Page 1

The 33rd Annual Conference of The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers

NOBCChE 2006

“The Secret is out, Find it at NOBCChE.ʺ Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel

Los Angeles, California April 9 - 15, 2006


TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome Letters

In Memoriam - Tributes to Drs. Ted Williams and Samuel Massie Future Conference Locations Hotel Layout NOBCChE Health Walk Map Map With Directions - Hyatt to UCLA Campus

iv

x xi xiii xv xvi

Conference Sponsors

1

Conference at a Glance

2

Technical Sessions at a Glance

5

Workshops and Forums at a Glance

6

NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund

7

Program Schedule

10

NOBCChE 2006 Exhibitors

51

Forum and Workshop Abstracts

53

Conference Speakers

63

Technical Abstracts

86

Poster Session Abstracts

153

National Conference Planning Committee

185

National Conference Planning Committee Subcommittees

186


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers

Greetings from the Executive Board Chair, Dr. Bobby Wilson

I welcome you to Los Angeles, California, for the 33rd Annual NOBCChE Conference. Expanding on the theme of the conference, “The Secret is out. Find it at NOBCChE,” I invite you to not only find the secret of NOBCChE’s success during your stay, but to also spread the good word of the organization’s achievements over the past 34 years. In April of 1972, an Ad Hoc Committee for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers was convened. The founding board was composed of five chemists--Dr. Lloyd Ferguson, professor, California State University; Dr. William M. Jackson, professor, Howard University; Dr. William Guillory, professor, Drexel University; Dr. Henry C. McBay, professor, Morehouse College; and Dr. Charles Merideth, chancellor, The Atlanta University Center, Inc. -- and two chemical engineers-- Dr. Joseph Cannon, professor, Howard University; and Dr. James Porter, professor, MIT. An $850 grant from the Haas Community Fund, and a $400 grant administered through Drexel University provided the financial backing for the committee. Upon receiving an overwhelmingly positive response to the committee’s survey that queried the interest of black chemists and chemical engineers in establishing a formal organization dedicated to their professional advancement, the committee reconvened, in September of 1972, as a larger body to structure the organization and formulate the financial plan needed to develop it. One year later, the Organizationʹs Executive Board began planning the first national meeting, which was held in March of 1974, in New Orleans. Each year, NOBCChE has held a national meeting in cities throughout the nation. Incorporated in 1975 under the laws of the State of Georgia, NOBCChE has tax-exempt status as a non-profit professional society. This conference has proven to be an invaluable venue in which black chemists and chemical engineers discuss the important issues in their careers, present technical papers, and formulate priorities and topics for future meetings. Succinctly encapsulating NOBCChE’s achievements and promise, the Mission Statement declares: “NOBCChE will achieve its mission through diverse programs designed to foster professional development and encourage students to pursue careers in science and technical fields. To this end, NOBCChE will establish educational partnerships with school districts, municipalities, businesses, industries, other institutions and organizations in the public and private sectors.” NOBCChE is a secret worth spreading. I hope that all conferees have a successful and profitable experience and look forward to seeing you next year in Orlando. Sincerely,

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013 1-800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org

President Joseph Francisco, Ph.D. Purdue University West Lafayette, IN Vice-President Isiah M. Warner, Ph.D. Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, MBA The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX Treasurer Dale Mack Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Tamika Hurst University of Michigan Ann Harbor, MI Midwest Regional Chair Kimberly D. Jackson The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Patrick Gordon, Ph.D. Emmanuel College Boston, MA Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Darrell Davis, Vice Chairman Drug Enforcement Administration Dallas, TX Perry L. Catchings Prime Organics, Inc. Lowell, MA Ella Davis Pfizer, Inc. Lititz, PA Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Discovery Partners International San Diego, CA Gloria Thomas, Ph.D. Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers

April 9, 2006

President Joseph Francisco, Ph.D. Purdue University West Lafayette, IN Vice-President Isiah M. Warner, Ph.D. Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

Dear NOBCChE Members, I am pleased to welcome you to the 23rd Annual Meeting of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers. The theme for this meeting is, ʺThe Secret is out: Find it at NOBCChEʺ. This week, as you participate in the events, you too will discover one of the ʺThe Best Kept Secretsʺ. NOBCChE has something to offer each and everyone of you in attendance. The National Planning Committee has organized a solid program of technical sessions, symposia and workshops. Continuing our commitment to professional development, NOBCChE has organized several workshops for our members. I would like to extend a special invitation to our young professional women in academia and industry to attend the COACH Workshop. There is a Science Teacher Workshop for the ongoing development of K-12 teachers. In keeping with our mission to encourage and prepare African Americans for careers in chemical and chemical engineering, there is a special workshop for our collegiate members on Landing the First Tenure-track Position Workshop. There is an exciting workshop on Forensic Science that everyone should not miss. I encourage members to attend and participate in this yearʹs Health Symposium that focuses on an overlooked condition in the African-American community: Depression. There is also the Estate Planning Workshop that should be considered. I would like to encourage our professional members to attend and give support to our youth participating in the Science Bowl competition. These young people will be the future of NOBCChE and our future leaders shaping science and technology. Please come out and support and give encouragement to these young people. I would like to invite every member to attend a special town meeting of the organization on Thursday to give NOBCChE leadership and its Presidential Task Forces your input into the future direction of the organization, and how the organization can best meet your professional development needs. I invite you to enjoy the conference the week ahead.

Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, MBA The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX Treasurer Dale Mack Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Tamika Hurst University of Michigan Ann Harbor, MI Midwest Regional Chair Kimberly D. Jackson The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Patrick Gordon, Ph.D. Emmanuel College Boston, MA Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Darrell Davis, Vice Chairman Drug Enforcement Administration Dallas, TX Perry L. Catchings Prime Organics, Inc. Lowell, MA Ella Davis Pfizer, Inc. Lititz, PA Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Discovery Partners International San Diego, CA Gloria Thomas, Ph.D. Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS

Joseph S. Francisco, Ph.D., President

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013 1-800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers

NOBCChE NATIONAL CONFERENCE PLANNING COMMITTEE Welcome to our 33rd Annual Conference, The National Conference Planning Committee of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) invites you to actively participate in all that this year’s conference offers. The Planning Committee has worked diligently since June of 2005 in organizing this conference. Over the past years, visitors to the annual conference have walked away from the conference questioning why they had not heard of NOBCChE before. Our unique style and informative way of conducting our annual meetings leave new attendees saying, NOBCChE has been a best kept secret. NOBCChE has been promoting and celebrating science for over 32 years and still remains as one of this country’s best kept secrets. To usher in a new era of having an impact on the scientific community through innovation, technology and education, this year’s theme exemplifies that change: ʺThe Secret is Out. Find it at NOBCChE.” This conference addresses a very diverse audience from secondary school students through professionals from academia, industry, and government. There will be over 120 technical presentations and posters, a variety of workshops, forums, and symposia for a more interactive experience. Over the past six years, we have included science teachers’ workshops that provide enrichment and professional development opportunities for those who are preparing the scientists of tomorrow, and we will continue this for this year’s conference. This activity has been enhanced greatly by partnering with NASA and UCLA. This year’s health symposium will focus on the latest scientific developments in clinical depression. We also hope that you visit and support our national Science Bowl/Fair competitions, as some of the brightest Junior and Senior High school students from across the country compete for national recognition. Finally, do not miss our Annual Awards Banquet, where outstanding science professionals and students are honored for their achievements in science research. With the help of our invaluable corporate partners, NOBCChE provides approximately $100,000 annually in scholarships and fellowships to students pursuing careers in science and engineering. On behalf of the National Planning Committee, I wish to express our sincere appreciation for your participation in NOBCChE 2006. Welcome to LA! Very truly, Darrell L. Davis Chairperson, NOBCChE National Planning Committee

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013 1-800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org

President Joseph Francisco, Ph.D. Purdue University West Lafayette, IN Vice-President Isiah M. Warner, Ph.D. Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, MBA The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX Treasurer Dale Mack Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Tamika Hurst University of Michigan Ann Harbor, MI Midwest Regional Chair Kimberly D. Jackson The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH Northeast Regional Chair Patrick Gordon, Ph.D. Emmanuel College Boston, MA Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Darrell Davis, Vice Chairman Drug Enforcement Administration Dallas, TX Perry L. Catchings Prime Organics, Inc. Lowell, MA Ella Davis Pfizer, Inc. Lititz, PA Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Discovery Partners International San Diego, CA Gloria Thomas, Ph.D. Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS


N BCChE National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers

President Joseph Francisco, Ph.D. Purdue University West Lafayette, IN

Tamiika K. Hurst NOBCChE National Student Representative 2004-2006

Vice-President Isiah M. Warner, Ph.D. Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA Secretary Sharon J. Barnes, MBA The Dow Chemical Company Freeport, TX Treasurer Dale Mack Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA National Student Representative Tamika Hurst University of Michigan Ann Harbor, MI Midwest Regional Chair Kimberly D. Jackson The Procter and Gamble Company Mason, OH

All, Welcome to the 2006 NOBCChE Annual Conference! NOBCChE has earned a reputation for its unique contributions to the mentoring and leadership development of underrepresented scientists and engineers. This year’s conference is themed: “The Secret is Out, Find it at NOBCChE.” What a noble articulation of NOBCChE’s commitment to the core areas of innovative research and teaching excellence! During this meeting, I encourage you to engage in the various hosted programs sponsored to promote educational discovery through a range of learning perspectives. These networking opportunities are essential components for successful career and personal development. NOBCChE’s image depends upon the academic and professional contributions that its members make. I laud the efforts of the leadership of NOBCChE to reflect the importance of “our” future in science, engineering and related fields. I humbly thank the membership for supporting these efforts with proposed ideas that are going to be implemented to advertise the growth and impact of NOBCChE.

Northeast Regional Chair Patrick Gordon, Ph.D. Emmanuel College Boston, MA Southeast Regional Chair James Grainger, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Southwest Regional Chair Melvin Poulson Schering-Plough Animal Health Baton Rouge, LA West Regional Chair Isom Harrison Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Livermore, CA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bobby Wilson, Ph.D. Chairman Texas Southern University Houston, TX Darrell Davis, Vice Chairman Drug Enforcement Administration Dallas, TX Perry L. Catchings Prime Organics, Inc. Lowell, MA Ella Davis Pfizer, Inc. Lititz, PA Ronald Lewis II, Ph.D. Discovery Partners International San Diego, CA Gloria Thomas, Ph.D. Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS

P.O. Box 77040 Washington, DC 20013 1-800-776-1419

www.nobcche.org


NOBCChE Pays Tribute to Two of Its Distinguished Members

Dr. Theodore Roosevelt ʺTedʺ Williams Robert E. Wilson Professor of Chemistry (emeritus ) The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH

10/ 23/1930 – 11/ 11/2005

With great regret, we reported the November 11, 2005 death of ʺTedʺ Williams in our Fall 05 issue of NNOL. Ted Williams, an analytical chemist, taught chemistry and mentored students at The College of Wooster for 42 years. As noted by Wooster President, R. Stanton Hales, “Dr. Williams had a profound effect on science education at Wooster. Affectionately known as “Ted,” Williams cherished his primary role as a science educator, but he also was nationally known for his research as well as his commitment to making science more accessible to women and minorities. In championing these causes, he brought the B-WISER (Buckeye Women in Science, Education and Research) Institute to campus in 1990, and actively participated in COSEN (Carolinas and Ohio Science and Engineering Network), a program that promotes science education among women and minorities.” Several students sponsored by the Delaware Chapter of NOBCChE received their degrees through these programs. Dr. Williams, a native of Washington, DC, received his B.A. from Howard University in 1952, his M.S. from Penn State in 1954, and his Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in 1960. Tedʹs research involved the characterization of biological tissues in normal and diseased states. The determination of trace metals and water content of eye tissues was a major area of his investigation. He took research leaves at Harvard University, Connecticut Medical School, Case Western Reserve University, and Carnegie-Mellon University. He taught introductory and analytical chemistry as well as a course in chemistry for non-science majors. He was the Sloan Visiting Professor of Chemistry at Harvard in 1969, received the Catalyst Award for outstanding teaching from the Manufacturing Chemists Association in 1978, the Award for Excellence in Teaching from the ACS Division of Analytical Chemistry and E.I. du Pont Company in 1989, and the Percy Julian Award for the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers in 1990. Ted served many years as chairperson of the Analytical Fellowship Committee of the ACS and in 2000 he chaired the Analytical Division of the ACS. At the College of Wooster, he was active with Project Kaleidoscope and the ChemLinks project, both sponsored by the NSF. Ted served as a member of the board of both of these programs. He enjoyed music of all kinds, especially chamber music. He is survived by his wife, Yvonne (Carter), also a former professor in the Wooster departments of black studies and political science and Dean of the Faculty from 1989-1993, and four daughters, including long time NOBCChE member, Dr. Alison Williams. In addition to Alison, their three other daughters are Lynora, Meredith and Lesley.


Dr. Samuel Proctor Massie Jr., the first African American faculty member at the U.S. Naval Academy, died on April 10, 2005 at the age of 86. Dr. Massie was a highly regarded leader in chemical education and in improving opportunities for minorities in the sciences. Among his many honors, Chemical & Engineering News named him one of the Top 75 Distinguished Contributors to the Chemical Enterprise in 1997. Born in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1919, Sam Massie graduated from high school at the age of 13, and by the age of 18 had received a bachelorʹs degree summa cum laude in chemistry from the Agricultural, Mechanical & Normal (AMN)College of Arkansas, now the University of Arkansas, Pine Bluff. He went on to earn an M.A. in chemistry from Fisk University, Nashville, TN, in 1940, and, a doctorate in organic chemistry at Iowa State University under the direction of Professor Henry Gilman. During that time, he also worked on the Manhattan Project contributing to uranium research. After graduation in 1946, Massie spent a year as a chemistry instructor at Fisk, then took a position as a chemistry professor and later chair of the department with Langston University in Oklahoma. In 1953, he returned to Fisk to serve as department chair, and in 1961 he took a position as chair of the chemistry department at Howard University. From 1963 to 1966, he served as president of North Carolina College, Durham, now North Carolina Central University. Dr. Massie joined the Naval Academy chemistry faculty in 1966. In addition to teaching chemistry, he chaired the Academyʹs first Equal Employment Opportunity committee where he helped write the Academyʹs first Affirmative Action Plan, headed the committee that launched the Academyʹs Black Studies program, and provided advice and support to the navyʹs minority recruitment program. He was appointed to the chemistry chair in 1977. He continued to serve as an emeritus professor after retiring in 1993. He later held a position as vice president for education with the Bingwa Software Co. As a scientist, Samuel Massie made significant contributions to silicon chemistry, and the study of antibacterial agents for which he received a U.S. patent (1984). He also authored a chemical review of phenothiazine that is considered a classic in the field. He is best known for his work encouraging disadvantaged students in the sciences. He served over the years on a number of educational institution boards, including 21 years with the Maryland State Board for Community Colleges. In recognition of his work, Dr. Massie was invited to give 11 guest lectureships, received five honorary doctorates, and was presented with numerous awards. NOBCChE named him their Outstanding Professor in 1980, and their Henry Hill lecturer in 1987. He was a frequent keynote speaker at annual conferences, most recently, Los Angles in 1995. In 1981 his alma mater, Iowa State University, awarded him its highest alumni honor: The Distinguished Achievement Citation. In 1988, he received The White House Lifetime Achievement Award for Contributions to Science, Technology, and Community Service. The ACS honored him with the 1994 James Flack Norris Award and the 1996 ACS Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences. In 1995, the National Academy of Sciences hung Dr. Massieʹs portrait in its gallery, and aspects of his career are on display at the Smithsonianʹs National Museum of American History. In 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy created the Samuel P. Massie Chairs of Excellence program to support environmental education and research at nine historically black colleges and universities and one Hispanic-serving institution. Dr. Massie also has an elementary school named in his honor in Prince Georgeʹs County, Md. Dr. Massie was preceded in death by his wife, Gloria, who passed away in January, 2005. He is survived by three sons, six grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter.


FUTURE NOBCChE ANNUAL CONFERENCE SITES AND DATES 2007 J W Marriott Orlando, Grande Lakes Orlando, Florida April 1 - 7, 2007

2008 Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Philadelphia, Pennsylvania March 24 - 29, 2008

2009 Renaissance Grand Hotel St. Louis, Missouri April 13 - 18, 2009

2010 Marriott Marquis Atlanta Downtown Atlanta, Georgia March 29 - April 3, 2010


HOTEL LAYOUT

California Level


HOTEL LAYOUT

Plaza Level

South Mezzanine Level


NOBCChE Run Map

NOBCChE Health Walk Distances (Follow Arrows) From Hotel to The Corner of Pico Blvd. via Avenue of The Stars 0.7 Mi w/return From Hotel to The Corner of Pico Blvd. and Motor Ave via 1.0 Mi w/return Avenue of The Stars From Hotel to The Corner of Motor Ave & Monte Mar Dr. via 2.0 Mi w/return Avenue of The Stars and Pico Blvd. From Hotel to Loop via Motor Ave, Monte Mar Dr., Patricia, & ~4.0 Mi Pico Blvd.


Driving Directions to UCLAs’ Ackerman Union 1:Start out going SOUTHEAST on AVENUE OF THE STARS toward EMPYREAN WAY.

0.1 miles

2: Make a U-TURN at EMPYREAN WAY onto AVENUE OF THE STARS.

0.7 miles

3: Turn LEFT onto SANTA MONICA BLVD / CA-2.

0.4 miles

4:Turn RIGHT onto S BEVERLY GLEN BLVD.

1.0 miles

5: Turn LEFT onto WOODRUFF AVE.

0.1 miles

6:Turn LEFT onto WYTON DR.

0.3 miles

7: Turn LEFT onto HILGARD AVE. 8: End at 405 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90095-9000, US

<0.1 miles ~ 3.0 Mi


Turning Science Into Caring For more than a century, Abbott Laboratories has been working to advance health care for people around the world. From prevention and diagnosis, to treatment and cure, we have evolved into a diversified health care company that discovers, develops, manufactures and markets innovative products. Headquartered in Chicago and with more than 60,000 employees around the world, we don’t just see a better world – we’re positioned to make it happen. www.abbott.com Abbott welcomes and encourages diversity in our workforce. An EEO/AA employer


CONFERENCE SPONSORS NOBCChE extends its thanks and appreciation to the companies listed below for their contributions to NOBCChE 2006. 3M Corporation St. Paul, MN

GlaxoSmithKline King of Prussia, PA

Abbott Laboratories Abbott Park, IL

Merck & Company, Inc. Rahway, NJ

Agilent Technologies Palo Alto, CA

NASA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; UCLA Center for Astrobiology Los Angeles, CA

American Association for the Advancement of Science Washington, DC

National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD

American Chemical Society Washington, DC

National Science Foundation Arlington, VA

Committee for Action Program Services Cedar Hill, TX

Pfizer Central Research Incorporated Groton, CT

Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists Eugene, OR

Rohm and Haas Company Spring House, PA

Colgate-Palmolive Company Piscataway, NJ

Roche Nutley, NJ

Dow Chemical Company Midland, MI

University of Maryland College Park, MD

Drug Enforcement Administration Washington, DC

University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA

Eli Lilly and Company Indianapolis, IN

1


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE Date

Event/Function Daily NOBCChE Office NOBCChE Health Walk Press Room Coffee Interview Rooms Hospitality Suite

Time

Room Location

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Convention Office North/South

6:30 AM - 7:15 AM

Outside of Hotel (See Map)

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Bel Air Room

7:30 AM - 9:00 AM

California Lounge

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

California Showroom

10:00 PM -12:00 AM

Penthouse Suite

Sunday NOBCChE Golf Outing April 9 PD Workshop 1 - COACh Registration Supported Students Meeting

7:00 AM - 3:00 PM

NOBCChE/COACh Reception

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Olympic I & II

3:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Convention Office North/South

5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Olympic I

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Constellation II

7:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Convention Office North/South

8:30 AM - 10:15 AM

Olympic I

10:30 AM - 11:50 AM

Olympic I

10:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Convention Office North/South

12: 00 N - 1:30 PM

Constellation I & II

12:00 N - 5:00 PM

California Showroom

Technical Sessions 1 & 2 PD Workshop 2 – HBCU Myths

1:30 PM - 4:40 PM

Westwood & Brentwood

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Pacific

Executive Board Meeting

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Senators Board

ACS Distinguished Scientist Sym.

