorescence  by  a  biological  matrix  least  occurs.  However,  a  major  disadvantage  of  these  dyes  is  that  their  Stokes  shifts  are  small  (less  than  25nm).  The  Stokes  shift,  which  determines the fluorescence of the emitted photon, has to be large in order for the detector  to  identify  the  fluorescence  signal  from  background  noise.  Also  other  spectral  properties  such as quantum yield, detection sensitivity, and molar absorptivity are important factors  in fluorescence studies of these dyes.     Ten symmetric and non‐symmetric hepthamethine cyanine dyes have been synthesized in  our  lab  by  Microwave  Assisted  Organic  Synthesis,  which  involves  heating  heterocyclic  salts, bisimine and sodium acetate in a single‐mode microwave. Spectral studies have been  conducted  on  these  dyes  and  properties  such  as  Stokes  shift,  quantum  yield,  molar  absorptivity, and detection sensitivity have been determined. Studies on these dyes reveal  an increase in molar absorptivity and a decrease in quantum yield for the non‐symmetric  alkyl substituted cyanine dyes from the symmetric dyes.   Current  work  involves  determining  the  effect  of  structure  modifications  of  the  dyes  on  their observed spectral properties. Modifications include substitution of the chlorine atom  on the central reactive site of the dye with amine groups and hydrogen and changing the  counter ion to determine their effects on the spectral properties. The synthesis of the amine  substituted dyes is still under investigation.    

52 

“Characterization Of Model Systems For The Development Of A   Single Molecule Trap”       Dominique A. Brooks, Christine A. Carlson, Jorg C. Woehl*   Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry   University of Wisconsin‐Milwaukee   Milwaukee, WI 53201       Abstract       Optical trapping of objects with nanoscale dimensions has evolved tremendously since its  first inception in 1970.  It is not yet possible, however, to use optical tweezers to trap single  molecules without attachment to micrometer‐sized polystyrene beads.  We are developing  177


POSTER ABSTRACTS  a  new  system  to  trap  and  manipulate  single  molecules  on  surfaces  using  near‐field  scanning  optical  microscopy  probes.   Our  current  focus  is  on  the  preparation  of  model  systems  that  show  movement  in  two  dimensions,  such  as  the  diffusion  of  organic  molecules  which  have  been  inserted  into  lipid  films.   Some  questions  we  are  addressing  are: How does film deposition pressure affect the velocity of single molecule diffusion, and  how does the number of layers affect the number of diffusing molecules? This insight will  be  crucial  for  the  preparation  of  two‐dimensional  systems  suitable  for  trapping  experiments.     “Substituent  Effects On The  Energetics Of Trans To Cis Isomerization In  53  Cyclohexene”       Jeffrey D. Veals* and Dr. Steven R. Davis     Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, University of Mississippi,   University, Ms 38677‐1848       Abstract       Renewable  Energy  Sources  are  becoming  increasingly  important.   Many  are  looking  for  ways  to  make  better  batteries  or  fuel  cells  and store  chemical  energy.   So,  with  the  same  mode  of  thinking,  we  began  studying  small  hydrocarbon  rings  and the energetics of ring strain that is imposed by having a trans oriented double  bond.   In  general,  it  takes  around  60  kcal/mol  of  energy  to  break  a  carbon‐carbon  double bond, but it takes no more than about 20 kcal/mol to break a carbon‐carbon  double  bond  in  this  small  cyclic  ring  for  the  trans    cis  isomerization.   We  have  attributed this lowering of activation energy to ring strain ‐ the ring is so strained in  this  conformation  that  it  releases  energy  during  the  isomerization  process.  In  particular, this research has focused on how the stability of the trans conformation  is affected by different substituents.  It is generally known that in linear alkenes a  trans  conformation  for  a  double  bond  is  more  favored  over  the  cis  isomer  as  substituents become bulkier.  It is also known that replacing the hydrogen atoms on  a double bond with alkyl groups helps to stabilize the double bond.  This research  is  centered  on  how  much  stability  can  be  imposed  on  the  trans‐isomer  of  these  types  of  molecules  to  possibly  allow  them  to  exist  at  standard  state  conditions.   Some trends are followed while some surprises were met.                          178