4:45 PM - 6:00 PM

Olympic I

NOBCChE Reception

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Constellation I & II

Supported Students Meeting

8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Olympic I

8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Campus of UCLA

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Palisades

9:00 AM - 12:00 N

California Showroom

8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

California Lounge

9:00 AM - 12:00 N

Westwood & Brentwood

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Palisades

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Olympic II

10:30 AM -12:00 N

Olympic II

Forum 2 - NSF Funding Opportunities

10:30 AM - 12:00 N

Palisades

Lunch (On Your Own) NOBCChE Presidentsʹ Meeting

12:00 N-1:30 PM

Monday Registration April 10 Opening Session Henry Hill Lecture Registration ACS Luncheon Career Fair Set-Up

Tuesday Science Teachers Workshop 1 April 11 Forensic Workshop Career Fair Set Up Registration Technical Sessions 3, 4, & 5 PDW 3 - AVUE Job Applications; Securing Equipment Via GSA PDW 4 – Strategies for Job/Career Transitioning Forum 1 - NASA Mars Mission

12:00 N -1:30 PM 2

Olympic I


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE PDW 5 - Landing First Academic Job NOBCChE Rohm and Haas Undergraduate Competition

1:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Olympic II

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Westwood

Career Fair Exhibitors Meeting

4:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Olympic I

4:30 PM - 5:00 PM California Showroom Poster Session Set Up 5:00 PM- 6:30 PM Westwood R&H Information Session 5:00 PM - 6:20 PM Constellation I Reception NIST/University of MD 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM Olympic I Plenary Lecture ʺAnalysis of the Collapse of the World Trade Center Towers,ʺ Dr. Shyam. Sunder, NIST 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Olympic I

7:30 AM - 8:20 AM

Senators Dining

7:30 AM - 8:20 AM

Governors Dining

Midwest Regional Meeting

7:30 AM - 8:20 AM

Governors Board

Southwest Regional Meeting

7:30 AM - 8:20 AM

Directors Dining

West Regional Meeting

7:30 AM - 8:20 AM

Directors Board

Registration General Session w/Breakfast

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM

California Lounge

8:30 AM - 10:15 AM

Beverly Hills

Science Teachers Workshop 2 Registration Percy L. Julian Lecture Career Fair Open

8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Campus of UCLA

10:15 AM - 4:00 PM

California Lounge

10:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Constellation I

10:30 AM - 11:50 AM

California Showroom

Percy L. Julian Luncheon Poster Set Up Career Fair Open NOBCChE Town Meeting Health Forum “Depressionʺ Science Competition Opening

12:00 N - 1:30 PM

Beverly Hills

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

California Showroom

1:45 PM - 5:00 PM

California Showroom

Supported Students Meeting Wednesday Northeast Regional Meeting April 12 Southeast Regional Meeting

2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Olympic I

4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Constellation I

5:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Westside

Career Fair Mixer/Poster Session

5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

California Showroom

NSF Reception

6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

California Showroom

P&G RTCI Reception-GS & Post-Docs

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Olympic II

Supported Students Meeting Science Fair Set Up

8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Olympic I

8:30 PM - 9:00 PM

California Showroom

8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Senators Boardroom

8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

California Lounge

8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Constellation I & II

9:00 AM - 12:00 N

Westwood & Brentwood

Thursday Executive Board Meeting April 13 Registration Science Teachers Workshop 3 Technical Sessions 6, 7, & 8 3


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE Career Fair

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

California Showroom

PDW 6 - Job Politics & Networking

9:00 AM - 10:50 AM

Olympic I

PDW 7 - Computational Science

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Olympic II

Science Fair Viewing

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

California Showroom

Forum 3 - NIH Research Jobs

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Olympic I

Lunch (On Your Own)

12:00 AM - 1:15 PM

Science Bowl Competitions Junior Division

12:30 PM - 5:00 PM 12:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Senators /Governors Dining, & Governors Board Rooms

Senior Division

12:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Forum 4 - Deciding Post-Doc Yes/No Technical Sessions 9, 10, & 11

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Regents /Directors Dining, & Directors Board Rooms Olympic II

1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Westwood & Brentwood

Forum 5 - Estate Planning Banquet Reception

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Olympic I

6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

California Lounge

Awards Banquet Science Competition Social

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Los Angeles

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Westside

Friday, Career Fair Booth Tear Down April 14 Science Bowl - Senior Division

8:00 AM - 12:00 N

California Showroom

8:00 AM - 11:45 AM

Olympic I

Science Bowl - Junior Division

8:00 AM - 11:45 AM

Olympic II

Technical Sessions 12, 13, & 14

9:00: AM - 12:00 N

Westwood & Brentwood

Students Awards Luncheon

12:00 N - 2:30 PM

Los Angeles

Science Competition Trip

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

California Science Center

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Penthouse Suite

Saturday, National Planning Committee April 15 Meeting

4


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE Technical Sessions at a Glance Room Westwood Monday, April 10 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM 1:30 PM - 4:40 PM 4:45 PM - 6:00 PM

Brentwood

Henry Hill Lecture in Olympic I TS 1 Analytical Chemistry TS 2 Spectroscopy ACS Distinguished Scientists Symposium in Olympic I

Tuesday, April 11 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM 10:30 AM - 12:30 M 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM 6:30 PM- 7:30 PM

TS 3 Chemical Engineering TS 4 Organic Chemistry I TS 3 Chemical Engineering (cont) TS 5 Chemical Education R&H Undergraduate Competition PL “Analysis of the Collapse of the World Trade Center Towersʺ in Olympic I

Wednesday, April 12 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Percy L. Julian Lecture in Constellation I Career Fair Mixer/Poster Session in California Ballroom

Thursday, April 13 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

TS 6 Polymer Organic TS 8 Pharmacological Organic TS 10 Modeling and Simulation

TS 7 Environmental Chemistry I TS 9 Environmental Chemistry II TS 11 Biochemistry

TS 12 Materials Chemistry TS 12 Materials Chemistry (cont)

TS 13 Organic Chemistry II TS 14 Organic Chemistry III

Friday, April 14 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM 10:30AM - 11:50 AM

5


CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE Professional Development Workshops and Forums at a Glance Room

Olympic I

Olympic II

Sunday, April 9 PDW 1 COACH Workshop

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Monday, April 10 1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

PDW 2 “Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs): Myths and Misunderstandings” (Pacific)

Tuesday, April 11 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

10:30 AM - 12:00 N 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Forensic Workshop (Palisades) Science Teachers Workshop 1 on UCLA’s Campus (w/Bus transportation) PDW 3 “Applying for Government PDW 4 “Strategies for Job and Career Jobs through AVUE; Securing Transitioning” analytical equipment through GSA” (Palisades) F 2 “NSF Funding Opportunities” F 1 NASA Mars Mission (Palisades) PDW 5 “Landing That First TenureTrack Academic Position” PL “Analysis of the Collapse of the World Trade Center Towers”

Wednesday, April 12 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Science Teachers Workshop 2 on UCLA’s Campus (w/Bus transportation) Health Forum ʺClinical Depressionʺ in Constellation I

Thursday, April 13 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM 9:00 AM - 10:50 AM 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Science Teachers Workshop 3 in Constellation I & II PDW 6 ʺThe Name of the Game: A Primer PDW 7 ʺComputational Scienceʺ on Politics & Networking” F 3 ʺSummer and Full-Time Research Opportunities for Scientists with Chemistry & Engineering Backgroundsʺ F 4 “Deciding if a Post-doc is Right for You” F 5 Estate Planning - ʺNow That You Got It, How Do You Keep Itʺ

PDW = Professional Development Workshop; F = Forum; PL = Plenary Lecture

6


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND We wish to thank members and friends of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers for their support and confidence in the future of NOBCChE by making a $500.00 or more tax deductible contribution to the NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund. Mildred Allison Denise Barnes Henry T. Brown Winifred Burks-Houck Virlyn Burse* Joseph N. Cannon Callista Chukwunenye Robert L. Countryman Andrew Crowe* Darrell Davis Anthony L. Dent* Lawrence E. Doolin* Linneaus Dorman* Fannie Posey Eddy James Evans, Sr. Lloyd Ferguson Lonnie Fogel Lloyd Freeman Eddie Gay Joseph Gordon* William Guillory* Jonathan K. Hale James Harris Bruce Harris* Ivory Herbert Kenneth W Hicks Neville Holder Isaac B. Horton, III Donald A. Hudson

Charles R. Hurt William M. Jackson* Madeleine Jacobs* Christopher Kinard Anita Osborne-Lee George Lester, Jr. Mallinkrodt Chemical Inc. Willie May Jefferson McCowan* Victor McCrary Sidney McNairy Lynn Melton Philip Merchant Reginald E. Mitchell William V. Ormond* James A. Porter Cordelia M. Price* Janet B. Reid Leonard E. Small* Florence P. Smith Michael Stallings* Clarence Tucker* Benjamin Wallace Charles Washington Joseph Watson Billy Williams Keith B. Williams Reginald Willingham Bobby Wilson Andrea Young*

* Contributed more than $500.00

7


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND We wish to thank members and friends of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers for their support and confidence in the future of NOBCChE, and for their tax deductible contribution to the NOBCChE Endowment Education Fund. Adegboye Adeyeno Keith Alexander Verlinda Allen Eugene Alsandor Roseanne Anderson Victor Atiemo-Obeng Benny Askew, Jr. Joseph Barnes Sharon Barnes Tegwyn L. Berry Alfred Bishop Iona Black Jeanette E. Brown Nora Butler-Briant James Burke Jacqueline Calhoun Lashanda Carter Perry Catchings, Jr. Aldene Chambles John J. Chapman Esteban Chornet Reginald A. Christy Regina V. Clark James Clifton Edward Coleman George Collins James E. Cotton Garry S. Crosson Reuben Daniel Kowetha Davidson Ella Davis Thomas Davis Thomas Dill Gerald Ellis Pat Fagbayi

Edward Flabe Edward E. Flagg Joe Franklin Russell Franklin Issac Gamwo John W. Garner Cornelia Gilyard Robert Gooden Warren E. Gooden Valerie Goss Etta Gravely Bernice Green Keith V. Guinn Everett B. Guthrie Gene S. Hall James Hamilton Kinesha Harris April Harrison Isom Harrison Rogers E. Harry-Oruru Lincoln Hawkins Ronald Haynes Ronald T. Henry Leonard Holley Sydana R. Hollins Smallwood Holoman, Jr. Brenda S. Holmes Nikisha Hunter Bernard Jackson Donald Jackson Evelyn P. Jackson Kim Jackson Kyle Jackson Ganiyua Jaiyeola Raymond James 8

Allene Johnson Elijah Johnson Harry Johnson Paula Johnson Saphronia Johnson Emmett Jones Evy Jones Jennifer A. Jones Jesse Jones Timothy Jones Thomas C. Jones Verlinda Jordan Jimmie Julian Ella L. Kelly Otis Kems Kirby Kirksey Rachel Law Mia Laws Lester A. Lee Cynthia R. Leslie Steve Lucas Alex Maasa Dale Mack George S. Mack Robert McAllister Aliecia McClain Gerald McCloud Walter McFall Saundra Y. McGuire Dawn McLaurin Linda Mead-Tollin Janice Meeks Charles W. Merideth Damon Mitchell M. P. Moon


NOBCChE ENDOWMENT EDUCATION FUND Robert Murff Harvey Myers Tina Newsome James Nichols Kenneth Norton Bunmi Ogunkeye Steven B Ogunwumi Mobolaji O. Olwinde Kofi Oppong Beverly Paul James Pearce James Pearson Tony L. Perry Howard Peters Mwita V Phelps Walter G. Phillips Louis Pierce Sonya Caston Pierre Wendell Plain Charles A. Plinton Jamacia Prince Marquita Qualls Daniel Reuben

Mary Robinson Press Robinson Anne Roby Tommie Royster Albert E Russell Franklin Russell Clark Scales Billy Scott Melva Scott Robert Shepard James P Shoffner Keroline M. Simmonds Tiffany Simpson Milton Sloan Karen Speights - Diggs Oreoluwa Sofekun Lucius Stephenson Wilford Stewart Grant St. Julian Richard Sullivan Albert Thompson Dameyun Thompson Ezra Totton

9

Jorge Valdes Grant Venerable Cheryl A. Vocking Samuel von Winbush Gerald Walker Leon C. Warner Michael Washington Odiest Washington Ben Watson Joseph W. Watson Helen P. White Ronald H. White Thomas Whitt Leonard Wilmen Harold Lloyd Williams Laura C. Williams Joe Williams Raymond Williams Jeremy Willis Sean Wright Sandra Wyatt


PROGRAM SCHEDULE DAY OF WEEK

EVENT

ROOM

6:30 AM - 7:15 AM

NOBCChE Health Walk

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

NOBCChE Office

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM 7:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Press Room NOBCChE Golf Outing

Outside Hotel (See Map) Convention Office North/South Bel Air Room

Sunday, April 9

Sunday, AM

Professional Development Workshop 1 - COACH Workshop Olympic I & II 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists

Facilitators: Nancy Houfek, Head of Voice and Speech, Institute for Advanced Theater Training, Harvard University; Saundra McGuire, Director, Center for Academic Success, Louisiana State University; Lee Warren, Associate Director, Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard University; Barbara Butterfield, Chief Human Resource Officer for Academic and Staff Human Resources and Affirmative Action, University of Michigan; Jane Tucker, Director, Human Resources, Teaching and Organizational Development, Duke University ; Ernestine Taylor, Senior Associate, Center for Creative Leadership 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Registration

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Supported Students Meeting

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

NOBCChE/COACH Welcome Reception Hospitality Suite

Constellation II

6:30 AM - 7:15 AM

NOBCChE Health Walk

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Press Room NOBCChE Office

7:00 AM - 8:30 PM

Registration

7:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Coffee

Outside Hotel (See Map) Bel Air Room Convention Office North/South Convention Office North/South California Lounge

10:00 PM - 12:00 AM

Convention Office North/South Olympic I

Penthouse Suite

Monday, April 10

10


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Opening Session 8:30– 10:15 AM

Monday, AM

Olympic I

Call to Order

Dr. Joe Francisco, President, NOBCChE

Official Opening

Dr. Bobby Wilson, Chairperson, Executive Board, NOBCChE

Welcome

Los Angeles City Officials

Keynote Speaker

Congresswoman Maxine Waters, US House of Representatives, 35th Congressional District - CA Ms. Deborah C. Allen, Supervisory Chemist, DEA, Mid Atlantic Region

Conference Overview Closing Remarks

Dr. Joe Francisco

Henry Hill Lecture 10:30 - 11:50 AM

Monday, AM

Olympic I

Sponsored by the American Chemistry Society Northeast Section

Speaker: Dr. Sharon Haynie, E.I. DuPont Company, Wilmington, DE 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Registration

Convention Office North/South

American Chemical Society Luncheon Monday, PM Constellation I & II 12:00 – 1:30 PM Speaker: Dr. E. Ann Nalley, President, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC

12:00 N - 5:00 PM

Career Fair Set-Up

11

California Showroom


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Monday, PM Session Chair 1:30 - 1:45

1:45 - 2:00

2:00 - 2:15

2:15 - 2:20 2:20 – 2:35

2:35 - 2:50

Technical Session 1 1:45 - 4:00 PM Westwood Analytical Chemistry Dr. Nixon Mwebi, Jacksonville State University Presenters “Fenton Reactions: The Nature Of Oxidizing Intermediates Involved” Nixon, O. Mwebi1, Neil V. Blough2 1Jacksonville State University, Department of Physical & Earth Sciences, Jacksonville, AL 36265; 2University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, College Park, MD 20742 “Sensitive And Specific Surface Immobilized Molecular Beacon Probes For Genetic Analysis” Catherine Situma1, 2, Amanda Moehring3, Mohamed A. Noor3 and Steven A. Soper* 1, 2 1Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803; 2Center for Bio-Modular Multi-Scale Systems, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803; 3Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 “Instrumentation For Chemical Hazard Evaluations” Frank Dixon Jr*, Susan Shilcrat, Julie Tsui, Sarah Lapka GlaxoSmithkline Research and Development, Department of Chemical Development, King of Prussia, PA 19406 Break “Use Of Microfluidic Hydrogels As A Biomolecule Immobilization Strategy” Gloria Thomas*, Hui Chen, Bindu Nanduri†, Shane Burgess† Department of Chemistry, Mississippi State University, MS State, MS 39762 †Center for Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, MS State, MS 39762 “An In-Situ Ellipsometric Study Of The Cl--Induced Adsorption Of Peg On Ru And Cu Upd/Ru“ Marlon L. Walker1, Lee J. Richter1, Daniel Josell2, and Thomas P. Moffat2 1Chemical Sciences and Technology Laboratory 2Material Science and Engineering Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD 20899

12


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 2:50 – 3:05

3:05 - 3:20

3:20 – 3:30 3:30 – 3:45

3:45 – 4:00

4:00 - 4:15

4:15 - 4:30

“Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization For In-Situ Detection Of Hazardous Materials” Jasmine E. Ervin*,I, J. Chance Carter II, Marion Lawrence-Snyder I, S. Michael Angel I I University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia SC 29208 II Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, M division/Forensic Science Center, Livermore, CA 94550 “The Analysis And Characterization Of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds In Aquatic Environments Utilizing Liquid Chromatography – Diode Array Detection – Mass Spectrometry (LC – DAD – MS)” Katoria Tatum-Gibbs*, Renard L. Thomas, and Bobby L. Wilson NASA University Research Center for Biotechnology & Environmental Health, Texas Southern University, Houston TX 77004 Break “Effects Of Low-Level Radiation On Oxidative Stress Mediated Signaling In Neuronal Cells” Eugene A. Gibbs-Flournoy*, Renard L. Thomas, Bobby L. Wilson NASA University Research Center for Biotechnology & Environmental Health, Texas Southern University, Houston TX 77004 “Accelerating Proteomic Discovery With Rapid High-Efficiency TwoDimensional Electrophoresis Using Disposable Microchips” Hamed Shadpour, Harrison Musyimi, Kermit K. Murray, and Steven A. Soper* Department of Chemistry and Center for BioModular Multi-Scale Systems, Louisiana State University, 232 Choppin Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 “Spectroscopy And Electrochemistry Of Functionalized Semiconductor Nanoparticle Surfaces For Multi-Electron Processes” Sherine O. Obare*, Kate Shaw, Catherine M. Simms and Jayni M. Angeli Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 “Surface Characterizations Of The Morphologies Of Polymer Blends By Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy And Near Field Scanning Optical Microscopy” Shameika Vick, Dr. Carl Bonner Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University Norfolk, Va 23504

13


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Monday, PM Session Chair 1:30 - 1:45

1:45 - 2:00

2:00 - 2:15

2:15 - 2:25 2:25 - 2:50

2:50 – 3:05

3:05 - 3:20

Technical Session 2 1:30 - 4:40 PM Brentwood Spectroscopy and Atmospheric Dr. Shawn Abernathy, Howard University Presenters “Aerosol And Chemistry Measurements In The Tropical Atlantic: What Do In-Situ Atmospheric Measurements Tell Us About Chemical And Climate Change Earth System?” Vernon R. Morris Graduate Program in Atmospheric Sciences and Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC 20059 “Atmospheric Sulfur And Nitrogen Measurements During The 2004 East Tennessee Ozone Study“ LaToya Myles*, William Pendergrass, and Tilden Meyers National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, Atmospheric Turbulence & Diffusion Division, Oak Ridge, TN, 37830 “The Infrared Spectroscopic Study Of Perfluorocarbons For Their Use As Terraforming Gases On Mars” Ramsey L. Smith and Vernon R. Morris, Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC 20059 Break “Deep Impact: A Pump Probe Experiment Of A Comet 9p/ Temple 1 With A Space Craft And The Keck Telescope” William M. Jackson* and Micha Galz, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis Anita L. Cochran, McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin Karen J. Meech, University of Hawaii Hien Tran, Keck Observatory, USA “Photodissociation Of 1, 2-Dibromomethane At 234 NM And 267 NM By Means Of Ion Velocity Imaging” Jamila R. Greene*1, Jianhua Huang2, William M. Jackson2 and Joseph S. Francisco1 1Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906, 2 University of California, Davis, CA 95616 “Dynamic Light Scattering Study Of N-(2-Hydroxypropyl) Methacrylamide Systems” Tedric D. Campbell and Oliver Steinbock* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4390

14


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 3:20 – 3:35

3:35 - 3:40 3:40 – 3:55

3:55 – 4:10

4:10 – 4:25

“Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation For The Structural Elucidation Of Oligosaccharides” Latasha Lamotte1, Milady Ninonuevo1, Kate Lancaster1 and Carlito B. Lebrilla1, 2 1University of California in Davis, Department of Chemistry, Davis, CA 95616 2School of Medicine, Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 Break “Surface Modification Of Polymer Substrates By Excimer Radiation” Emanuel Waddell1*, Josh Campbell1, Branden Reid2, and James McKee3 1University of Alabama in Huntsville Department of Chemistry, Huntsville, AL 35899 2Morgan State University, Department of Physics, Baltimore, MD 21251 3University of Alabama in Birmingham, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Birmingham, AL 35294 “Identifying Dioxin Deposited In Ground Beef Using 1H-NMR“ Akintunde Akinyemi and Shawn M. Abernathy*, Ph.D. Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059 “Study Of Nanostructured Materials By Magnetic Resonance Methods” Tracee Harris1, Marsha King2, Donald White3, Feng Cheng1, Natalia Noginova1* 1Norfolk State University, Centers for Materials Research, Norfolk, VA 23504 2South Carolina State University, Department of Chemistry, Orangeburg, SC 29117 Tuskegee University, Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee, AL 36088 “Structure-Activity Relationships For Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons From Fourier Transform Infrared And Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopy Data” James Grainger, Angela Ragin, Zheng Li and Donald G Patterson, Jr Division of Environment Health Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 3

4:25 – 4:40

15


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Professional Development Workshop 2 Monday, PM 1:45 - 3:30 PM Pacific “Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs): Myths and Misunderstandings” Moderator Kiana Hamlet, Forensic Chemist, DEA, South Central Lab, Dallas, TX Presenter Dr. Robert Shepard, Executive Director, Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc., Washington, DC 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Executive Board Meeting

Senators Board Rm.

4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Industrial Exhibitors Meeting

Mediterranean 3

Monday, PM

ACS Distinguished Scientists Symposium 4:45 - 6:00 PM

Olympic I

Sponsored by American Chemical Society

Speaker Dr. Stephen L. Mayo Associate Professor of Biology and Chemistry California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125

Monday, PM

NOBCChE Reception 6:00 - 7:30 PM

Constellation I & II

8:00 PM - 9:00 P.M.

Supported Students Meeting

Olympic I

10:00 PM -12:00 AM

Hospitality Suite

Penthouse Suite

Tuesday, April 11 6:30 AM - 7:15 AM

NOBCChE Health Walk

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Press Room NOBCChE Office

7:30 AM - 9:00 AM 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Coffee Interview Rooms 16

Outside Hotel (See Map) Bel Air Room Convention Office North/South California Lounge California Showroom


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Tuesday, AM

California Lounge

Forensic Workshop Career Opportunities in Forensic Science 8:00 - 9:30 AM

Moderator Panelists

Tuesday, AM

Registration

Palisades

Rashad Sims - Supervisory Chemist, Drug Enforcement Administration, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX Steven Carter, Group Supervisor, DEA’s Digital Evidence Laboratory (Computer Forensics) Jasmine Jefferson, American Academy of Forensic Sciences and the California Association of Criminalists Cornell Wilson,Jr., Forensic Chemist, Drug Enforcement Administration South Central Lab, Dallas, Texas Anna Zadow, Fingerprint Specialist, DEA, South Central Laboratory, Dallas, Texas

Teachers Workshop I 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Bus departs at 7:30 AM to UCLA Campus Ackerman Union, Viewpoint Conference Room – A201 A&B “Discover the Mysteries of Science Through Education”

Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, Abbott Laboratories, ACS, NASA/UCLA, and NOBCChE

Moderator

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services Dallas, TX

8:35AM – 9:00 AM 8:45 AM - 9:00 A.M.

Registration and Continential Breakfast Welcome and Opening Remarks Mrs. Linda Davis, Director, CAPS Ms. Barbara A Laval, Director, Astrology Institute-NASA/UCLA

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

“Teaching Students How to Learn” Dr. Saundra McGuire Center for Academic Success, Lousiana State University Break “Teaching Students How to Learn (Cont’d)” Lunch On Canpus

10:00 AM – 10:15 AM 10:15 AM – 11:30 AM 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM

17


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

2:15 PM – 2:30 PM

“Inquiry Matters” TEKS 5th thru 8th” Mr. James Kessler Educational Specialist, Americal Chemical Society Break

2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

“Inquiry Matters” TEKS 5th thru 8th (Cont’d)”

4:30 PM

Bus Departs from UCLA to Hotel

1:00 PM – 2:15 PM

9:00 AM - 12:00 N

Tuesday, AM Session Chair 9:00-9:15

9:15-9:30

9:30-9:45

9:45-9:50

Career Fair Set Up

California Showroom

Technical Session 3 9:00 - 11:30 AM Westwood Room Chemical Engineering Dr. James Mitchell, Howard University Presenters “Bimetallic Layered Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization And Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis” Nancy N. Kariuki*, Wang Xiaoping, Myers J. Deborah, and Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Division, 9700 S Cass Ave, Lemont, IL, 60439 “Microemulsion Synthesis Of Particles For Controlled Release Applications” Kelly J. Cross* and Michael T. Harris School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 “The Effects Of Laser Pulse Energy, Geometric Confinement And Material Stiffness On The Extent Of Damage From Laser-Induced Cell Lysis In A Microfluidic Chip” Marlon Thomas*†, Amy Stacy‡, G.P. Li‡, §, Mark Bachman§, Chris Sims±, Nancy Allbritton‡,±, Vasan Venugopalan†,‡ †Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, ‡ Department of Biomedical Engineering, ±Department of Physiology and Biophysics and § Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 Break

18


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 9:50-10:05

“Diesel Emissions Control Technologies” Steven B. Ogunwumi*1, Roychelle Ingram-Ogunwumi2, Jimmie Williams3 1,3Corning Incorporated, Crystalline Materials Research, Corning NY 14831 2 Corning Incorporated, Diesel Technology Development, Corning NY 14831

10:05-10:20

“CO2 Sequestration In Coal Seams: Effects Of Carbon Dioxide On Coal And Its Structure” Ryan N. Favors*1,2 and Angela L. Goodman1 1National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 2Purdue University, Chemistry Department, West Lafayette, IN 47907 “Ceramic Monoliths In Automotive Emissions Control” Roychelle Ingram-Ogunwumi*1, Steven B. Ogunwumi*2, Jimmie Williams3 1 Corning Incorporated, Diesel Technology Development, Corning NY 14831 2,3Corning Incorporated, Crystalline Materials Research, Corning NY 14831 Break “Analytical Nonlinear Model Predictive Control Using Third - Order Volterra-Laguerre Models” Abigale L. Antoine*, and Robert S. Parker Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 “Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation Of Pulsatile Blood Flow Through Left Coronary Artery” Sahid Smith1, Shawn Austin1 and G. Dale Wesson*1,2 1 Florida A&M University, Department of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 2 Florida A&M University, Biological and Agricultural Systems Engineering Program, Tallahassee, FL 32307 “Characterization Chemistry Of Ultrapure Nanomaterials” James W. Mitchell* and Jude Abanulo CREST Nanomaterials Characterization Science and Processing Technology Center Howard University, Chemical Engineering Department, Washington, DC, 20059

10:20 – 10:35

10:35 - 10:40 10:40 – 10:55

10:55 – 11:10

11:10 - 11:40

19


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Tuesday, AM

Technical Session 4 9:00 - 10:20 AM Organic Chemistry I

Brentwood Room

Session Chair 9:00-9:20

9:20-9:40

9:40-9:45 9:45-10:05

10:05-10:20

Presenters “Synthesis And Characterization Of Sf-Ppv-I: C10h24 Side Chain” Taína D. Cleveland, James Haliburton, Sam Sun Ph.D* Norfolk State University, Center for Material Science, Norfolk ,VA 23504 “Synthesis And Photophysical Characterization Of Near-Ir MetalloPhthalocyanine And Their Protein Conjugates” Vera Verdree, Guif Su, Serhii Pakhomov, Michael Allen, Robert Hammer, and Steve Soper Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Break “Synthesizing Novel Fluorescent Supports For Immunosensor Applications” Wraegen A. Mealy, Suzanne M. Ruder, Ph.D.* Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Chemistry, Richmond, VA, 23284 “Application Of Recyclable, Polymer-Immobilized Iodine(III) Oxidants In Catalytic C–H Bond Functionalization” Eric W. Kalberer, Salena R. Whitfield and Melanie S. Sanford* Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 North University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

20


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Tuesday, AM Session Chair

10:30-10:45

10:45-11:00

11:00-11:15

11:15-11:30

11:30-11:45

11:45-12:00

Technical Session 5 10:30 - 11:30 AM Brentwood Room Chemical Education Dr. Murphy Keller, III, United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Presenters “Touching The Future: A Chemistry Course For Teachers Of The 21st Century” Barbara Burke1, Brenda Olsen2, Janeen Volsey1, Edward Walton1* 1California State Polytechnic University, Department of Chemistry Pomona, CA, 91768 2Diamond Ranch High School, Science Department, Pomona Unified School District, Pomona CA “Integration Of Professional Development Into The Chemistry Curriculum” Gloria Thomas Department of Chemistry, Mississippi State University, MS State, MS 39762 “Introduction Of Environmental Science Project Into The Middle School Classroom – Challenges And Successes” Richmond J. Ampiah-Bonney, Julian F. Tyson* University of Massachusetts, Department of Chemistry, 701 Lederle Graduate Research Center, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 “Student And Faculty Fellowships At DOE Laboratories “ Linda Phaire-Washington, PhD* Argonne National Laboratory, Division of Educational Programs, Argonne IL 60439-4845 “Establishing Connections Between Chemistry And Societal Needs Through Project-Based Analytical Labs” Charles Hosten Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059 “National Energy Technology Laboratory – Minority Mentoring & Internship Program (MMIP)” Murphy J Keller III, Ph.D.* United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA

21


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Professional Development Workshop 3A 8:30 -10:00 AM Palisades “Applying for Government Jobs through AVUE” Ms. Rashida Weathers, Drug Enforcement Administration

Tuesday, AM Presenters

Professional Development Workshop 3B “Securing Analytical Equipment from GSA” Deatrice Washington, Drug Enforcement Administration

Tuesday, AM

Tuesday, AM Presenter:

Tuesday, AM Presenter:

Professional Development Workshop 4 8:30 -10:00 AM Olympic II “Strategies for Job and Career Transitioning” Presenter: Dr. Donald Bly Sponsored by The American Chemical Society

Forum 1 10:30 AM - 12:00 N Olympic II “NASA Mars Mission“ Dr. John L Callas, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

Forum 2 10:30 AM - 12:00 N Palisades “NSF Funding Opportunities” Dr. Tyrone Mitchell, National Science Foundation

12:00 N - 1:30 PM

Lunch (On Your Own)

12:00 N -1:30 PM

NOBCChE Presidentsʹ Meeting

22

Olympic I


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Professional Development Workshop 5 Tuesday, PM 1:30 - 3:00 PM Palisades “Landing That First Tenure-Track Academic Position“ Dr. Gregory N. Tew Polymer Science and Engineering University of Massachusetts Amherst

NOBCChE - Rohm and Haas Tuesday, PM Moderator

Undergraduate Research Competition Westwood 3:00 – 5:00 PM Mr. Vere O. Archibald, Rohm and Haas Company Presenters

3:00 - 3:30

“Dielectrophoresis Based Micro-Devices For Separation And Analysis Of Micro-Particles” Jamie McNeir 1, Swaminathan Rajaraman 2, Peter Hesketh 2, David Gottfried 3, Jim Gole 4 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Prairie View A & M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 2 School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, J. Erskine Love Jr. Manufacturing Bldg. Atlanta, GA 30332 3 Electro-Optics, Environment, and Materials Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA 30332 4 Department of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332

3:30 - 4:00

“Synthesis And Properties Of Poly(4’-Methyl-2,5Benzophenone)-B-Poly(Arylene Ether Sulfone) Multibolock Copolymers” Domonique O. Downing, Charles A. Jones III, Valerie S. Ashby* University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Chemistry, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 “Metal-Polymer And Metal-Ceramic Colloidal Building Blocks For 3D Photonic Crystals” Isa Watson1, Ian Hosein, Stephanie Lee, C. M. Liddell Hampton University, Hampton, VA 23668

4:00 - 4:30

23


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 4:30 - 5:00

“Synthesis, Analysis And Photochemical Studies Of Diarylnorbornadiene Derivatives” Obiamaka Obianyo and Felix Goodson* West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19380

4:30 PM - 5:00 PM 4:30 PM - 5:00 PM 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Career Fair Exhibitors Meeting Poster Session Set Up Rohm and Haas Information Session

Olympic I California Showroom Westwood

5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Reception NIST/University of MD

Constellation I

Tuesday, PM

Plenary Lecture 6:30 - 8:00 PM Olympic I ʺAnalysis of the Collapse of the World Trade Center Towersʺ Dr. Shyam Sunder Deputy Director, Building and Fire Research Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

8:00 PM - 9:00 P.M.

Supported Students Meeting

10:00 PM -12:00 AM

Hospitality Suite

Olympic I Penthouse Suite

Wednesday, April 12 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Press Room NOBCChE Office

6:30 AM - 7:15 AM

NOBCChE Health Walk

Bel Air Room Convention Office North/South Outside Hotel (See Map)

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Interview Rooms

California Showroom

7:30 AM - 8:20 AM 7:30 AM - 8:20 AM

Registration Regional Meetings Northeast

California Lounge

Southeast

Governors Dining

Midwest

Governors Board

Southwest

Directors Dining

West

Directors Board 24

Senators Dining


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Bus departs at 7:30 AM Wednesday, AM Teachers Workshop 2 to UCLA Campus 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Ackerman Union, Viewpoint Conference Room – A201 A&B “Discover the Mysteries of Science Through Education” Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, Abbott Laboratories, ACS, NASA/UCLA, and NOBCChE

Moderator

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services, Dallas, TX

8:15AM – 9:00 AM 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

2:15 PM – 2:30 PM

Registration and Continential Breakfast “Integrating Tools for Hands-on Teaching in the Classroom” Ms. Yolanda George Program Director, American Associationfor the Advancement of Science Break “Integrating Tools for Hands-on Teaching in the Classroom (Cont’d)” Lunch On Canpus “Introduction into Astrobiology” Ms. Barbara A. Laval Director, Astrology Institute-NASA/UCLA Break

2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

“Introduction into Astrobiology (Cont’d)”

4:30 PM

Bus Departs from UCLA to Hotel

10:00 AM – 10:15 AM 10:15 AM – 11:30 AM 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM

25


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Wednesday, AM Call to Order and Presidentʹs Report Financial Report Elections Report Announcements and Updates Closing Remarks

General Session w/Breakfast 8:30– 10:15 AM Beverly Hills Dr. Joseph Francisco, NOBCChE President Mr. Dale Mack, NOBCChE Treasurer Mr. Perry Catchings, Ms. Deborah C. Allen, NCPC, DEA Dr. Joseph Francisco, NOBCChE President

10:15 AM - 4:30 PM

Registration

California Lounge

Wednesday, AM

Percy L. Julian Lecture 10:30 - 11:45 AM

Constellation I

Dr. Jimmie Williams, Scientist and Manager, Environmental Technology Dept., Corning Inc., Corning, NY

10:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Career Fair Opens

California Showroom

Percy L. Julian Luncheon 12:00 – 1:30 PM

Wednesday Noon Speaker:

Beverly Hills Dr. Gail Wyatt, Associate Director, UCLA AIDS Institute Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences

1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Career Fair Open to Public

California Showroom

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Poster Set - Up

California Showroom

2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

NOBCChE Town Meeting

Olympic I

26


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

NOBCChE Health Forum Wednesday, PM

4:00 – 6:30 PM

Constellation I

Sponsored by Abbott Laboratory

Moderator Panelists

Dr. Ronald D. Lewis, II, Chair, 2006 NOBCChE Health Symposium Senior Scientist, Discovery Partners Int’l, Inc. A panel of Medical Experts Will Discuss Clinical Depression

Questions and Answers Open to the Floor Closing Remarks

Dr. Ronald D. Lewis, II

5:30 PM – 8:30 P.M.

Secondary Studentʹs Rap Session

Westside

Wednesday, PM

Exhibitor Mixer/Poster Session 5:00 - 6:30 PM

California Ballroom

Posters (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co-Author(s), Affiliation 1

“Transfection Of The Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (Ahr) Into The A Human B-Cell Lymphoma (SKW 6.4)” Andre’ P. Clay, Robert B. Crawford*, and Norbert Kaminski* Center for Environmental Toxicology and Department of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824

2

“Optical Properties Of Molecules And Molecular Aggregates Adsorbed On Solid Surfaces. First Principle Study” Alexander V. Gavrilenko*, Vladimir I. Gavrilenko, Carl E. Bonner Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504

3

“Polymers Made From Replenisabe Resources: Polyurethanes Based On Oleochemical Polyols” Anna-Gay Nelson1, Dr. George Armstrong*2 1Tougaloo College, Natural Science Department, Tougaloo MS, 39174

27


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 4

“Enzyme-Catalyzed Polyester Degradation: I) Protein Engineering Of Fusarium Solani Cutinase For Hydrolysis Of Polyesters “ Arthur W. Martin, Richard A. Gross Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences Polytechnic University, 98 Tech Place, Brooklyn, NY 11201

5

“The Synthesis And Analysis Of Magnetic Nanoparticles” Apollonia McMillan1, Dr. Kelley Bradley2, and Dr. Antony Jeeverajan2 1NASA University Research Center, Texas Southern University, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas 77004 2 Human Adaptation & Countermeasures, NASA-JSC, Houston, Texas 77058

6

“System Identification For Type 2 Diabetics” Amber L. Strohbehn1 and Derrick K. Rollins*1, 2 1Iowa State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ames, IA 50010 2 Iowa State University, Department of Statistics, Ames, IA 50010

7

“Synthesis And Characterization Of Polymethylmethacrylate And Poly(Methylmethacrylate Co-1H, 1H, 4H-Hexafluorobutyl Methacrylate)” Crystal D. Brown1, Dr. George Armstrong*1 1Tougaloo College, Natural Science Department, Tougaloo, MS 39174

8

“Using ADMET Predictor To Measure Parameters Of Heterocyclic Molecules” Carmine Leggett and Leyte Winfield, Ph.D.* Spelman College, Chemistry Department, Atlanta, GA 30314

9

“Observing The Products Formed From Heated Motor Oil Using High Resolution NMR” Carmela Wingfield, Debbie Lee, and Shawn M. Abernathy*, Ph.D. “A Comparative Study Of Harris County National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Outfall Screening Data” Carla L. Wyatt, Oscar Criner, Sherri Dunlap, Lee Graham Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas 77004

10

28


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 11

“Predicting Biologically Important Properties Using Solubilities And The Abraham General Solvation Model” Chelsea K.A. Givensa, Stephanie Keownb, Dawn M. Stovallb, Kaci R. Hooverb, William E. Acree, Jr.*b and Michael H. Abrahamc aNASA University Research Center, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas 77004, USA bDepartment of Chemistry, P.O. Box 305070, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5070 (USA) cDepartment of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (UK)

12

“Intercalation Of Small Molecules Into Organic Solids” Danyell C. Coleman and Alicia M. Beatty*, Department of Chemistry, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 “The Purification Of Pam In The Biosynthetic Pathway Of Taxol” Dominique Hopkins, Karin Klettke, Dr. Kevin D. Walker* College of Natural Science, Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 “Using NMR To Observe Dioxin Absorbed In Store Purchased Ground Beef” Darrell Maxwell, Healey LeCator, Shawn M. Abernathy*, Ph.D. Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059

13

14

15

“Synthesis And Characterization Of Funtionalized Polypyrrole And The Impact Of Anti-DNP Antibodies On Nanofiber Conductance.” Darkeyah Reuven and Ishrat M. Khan, Department of Chemistry, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314

16

“The Use Of Microwave Heating To Study The Mechanism Of Heat Flow In An Immiscible Liquid System” *Dawn Walker and Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland 21251

17

“Determination Of Corrosion Inhibitors In Synthetic Black Liquor“ Esinam Glakpe and Preet Singh Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30318

29


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 18

“Analytical Investigation Of The Importance Of Vitamin B12 For Vegetarians & The Elderly” Evelyn A. Wolfe, Ph.D.*, Nikisha Joseph , Kelesha Sarjeant, Tricia Edmund, Jerome Williams, Angela Bruno St. Francis College, Chemistry & Physics Department, Brooklyn Heights, New York 11201

19

“Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR) Of Antibacterial Fatty Acids” Ezekeil H. Hudson II*1, Brooke Woodard2, and Shavon Clark3. Texas Southern University, 3100 Cleburne, Houston, TX 77004, Department of Chemistry, Texas Southern University

20

“Profiling TE 10β-Acetyltransferase Of The Taxol Biosynthetic Pathway: Assessment Of The Regio- And Substrate Specificity And In Vivo Production Of Baccatin III In E. Coli” Erin Merriweather, Catherine Loncaric, Kevin D. Walker* College of Natural Science, Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823

21

“Investigation Of Air Tolerance Of Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) In Polymer Grafting” Geoffrey O. Okelo, Xinhui Lou, and Lin He Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695

22

“Characterization Of Maldi Sample Prepared By Different Deposition Methods Using Surface Profiling Techniques, Microscopy And Mass Spectrometry“ Harrison K. Musyimi, Steven A. Soper* and Kermit K. Murray* Department of Chemistry and Center for BioModular Multi-Scale Systems (CBM2) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803

23

“Industrial Products From Renewable Resources: Industrial Lubricants Based On Soy Bean Oil” Jennifer Fisher1 and Dr. George Armstrong*1 1Tougaloo College, Natural Science Department, Tougaloo, MS 39174

30


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 24

“Optimization Of Insitu Chemical Oxidation Via The Elucidation Of Key Mechanistic Processes Impacting Technology Maturation And Development Of Effective Application Protocol” Krystle D. Roberts, Dr. Mark E. Zappi*, John M. Harden, Dr. W. Todd French Mississippi State University Environmental Technology Laboratory, Dave. C. Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State, MS, 39762

25

“Synthesis And Molecular Structure Of A Bimetallic Salen Complex Containing Zn And La: A Disorded Nitrate Group Dancing Between Two Metal Centers” Dyers, Leon, Jr; VanDerveer, Donald,; Bu, Xiu, R

26

“Preliminary Analysis Of Volatile Organic Compounds (Vocs) And Trace Metals Present In The Fresno Community Drinking Water” Lindsey S. Scott*1, Denae King, Ph.D2, Richard Hajek, Ph.D2, Renard Thomas, Ph.D3, and Lovell Jones, Ph.D2 1NASA University Research Center, Texas Southern University, Houston TX, 77004 2UT MD Anderson Cancer Center CURE Summer Intern, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004 2UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Center for Research on Minority Health, Houston, TX, 77054 “Definition Of Optimum Temperature Range For Catalytic Materials” Marja N. Mullings* Georgia Institute of Technology School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Atlanta, GA 30332

27

28

29

“Calculation Of Structures And Energetics For Mercury Compounds In The Gas Phase And In Solution” John A. Tossell*, Merle D. Zimmermann University of Maryland, Chemistry Department College Park, MD 20910 “Extraction And Characterization Of Isothiocyanates From Various Cruceriferous Vegetables” N. Paul Nolen1, Bernadette Early2, Ayesha J. Mindingall3, Monica Frazier3, Pamela M. Leggett-Robinson*4 1Department of Animal Science, Tuskegee University; 2Department of Biology, Tuskegee University; 3CBR/RCMI, Tuskegee University; 4Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee University

31


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 30

“The Effectiveness Of Fecal DNA Versus Feather DNA In Mockingbirds As A Means Of Noninvasive Sampling” Phylesha A. White, Courtney E. Byrd, Casey L. Owens, Dr. Dorothy B. Engle* Department of Biology, Xavier University, 3800 Victory Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45207

31

“Synthesis And Properties Of Various Heptamethine Cyanine Dyes” Nikia Smith, Dr. Angela Winstead Chemistry Department, Morgan State University, Baltimore MD 21251

32

“The Effects Of Alkylmethylimidazolium Chloride Salts On RNA Function” Lori D. Johnson, Naomi F. Campbell*, Erick D. Ellis, Ken S. Lee Jackson State University, Department of Chemistry, Jackson, MS 39217

33

“Investigation Of The Interacting Partners Of Yeast COQ6: A Component Of The Multienzyme Complex Required For Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis” Odi Osonkie* and Catherine F. Clarke University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095

34

“Wittig Reaction: Conventional V.S Microwave-Assisted Method” Kristina Harkins1, Marc Remsay1, Dr. Yousef Hijji1 1Chemistry Department, Morgan State University, 1700 E. Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore, MD 21251