POSTER ABSTRACTS  54 

“Probing Phenylalanine/Adenine Π‐Stacking Interactions In Protein Complexes With  Explicitly Correlated And CCSD(T) Computations”       Kari L. Copeland and Gregory S. Tschumper*     University of Mississippi, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University, MS       Abstract       To examine the effects of π‐stacking interactions between aromatic amino acid side chains  and  adenine  bearing  ligands  in  crystalline  protein  structures,  26  toluene/(N9‐methyl‐ )adenine  model  configurations  have  been  constructed  from  protein/ligand  crystal  structures.  Full  geometry  optimizations  with  the  MP2  method  cause  the  26  crystal  structures  to  collapse  to  6  unique  structures.  The  complete  basis  set  (CBS)  limit  of  the  CCSD(T)  interaction  energies  have  been  determined  for  all  32  structures  by  combining  explicitly correlated MP2‐R12  computations with a correction for higher‐order correlation  effects  from  CCSD(T)  calculations.  The  CCSD(T)  CBS  limit  interaction  energies  of  the  26  crystal structures range from −3.19 to −6.77 kcal mol‐1 and average −5.01 kcal mol‐1. The  CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energies of the optimized complexes increase by roughly 1.5  kcal  mol‐1  on  average  to  −6.54  kcal  mol‐1  (ranging  from  −5.93  to  −7.05  kcal  mol‐1).  Corrections  for  higher  order  correlation  effects  are  extremely  important  for  both  sets  of  structures  and  are  responsible  for  the  modest  increase  in  the  interaction  energy  after  optimization.  The  MP2  method  overbinds  the  crystal  by  2.31  kcal  mol‐1  on  average 

compared to 4.50 kcal mol‐1 for the optimized structures. This data indicates that CCSD(T)  computations  are  still  necessary  to  obtain  reliable  interaction  energies  for  π‐stacking  systems even when they adopt the crystal structure geometry, where the fragments tend to  be significantly further apart than at the gas‐phase optimized geometry.     “A Photoacoustic Calorimetry Investigation Of The Excited‐State Properties Of The  55  Oxygen‐Transport Protein Hemerythrin”       Shawna N. Lee*, Maurice Edington   Florida A&M University, Department of Chemistry, Tallahassee, FL 32304       Abstract       Hemerythrin  is  a  dioxygen‐transport  protein,  whose  oxygen‐binding  site  is  a  binuclear  iron  center.  Spectroscopic  investigations,  including  steady‐state  absorption  and  photoacoustic calorimetry measurements have been conducted on hemerythrin in its met,  oxy  and  azide  forms.  The  results  indicate  all  forms  of  hemerythrin  studied  exhibit  a  molecular  volume  expansion  when  the  metal  center  charge‐transfer  excited  states  are  excited  at  355  nm.  Preliminary  results  convey  that  the  met  form  of  hemerythrin  releases  70% of its absorbed energy as heat and the oxy form releases 90% of its absorbed energy as  heat.  The  oxy  form  has  a  40%  larger  volume  expansion  than  the  azide  form.  These  179


POSTER ABSTRACTS  investigations  will  aid  in  our  understanding  of interactions  that  occur  between  the metal  centers  and  the  protein  active  site  environment  that  are  essential  for  dioxygen‐binding  reactivity.     “A Spectroscopic Investigation Of The Ultrafast Decay Dynamics Of The Dioxygen  56  Carrier Protein Hemocyanin”      Tarah A. Word and Maurice Edington*   Department of Chemistry, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee FL, 32307       ABSTRACT       A  series  of  spectroscopic  investigations  were  preformed  on  the  dioxygen  carrier  protein,  hemocyanin (Hc), using time‐resolved laser spectroscopy in an attempt to understand how  dioxygen  (O2)  reactivity  is  mediated  by  interactions  between  the  copper  center  and  the  active‐site  environment.  Specifically,  the  methods  of  photoacoustic  calorimetry  and  nanosecond transient absorption were used to gain insight into the environmental factors  that  mediate  (O2)  reactivity  in  hemocyanin.  Currently,  the  excited  state  dynamics  of  the  OxyHc  metal  center  and  the  O2  binding/dissociation  reactions  are  not  well  understood.  Our  results  indicate  that  OxyHc  releases  ~76  %  of  the  absorbed  photon  energy  non‐ radiatively.  This  suggests  that  the  O2  photodissociation  quantum  yield  is  ~24%.  We  will  discuss  these  results  and  their  impact  on  our  current  understanding  of  how  the  ligand  binds to non‐heme metal centers.       57  “Identification  Of  Compact  Basis  Sets  For  The  Reliable  Characterization  Of  Higher‐ Order Correlation Effects In Π‐Type Interactions”       Brittney D. Smith and Dr. Gregory S. Tschumper*   The University of Mississippi  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry   University, MS 38677       Abstract       The dimers of acetylene (H − C ≡ C − H)2, cyanogen (N ≡ C− C ≡ N)2 and diacetylene   (H − C ≡ C − C ≡ C − H)2  were used to examine the basis set dependence of higher‐order  correlation  effects  on  π‐type  interactions.  The  parallel‐displaced  and  t‐shaped  configurations were used for the cyanogen and diacetylene dimers while the stacked and t‐ shaped  configurations  were  used  for  the  acetylene  dimer.  Intermolecular  interaction  energies  were  calculated  for  each  dimer  configuration  using  the  MP2, CCSD  or  CCSD(T)  methods in conjunction with 16 different basis sets in order to identify compact basis sets  that accurately reproduce higher‐order correlation corrections.       180