35

“Binding Of Chromium To Chromodulin Candidate Peptides As Studied To Mass Spectrometry” Rozlyn Nicole Chambliss*1,Junjie Gao2, Carolyn Cassady2 1Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee University, 102 Armstrong Hall, Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088 2Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, Box 870336,Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0336

36

“The Influence Of Environmental Temperature On Aging In Drosophila: Ion Mobility Coupled With Mass Spectrometry Methods For Proteome Profiling” Renã A. Sowell*1, John F. Kellie1, Thomas C. Kaufman2, and David E. Clemmer1 1Indiana University, Department of Chemistry, Bloomington, IN 47405 2Indiana University, Department of Biology, Bloomington, IN 47405

32


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 37

38

“Alternative Approaches To Minimizing The Tin Requirement In Multi-Step Organostannane Mediated Reactions” Shavon L. Ford, Jill A. Muchnij, Robert E. Maleczka, Jr.* College of Natural Science, Dept. of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48825 “Determination Of The Effect Of Breakage On Crystal Shape Distribution” Sheena Reeves*, Devkant Gandhi, and Dr. Priscilla Hill Department of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS

39

“Surface Tension From Pendant Drop Profiles: A Spherical Coordinate/ Finite Element – Based Algorithm” Samantha Sanders1, Michael T. Harris1 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

40

“Electrochemical Destruction Of Dichlorobenzene At Carbon-Felt Electrode In Lamellar Phase Of Aqueous Didodecyldimethyl-Ammonium Bromide” Yailouise Ndure* and Dr Maurice Iwunze Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251

41

“Medicinal Folklore Plants” Tiffany N. Taylor1, Monica Frazier2, Pamela M. Leggett-Robinson*1 1Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee University; 2CBR/RCMI, Tuskegee University Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088

42

“Quantitative Analysis Of Commercially Bottled Water By ICP-MS” Tamika Thompson*1, Andrea Oyewole2, Dr. Aref El-Demerdash2, Dr. Renard Thomas3, and Dr. Bobby Wilson4 1NASA University Research Center Internship Program Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004 2Environmental Toxicology Ph.D. Program, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004 3Environmental Research Toxicology Transfer Center, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004 4Principle Investigator and Provost, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004

43

“Enriched Sol-Gel Synthesis Of Ta2O5 Thin Films “ Tabitha A. Wilhoite*, Nicholas Ndiege, Ravi Subramanian, Richard Masel. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemical Engineering, Urbana IL, 61801

33


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 44

“Electrophoretic Deposition And Characterizations Of Silver Nanoparticle Films” Uche C. Nwodo*, Patricia Tillman, and James W. Mitchell Howard University, Nanomaterials Characterization Science Center, CREST, Washington, DC, 20059

45

“Luminescent Siloles As Chemosensors For Trace Nitroaromatic Explosives And Aqueous Chromium (VI)” Victoria D. Crockett*1, Sarah J. Toal2, William C. Trogler2 1Tougaloo College, Department of Chemistry, Tougaloo, MS 39174 2University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, CA 92037

46

Stepwise Assembly Of Tetraamines Via SN2 Reactions With Sulfamates And Sulfamidates Joseph R. Atkins*, Stefan Kraft Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, Manhattan, KS 66502

47

“Synthesis Of Mixed-Valent Gold Bromide Perovskites” D’Vesharronne J. Moore*1, Dana E. Gheorghe2, Zhongjia Tang2 and Arnold M. Guloy2 1NASA University Research Center, Texas Southern University, Houston,TX, 77004 2Department of Chemistry, Center for Materials Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204

48

“Incorporating Novel Methods To Teach General Chemistry To Non-Science Majors” Nichole L. Powell* and Gregory Pritchett Tuskegee University, Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee, AL 36088

49

“Preparation Of Supported Nanostructured Tio2 And Nitrogen Doped Tio2, And Applications To Photo Catalytic Disinfection” Kenneth K. Bota1, William N. Harris III13, Olivier K. Kainda1, Sharifeh Mehrabi2, David Collart2, Lebone Moeti3, Eric A. Mintz*1 Department of Chemistry, 2Department of Biological Sciences, 3Department of Engineering, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314 1

Wednesday, PM

National Science Foundation Reception 6:30 – 8:00 PM

California Showroom

Sponsored by NSFʹs Divisions of Chemistry, Materials, and Chemical and Transport Systems 34


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 7:00 PM – 8:30 P.M.

Research and Technical Careers in Industry (RTCI) Reception for Graduate Students and Post Doctoral Fellows Sponsored by Procter & Gamble

Olympic II

10:00 PM -12:00 AM

Hospitality Suite

Penthouse Suite

6:30 AM - 7:15 AM

NOBCChE Health Walk

Outside Hotel (See Map)

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Press Room NOBCChE Office

7:00 AM - 8:00 AM 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Executive Board Meeting Coffee

Bel Air Room Convention Office North/South Senators Boardroom California Lounge

7:00 AM - 8:00 AM

California Showroom

8:00 AM - 4:00 PM 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Science Fair Set-up Junior & Senior Division Registration Interview Rooms

8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Poster Session Viewing

California Showroom

Thursday, AM

Teachers Workshop 3 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Constellation I & II

Thursday, April 13

California Lounge California Showroom

“Discover the Mysteries of Science Through Education” Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, Abbott Laboratories, ACS, NASA/UCLA, and NOBCChE

Moderator

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services, Dallas, TX

8:30AM – 9:00 AM 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Registration and Continential Breakfast “Science Talk for Teachers’, Part I and Part II Astrobiology; Classroom Activities/Curriculum; Resources-TEKS 9-12” SETI Institute NASA Science Education Team Break

10:15 AM – 10:30 AM

35


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

2:15 PM – 2:30 PM

“Science Talk for Teachers’, Part I and Part II Astrobiology; Classroom Activities/Curriculum; Resources-TEKS 9-12 (Cont’d)” Lunch in Constellation I & II Depart Hotel to the IMAX Theatre, THE BRIDGE Movie: “Aliens of the Deep,” Walt Disney Pictures and Walden Media PresentsA James Cameron Film Break

4:00 PM

Depart IMAX Theatre to Hotel

5:00 PM

Arrive at Hotel

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Career Fair

10:30 AM – 12:00 N 12:00 N – 1:00 PM 1:00 PM

California Ballroom

Professional Development Workshop 6 Olympic I Thursday, AM 9:00 - 10:50 AM ʺThe Name of the Game: A Primer on Politics & Networkingʺ Presenter: Dr. Victor McCrary Jet propulsion Lab, The Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD

Thursday, AM Instructor

9:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Professional Development Workshop 7 9:00 - 10:50 AM ʺComputational Scienceʺ Dr. José Unpingco The Ohio Supercomputer Center Columbus, OH Science Fair Judging Junior Division Senior Division

36

Olympic II

California Showroom


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Thursday, AM Session Chair Presenters 9:00-9:15

9:15-9:30

9:30- 9:45

Technical Session # 6 9:00 - 11:00 AM Polymer Organic Chemistry Dr. Malika Jeffires-El, Iowa State University

Westwood

“Sugar-Substitutedpoly(P-Phenylene Ethynylene)S In The Development Of Biosensors For Pathogens” Dana L. Broughton*1, John J. Lavigne1, Belma Erdogan2, James N. Wilson2, Uwe H. F. Bunz2 1University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29208 2Georgia Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332 “Detection And Discrimination Of Small Molecules Using A CrossReactive Polythiophene” Marc S. Maynor and John J. Lavigne* University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29210 “Discrimination And Quantification Of Biogenic Amines Using A Conjugated Polymer-Based Sensor Array” Toby L. Nelson, Caroline O’Sullivan, John J. Lavigne* University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29208

9:45 – 9:50

Break

9:50 – 10:15

“Design And Synthesis Of Novel Biomaterials: A Structure-Property Approach” David A. Olson, Yue Yang, Benjamin A. Pierce, Andrew H. Brown, and Valerie V. Sheares* The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Chemistry, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

10:15-10:30

“Molecular Level Studies On Interactions Between A Pet Surface And Model Ink Components To Understand Adhesion” William Johnson*1, Cheryl Loch1, Priya Varadan2, Ralph Priester2 and Zhan Chen1 1 Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 2 Flint Ink Corporation, 4600 Arrowhead Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105

37


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Thursday, AM Session Chair Presenters 9:00- 9:15

9:15- 9:30

9:30- 9:40 9: 40-9:55

9:55 -10:10

10:10-10:25

Technical Session # 7 9:00 - 10:25 AM Environmental I Dr. Steven Ogunwumi, Corning Incorporated

Brentwood

“An Assessment Of In-Vehicle Volatile Organic Compounds During Afternoon Rush Hour Commutes In Houston Metropolitan Areas” Siobhan L. Tarver*, Felicia L. Conley, Renard L. Thomas, and Bobby L. Wilson NASA University Research Center for Biotechnology & Environmental Health, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004 “Detection Of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Derivatives In Environmental Samples” Aidee Gonzalez, Exequiel Tostado, Mary Lee, Noe Ramos and Krishna L. Foster California State University, Los Angeles, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Los Angeles, CA, 90032 Break “Source Identification Of Btex In Indoor Parking Facilities In Houston, Texas” Gabriel.A.Kristanto*, Felicia Conley, Renard Thomas, and Bobby Wilson Environmental Toxicology Program-Chemistry Department, Texas Southern University, 3100 Cleburne St, Houston, TX 77004 “Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Measurement Of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Hemoglobin Adducts In A Cohort Of Smoking And Non-Smoking Human Subjects” Angela Ragin, Selvin Edwards, Charisse Walcott, Donald G. Patterson, Jr, and James Grainger National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA “Volatile Organic Compound Determination Of The Seabrook Air Monitoring Project” Latrice B. Babin*, Siobhan L. Tarver, Gabriel Kristanto, Felicia L. Conley, Renard L. Thomas, and Bobby L. Wilson NASA University Research Center for Biotechnology & Environmental Health, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004

38


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Thursday, PM Session Chair Presenters 10:30-10:45

10:45-11:00

11:00-11:15

11:15 -11:30

11:30 -11:45

11:45 -12:00

Technical Session # 8 1:00 - 3:00 AM Westwood Pharmacological Organic Dr. Alfred Williams, North Carolina Central University “Synthesis Of A Fluorescent Peptide For The Biochemical Assay Of Yopt Protease” Laurel A. Royer*, Richard A. Gibbs Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN “Rational Design And Synthesis Of Substituted Carboranes As Serine Protease Inhibitors” Michael F. Z. Page, Satish S. Jalisatgi, M. Frederick Hawthorne* University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 “Neural Zinc Finger Factor-1 Protein Fragments For Metal Binding Studies” Niall D. Lue Sue*1, Sarah L. J. Michel2, and Holly J. Cymet1 1 Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251 2 University of Maryland, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 “Design And Synthesis Of Dithiocarbamate Ester Analogues As Potential Lipoxygenase Inhibitors In Suppression Of Prostate Cancer” Oladapo Bakare Ph.D.*, and Priscilla B. Walker Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington, D.C. 20059 “Ternary Particle Vaccine For Effective Delivery To Pulmonary System” Treniece L. Terry*1, Ali K. Salem1,2, Victor G.J. Rogers1 University of Iowa, Department of Chemical Engineering1, Department of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmaceutics2 Iowa City, IA 52242 “Synthesizing Novel Fluorescent Supports For Immunosensor Applications” Wraegen A. Mealy, Suzanne M. Ruder, Ph.D.* Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Chemistry, Richmond, VA, 23284

39


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Thursday, AM Session Chair Presenters 10:30-10:50

10:50-11:10

11:10-11:15 11:15 -11:35

11:35 – 11:55

Technical Session # 9 10:30 - 11:50 AM Environmental II Dr. Angela Winstead, Morgan State University

Brentwood

“Ion Chromatographic Anaysis Of Hanford Tank Waste For Analytes Of Low Level Concentrations Using Suppressed Conductivity Detection: Linear Verses Quadratic Calibration Fits Revisited” Asopuru Okemgbo* Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc., Richland, WA 99325 “Phytoextraction Of Arsenic From Soil By Leersia Oryzoides” Richmond J. Ampiah-Bonney1, Guy R.Lanza2, Julian F. Tyson*1 1 University of Massachusetts, Department of Chemistry, 701 Lederle Graduate Research Center, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 2 University of Massachusetts, Department of Environmental Sciences, 312 Stockbridge Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 Break “The Use Of Otolith Microchemistry To Monitor And Evaluate The Movement Of Coral Reef Fish In South Florida Waters” Trika L. Gerard*1, Dave Jones2, Monica Lara2 1National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NMFS SE Fisheries, Miami, FL 2U Miami, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Miami, FL “Trace Metal Analysis Of Lake Houston Water Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS)” Edidiong Obot*1, Charmaine Little1, Aref El-Demerdash2, Renard Thomas2, Bobby Wilson3 1Space and Environmental Science Internship Program (SESIP), Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004 2Environmental Research Technology Transfer Center (ERT2C), Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004 3SESIP Program Director, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004

40


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Forum # 3 11:00 - 12:30

Thursday, AM

Olympic I

ʺSummer and Full-Time Research Opportunities for Scientists with Chemistry & Engineering Backgroundsʺ Presenter Dr. Carla Easter, Science Educator, National Human Genome Research Institute

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch (On your own)

Hotel Restaurants

12:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Career Fair

California Ballroom

1:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Science Fair Viewing

12:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Science Bowl Junior Division

12:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Science Bowl Senior Division

Thursday, PM Presenter

Senators Dining Room Governors Dining Room Governors Board Room Regents Dining Room Directors Dining Room Directors Board Room

Forum # 4 1:30 - 3:00 PM Olympic I “Deciding If A Post-Doc Is Right For You” Ray Gamble, National Research Council

Forum # 5 Thursday, PM 3:30 - 5:00 PM Olympic I “Estate Planning – Now That You Got It, How Do You Keep It” Presenter Derry Haywood, The Pennisula Group

41


PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Thursday, PM Session Chair Presenters 3:00-3:20

3:15-3:30

3:30-3:45

3:45-4:00

4:00-4:15

4:15-4:30

Technical Session # 10 3:30 - 5:00 PM Modeling and Simulation Dr. Vernon Morris, Howard University

Westwood

“Theoretical Investigation Of Band Gaps Of ∏-Conjugated Polymers For Photovoltaic Applications” Anu Bamgbelu1 and Suely M. Black*1 1Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504 “Quantum Monte Carlo Study Of The Electronic Properties Of The First Row Transition Metals“ Ainsley A. Gibson, Floyd A. Fayton, Gordon J. P. Taylor, Jose Gonzalez and John A. W. Harkless* Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington DC 20059 “Time Dependent Dft Study On Homo-Lumo And Excitation Energies Of Polythiophene” A. C. Sykes1, S. M. Black1, and S. Sun 1 Norfolk State University, Center for Materials Research, Norfolk, VA 23504 “Theoretical Investigation Of Acceptor Molecule In An Organic Polymer For Solar Cell Application” Brandy A. Langston1 and Suely M. Black*1 1Norfolk State University, Center for Materials Research, Norfolk, VA 23504 “Prediction Of Excited States For Carbon, Nitrogen And Oxygen Systems Using Quantum Monte Carlo” Floyd A. Fayton Jr, Ainsley A. Gibson, and John A.W. Harkless* Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059 “Ab Initio Insight On The Interaction Of Ascorbate With Li+, Na+, K+, Be2+, Mg2+, And Ca2+ Metal Cations” Reeshemah N. Allen, M. K. Shukla, and Jerzy Leszczynski Computational Center for Molecular Structure and Interactions, Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217

42


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 4:30-4:45

4:45-5:00

Thursday, PM Session Chair Presenters 3:00-3:15 3:15-3:30

3:30-3:45

“An Oniom Investigation: Modeling The Adsorption Of 2-Methyl-4Nitroaniline (Mna) Onto The Hydrogen-Terminated 2 X1 Si (100) Surface” Dr. Suely M. Black1, 2* and Sheena M. Inge1 1Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA. 23504, Center for Materials Research 2 Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504, Department of Chemistry “Nitrosyl Sulfuric Acid Structure And Spectroscopy: Comparison Of Experimental Results And Quantum Chemical Calculations” Vernon R. Morris and Serenella Linares Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC 20059

Technical Session # 11 3:30 - 5:00 PM Biochemistry Dr. Derrick K. Rollins, Iowa State University

Brentwood

Open “Mutagenicity Of N-(Deoxyguanosin-8-Yl)-1-Aminopyrene Adduct In Simian Kidney Cells” Danielle L. Watt and Ashis Basu* University of Connecticut, Department of Chemistry, Storrs Mansfield, CT 06269 “Stoichiometric Inhibition Of Amyloid -Protein Aggregation With Peptides Containing C  -Disubstituted Amino Acid Amyloid Protein Aggregation Inhibition” Marcus. A. Etienne1*, Cyrus K. Bett1, Jed. P. Aucoin1, Tim. J. Jensen1, Robin. L. McCarley1, Ted. Ajmo2, Donna. Herber2, David. Morgan2, and Robert. P. Hammer1* 1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, 2Alzheimer Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612

43


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 3:45-4:00

“Spectroscopic Studies Of A Prokaryotic Nitric Oxide Synthase With Magnetic Circular Dichroism” Ryan D. Kinloch1, Masanori Sono1, Jawahar Sudhamsu2, Brian R. Crane2, and John H. Dawson*1 1University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29210 2Cornell University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Ithaca, NY 14853

4:00-4:15 4:15-4:30

Break “Increasing Specificity In The Identification Of Biological Particles Using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS)” Erica L. McJimpsey*1, Paul T. Steele2, Keith R. Coffee2, David P. Fergenson2, Vincent J. Riot2, Bruce W. Woods2, Eric E. Gard2, Matthias Frank2, Herbert J. Tobias2, Carlito B. Lebrilla1 1University of California-Davis, Department of Chemistry, Davis, CA 95616 2Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry Group, Livermore, CA 94550

4:30-4:45

“Block-Oriented Adaptive On-Line Modeling For Time Varying Systems” Derrick K. Rollins*1, 2, Stephanie Loveland1, and Ola Shadiya1 1Iowa State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ames, IA 50010 2Iowa State University, Department of Statistics, Ames, IA 50010 “A Novel Data Mining Method To Identify Assay-Specific Signatures In Functional Genomic Studies” Derrick K. Rollins, Sr.*1, 2, Dongmei Zhai1, 2, Jack W. Guidarelli1, and Ramon Gonzalez3 1Iowa State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ames, IA 50010 2 Iowa State University, Department of Statistics, Ames, IA 50010 3Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892

4:45-5:00

44


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 6:00 PM – 7:00 P.M.

Banquet Reception

California Lounge

NOBCChE Awards Banquet Thursday, PM

7:00 – 10:30

Los Angeles

7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Social Dance (DJ)

Westside

10:00 PM -12:00 AM

Hospitality Suite

Penthouse Suite

6:30 AM - 7:15 AM

NOBCChE Health Walk

Outside Hotel (See Map)

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Press Room NOBCChE Office

7:30 AM -9:00 AM 8:00 AM - 11:30 AM 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Coffee Registration Interview Rooms

Bel Air Room Convention Office North/South California Lounge California Lounge California Showroom

8:00 AM – 11:45 AM

Science Bowl Senior Division Junior Division

Olympic I Olympic II

Career Fair Booth Tear Down

California Showroom

Friday, April 14

9:00 AM – 12:00

Friday, AM Session Chair Presenters 9:00-9:15

Technical Session # 12 9:00 - 11:50 Materials Chemistry Dr. Jimmie Williams, Corning Incorporated

Westwood

“Carbon Nanotube Synthesis For Thermal Interface Applications” Baratunde A. Cola*1, 2, Jun Xu1,2, Placidus Amama1,2, Changrui Cheng1, Xianfan Xu1,2, and Timothy S. Fisher1, 2 1Purdue University, School of Mechanical Engineering, West Lafayette, IN 47907 2Purdue University, Birck Nanotechnology Center, West Lafayette, IN 47907

45


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 9:15-9:30

9:30-9:50 9:50-10:05

10:05-10:20

10:20-10:35

10:35-10:50

10:50-10:55 10:55 -11:10

11:10-11:40

“Temperature Dependence Of Orbital Mediated Tunneling” Bryan Wiggins, Brett Gyarfas, and K W Hipps* NSF REU Program (Grant #0453554) Summer 2005 Materials Science program Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4630 Break “PtCDA Doped Metal (Cu, Zn, Ni) Phthalocyanine Thin Films For Photovoltaic Cells” Harold D. Cooper *1 and Kang Seo1,2 1Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504 2 Applied Research Center, Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, VA 23606 “Ceramic Substrates For Chemical Processing” Jimmie L. Williams Corning Incorporated, Crystalline Materials Research, Corning, NY 14831, USA “Measurement Of The Optical Properties Of Donor And Acceptor Derivatized Ppv Block Copolymers” Kizzy M. Winston*, Carl E. Bonner, Sam-Shajing Sun, and Chang Zhang Norfolk State University, Center for Photonic Materials Research, Norfolk, VA. 23504 “Sol-Gel Synthesis Of Thick Ta2o5 Films For Photonic Band Gap Materials” Nicholas Ndiege*, Tabitha Wilhoite, Vaidyanathan Subramanian, Mark A. Shannon and Richard I. Masel** Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering University of Illinois Urbana Champaign 600 S. Mathews, Urbana, IL61801 Break “Computational Analysis Of Platinum Oligomer And Polymer Ground States And Triplet States” Tomekia Simeon1, Jean-Philippe Blaudeau2*, and Jerzy Leszczynski1 1Jackson State University, Department of Chemistry, Jackson, MS 39217 2Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 “Surface Plasmon Resonance In Nano Probing Interactions” Jude C. Abanulo and James W. Mitchell* Nanotechnology Center, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059 46


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 11:40 – 11:55

Friday, AM Session Chair Presenters 9:00-9:15

9:15-9:30

9:30-9:35 9:35-9:50

9:50-10:05

“Application Of Recyclable, Polymer-Immobilized Iodine(III) Oxidants In Catalytic C–H Bond Functionalization” Eric W. Kalberer, Salena R. Whitfield and Melanie S. Sanford* Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 North University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Technical Session # 13 9:00 - 10:20 AM Brentwood Organic Chemistry II Dr. Shawn Abernathy, Chemistry Department, Howard University, Washington, DC Celinah Mwakwari* and Kevin M. Smith Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803 “Liquid Crystals And Self Assembled Monolayers: Improving On An Immunosensor Design” Dwight A. Williams and Suzanne Ruder* Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Chemistry, Richmond, VA 23284 Break “Studies Toward The Synthesis Of Spiroisoxazolines” Erick D. Ellis, Jun Wang and Ashton T. Hamme Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 17910, Jackson, Mississippi “Development Of The Bridged Robinson Annulation And Its Application In Synthesis” Michael E. Jung*1, Hisham O. Eissa1, Andreas Maderna2 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 2Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, 3300 Hyland Avenue, Costa Mesa, CA 92626

47


PROGRAM SCHEDULE 10:05 - 10:20

Friday, AM Session Chair Presenters 10:30-10:45

10:45-11:00

11:00 – 11:15

“Synthesis And Development Of Peptide Based Borono-Lectins (PBLS) For Selective Saccharide Sensing” Dana L. Broughton*1, Yuejiao Zou1, John J. Lavigne1, Paul R. Thompson1 1University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29208.

Technical Session # 14 10:30 AM - 12:00 N Organic Chemistry III Dr. Zachary Cross, GlaxoSmithKline

Brentwood

“Tri-Cationic Porphyrins: Synthesis, Structure And Interactions With DNA “ Kim Andrews and David R. McMillin* Purdue University, Department of Chemistry, West Lafayette, IN 47907 “Synthesis Of Water-Soluble N-Acyl Derivatives For Characterization As Bactericidal Agents “ Lakia M. Champagne*, William H. Daly Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 “Controlling Factors For Rhodium-Catalyzed Enantioselective C-H Functionalization Versus Cyclopropanation” Michael G. Coleman and Huw M.L. Davies*, University at Buffalo, Department of Chemistry, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260

11:15 – 11:25 11:25-11:40

Break “A Review Of Microwave Assisted Organic Synthesis” Zachary C. Cross* GlaxoSmithKline, Research and Development, Department of Chemical Development, Strategic Technologies, King of Prussia, PA 19406

11:40 – 11:55

“Synthesis Of Quaternary Salt Derivatives” Nicole Fleming*, Angela Winstead Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251

48


PROGRAM SCHEDULE Friday Noon

Students Awards Luncheon Los Angeles 12:00 N – 2:30 PM Speaker: Dr. William F. Carroll, Jr., ACS Past President, Vice President, Oxidental Petroleum

3:00 PM - 5:00 P.M.

Science Competition Educational Trip

California Science Center

10:00 PM -12:00 AM

Hospitality Suite

Penthouse Suite

National Planning Committee Meeting

Penthouse Suite

Saturday, March 26 9:00 AM – 12:00 P.M.

49


Texas Southern University “Excellence in Achievement”

Bobby L. Wilson, Ph.D. Co-Principal Investigator, Houston LSAMP

Provost and L. Lloyd Woods Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Congratulations from the Texas Southern University-Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (TSU-LSAMP) to the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers Conference. May you have continued success in sponsoring this outstanding conference for these exceptional individuals in academia, government, and business organizations, for they mold the minds of the next generation of our country’s scientists, leaders, and academicians.


NOBCChE 2006 EXHIBITORS 3M St. Paul, MN

Eastman Kodak Rochester, NY

Abbott Laboratories Abbott Park, IL

Eli Lilly And Company Indianapolis, IN

Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL

Environmental Protection Agency/ Natâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Center for Environmental Research Washington, DC

Battelle Columbus, OH Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Ridgefield, CT

Federal Bureau of Investigation Washington, DC

Cargill Minneapolis, MN

FTM, Inc. Las Vagas, NV

Carnegie-Mellon University Pittsburg, PA

Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA

Center For Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis (CEBC) Lawrence, KS

Glaxo Smithkline Durham, NC

Colgate-Palmolive Piscatway, NJ Cornell University Ithica, NY Corning Incorporated Corning, NY The Dow Chemical Company Midland, MI

Gordon Research Companies West Kingston, RI Hunter College New York, NY Iowa State University Ames, IA Johns Hopkins University- Applied Physics Laboratory Baltimore, MD

Drug Enforcement Administration Arlington, VA

51


NOBCChE 2006 EXHIBITORS Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM

University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA

National Research Council Of The National Academies Washington, DC

University Of Maryland College of Chemical & Life Science College Park, MD

National Institute Of Standards & Technology Gaithersburg, MD

University Of Massachesetts - Amherst Amherst, MA

National GEM Consortium, The Notre Dame, IN

University Of Michigan Chemistry Department Ann Arbor, MI

ORISE - Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, TN

University Of South Carolina, The Columbia, SC

PPG Industries Pittsburgh, PA

University Of Wisconsin, Madison Madison, WI

Rice University Houston, TX

US Customs & Border Protection Washington, DC

Roche Laboratories Inc. Nutley, NJ

USDA, Agricultural Research Service Beltsville, MD

Rohm And Haas Company Spring House, PA

Wayne State University Detroit, MI

SC Johnson and Son, Inc. Racine, WI

Wyeth Pharmaceuticals Collegeville, PA

University Of California, Davis Davis, CA

Yale University New haven, CT

52


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS Sunday, PM

Professional Development Workshop 1 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

Olympic II

Coaching Strong Women in the Art of Strategic Persuasion Session A This workshop will help professional women be more effective when leading or participating in discussions, meetings, or group negotiations. Learn about strategic rather than reactive behaviors and effective speaking voices, while tuning out stress and tension, to make yourself heard. How one presents oneself and oneʹs ideas is a key to their acceptance and your success. This workshop, which combines self-presentation, leadership training, and faculty development in an interactive format that encourages highly personal learning, is designed to enhance womenʹs abilities and confidence in such situations. It will 1) teach participants techniques used in theater and leadership programs to enhance performance, 2) use role-plays of their own cases, and 3) coach participants in strategic management of discussions and negotiations, 4) present strategies that minority faculty members find particularly effective. Session B This presentation will be centered on professional negotiation skills, and its multi-faceted approach includes some pragmatic learning content, case studies, and an incorporation of the real issues facing minority faculty members. The intended outcome is professional growth and development. Individual success through teamwork, or the ʺPower of Partnershipsʺ, at the departmental, campus, and professional organizational levels will be discussed. The speakers are experienced professionals in human resources, leadership training, teaching, and higher education administration, with successful presentations in many venues including academia. Participants are encouraged to wear comfortable clothes. Facilitators: • Nancy Houfek, Head of Voice and Speech, Institute for Advanced Theater Training, Harvard University • Saundra McGuire. Professor, Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University • Lee Warren, Associate Director, Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard University • Barbara Butterfield, Chief Human Resource Officer for Academic and Staff Human Resources and Affirmative Action, University of Michigan • Jane Tucker, Director, Human Resources, Teaching and Organizational Development, Duke University

53


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS Monday, AM

Henry A. Hill Lecture 10:30 - 11:50

Olympic I

Sponsored by the American Chemistry Society Northeast Section

Dr. Henry A. Hill 1977 ACS President

Dr. Henry Aaron Hill (1915 – 1979), the renowned African - American chemist in whose memory this award was established, was a former Chairman of the ACS Northeastern Section (1963) and President of the American Chemical Society in 1977. Dr. Hill’s outstanding contributions to chemistry, particularly industrial chemistry, and to the professional welfare of chemists are legion. Dr. Hill’s first concern and interest was in his fellow humans, and this was the driving force behind all that he did both in the chemical community and the world at large. Henry Hill was a native of St. Joseph, Missouri. He was a graduate of Johnson C. Smith University in North Carolina and received the doctorate degree from M.I.T. in 1942, after getting the highest grades in his class. He began a professional career in industrial chemistry in that year, with North Atlantic Research Corporation of Newtonville, Massachusetts. He eventually rose to be vice president while doing research on and development of water-based paints, fire-fighting foam, and several types of synthetic rubber. After leaving North Atlantic Research, he worked as a group leader in the research laboratories of Dewey and Almy Chemical Company before starting his own entrepreneurial venture—National Polychemicals in 1952. Ten years later he founded Riverside Research Laboratories in Cambridge, Mass. The firm offered research, development and consulting services in resins, rubbers, textiles and in polymer production. Riverside Research Laboratory introduced four successful commercial enterprises, including its own manufacturing affiliate. Dr. Hill, particularly after having been appointed by President Lyndon Johnson to the National Commission on Product Safety, became active in research and testing programs in the field of product flammability and product safety. The American Chemical Society was always very close to Henry Hill’s heart. His active career with the ACS began in the middle 1950s in the Northeastern Section. Dr. Hill served on Northeastern Section committees, became a councilor in 1961 and was Chairman of the Section in 1963. He served the ACS in important National positions including secretary and chairman of the Professional Relations Committee, the ACS Council; Policy Committee, the Board of Directors, and ultimately president in 1977. He made an especially significant impact in professionalism by pioneering establishment of a set of guidelines defining acceptable behavior for employers in their professional relations with chemists and chemical engineers. This effort resulted in the ACS landmark document entitled ʺProfessional Employment Guidelines.ʺ Dr. Henry Hill remains to date as the only African American to become President of the American Chemical Society. In recognition of his many outstanding achievements, NOBCChE identifies an outstanding African – American chemist or chemical engineer to be designated as that year’s Henry A. Hill Lecturer. Dr. Sharon Haynie from the DuPont Company, Wilmington, DE, is this year’s honoree. Our award is sponsored by the ACS Northeast Section.

54


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS

Monday, PM

Professional Development Workshop 2 1:45 - 3:30

Pacific

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs): Myths and Misunderstandingsâ&#x20AC;? Moderator Kiana Hamlet, Forensic Chemist, DEA, South Central Lab, Dallas, TX Presenter Dr. Robert Shepard, Executive director, Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc., Washington, DC Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are institutions established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of African Americans. The HBCUs were founded and developed in an environment unlike that of any other institutions of higher education - one of legal segregation. In the midst of such conditions, they strived to serve a population which lived under legal, social, economic, and political restrictions. These early conditions gave rise to myths and misunderstandings that seem to transcend time. This talk strikes a balance between the real and the imaginary.

Monday, PM

ACS Distinguished Scientists Symposium 4:45 - 6:00

Olympic I

Sponsored by American Chemical Society

Dr. Stephen L. Mayo Associate Professor of Biology and Chemistry California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA Dr. Mayo is interested in the theoretical, computational, and experimental aspects of protein design and folding. The focus of his lab has been the development and application of computational protein design methods with the overarching aim of elucidating the relationships between amino acid sequence, protein structure, and biological function. His efforts encompass both multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary activities, including applied mathematics and computer science, physical chemistry, experimental protein chemistry, and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) and x-ray crystallographic structure determination. This talk will describe his recent developments and successes in this area of research.

55


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS Tuesday, AM Wednesday, AM Thursday, AM

Teachers Workshops 1, 2, & 3 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

UCLA Campus UCLA Campus Constellation I & II “Discover the Mysteries of Science Through Education” Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, Abbott Laboratories, ACS, NASA/UCLA, and NOBCChE

The workshop will run from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and will be held on the UCLA campus on Tuesday and Wednesday. It will conclude on Thursday, April 13th at the Hyatt Regency followed by a special screening of the James Cameron education film “Aliens of the Deep” with special guests which will be shown at The Bridge IMAX Theater near LAX. A continental breakfast and lunch will be provided to registered teachers. There is no cost for science educators. Tuesday’s topics involve teaching students how to learn. Wednesday’s topics will be “Integrating Tools for Hands-on Teaching in the Classroom” and an “Introduction into Astrobiology.” On Thursday, the workshop will begin with discussions of science talk for teachers and conclued the movie, “Aliens of the Deep.” Bus transportation will be provided to and from the Hyatt Hotel to UCLA and the movie.

Tuesday, AM

Professional Development Workshop 3A Olympic I 8:30 - 10:00 AM “Applying for Government Jobs through AVUE”

Presenters Avue Central is a federal employment service provided absolutely free to the public. It’s the fastest and easiest way to find and apply for federal employment. Avue Central offers completely private, safe, and secure access to thousands of federal jobs worldwide. The first thing you want to do is learn what vacancies or potential vacancies are ʺout there.ʺ You can do this here by going to the Main Menu and selecting Search for Jobs. Law requires most federal agencies to post notice of vacancies for positions lasting 60 days or more, for which they will consider anyone outside of the agencyʹs current workforce. Some agencies are not required to list their positions as described above. These agencies include ʺExcepted Agenciesʺ such as the FBI, CIA, and others whose rules are not the same as the majority of what is often termed ʺthe competitive civil service.ʺ To learn about employment with these agencies contact their individual websites. Most are usually found under a very easily determined address such as www.irs.gov (The Internal Revenue Service), or can be found by accessing www.whitehouse.gov and clicking on ʺYour Government.ʺ Once you identify a vacancy in which youʹre interested, you can view the vacancy announcement, see the qualifications required, and, in many cases, apply online. In addition to regular ʺcompetitiveʺ positions, there are a number of special authorities, which allow agencies to hire certain kinds of veterans, those who are recovered from a mental disability, those who have a severe physical disability, people whose undergraduate grade point average 56


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS (GPA) is 3.5 or better, and others. When you complete your application profile, we will ask you questions to help determine your eligibility for a number of special authorities. When you apply for a specific position, and your application is forwarded, your eligibility for special hiring authorities will be noted. Almost all federal jobs require ʺexaminationʺ of one kind or another. Very few positions require ʺpaper and pencilʺ tests these days, but some important ones (many in law enforcement, for example) do. Other jobs examine through an evaluation of education and experience or demonstration that you possess certain knowledges, skills, abilities, or competencies. This workshop will guide you through the process of applying for a federal job.

Tuesday, AM

Professional Development Workshop 3B Olympic I 8:30 - 10:00 AM “Securing Analytical Equipment Through GSA “

Today colleges and universities are faced with decreasing budgets and resources to procure analytical equipment for there science departments. The lack of analytical equipment severely hampers the effectiveness of college professors to teach and conduct research with undergraduate and graduate students. The General Services Administration (GSA) has programs available that allows excess equipment to be donated to qualified post secondary schools. This workshop will provide information on how to access these programs.

Tuesday, AM

Forensic Workshop 8:00 - 9:30 ʺDisciplines of Forensic Chemistryʺ

Palisades

So you thought CSI and Law and Order were TV shows! Well, this year’s Forensic workshop will open the doors of the real “crime scene” investigations that take place every day across the country. The objective of this workshop is to provide updated information on the many different disciplines and career choices in the field of forensic chemistry. The presenters in this workshop are representatives from federal, state, and local crime laboratories. This workshop will cover the latest technology used in the field of forensics to include: • DNA analysis • Toxicology • Serology • Drug chemistry • Fingerprint examination

57


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS Tuesday, AM Presenters:

Forum 1 Olympic II NASA Mars Mission 10:30 AM - 12:00 N Dr. John L. Callas, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

Spirit and Opportunity: The Great Surface Exploration of Mars Keeps Going For over two Earth years, two intrepid robotic explorers, Spirit and Opportunity, have been successfully conducting field geology day after day on Mars at two distinct locations on the surface. Originally designed for a 90-Martian day mission, the rovers have exceeded that requirement by a factor of 8, and show no signs of stopping. As the rovers move, each day becomes a brand new mission with new sights and new geology to explore. Both rovers have made significant discoveries in understanding the Red Planet, but great adventures still lie ahead for each rover.

Tuesday, PM

Presenter

Professional Development Workshop 4 1:30 - 3:00 PM

Olympic II

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Landing That First Tenure-Track Academic Positionâ&#x20AC;? Dr. Gregory N. Tew Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA

Landing that first tenure-track academic position remains one of the greatest mysteries of graduate education. Far too often, little mentoring is provided toward this critically important objective. There is no question that a tremendous shortage of underrepresented minority students receives Ph.D.s in science, mathematics, and/or engineering (SME). This shortage is amplified at the tenure-track level. This workshop will aim to diminish the barriers to applying for the first tenure-track position by establishing an open forum with Professors who have successfully landed their positions. A step by step outline of their successful package will be discussed. In addition, invited guests will include senior Professors with broad experience in mentoring and in the hiring process. One outcome of this workshop is to connect various national programs whose mission is to mentor students toward careers in the Professoriate.

58


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS

Tuesday, AM

Presenter

Forum # 3 10:30 - 12:00

Olympic I

ʺNSF Funding Opportunitiesʺ Dr. Tyronne D. Mitchell, National Science Foundation, Arllington, VA

This talk will focus attention on the many and varied opportunities for obtaining funding from the National Science Foundation for your research and educational activities. The National Science Foundation funds research and education in most fields of science and engineering. It does this through grants, and cooperative agreements to more than 2,000 colleges, universities, K-12 school systems, businesses, informal science organizations and other research organizations throughout the United States. The Foundation accounts for about one-fourth of federal support to academic institutions for basic research.

Tuesday, PM

Presenter

Plenary Lecture 6:30 - 7:30 PM Olympic I ʺAnalysis of the Collapse of the World Trade Center Towersʺ Dr. S. Shyam Sunder Deputy Director, Building and Fire Research Laboratory (BFRL) National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Gaithersburg, MD At the direction of Congress, the Federal Emergency Management Agency transferred $16 million to NIST to investigate and determine the most probable factors that contributed to the post-aircraft impact collapse of the World Trade Center Towers and the 47-story WTC 7, and the associated evacuation and emergency response experience. NIST began the investigation in August, 2002. Using staff from three of the NIST Laboratories and contracts to 16 leading engineering firms, more than 150 individuals contributed to completion of the investigation. Using metallurgical analysis of structural elements from the two towers, the most sophisticated computers programs available for simulation of structural and fire phenomena, and a wealth of visual information obtained from a wide range of sources on the day of the event, NIST determined the probable cause and sequence of events leading to the tower collapses. In addition, a thorough analysis of the response of the occupants and first responders to the disaster was completed.

59


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS NOBCChE Health Forum Wednesday, PM

4:00 – 6:30

Constellation I

The 2006 NOBCChE Health Symposium will focus on “Depression in the African American Community: An Unrecognized Sufferer.” Clinical depression is a serious mental illness affecting more than 19 million Americans annually. When properly diagnosed, more than 80% of people with depression can be effectively treated with medication, psychotherapy or both. However, within the African American community, clinical depression often goes undiagnosed due to a number of factors including: a belief that depression is a sign of ʺpersonal weaknessʺ; depression is not a ʺlegitimateʺ health problem; a general mistrust of medical health professionals; cultural and socio-economic factors and a general reliance on family and the religious community for emotional support. Our expert panel will shed light on the many causal factors of Clinical Depression, the stigmas attached to depression, issues facing the African American community, as well as the science behind some of the leading marketed antidepressant drugs.

Thursday, AM

Forum # 3 11:00 - 12:30

Olympic I

ʺSummer and Full-Time Research Opportunities for Scientists with Chemistry & Engineering Backgroundsʺ Dr. Carla Easter, Science Educator, National Human Genome Research Institute Presenters The health status of all U.S. racial and ethnic groups has improved steadily over the last century. However, disparities in major health indicators among segments of the U.S. population are growing. In general, racial and ethnic minority populations are disadvantaged relative to whites on most health indices. These disparities are of great concern to the Nation, and there are efforts under way at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services, to address such disparities. Dr. Carla Easter, Science Educator with the National Human Genome Research Institute, will provide participants with an overview of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including the on-going research activities. In addition, Dr. Easter will discuss the training opportunities available at the NIH for undergraduate and graduate students who may be interested in pursuing careers in the biomedical sciences.

60


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS Professional Development Workshop 6 Thursday, AM 9:00 - 10:50 Olympic I “The Name of the Game: A Primer on Politics & Networkingʺ Presenter Dr. Victor McCrary, Jet propulsion Lab, The Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD This presentation is based on the popular course EMTM 571, Playing the Game: A Primer on Politics and Networking given as a lecture series associated with the Executive Masters of Technology Management School of Engineering/Wharton School of Business University of Pennsylvania, and emphasizes and exposes the unwritten rules of networking and politics in the corporate environment. A thorough understanding and practice of these “rules of thumb” manifests eventually in career advancement and personal fulfillment. The attendee’s ultimate goal is to increase their influence in order to make positive changes in their work environments from any vantage point. Attendees will be exposed to topics on self branding, and primary and secondary club development in order to create efficient networks, both professional and personal, in a non-linear, yet pedagogical manner. A common concern of many professionals is the following: “I received a large degree of the formal knowledge, yet there seems to be a gap between theory and practice” (one common refrain from professionals is that they see others in their organizations advancing and being effective, yet they have little or no formal training at the same level as offered by formal degree programs). The “gap” that attendees experience is the gap between two-dimensional (formal) knowledge and three-dimensional (experiential) knowledge. This presentation will provide this three dimensional knowledge, and attendees will be exposed to strategies which will give immediate results in terms of personal and professional satisfaction, and to overall create develop a savvy style, as well as informed professional in the work force.