POSTER ABSTRACTS  “Tunable Ag‐‐Nanoparticle Surface Plasmon Absorption And Its Effect On Surface  Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Activity”       Christen M. Robinson, Dulal Senapati and *Paresh C. Ray   Jackson State University, Department of Chemistry Jackson, MS‐39216     Abstract     We have synthesized variable sized (4‐100 nm in diameter) Ag‐nanoparticles by Na‐citrate  reduction method. Without changing the surfactant, simply by changing the ratio of Ag to  Na‐citrate we have tuned the size of the Ag‐nanoparticles. Depending on their size, these  nanoparticles  show  tunable  surface  plasmon  bands  (generally  shows  red  shifting  with  increasing  the  diameter)  with  variable  molar  extinction  coefficient.  We  have  observed  a  two  order  (~100  times)  enhancement  of  molar  extinction  coefficient  by  changing  the  diameter from 4nm to 100nm. Size and shape of these nanoparticles have been confirmed  by  TEM‐analysis.  Using  these  tunable  sized  nanoparticles  we  have  measured  the  Raman  enhancement  factor  for  Rh6G  at  633nm  which  gives  us  an  idea  about  the  effect  of  nanoparticle size on polarizability and hence the surface enhanced Raman (SERS) activity.       “A Preliminary Photoacoustic Calorimetry Investigation Of The Nonradiative  59  Relaxation Processes Of Photoactive Yellow Protein”         Johnny Williams and Maurice Edington*     Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee FL, 32307       ABSTRACT       This investigation uses photoacoustic calorimetry to attain a comprehensive understanding  of how the active‐site environment of Photoactive Yellow Protein mediates photochemical  reactions exhibited by p‐coumaric acid and variants. This will allow us to characterize the  nonradiative  relaxation  process  of  the  photocycle,  as  well  as  give  insight  on  key  electrostatic interactions involved in stabilizing the chromophore photochemical reactions.  This  will  bring  our  lab  closer  to  our  goal  of  understanding  how  light  absorption  induces  chemical and conformational changes that subsequently trigger an unknown messenger to  induce signal transduction.                     58 

181


POSTER ABSTRACTS  “Coupled Dielectric And Thermochemical Studies Of The Influence Of Curing Agent Structure On Epoxy-Amine Cure”

60 

Abdul-Rahman O. Raji*, Alvin P. Kennedy, and Solomon Tadesse Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251 Abstract Dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry have been used to monitor the isothermal cure of Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol A with 3, 3ʹ-DDS and 4, 4ʹ-DDS. Combination of both methods provides a powerful technique for understanding the morphology of network-forming epoxy-amine during cure. It is interesting that though the only difference in the structure of both curing agents is the location of their amine groups, there is a significant difference in their final glass transition temperature. Their in-situ dielectric properties also showed huge distinctions. The result of the experiments revealed that although the rate of reaction or the rate of network formation is higher for the 3, 3ʹDDS, it is not directly responsible for the disparity in the final glass transition temperature.   “Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy In Biological Systems”    Marquis Gordon*, Tia Mitchell, Lewis Johnson, and Maurice Edington  Department of Chemistry, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee FL, 32307 

61 

  Abstract            This  investigation  assesses  the  use  of  Laser  Induced  Breakdown  Spectroscopy  as  a  rapid detection technique to identify and characterize various inorganic elements found in  biological pathogens and toxins that could possibly be harmful to both humanity and the  environment. We will explore the use of various combinations of LIBS configurations, such  as  single‐pulse  and  double‐pulse  schemes,  in  order  to  optimize  plasma  generation  and  detection  for  the  targeted  samples.    The  ultimate  goal  of  this  work  is  to  develop  a  LIBS  system  that  will  detect  biological  agents  in  more  complex  environments,  such  as  food  sources  under  atmospheric  condition,  as  well  as  detect  and  prevent  the  transmission  of  biological  pathogens  and  toxins,  especially  those  identified  as  potential  bioterrorism  attacks.       