Thursday, PM Presenter

Forum # 4 1:30 - 3:00 Olympic I “Deciding if a Post-doc is Right for You” Ray Gamble, National Research Council

Students nearing the completion of their doctoral studies are faced with decisions concerning the next steps in their career. For scientists in some fields, doing a postdoc has been an historical requirement, while for others it is just one option. Reasons for doing a postdoc vary, but may include one or more of the following: a desire to deepen understanding of a particular field, a desire to learn a new subfield or to switch fields entirely, or a desire to gain experience in a new environment (i.e., industrial or government facility). Whatever the motivation, the postdoctoral years are a time to build upon educational background and training, to expand research capabilities and publication lists, and to grow in independence as a researcher and scholar. At the conclusion of a postdoc, the individual should be much better prepared to enter into, and succeed, in any sector of the education or research communities. In this session we will highlight the value of the postdoctoral experience for chemists and chemical engineers by bring together former postdocs who will share their career experiences. 61


FORUM AND WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS Forum # 5 Thursday, PM 3:30 - 5:00 Olympic I “Estate Planning – Now That You Got It, How Do You Keep It” Presenter Derry Haywood, The Pennisula Group With the ever changing financial environment in today’s economy, financial management is essential for ensuring that when we retire, we will be able to live a life style that is affordable. The Peninsula Group will host a financial education workshop that will equip attendees on how to make informed decisions and reach their long term financial goals. Education is the first key step to financial security. We invite you to attend the following workshop and discover financial solutions based on knowledge. This comprehensive, one-session workshop is designed for anyone who is serious about money management. By attending you can learn how to: • Create a financial plan • Manage your money • Save and invest • Allocate your investments • Plan for retirement • Estate Planning

As part of the top-ranked University of Maryland, College Park, the College of Chemical and Life Sciences has an accomplished, creative and ambitious faculty and a learning and research environment that promotes an inquisitive mind and a desire to excel. The College offers strong graduate and undergraduate programs in four Departments: • Biology • Chemistry and Biochemistry • Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics • Entomology Interdisciplinary University graduate programs include: • Chemical Physics • Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences (MEES) • Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS)

Molecular and Cell Biology (MOCB)

Programs dedicated to broadening the learning experience and providing innovative research opportunities, as well as a geographic location that offers access to the private sector scientific community and federal labs such as Food & Drug Administration (FDA), National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Navy Research Laboratory (NRL), provide a wealth of opportunities to enhance graduate student training. Our goal at the College of Chemical & Life Sciences is to create a community of outstanding faculty, students, staff, alumni, and friends that is vibrant, diverse and shares a unified vision and commitment to building a culture of excellence. Contact information:

www.chemlife.umd.edu

Dr. Amel Anderson, aanders@umd.edu, 301.405.2080

Dr. Lawrence Sita, lsita@umd.edu, 301.405.7160

62


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Monday, AM

Opening Session 8:30– 10:00

Olympic I

Congresswoman Maxine Waters United States House of Representatives 35th Congressional District - California

Congresswoman Maxine Waters is considered by many to be one of the most powerful women in politics today. Her work has earned her the reputation of being an outspoken advocate for women, children, people of color and the poor. Born on August 15, 1938, in St. Louis to Remus and Velma Lee Carr Moore, Waters was one of thirteen children. In 1961, she moved to Los Angeles, where she found work in a garment factory and as a telephone operator. In 1966, Waters was hired as an assistant teacher with the newly formed Head Start program in Watts. Waters decided to attend college while working at Head Start, and in 1970 earned a sociology degree from California State University in Los Angeles. Waters became the voice for frustrated Head Start parents. Her efforts encouraged these parents to make federal budget requests, to contact legislators and agencies for increased funding, and to lobby for Head Start components tailored to their community. Watersʹ concern for parentsʹ rights led her to become involved in local politics, and in 1973 she went to work as chief deputy to City Councilman David Cunningham. In 1976, Waters quit her job and successfully ran for election to the California State Assembly. During her tenure in the State Assembly, Waters authored numerous pieces of legislation, including a law requiring state agencies to award a percentage of public contracts to minorities and women; tenantsʹ rights laws; a law restricting police efforts to use strip searches; and the largest divestment of state pension funds from businesses involved in South Africa. After serving for fourteen years in the California State Assembly, in 1990 Waters successfully ran for a seat in the 29th Congressional District of California. In 1992, Waters ran in the much larger 35th District, representing South Central Los Angeles, Inglewood, Gardena and Hawthorne, and won 83 percent of the vote. Waters continues to represent the 35th District and has been active on a number of issues, including affirmative action, community development, womenʹs health and welfare reform. Waters focused attention on the plight of inner-city communities as well as the allegations of CIA involvement in Contra cocaine drug trafficking in South Central Los Angeles in the mid1980s. Waters lives in Los Angeles and is married to Sidney Williams, former U.S. ambassador to the Bahamas. They have two adult children, Karen and Edward.

63


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Monday, AM

Henry Hill Lecture 10:30 - 11:45

Olympic 1

Dr. Sharon Haynie Principal Investigator Central Research & Development Department DuPont Experimental Station Laboratories E.I. DuPont Company Wilmington, DE Sponsored by the American Chemistry Society Northeast Section Dr. Sharon L. Haynie was born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland and educated in the Baltimore City Public Schools. This experience prepared her to attend the Univ. of Pennsylvania as a Benjamin Franklin Scholar (1973 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1976, B.A., Biochemistry). At Penn she enjoyed research experiences ranging from organic synthesis, biophysics and biochemistry to biochemical engineering with Profs. Edward Thornton, Britton Chance, Phoebe Leboy and Arthur Humphrey. This broad exposure to and enjoyment of the chemical sciences led her to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1977 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1981, Ph.D., Chemistry) where she studied in an atmosphere of broad, diverse science with Professor George Whitesides. Sharon had a brief stint at the AT&T Bell Laboratories (Chemical Research Laboratory, Murray Hill, NJ, 1981 - 1984) before she joined the research community of the DuPont Company. She has been a principal investigator in the Central Research & Development Department at the Experimental Station Laboratories (Wilmington, Delaware) for most of her 22-year tenure at DuPont. Her research activities have ranged from new materials for therapeutic use (e.g. vascular graft; antimicrobial materials, medical adhesives) to biocatalysis and green chemistry. She was a member of a large DuPont/Genencor bio-propanediol team that received the 2003 EPA Presidential Green Chemistry Award for New Innovation. Sharon also served brief tenures as adjunct professor of chemistry at Delaware State University and the University of Delaware. Sharon has been active in several professional communities. During the mid 1980s and the early 1990s, Sharon was active in the Delaware Valley Chapter of NOBCCHE, and a mentor and board member with the Franklin Institute Partnership to Achieve Careers in Technology and Science-- a community science outreach program. She has served as a past-chair of the Philadelphia Section, American Chemical Society and served at the national level as Councilor. Each summer, Sharon serves as a research mentor for a high school student through ACS Project SEED. Beyond science service, Sharon enjoys volunteer work that seeks to strengthen individuals and the urban community where she lives. These activities have been diverse and have ranged from work with teen mothers, service on community police advisory boards, science textbook reader for Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic to tutoring adults with basic literacy needs. She has a passion for reading, basketball, music, visual arts, walking and traveling.

64


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Monday, PM

ACS Luncheon 12:00 – 1:15

Palazzo A-C

Dr. E. Ann Nalley President, American Chemical Society Physical Science Department Professor of chemistry Cameron University Lawton, Oklahoma Dr. Ann Nalley, 2006 President of the American Chemical Society, is currently a Professor of Chemistry in the Physical Science Department at Cameron University, a position that she has held since 1969. Before coming to Cameron she taught high school chemistry and mathematics at Muskogee High School. She has held positions as a visiting scientist or professor in the Chemistry Departments at the University of Oklahoma and the University of Texas at Dallas, and the Polymer Science Department at the University of Southern Mississippi. She earned a Bachelor of Science Degree at Northeastern Oklahoma State University, a Masterʹs Degree in Analytical Chemistry at Oklahoma State University, and a Ph.D. in Radiation Chemistry from Texas Womanʹs University. Her research includes new product development and solving industrial problems in the area of cosmetic analysis, nanostructural materials, applied research in the petroleum industry and molecular modeling. Her research is currently funded through the Oklahoma OCAST (Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology) program. Her activities in the American Chemical Society as well as the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi have earned her recognition at the national level. She has held every office in the local section of the American Chemical Society and has served on nine national committees and or task forces. In 1992, she was honored by the five Oklahoma sections of the American Chemical Society as the Oklahoma Chemist of the Year. She was the first and only woman to be so honored. In March of 1996, she was honored at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans when she was presented with the Division of Professional Relationʹs Henry Hill Award for Outstanding Contributions to Professionalism. She has served as a Councilor for more than 25 years. In 2005 she was elected to the position of President-Elect and will serve as President in 2006 and Immediate Past President in 2007. She had previously served for seven years on the Board of Directors of the American Chemical Society as Director of District V. She served four years on the National Board of the American Institute of Chemists as a Director-At-Large, a term she completed in 1996. She also served on the Board of Directors of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi (the largest and most prestigious multidisciplinary honor society) for 21 years, completing her last term as the immediate past National President in August of 2001. She served in the positions of Regent (198065


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS 89) and National Vice President (1989-92), President-Elect (1992-95) and National President (199598). She has chaired or served on numerous local and National Phi Kappa Phi Committees Her honors include: 2001, the Oklahoma State Science Teacherʹs Association, Higher Education Oklahoma State Science Teacher of the Year; 2001, Oklahomaʹs Governor’s OCAST Award for Outstanding Contributions to Economic Development in Oklahoma; 2001 Southwest Technology Distinguished Research Award; 2001, Texas Womanʹs University Distinguished Alumnae Award; 1998, the Cameron University Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi Promotion of Excellence Award; 1981 and 1989, Phi Kappa Phi Meritorious Service Awards;. 1987, Cameron University Professor of the year; 1993, Cameron University Advisor of the year; 1995, Cameron University Distinguished Service Award, (the highest award given by the University. She is the first and only faculty member to receive this award); 1996,Cameron University Hall of Fame. She is listed in Whoʹs Who Among American Women, Whoʹs Who in America, Whoʹs Who Among American Teachers, Whoʹs Who International, Whoʹs Who in International Business and Professional Women, American Men and Women in Science, and Whoʹs Who in Science and Engineering. She is a member of Sigma Xi, Sigma Pi Sigma, Phi Delta Kappa, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Association for University Women, American Institute of Chemists, and four divisions of the American Chemical Society. In her spare time, Nalley finds time to maintain a pet refuge for more than 40 displaced or deserted animals, helps to raise and race registered quarter horses, tends a large garden and takes care of her family. Her philosophy of teaching encompasses more than what takes place in the classroom. She believes it also involves nurturing students and serving as mentor and role model, exposing them to career information and helping them develop leadership skills.

Monday, PM

Professional Development Workshop 2 1:45 - 3:30 PM

Pacific

“Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs): Myths and Misunderstandings”

Dr. Robert Shepard Executive director, Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc. Washington, DC

Dr. Robert Shepard, founding executive director of the Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc. (SEA), is a physical organic chemist by training and experience. In 1990, he formed the SEA as a nonprofit educational consortium with a mission to create opportunities for access and inclusion of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) more fully in the federal research and development (R&D) enterprise. 66


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Dr. Shepard developed his research career in the laboratories of the Celanese Corporation and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and his technical management skills in the Office of Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). He has been a Visiting Research Scientist at Howard University, a NASA Fellow, and a guest speaker in the Applied Sciences’ Executive Master of Technology Management Program at Wharton School of Business and School of Engineering. Dr. Shepard is a member of various societies and organizations, has received a number of awards and honors, and serves on several advisory boards. In 1998, Howard University identified him as their “Most Distinguished Alumni in Chemistry with Leadership Potential for the 21st Century.” Also in 1998, the City Council of Jackson, Mississippi awarded Shepard with their Trailblazer Award. In 2001, he was invited to the White House twice to take part in President Bush’s briefings on the “No Child Left Behind” educational initiative. In 2002, he was appointed to the Building Engineering and Science Talent (BEST) Blue Ribbon Panel that is charged with identifying best-in-class and exceptionally promising programs that focus on the full continuum of workforce development to increase the participation of underrepresented groups. Bob earned a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Saint Augustine’s College, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Physical Organic Chemistry from Howard University. He was born in Garner, North Carolina on December 25, 1947, and resides in Silver Spring, Maryland with his wife Alzonia. They have three grown children and two grandchildren. Shepard’s philosophy toward his work and his life is to stay the task because “better is the end than the beginning.” Therefore, he believes that one should always persevere, but take the high road in the process.

Monday, PM

ACS Distinguished Scientists Symposium 4:45 - 6:00

Olympic I

Sponsored by American Chemical Society

Dr. Stephen L. Mayo Associate Professor of Biology and Chemistry California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA Dr. Mayo is an Associate Professor of Biology and Chemistry in the Divisions of Biology and Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology and an Associate Investigator in the Structural Biology section at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He also holds an appointment at the University of Southern California School of Medicine as an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the Pennsylvania State University, where he developed an interactive macromolecular modeling program with Roy Olofson and a Ph.D. degree in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology, where he studied biological electron transfer with Harry Gray. He developed a rule based molecular 67


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS mechanics force field as a Miller Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley and studied hydrogen/deutrium exchange reactions in proteins as a postdoctoral fellow with Robert Baldwin at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Mayo is also a Rita Allen Foundation Scholar, a Searle Scholar, a Packard Fellow and a cofounder of Molecular Simulations, Inc. Professor Mayo was recently elected to the National Academy of Sciences for his work in protein design.

Tuesday, AM

Forensic Workshop 8:00 - 9:30 AM ʺDisciplines of Forensic Chemistryʺ

Palisades

Rashad Sims - Supervisory Chemist (Moderator) Rashad Sims has been a Supervisory Chemist with the South Central Laboratory since March 2004. He is responsible for the technical chemist group 3. Rashad Sims began his career with DEA in August1997 as a Forensic Chemist at the Southwest Laboratory in San Diego, CA. During his tenure there Mr. Sims was declared an expert in drug evidence analysis in both Federal and State courts. Prior to his employment with DEA, Mr. Sims was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from Jackson State University in May 1997. He then received a Master of Public Administration degree from San Diego State University in December 2002. Steven Carter (Panelist) Steven L. Carter has a BS in Computer Science from Jackson State University. He was employed as a Supervisor Contractor with DEA’s Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Information System. He is currently a Group Supervisor with DEA’s Digital Evidence Laboratory (Computer Forensic) Jasmine Jefferson (Panelist) Jasmine Jefferson has a B.S. in Biological Sciences from the University of California, Irvine, and a M.S. in Criminalistics from the California State University, Los Angeles. She was employed by the Los Angeles County Sheriffʹs Department - Scientific Services Bureau, and was assigned to the Blood Alcohol Testing Unit for 3 ½ years. She has been employed by the Los Angeles Police Department - Scientific Investigations Division for about 1 year and has been assigned to the Firearms Analysis Unit for that entire time. Before her employment at the Sheriffʹs Department she was a physical science teacher for the Compton Unified School District, and taught 8th grade. She is currently a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and the California Association of Criminalists. Cornell Wilson, Jr. (Panelist) Born in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1970, Cornell Wilson, Jr. is currently employed as a Forensic Chemist with the Drug Enforcement Administration in Dallas, Texas. Mr. Wilson obtained a Bachelors of Science degree in Chemistry from Texas Southern University in 1996. Prior to attending college, Mr. Wilson received an Honorary Discharge from the United States Navy after four years of dedicated service. 68


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Mr. Wilson has been an active member of National Organization of Black Chemist and Chemical Engineers since his undergraduate years and currently serves as interim Vice President for the North Texas Chapter. Mr. Wilson also serves in his community church as an ordained Minister of Education. Anna Zadow (Panelist) Anna Zadow has been a Fingerprint Specialist with the Drug Enforcement Administration in Dallas, Texas for 3.5 years. Prior to working for the DEA, Ms. Zadow was a Crime Scene Investigator for 8.5 years with the Arlington and Garland Police Departments in Texas. In 1991, Ms. Zadow received a Bachelor of Science degree in Forensic Science from Michigan State University. Ms. Zadow also received an Associate in Science degree with an emphasis in Chemistry from Alpena Community College in 1989. After beginning her career as a Crime Scene Investigator, Ms. Zadow became a Certified Latent Print Examiner and certified as a Senior Crime Scene Analyst by the International Association for Identification.

Tuesday, AM Wednesday, AM Thursday, AM

Teachers Workshop 1 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM

UCLA Campus Ackerman Union, Viewpoint Conference Room – A201 A&B Constellation I & II

“Discover the Mysteries of Science Through Education” Sponsored by 3M, AAAS, Abbott Laboratories, ACS, NASA/UCLA, and NOBCChE

Mrs. Linda Davis, Committee Action Program Services Linda Davis is founder and executive director of the Committee for Action Program Services (CAPS). CAPS is a non-profit organization specializing in teachers professional development in science. Ms. Davis is presently an Administrator at A+ Academy in Dallas, Texas. Her responsibilities include, special projects coordinator for science curriculum and programs; senior advisor for SAT/ACT programs; grant writer for the science department; and coordinator/facilitator for staff development for science and math teachers. Ms. Davis is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Organizational Management from Paul Quinn College in Dallas, Texas. Barbara A. Laval, Manager of the NASA-UCLA Center for Astrobiology and Director of Education and Public Outreach Barbara Laval has built a career managing and developing university and scientific programs at UCLA. The Center for Astrobiology is located in the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. Ms. Laval is the liaison to the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI), and was elected to the NAI 69


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Executive Council and co-represented the eighteen lead team EPO Directors and Collaborators. In March 2002, under the direction of the then NASA Astrobiology Institute Director, Nobel Laureate, Dr. Baruch Blumberg, the NAI Minority Institution Research Sabbatical (MIRS) program was created. Ms. Laval had an integral role with the development of the program and served as a member of the MIRS team. Ms. Laval is intent on bringing the field of science education and knowledge of Astrobiology to the K-14 classrooms emphasizing the fun there can be in science and provide information on the future of science research at the higher education levels. Her personal focus is to motivate and inspire our youth to consider careers in science. Ms. Laval is advisor to the UCLA AstroBiology Society and was University Affairs liaison for the Minority Institution Astrobiology Collaboratory (MIAC). Ms. Laval was a judge at the AfroAmerican, Academic, Cultural, Technological, and Science Olympics (ACT-SO) sponsored by NASA and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. She participated in the NASA Astrobiology Institute’s (NAI) Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) inaugural program – “Voyages Through Time” their Astrobiology Summer Science Experience for Teachers (ASSET) at the SETI institute. March 2002, Ms. Laval was the luncheon speaker at Tennessee State University’s 24th annual University-Wide Research Symposium. In July 2002, she was a member of the UCLA Astrobiology team that participated in the Curso de Verano Astrobiologia in Madrid, Spain. Ms. Laval served as the Executive Vice President of the Administrator’s and Supervisor’s Association at UCLA, and had an integral part designing the first ever UC Conference on Leadership and Management and is a UCLA campus wide mediator. Ms. Laval was a delegate to the United Nations 2001 World Conference on Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and other Intolerances, held in Durban South Africa. After returning from South Africa, she organized a conference on the UCLA campus titled “Race Rave”. Webster’s definition of “rave” is to talk and write with enthusiasm. The Race Rave was a two day conference, where people of all ages, ethnicity’s and religions came together and discussed issues of concern that continue to exist in our society today (racism, sexism, and child welfare etc.). For her community outreach and volunteer work, Ms. Laval received a Congressional recognition on August 10, 2002, by Congresswoman Diane E. Watson. That same day, as part of her Native American heritage, Ms. Laval participated in an official Native American naming ceremony where she received her official Cherokee name “Angel (Spirit) Wings”. August 17, 2005, Ms. Laval received her second Congressional recognition for her NASA-UCLA Education and Public Outreach work from Congressman Brad Sherman.

Dr. Saundra Y McGuire, Associate Dean of University College, Louisiana State University Dr. Saundra Yancy McGuire is the Director of the Center for Academic Success, Adjunct Professor of Chemistry, and Associate Dean of University College at Louisiana State University. She received her B.S. degree, magna cum laude, from Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA in 1970; her M.A. from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, in 1971, and her Ph.D. in Chemical Education in 1983 from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, where she received the Chancellorʹs Citation for Exceptional Professional Promise. 70


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Prior to joining LSU in August 1999, Dr. McGuire spent eleven years at Comell University, where she served as Acting Director of the Center for Learning and Teaching and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry. While at Comell she received the highly coveted 1991 Clark Distinguished Teaching Award. Dr. McGuire has been teaching chemistry for the past 30 years, and has previously held academic appointments at The State University of New York, Brockport; The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; and Alabama A & M University, Huntsville. She is actively involved in university curriculum reform efforts, and has written the Student Study Guide, Problem Solving Guide and Workbook, and Instructors Teaching Guide that accompanies the 2002 edition of the Russo Silver Introductory Chemistry textbook published by Benjamin Cummings.

Mr. James Kesseler, American Chemical Society Mr. James Kessler’s science education career started as a classroom teacher for 9th and 10th grade biology and physical science. I have spent the last 14 years developing and publishing science activities for elementary and middle school students and teachers through the Education Division of the American Chemical Society. Over the last few years, I have been involved in creating and conducting in-person and online teacher professional development workshops to help teachers incorporate more inquiry-based physical science into their teaching.

Ms. Yolanda George, Program Director, American Association for the Advancement of

Science Ms. Yolanda S. George is Deputy Director and Program Director for the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs (EHR) at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Her responsibilities include conceptualizing, developing, implementing, planning, and directing multi-year intervention and research projects related to increasing the participation of minorities, women, and disabled persons in science and engineering. Her recent K-12 mathematics and science reform work includes contributing to the development of materials for infusing equity into systemic reforms and conducting research on how state departments of education and school districts are aligning equity and science and math initiatives. Also, she has conducted equity reviews for textbooks and software publishers and test developers, including New Standards Science. She serves as a consultant to numerous federal and state agencies, foundations and corporations, and colleges and universities including the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the New Jersey State Department of Education, and the Louisiana State Department of Education, and serves on several advisory boards including the National Academy of Engineering Committee on Women in Engineering, California State University, Los Angeles Access Project, and WGBH Instructional Television Science Project and others. Dr. Jamie Elsila, Astrochemist – NASA Ames Research Center Dr. Jamie Elsila received her bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Kalamazoo College, Michigan in 1996. She then served two years in the Peace Corp, teaching math and chemistry at Masasi Day Secondary School, Masasi, Tanzania, before beginning her graduate studies. 71


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Dr. Elsila earned her Ph.D in Physical Chemistry from Stanford in August 2004 with a dissertation entitled “Astrochemical Studies of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Fullerenes.” She them obtained a National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Associate- ship through NASA’s Astrobiology Institute, which enabled her to move to the Astrochemical Lab at Ames, where she currently studies interstellar ice chemistry. Ms. Edna Devore, Deputy Chief Executive Officer and Director of Education and Public Outreach – Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute (SETI) Edna Devore is most interested in the question, ʺAre we alone in the universe?ʺ She has been a researcher, planetarium director, teacher, curriculum writer and administrator. In addition to management responsibilities, she works on projects related to education and outreach. They include the ʺLife in the Universeʺ curriculum from students in grades 3-9 and an integrated high school course, ʺVoyages Through Time.ʺ She co-directs the education and public outreach (E/PO) programs for two major NASA research missions: NASAʹs SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) airborne observatory, and Kepler, a Discovery Mission that seeks Earth-sized planets around other stars. Edna has presented more than 200 invited talks and teacher workshops across the nation. She has received numerous honors for her work including a Professional Award for Outstanding Contributions to Amateur Astronomy, NASA Ames Research Center Employee Award, the US Department of Education Christa McAuliffe Teaching Fellow Award, and an NSF Fellowship for her MS in Astronomy. She received the Women in Aerospace (WIA) Aerospace Awareness Award for 2005. Ms. Pamela Harman, Education and Public Outreach Manager, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute (SETI) Ms. Harman has an engineering degree, a science teaching credential, and high school classroom teaching experience. Prior to teaching she was a project manager in the construction industry and mentored engineering students. She began her career at the SETI Institute as a part time tech writer on the Voyages Through Time (VTT) curriculum development project, then piloting part of the curriculum in her classroom. When she moved to the institute full time, she managed a pilot test of infrared astronomy classroom activities and continued work on VTT as curriculum writer, eventually working with the project director managing the completion and revision process. She has also managed conference exhibits, professional development workshops and short courses, established an educator network, edited a quarterly e-news letter, and given numerous talks. The SETI Institute scientists conduct research in all factors of the Drake Equation, in particular, and are active in several NASA endeavors including the Mars Rover Spirit, SOFIA, the Kepler Mission, and NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI). The institute also is a partner for the SOFIA and Kepler Mission Education and Public Outreach (EPO).

72


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Tuesday, AM

Professional Development Workshop 3A 8:30 - 10:00 AM

Olympic I

“Applying for Government Jobs Through AVUE” Ms. Rashida Weathers Program Manager, Office of Forensic Sciences Drug Enforcement Administration Arlington, VA Ms. Rashida Weathers has been employed with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) since 1997. Ms. Weathers began her career as a Forensic Chemist at the DEA Southwest Laboratory, San Diego, CA where she analyzed controlled substances, assisted law enforcement in the seizure of clandestine laboratories, and testified as an expert witness in the field of drug analysis in several federal and state courts. In 2002, Ms. Weathers transferred to the DEA South Central Laboratory, Dallas, TX as a Supervisory Chemist. While in Dallas, Ms. Weathers was responsible for overseeing evidence accountability within the laboratory. Since 2005, Ms. Weathers has been employed as a Program Manager with the DEA Office of Forensic Sciences, Arlington, VA. She is currently responsible for coordinating the employment and background investigation process for new hires within the DEA Laboratory System. Ms. Weathers earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry from Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia, PA in 1995. She then went on to Miami University, Oxford, OH where she earned a Master of Science degree in Chemistry in 1997.

Tuesday, AM

Professional Development Workshop 3B Olympic I (Follows Part A) “Securing Analytical Equipment Through GSA “ Ms. Deatrice Washington Accounting Technician, South Central Laboratory Drug Enforcement Administration

Ms. Deatrice Washington has been employed with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) since 2002. Ms. Washington began her career as an Accounting Technician at the DEA South Central Laboratory, Dallas, Texas where she was responsible for the procurement activities, property custodian, and fleet manger for the laboratory. Prior to working for DEA Ms. Washington, was a Program Assistant with the Department of Veterans Affair in Dallas, Texas. She served as the assistant to the General Surgeon for the VA in Dallas. Ms Washington is currently an Accounting Technician for the DEA South Central Laboratory where she is accountable for of the analytical instrumentation for the laboratory.

73


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Tuesday, AM

Professional Development Workshop 4 8:30 - 10:00 AM “Strategies for Job and Career Transitioning”

Olympic II

Dr. Donald D. Bly ACS Consultant

Don Bly is self-employed as a consultant. He provides scientific expertise, educational instruction, and critical examination of data in the broad areas of analytical chemistry, polymer chemistry, scientific instruction and career management. He has written 18 scientific publications and has co-authored two technical books. Previously he served as Manager of Analytical Science in Central Research at DuPont. Don also managed the corporate recognition and awards programs for DuPont, and was involved with organizational effectiveness. He received a BA degree from Kenyon College and a Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from Purdue University. Don is an active member of the ACS. He served as a Councilor for the Delaware Section for 15 years and during that time held leadership positions on a number of Council Committees. He has been chair of both the Division of Analytical Chemistry and the Delaware Section. Currently he helps to develop and present a wide variety of workshops on career related issues for the ACS Department of Career Services.

Tuesday, AM

Forum 1 NASA Mars Mission 10:30 AM - 12:00 N

Olympic II

Dr. John L. Callas, Science Manager, Mars Exploration Rover Project Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Dr. John L. Callas received his Bachelorʹs degree in Engineering from Tufts University in 1981 and his Masters and Ph.D. in Physics from Brown University in 1983 and 1987, respectively. After completing his doctorate, he joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California to work on advanced spacecraft propulsion, which included such futuristic concepts as electric, nuclear and antimatter propulsion. However, since 1989 he has worked on several Mars missions. In 2000, Dr. Callas became the Science Manager for the highly successful Mars Exploration Rover Project. He currently serves as the Deputy Project Manager for the Mars Exploration Rovers. In addition to his work on Mars Exploration, Dr. Callas is involved in the development of instrumentation for astrophysics and planetary science, and teaches mathematics at Pasadena City College as an adjunct faculty member. 74


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Tuesday, PM

Professional Development Workshop 5 1:30 – 3: 00 PM

Palisades

“Landing That First Tenure-Track Academic Position”

Dr. Gregory N. Tew Polymer Science and Engineering University of Massachusetts Amherst Amherst, MA Dr. Gregory N. Tew was born in North Carolina and attended North Carolina State University where he earned a B.S. in Chemistry in 1995, graduating with honors. During this time he worked at the University with Prof. D. A. Shultz performing undergraduate research on self-assembled monolayers containing stable free radicals and at Glaxo, formerly Burroughs-Wellcome, working on cardiovascular therapies. Upon graduation, he attended the University of Illinois-Urbana to pursue graduate studies with Prof. Sam Stupp. His work on self-assembling rod-coil molecules lead to an understanding of the important molecular structures and association energies governing nanostructure formation. While in graduate school, his work was recognized by two fellowships including the Beckman Research fellowship and American Chemical Society Organic Division Fellowship in 1998 and 1999, respectively. After graduating in 2000, he accepted a faculty position in Polymer Science and Engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. However, before starting on the faculty he spent one year in Prof. William DeGradoʹs laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania in Biochemistry and Biophysics studying biomimetic principles. This work led to two publications and the formation of a new company. In 2001, he started at UMass and since then has received a number of prestigious awards including the Office of Naval Research and Army Research Office Young Investigator Awards, the 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant, and the DuPont Young Faculty Award. In May of 2004, he was invited to the White House to receive the highest honor given by the Federal government to young investigators, the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). His research interests include supramolecular polymer science, bioinspired and biomimetic structures, polymers for biomedical science, self organization, well defined macromolecular architectures, functional materials, novel biomaterials and hydrogels. His laboratory has published many papers on these topics since 2001. In addition to his research interest, Greg is actively involved in novel mentoring programs for young scientists and engineers. This includes chairman of the chemistry-biology interfaces training grant recruiting committee and participation in the northeast AGEP program.

75


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Tuesday, PM

Plenary Lecture 6:30 - 7:30 PM Olympic I ʺAnalysis of the Collapse of the World Trade Center Towersʺ

Dr. S. Shyam Sunder Deputy Director, Building and Fire Research Laboratory (BFRL) National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Gaithersburg, MD Dr. S. Shyam Sunder received his BS in Civil Engineering (with honors) in 1977 from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi. At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he earned the masters degree in Civil Engineering in 1979, and the Doctor of Science degree in Structural Engineering in 1981. Currently, he is Deputy Director of the Building and Fire Research Laboratory (BFRL) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). BFRL’s mission is to meet the measurements and standards needs of the building and fire safety communities by serving as a critical source of metrics, models, and knowledge used to enhance economic security and public safety by promoting U.S. innovation, industrial competitiveness, and improved codes, standards, and practices. New construction and renovation amount to about 1.3 trillion dollars annually – about 12 percent of U.S. GDP – and unwanted fires cost the economy over $100 billion annually. Public safety and quality of life, and the productivity of all industries, depend on the quality of constructed facilities. BFRL has an annual operating budget of about $40 million and its staff includes about 180 federal employees and 100 research associates and guest researchers from industry, universities, and foreign laboratories. Dr. Sunder also serves as the lead investigator for the federal building and fire safety investigation into the World Trade Center disaster. He oversees NIST activities as lead agency for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP); and chairs the Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in Construction (ICSSC) – a group that recommends policies and practices to its 32 member-agencies on improving the seismic safety of federal buildings nationwide. Dr. Sunder was chief of the Structures Division from January 1998 until June 2002 and chief of the Materials and Construction Research Division from June 2002—when the Building Materials Division was merged with the Structures Division and renamed—until March 2004. From June 1996 to December 1997, Dr. Sunder was on assignment to the Program Office, the principal staff office of the NIST Director, first as a Program Analyst and later as the Senior Program Analyst for NIST. In 1994, Dr. Sunder joined NIST’s Building Materials Division as Manager of BFRL’s newly created High-Performance Construction Materials and Systems Program and served in that position until June 1996. Prior to joining NIST, Dr. Sunder held a succession of positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) beginning in 1980: instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, principal research scientist, and senior research scientist. 76


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Dr. Sunder’s awards include the Gilbert W. Winslow Career Development Chair (1985-87) and the Doherty Professorship in Ocean Utilization (1987-89) from MIT, the Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize (1991) from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Equal Employment Opportunity Award (1997) from NIST, and the Gold Medal Award (2005) for his distinguished leadership of the federal building and fire safety investigation of the World Trade Center disaster from the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Wednesday, AM

Percy L. Julian Lecture 10:30 - 11:45

Dr. Jimmie L. Williams Manager, Materials Development Group Environmental Technologies Development Department Corning Incorporated Corning, New York

Dr. Jimmie L. Williams is currently manager of the Materials Development group in the Environmental Technologies Development department at Corning Incorporated. He is responsible for development of the next generation of materials as catalyst substrates for automotive and diesel exhaust emissions control to meet future emissions standards. In 2001 he was awarded by the National Society of Black Engineers for his accomplishments, the 2001 Golden Torch “Distinguished Engineer” Award in Indianapolis, IN. Dr. Williams began his career in ceramics research at Corning in 1983 as a senior research scientist. There he started a catalyst program for DeNOx and led joint automotive projects for development of catalytic converters for cold start emissions. He was promoted to Senior Research Associate. Dr. Williams then transferred from research to product development as a project manager. He was responsible for development of ceramic substrates for the chemical process industry before taking on his new role as manger of materials development. Dr. Williams received his B.S. degree in Chemistry from Jackson State, Jackson, MS, and went on to get his M.S. in Inorganic Chemistry from Yale University and his Ph.D., in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of California, Riverside. He holds 18 US patents and has published in 25 technical publications. He is invited speaker at numerous universities and international conferences on environmental control technologies. His innovation has helped Corning Environmental Technologies remain a leader in automotive and stationary emission control technologies. In addition to his rewarding work at Corning, Dr. Williams manages to serve as vice president of the Elmira/Corning branch of the NAACP, and was awarded its President award in 1995. Williams is a member of numerous professional and scientific societies, serving as chair of the Corning local section of the American Chemical Society in 1998, and president-elect of the Corning local chapter of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Society, 1990. 77


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Percy L. Julian Luncheon Wednesday Noon

12:00 – 1:30 PM

Beverly Hills

Dr. Gail Wyatt, Associate Director, UCLA AIDS Institute Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA Dr. Gail Wyatt is a Clinical Psychologist, Sex Therapist and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA. She is Associate Director of the UCLA AIDS Institute and coordinates a core of behavioral scientists that consult with other researchers to recruit underserved populations and conduct research that effectively incorporates socio-cultural factors in HIV/AIDS research. Dr. Wyatt has conducted national and international research since 1980 funded by The National Institute of Mental Health, The National Institute of Drug Abuse, state and private funders. She was an NIMH Research Scientist Career Development Awardee for 17 years. Her research examines the consensual and abusive sexual relationships of women and men, the effects of these experiences on their psychological well-being and the cultural context of risks for sexually transmitted diseases and HIV. Dr. Wyatt has more than 110 publications in journals and book chapters, and has co-edited or written five books, including ʺStolen Women: Reclaiming our Sexuality, Taking Back Our Livesʺ, John Wiley & Sons, 1997, and ʺNo More Clueless Sex: 10 Secrets to a Sex Life that Works for Both of Youʺ, John Wiley & Sons, 2003. A recipient of numerous awards and honors for her scientific accomplishments, mentoring and teaching, Dr. Wyatt is the first African American woman to be licensed as a psychologist in the state of California. She has also testified before the United States Congress eight times on issues related to health policy. Dr. Wyatt has been happily married for 39 years to Dr. Lewis Wyatt, an ObstetricianGynecologist in private practice. They have two adult children, Lance, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon, Lacey, a Family Medicine physician on faculty at UCLA, and one beautiful granddaughter, Kamile. The family enjoys a commitment to health and to each other.

78


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Thursday, AM

Professional Development Workshop 6 9:00 - 10:50 Olympic I “The Name of the Game: A Primer on Politics & Networkingʺ

Dr. Victor McCrary Jet propulsion Lab The Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD Dr. Victor R. McCrary is the Business Area Executive for Science and Technology and Assistant Department for the Milton S. Eisenhower Research and Technology Development Center for the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, JHUAPL. He is responsible for the management and business planning for science and technology strategic investments for long-term research and development support of JHUAPL’s mission to provide critical contributions to critical challenges in the areas of national security, homeland defense and space. Prior to joining APL, Dr. McCrary was the Chief of the Convergent Information Systems Division at the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST). At NIST, he lead R&D efforts and standards development activities in areas of biometrics, digital preservation, DVD reliability and standards, digital TV standards, quantum communications, and electronic books. In 2000, he received the Department of Commerce’s Gold Medal from the Secretary of Commerce for the facilitation of global standards for electronic books. During his tenure at NIST, Dr. McCrary stressed the importance of student interns and post doctoral associates in the development of new, innovative technologies. Dr. McCrary also served as a program manager for the Advanced Technology Program where he was responsible for directing over $47M in high-risk, technology programs in the areas of photonics and electronics. Dr. McCrary received his doctoral degree in 1985 from Howard University in physical chemistry, where he was an Allied Chemical Fellow. From 1985 to 1995 he was a Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, where he conducted research efforts in crystal growth for semiconductor lasers. He received an Executive Masters of Science & Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in May 1995, where he was a Moore Fellow. Dr. McCrary’s honors include: 2005 Top 50 Minorities in Science & Technology, Science Spectrum Magazine 2004 Emerald Honors “Career Achievement in Academia” by Science Spectrum Magazine and US Black Engineer & Information Technology Magazine, and 2002 Percy Julian Award for Lifetime Achievement in Science and Engineering from the NOBCChE. He currently serves on the National Digital Strategy Advisory Board for the Library of Congress, Chair of the Howard County Technology Incubator Advisory Board, and is a member of the Distinguished Lecturers Committee for Sigma Xi. Dr. McCrary is an adjunct lecturer in the Executive Masters of Technology Management Program at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. McCrary is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and Executive Board of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, and Sigma Xi. He has authored or co-authored over 60 publications, and edited two 80


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS conference books. He is married to CMDR. Mercedes McCrary, and they have two children, Francesca and Max and reside in Clarksville, MD.

Thursday, AM

Professional Development Workshop 7 9:00 - 10:30 ”Computational Science”

Olympic II

Dr. José Unpingco The Ohio Supercomputer Center 1224 Kinnear Road, Columbus, OH 43212 Dr. José Unpingco has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, San Diego (1997). He spent eight years as a systems engineer and senior scientist in the Advanced Concepts and Technology section at Raytheon in El Segundo, California. He developed signal processing algorithms, systems simulations, and data analysis methods for remote surveillance systems from the antenna model to the target tracker. Since the fall of last year, Dr. Unpingco has worked for The Ohio Supercomputer Center as the on-site Director of Computational Signal / Image Processing at the Department of Defenseʹs SPAWAR Systems Center in San Diego. His responsibilities include interacting with DoD personnel across the entire west coast as part of the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Programʹs User Productivity Enhancement and Technology Transfer contract. In this role, he utilizes his extensive expertise with numerous computing systems and applications to address a variety of computationally related issues that the DoD faces.

Thursday, AM

Forum # 3 11:00 - 12:30

Olympic I

ʺSummer and Full-Time Research Opportunities for Scientists with Chemistry & Engineering Backgroundsʺ Presenter Dr. Carla Easter Science Educator, National Human Genome Research Institute Dr. Carla Easter is currently the Education Specialist for the Education and Community Involvement Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute (National Institutes of Health). Formerly, she was the Director of Outreach for the Genome Sequencing Center at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Easter earned her B.S. degree in Microbiology from the University of California, Los Angeles, CA in 1990 and her Ph.D. in Biology from the University of California, San Diego, La Jolla in 1997. Other professional experiences include Research Associate in the Department of Education at Washington University (2001-2003), Project Associate for the Quality Education for Minorities (QEM) Network, and Pre-College Coordinator for the NASA Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Plus (SHARP) Program in 81


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Washington D.C. (2000-2001), and Post doctoral Fellow, Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine (1997-2000).

Thursday, PM

Forum # 4 1:30 - 3:00 Olympic I “Deciding if a Post-doc is Right for You”

Dr. Ray Gamble Director of the Fellowships Office National Research Council Washington, DC Dr. Ray Gamble received his B.A. in biology from Lafayette College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in biochemistry from the Ohio State University. From 1980 to 1981 he was an NIH postdoctoral Fellow in immunoparasitology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He began his career as a research scientist at the National Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, where he worked on the diagnosis and control of parasitic diseases of livestock and zoonotic diseases of man. He has over 170 publications in the fields of food safety/zoonotic diseases, parasitic diseases of livestock, disease detection, vaccines, nematode neurobiology and behavior, nematode biochemistry and immunology. In 1993 he assumed the position of Research Leader of the Agricultural Research Service, Parasite Biology and Epidemiology Laboratory and subsequently served in various leadership positions in the Agricultural Research Service, including National Program Leader for Medical and Veterinary Entomology. Dr. Gamble’s research has made substantial contributions to food safety both in the U.S. and internationally. In 2000, Dr. Gamble joined the National Research Council as Director of the Fellowships Office. In this position, he oversees that administration of a variety of fellowship programs with federal government and foundation sponsorship including the Resident Research Associateship Programs and Ford Diversity Fellowship Programs. Dr. Gamble is an Adjunct Professor in the George Washington School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Tropical Diseases and continues as a collaborator with the USDA Agricultural Research Service and a consultant to the USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service.

82


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Forum # 5 Thursday, PM 3:30 - 5:00 Olympic I “Estate Planning – Now That You Got It, How Do You Keep It” Presenter Mr. Derry Haywood II, The Pennisula Group Mr. Derry L. Haywood, II is the founder of The Peninsula Financial Group Inc. Launched in 1995 it is a leader in the financial services arena. Under Mr. Haywoodʹs direction The Peninsula Financial Group has received numerous awards for excellence within its industry. The Peninsula Financial Group currently serves many customers in 7 states from its offices in Newport News, VA. Mr. Haywood is called upon often to speak to various groups and organization regarding financial issues. Mr. Haywood is a native of Baltimore Maryland where he received his initial education. He is currently enrolled and pursuing his degree as a Certified Financial Planner from The American College in Bryn Mawr, PA. Mr. Haywood is a successful graduate of the Dale Carnegie course for Human Relations and Public Speaking. Since 2000, Mr. Haywood also has been a Principal in Capstone Financial Services, LLC, and from 1987 to 1995, he was a Partner in the Spence Financial Group. He is very active in community affairs including serving at Virginia International Terminals as a Board member, past President of the Board, Member Audit Committee, and Chairmen of the Employee Benefits Committee which is responsible for policy and legislative affairs that affect the port facilities. In addition, at Virginia Peninsula United Way, he is a current board member, past Chairman of the Executive Board, past vice President of Administration (responsible for all internal functions including strategic Planning and financial decision-making), a member of the Governance Committee (responsible for board selection, and preparation of the organizations By-Laws), and a member of the Finance Committee, which oversees a $7.0 Million budget and $1.5 Million Endowment Fund. At the Virginia Chapter of the Arthritis Foundation, he serves as Vice Chair of the Development Committee. At the Food Bank of the Peninsula, he serves on the Executive Board as Chairman of Development which is responsible for the $.5 Million Capital Campaign Fund. On the City of Portsmouth’s Planning Commission, he was the Past Vice President (responsible for setting zoning criteria for the city). On the Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce, he is Chairman of the Sea Fest. Mr. Haywood is also very active in his church, Gethsemane Baptist Church Newport News, VA.