 

182


NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE Conference Chair Sandra K. Parker The Dow Chemical Company

Core Team Chairs Meeting Planner & Site Logistics Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill Leading Edge Marketing and Planning, Inc. Secondary Education Linda Davis

Conference Participation Ella L. Davis

Committee for Programs Action Services (CAPS)

Finance Lolita Grant, CPA National Treasurer

New Business Development Dale Mack Morehouse School of Medicine

Workshops/Symposiums/Technical Programs/Student Support Rebecca Tinsley, PhD & Sharon Kennedy, PhD Colgate Palmolive

Ex-Officio Member Victor McCrary, PhD ~ National President Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory

183


NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE Sub-Committees Health Symposium Ron Lewis PhD, Co-Chair Pfizer Inc., PGRD La Jolla

Meeting Planning/Site Logistics Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, Meeting Planner Leading Edge Marketing and Planning, Inc.

Patty Blanchard, Onsite Staff Leading Edge Marketing and Planning, Inc

Professional Development Workshops Sharon J. Barnes MBA/HRM The Dow Chemical Company

Printing/Publishing Tony Dent, PhD, Chair Retiree, PQ Corporation

Guest Speakers William Jackson PhD, Chair University of California, Davis

Steven Thomas Webmaster

Awards & Student Programs Sharon Kennedy PhD, Chair Colgate Palmolive

New Business Development Dale Mack, Chair Morehouse School of Medicine

Christine Grant PhD University of North Carolina

Cassandra Broadus Morehouse School of Medicine

Alvin Kennedy PhD Morgan State University

Darrell Davis Committee for Program Action Services (CAPS)

Andre Palmer PhD The Ohio State University

Derry Haywood The Peninsula Financial Group

Rebecca Tinsley, PhD Colgate Palmolive Company

Victor McCrary, PhD Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory

Nikisha Bent Rohm and Haas Company Technical Workshops & Symposiums Rebecca Tinsley PhD, Co-Chair Colgate Palmolive

Calvin James Lubrizol Corporation

Dale Wesson PhD Florida A&M University

184


NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE Proceedings Tommie Royster PhD, Chair Eastman Kodak Company

Career Expo Dale Mack, Co-Chair Morehouse School of Medicine

Dinah Jordan Princeton University

Dr. Kenneth Smith, Co-Chair Elementis Specialties

Alison Williams PhD Princeton University

Rasheda Weathers Drug Enforcement Administration

Jesse Edwards PhD Florida A&M University

Henry Beard

Teachers Workshop Linda Davis, Chair

Conference Registration Felicia Barnes-Beard, Co-Chair Rohm and Haas Company

Committee for Action Program Services (CAPS)

Ella L. Davis, Co-Chair

Sheila Turner Marine Corp Recruit Depot

Brenda Brown San Diego Unified School District

Joyce Chesley-Dent Retiree, Federal Government

Celeste Tidwell San Diego Unified School District

Jennifer Stimpson Dallas Independent School District

Shirley Hall Retiree, San Diego City Government

Science Bowl/Science Fair Saphronia Johnson, Co-Chair Benedict College

Dorothy Haynes Kiana Hamlett, Co-Chair Drug Enforcement Administration

Henry Beard

Sheila Turner Marine Corp Recruit Depot

185


“I get to do high level science everyday. I’m also able to try to inspire our younger generation’s interest in science. This is really my dream job.” Roche, United States

Make your mark. Improve lives. At Roche, 80,000 people across 150 countries are pushing back the frontiers of healthcare. Working together, we’ve become one of the world’s leading research-focused healthcare groups. Today, scientists at our research centers around the world are focusing on treatments for diabetes, inflammation, influenza, nervous system disorders, various cancers, cardiovascular and other diseases. We’re also a leader in researching and providing advances in diagnostics, such as PCR technology. Some of the brightest and most talented scientists in the world work in our laboratories. Turning their ideas into effective new treatments and cures that help people live healthier, longer lives is the mission that drives us. For information on career opportunities in the U.S., go to www.rocheusa.com. Roche is an Equal Opportunity Employer fully committed to workplace diversity


LSAMP COMMUNITY OF  • Science • Technology • Engineering & Mathematics • 

   TSU H‐LSAMP PERSONNEL  Dr. Bobby Wilson Project Director, Shell Oil Endowed Chair of Environmental Toxicology, and L. Lloyd Woods Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Dr. Willie Taylor Associate Director and Professor of Mathematics Ms. Michelle Tolbert Program Coordinator Texas Southern University 3100 Cleburne Street Houston, Texas 77004 Phone: (713) 313-4278 Website: www.em.tsu.edu/LSAMP Email: LSAMPScholarship@tsu.edu

Congratulations from the Texas Southern University-Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (TSU-LSAMP) to the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers 2009 Conference. May you have continued success in sponsoring this outstanding conference for these exceptional individuals in academia, government, and business organizations, for they mold the minds of the next generation of our country’s scientists, leaders, and academicians. 



NOBCChE 36th Annual Conference of NOBCChE | St. Louis, MO | April 13 - 15, 2009