83


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Friday Noon

12:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:30 Students Awards Luncheon

Los Angeles

Dr. William F. Carroll, Jr. President, American Chemical Society Vice-President, Occidental Chemical Corporation

Dr. William F. Carroll, Jr. holds a B.A. in Chemistry and Physics from DePauw University, Greencastle, IN, an M.S. from Tulane University in New Orleans, and a Ph.D. from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, both in Organic Chemistry. Bill started his industry career in 1978 and after a year with Rohm and Haas Company, Bristol, PA, moved to what is now known as Occidental Chemical Corporation. He is currently Vice President, Chlorovinyl Issues for OxyChem and works on public policy issues and communications related to chlorine and PVC. He is also Adjunct Professor of Chemistry at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana and teaches polymer chemistry there. Bill was President of the American Chemical Society in 2005 and is currently Immediate Past President. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a member of the Chemical Sciences Roundtable of the National Academy of Science, a member of the US National Committee for the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, a member of the Science Advisory Board for DePauw University and the Colorado School of Mines Chemistry Department Visiting Committee. He has been an active member of and chaired various committees for a number of chemistry, plastics, fire protection and recycling organizations. He has served on expert groups commissioned by the United Nations Environmental Program, the State of Florida, and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. He received the Vinyl Instituteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roy T. Gottesman Leadership Award for lifetime achievement in 2000. He holds two patents, and has over forty publications in the fields of organic electrochemistry, polymer chemistry, combustion chemistry and physics, incineration, plastics recycling and chlorine issues.

84


The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) develops technologies, measurement methods and standards that help U.S. companies compete in the global marketplace. Congress created NIST in 1901 at the start of the industrial revolution to provide the measurement and standards needed to resolve and prevent disputes over trade and to encourage standardization. That's why you can have confidence that a gallon of milk contains one gallon and that the electric meter at your house accurately gauges how much electricity you use. From automated teller machines and atomic clocks to mammograms and semiconductors, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by NIST. To learn more about NIST: www.nist.gov To learn more about NSF: www.nsf.gov

You and your school are invited to participate in the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Gaithersburg, MD Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program for students majoring in science, mathematics and engineering. SURFing is a partnership, supported by NIST, NSF, and the participating colleges/universities.

The NIST facilities are located outside Washington, DC in Gaithersburg, MD and in Boulder, CO. The SURF program is anticipated to run May through August. Applications for participation in the SURF program are only accepted from colleges or universities.

Prepare for 2007!

Students can participate in any one of the seven NIST laboratories: • Building and Fire Research • Chemical Science and Technology • Electronics and Electrical Engineering • Information Technology • Manufacturing Engineering • Materials Science & Engineering • Physics.

SURFing at NIST - - Gaithersburg, MD Website: surf.nist.gov/surf2.htm SURFing at NIST - - Boulder, CO

Website: surf.boulder.nist.gov/htmls/welcome.html


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Monday, PM Session Chair

1:30 - 1:45

Technical Session 1 1:30 - 4:00 Analytical Chemistry

Westwood

Dr. Nixon Mwebi Jacksonville State University Presenters “Fenton Reactions: The Nature Of Oxidizing Intermediates Involved”

Nixon, O. Mwebi1, Neil V. Blough2 1Jacksonville State University, Department of Physical & Earth Sciences, Jacksonville, AL 36265; 2University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, College Park, MD 20742 Abstract The exact nature of the intermediates involved in the Fenton reaction (Fe (II) /H2O2) is still a matter of considerable debate despite numerous studies. These species are thought to play a key role in biological systems where they may react with biomolecules leading to oxidative damage and promote oxidative related diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Although many studies have been conducted examining the nature of these intermediates, a number of these have been found to be inconclusive due to experimental artifacts in the analytical techniques involved. A highly sensitive and selective technique is hereby employed to quantify the magnitude of the oxidizing intermediates involved in these reactions. Results depicting the nature of these species by employing their characteristic reactions with substrate molecules in aqueous solution will be presented. The influence of metal chelating ligands and pH changes on the nature of the species involved will also be presented.

1:45 - 2:00

“Sensitive And Specific Surface Immobilized Molecular Beacon Probes For Genetic Analysis”

Catherine Situma1, 2, Amanda Moehring3, Mohamed A. Noor3 and Steven A. Soper* 1, 2 1Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803; 2Center for Bio-Modular Multi-Scale Systems, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803; 3Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 Abstract Advances in microarray technology have enabled rapid progress in research involving gene expression analysis, disease diagnostics, drug discovery and toxicology studies. Gene analysis requires highly sensitive and specific DNA / RNA detection methods, which can be accomplished in many cases using fluorescent DNA probes called molecular beacons (MBs). MBs enable selective and rapid analysis of DNA / RNA molecules inside living cells, in homogeneous solutions or at the liquid-solid interface. The use of molecular beacons has advantages over linear nucleic acid probes. 86


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS For example, Unhybridized molecular beacons do not fluoresce thus it is not necessary to remove them to observe hybridized probes which offers an advantage of detection without separation. Also, the target molecules do not require labeling thus the beacon is the probe and transducer. Surface-immobilization of MBs in a microarray format offers the advantage of spatially multiplexed detection with a probe that not only offers selective affinity for its complement, but also reports on the molecular association, a powerful tool in DNA biosensor development. Currently, surface immobilized MBs display low sensitivities (fluorescence ratio of immobilized MBs upon binding with their complementary targets versus those on the surface in the unbound state) in comparison to their solution based counterparts. These have been performed on glass surfaces however glass suffers interfacial effects. The static charging experienced by glass surfaces can be detrimental especially if it contributes to noise in hybridization signals hence the need to eliminate these artifacts prior to hybridization. Because of this, we have designed MBs for immobilization onto poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) polymeric substrates by using carbodiimide attachment chemistries, this was then compared to MBs immobilized onto glass as a solid support. Improved sensitivities of MBs were observed by use of PMMA which is attributed to low backgrounds exhibited by PMMA at the detection wavelengths used. These protocols were then used for the analysis of cDNAs specific for fruitless (fru) and ods-site homeobox H (OdsH) genes extracted from drosophila melanogaster fruit fly. Fruitless (fru) gene functions in the central nervous system where it is necessary for male courtship behavior while the ods H is involved in spermatogenesis. We will discuss the functionalization of polymeric substrates, design of molecular beacon probes and immobilization chemistries of this hairpin probes and their improved selectivity / sensitivity in analysis of cDNA in a microarray format.

2:00 - 2:15

“Instrumentation For Chemical Hazard Evaluations” Frank Dixon Jr*, Susan Shilcrat, Julie Tsui, Sarah Lapka GlaxoSmithkline Research and Development Department of Chemical Development King of Prussia, PA 19406 Abstract

The application of differential scanning calorimetry, adiabatic calorimetry and reaction calorimetry in the chemical process hazard evaluation field is reviewed. Some applications from the pharmaceutical industry are discussed. The differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) is the primary tool used to screen compounds for thermal instability observed in the temperature range of a reaction. The accelerated rate calorimeter (ARC) is the tool use to determine the precise onset of thermal instability in solids or homogenous liquids, either substrate, reagents or reaction mixtures. The advance reactive system screening tool (ARSST) is the preferred instrument for evaluating thermal instability of heterogeneous liquids. The RC1e reaction calorimeter is use to evaluate the enthalpy of reaction, mixing and thermal kinetics of a reaction. These are the typical instruments used in the pharmaceutical industry to establish a “Basis of Safety” and to assess the scalability of a reaction. 87


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS “Use Of Microfluidic Hydrogels As A Biomolecule Immobilization Strategy” Gloria Thomas*, Hui Chen, Bindu Nanduri†, Shane Burgess† Department of Chemistry, Mississippi State University, MS State, MS 39762 †Center for Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, MS State, MS 39762

2:20 – 2:35

Abstract Polymeric structures provide a conceptually simple approach to biomolecule immobilization. In particular, polyacrylamide hydrogels may be employed within microfluidic channels with probes covalently-linked or physically entrapped within the hydrogel pores. In this manner, biomolecules can be quickly and easily immobilized in photo-initiated polyacrylamide hydrogels capable of specific capture of target molecules. Potential advantages of this technique include low volume requirements, enhanced performance, automation, use of modular and parallel formats, improved efficiency, ease of use, and reduced cost. The research presented here describes the application of these microfluidic hydrogels to two applications: metabolite analysis using physically-entrapped antibodies and transcription factor analysis using acrydite-modified DNAs for covalent immobilization. Parameters including specificity, reproducibility and quantitation will be compared across the three hydrogel-based immobilization strategies.

2:35 - 2:50

“An In-Situ Ellipsometric Study Of The Cl--Induced Adsorption Of Peg On Ru And Cu Upd/Ru“ Marlon L. Walker1, Lee J. Richter1, Daniel Josell2, and Thomas P. Moffat2 1Chemical Sciences and Technology Laboratory 2Material Science and Engineering Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD 20899 Abstract

The adsorption of PEG-Cl- on three surfaces: a.) air-oxidized Ru, b.) reduced or “activated” Ru and c.) underpotential deposited (upd) Cu on “activated” Ru was examined in-situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry. In the absence of Cl-, PEG adsorption was minimal at all relevant potentials on the reduced Ru and Cu upd surfaces characterized in this study. On activated Ru, the addition of Cl- ion resulted in enhanced PEG co-adsorption. At potentials relevant to Cu upd, a three-component PEG-Cl--Cu layer forms independent of the order of additive addition to the electrolyte. The PEG-Cl--Cu upd overlayer provides inhibition of subsequent Cu overpotential deposition. At potentials positive of Cu upd, a monolayer oxide film forms that inhibits PEG adsorption even in the presence of Cl-. Slight PEG adsorption was observed on air-oxidized surfaces, although there was no enhancement observed in the presence of Cl-. Ru oxidation exerts 88


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS a strong effect on the adsorption of additives that are directly relevant to the nucleation and growth of electrodeposited Cu.

2:50 – 3:05

“Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization For In-Situ Detection Of Hazardous Materials”

Jasmine E. Ervin*,I, J. Chance Carter II, Marion Lawrence-Snyder I, S. Michael Angel I I University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia SC 29208 II Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, M division/Forensic Science Center, Livermore, CA 94550 Abstract We are currently investigating the use of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy for detecting low levels of hazardous substances. Hazardous materials are chemical substances, which if released or misused can pose a threat to the environment or human health. Such substances may be released into the environment accidentally (chemical spills, incineration by-products, etc.) or intentionally. REMPI is ideal for detecting a wide range of hazardous substances as it is both highly selective and sensitive and has the potential for in-situ detection. We have used REMPI to monitor sub-ppb levels of benzene, toluene, and xylene. In more recent studies, we have used REMPI to monitor, in real time, the conversion of tetrachloroethylene to trichloroethylene in a batch reactor. Currently, we are extending this technique to the application of solid materials by the use of laser desorption (LD). Our previous studies have shown feasibility for the approach by measuring toluene contaminated clay samples. One of our long term goals is applying LD/REMPI to measure high explosives.

3:05 - 3:20

“The Analysis And Characterization Of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds In Aquatic Environments Utilizing Liquid Chromatography – Diode Array Detection – Mass Spectrometry (LC – DAD – MS)”

Katoria Tatum-Gibbs*, Renard L. Thomas, and Bobby L. Wilson NASA University Research Center for Biotechnology & Environmental Health, Texas Southern University, Houston TX 77004 Abstract In recent times, the presence of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the environment has become increasingly important to scientific researchers. Among the various compounds considered as emerging environmental pollutants, natural and synthetic steroids, pesticides, and industrially produced by-products all warrant particular concern; both because of the volume of these substances used, and because of their potential to act as endocrine disruptors. Of the various groups of substances with reported endocrine-disrupting properties, female sex hormones and 89


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS synthetic steroids are considered to be the most potent types of estrogenic compounds (Alda et al., 2003). Unfortunately, it has not been until recent investigations that these compounds have received any attention from the scientific community, most likely because they are present in the environment at very low concentrations. Now, researchers are beginning to realize that the widespread use of oral contraceptives and animal growth stimulators formulated with these potent estrogenic chemicals are yielding potentially dangerous consequences with their presence in waste water and aquatic environments (Ying et al., 2002). Furthermore, these compounds are capable of inducing adverse responses in various organisms at extremely low concentrations (Snyder, 1999). Thus, the introduction of these potentially toxic compounds in the environment will not only affect water quality, but could also affect the health of wildlife and humans existing in that environment. This study seeks to identify and quantify EDCs in aquatic environments. The study and experimental design aim to understand many aspects of aquatic environments with respect to estrogen contamination, as well as, other EDCs; and focus on the presence and removal of these contaminants from waste water. Water samples will be collected and analyzed using LC-DAD-MS from several heavily industrialized areas of Houston, TX. Results obtained form this study will show the extent to which aquatic environments are affected by EDCs and show the possible toxicity of these contaminants to the environment and human health. Identification of these compounds is important to understand their health impact, and how to deal with them once they have entered the environment.

3:30 – 3:45

“Effects Of Low-Level Radiation On Oxidative Stress Mediated Signaling In Neuronal Cells”

Eugene A. Gibbs-Flournoy*, Renard L. Thomas, Bobby L. Wilson NASA University Research Center for Biotechnology & Environmental Health, Texas Southern University, Houston TX 77004 Abstract In the recent years of scientific investigation, the role of DNA in disease pathology has become increasingly more important. In attempts to understand the effects of foreign materials and energies on DNA structures and interactions, several types of genetic damage have been characterized. One type of genetic malfunction that is of interest to this laboratory is oxidative damage to DNA. Oxidative damage can result when cells are exposed to stimuli such as ionizing radiation, creating free radicals from metabolic processes that can attack and damage cellular components such as DNA, thus leading to elevated levels of oxidative stress. The objective of this investigation is to examine the effects of low-level radiation on oxidative damage to DNA in cultured neuronal brain cells. It is hypothesized that oxidative damage resulting from low-level radiation exposure may be monitored and assessed by means of HPLC analysis of 8-Hydroxy,2deoxyguanosine, a specific biomarker of oxidative stress.

90


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 3:45 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:00

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Accelerating Proteomic Discovery With Rapid High-Efficiency TwoDimensional Electrophoresis Using Disposable Microchipsâ&#x20AC;?

Hamed Shadpour, Harrison Musyimi, Kermit K. Murray, and Steven A. Soper* Department of Chemistry and Center for BioModular Multi-Scale Systems, Louisiana State University, 232 Choppin Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Abstract Separation of complex samples such as a protein mixture into its components requires sophisticated technologies. As most separation techniques are capable of resolving at most several dozen components, combination of two separation techniques is important for the resolution of complex mixtures. Provided that the separation mechanisms in the two dimensions are orthogonal, i.e., the two separation techniques are based on different physiochemical characteristics of the analytes, the number of resolution elements of two-dimensional (2D) separation is given by the product of the resolution elements of each separation technique. As a result of the heterogeneity of proteins derived from cell populations, comprehensive and heartcutting techniques have been developed for 2D electrophoresis to achieve adequate separation of complex protein mixture. Mass spectrometry (MS) employing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) has evolved to become an essential tool for protein and peptide identification. For the analysis of very complex mixtures of proteins, such as cell lysates, 2D electrophoresis has been proven to show excellent resolving power and is the most powerful tool and widely used technique in protein analysis prior to MS. However, classic 2D electrophoresis techniques are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Moreover, the planar 2D gel electrophoresis is not easily coupled with MS to perform on-line identification. In the post-genomic era, this technique is not attractive as a routine method. Capillary-based 2D techniques as alternative methods suffer from sample loss due to dead volume in interconnections between two separation columns. Therefore, lab-on-a-chip technologies have recently been applied to biomolecule analysis and separation science, since they are superior to traditional tools in many aspects, such as minimal dead volume, high efficiency separations, speed, small chemical consumption, automation and portability. Polymer-based microchips have an advantage of being inexpensive and disposable and provide a wide variety of choices for chip substrate selection to perform a specific separation. In this work, physiochemical properties of many commercially available polymers were evaluated and optimized for optimal replication and separation performance. The microchips were fabricated from different polymers through a hot embossing process using a metal mold insert machined via micro-milling. After thermal annealing of the embossed chips used to perform 2D electrophoresis, separation efficiencies obtained with gel electrophoresis was sufficiently improved by combination with different types of electrokinetic chromatography (EKC) as a second separation dimension. The orthogonality of coupled separation techniques was also evaluated. The gel matrix was placed inside the first microchip dimension using pressure or photopolymerization protocol with a UV lamp. Continuous and pulsed electrokinetic sample transfer was performed using high voltage power supplies and relays controlled by labVIEW. Laser-induced fluorescence and conductivity were used as detection methods for comprehensive and heart-cutting 2D separation of the protein mixture, respectively. Conductivity of resolving species passing through 91


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS the microchip channels was collected using platinum wires. In comprehensive separation with fluorescence detection, each analyte eluting from the first dimension was transferred into the second dimension channel with fixed frequency pulses. In this mode, each peak in the first dimension, including co-migrating components (i.e. proteins similar in size) was transferred into the second dimension to construct a three-dimensional landscape of resolved proteins in the mixture. In the heart-cutting 2D analysis, peaks of interest in the first dimension, including the comigrating components were transferred into second dimension for further separation; the electropherogram was constructed by plotting signals receiving form a conductivity sensor that was placed inside the microchip channel. Peak capacities >1,000 were obtained in 5-15 min for the protein mixture in 2D analysis performed on microchips smaller than a credit card. The resolved proteins are transferred subsequently to an on-chip digestion / peptide separation unit prior to coupling with MS.

4:00 - 4:15

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spectroscopy And Electrochemistry Of Functionalized Semiconductor Nanoparticle Surfaces For Multi-Electron Processesâ&#x20AC;?

Sherine O. Obare*, Kate Shaw, Catherine M. Simms and Jayni M. Angeli Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 Abstract Nature uses enzymes or a combination of enzymes for specific biochemical transformations, for example multi-electron transfer reactions. Multi-electron catalysts are needed for environmental remediation, water splitting, small molecule activation (for example CO2, N2 and O2), and solar energy conversion. Therefore, it is attractive to mimic strategies utilized by nature to develop new materials that carry out important chemical transformations. Surface functionalization of semiconductor nanoparticles with an appropriate molecular catalyst provides a versatile tool for the development of multi-electron catalysts. These systems are capable of driving energetically demanding transformations and their investigation has allowed for the underlying mechanistic principles to be understood. We have exploited the inherent catalytic properties of the individual components (i.e. molecular catalyst or semiconductor nanoparticle) to develop a rationale for their organization. The overall kinetics of the multi-electron process was drastically affected by pH, nanoparticle size, and distance between the semiconductor nanoparticle and the molecular catalyst. These results have provided insights into the factors that govern electron transfer processes at the semiconductor nanoparticle interface. In general, understanding charge transfer processes on the nanoscale is essential to both the frontier of fundamental science and to applications in solar energy conversion, water splitting, electrocatalysis, sensors and photonics. The presentation will showcase the design, synthesis, characterization and assembly of molecular catalysts and their functionalization onto nanoscale materials. The molecular catalysts include modified flavin enzymes, antimony porphyrins and iron porphyrins, while the semiconductor nanoparticles consist of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2). Ultravioletvisible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry provide insights into the choreography of electron transfer. 92


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 4:15 - 4:30

“Surface Characterizations Of The Morphologies Of Polymer Blends By Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy And Near Field Scanning Optical Microscopy” Shameika Vick, Dr. Carl Bonner Center for Materials Research Norfolk State University Norfolk, Va 23504 Abstract

Surface Characterization Studies of the Morphologies of Polymer Blends by Tapping-Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM) and Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) have been investigated. To analyze and identify the surface species, polymer blends were varied by relative concentration, deposition method, and temperature. Films were prepared by spin coating and drop casting from solutions onto silicon or glass substrates. Both phase and topographic imaging in tapping mode AFM were collected on these films under ambient conditions and at different tapping force levels. At certain tapping force levels, the phase-separated donor and acceptor regions were easily observed. Optical emission measurements were then made on the thin films to identify the composition of the phase separated regions as donor rich areas using nearfield scanning optical microscopy.

Monday, PM Session Chair

1:30 - 1:45

Technical Session 2 1:30 - 4:40 Spectroscopy and Atmospheric

Brentwood

Dr. Shawn Abernathy Howard University Presenters “Aerosol And Chemistry Measurements In The Tropical Atlantic: What Do In-Situ Atmospheric Measurements Tell Us About Chemical And Climate Change Earth System?”

Vernon R. Morris Graduate Program in Atmospheric Sciences and Department of Chemistry Howard University Washington, DC 20059 Abstract The chemistry and climate of the Earth system is strongly coupled to aerosol processes in the lower atmosphere. The climate systems of the tropical regions of our planet are particularly 93


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS sensitive to changes in the water cycle, atmospheric oxidation, temperature and humidity, carbon uptake, and radiative forcing. There is a natural component to climate change which is confounded by rapidly increasing but non-uniform human influences on the land surface, industrialization, and pollution. This talk aims to give an overview of our present understanding of the impacts of climate change due to aerosol and chemical processes at low latitudes. Highlights of field experiments and observations carried out in the tropical Atlantic, Caribbean, and Africa over the past five years will be presented.

1:45 - 2:00

“Atmospheric Sulfur And Nitrogen Measurements During The 2004 East Tennessee Ozone Study“

LaToya Myles*, William Pendergrass, and Tilden Meyers National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, Atmospheric Turbulence & Diffusion Division, Oak Ridge, TN, 37830 Abstract The East Tennessee Ozone Study (ETOS) began as a regional ozone measurement and meteorological monitoring network in 1999. In 2004, the program broadened its research database to include gaseous and particulate sulfur and nitrogen. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitric acid (HNO3), as well as PM 2.5 sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-), were measured with annular denuder systems at thirteen rural and suburban sites across the unique ridge/valley structure of East Tennessee. Twelve-hour (day/night) samples from July 19-October 12, 2004 were analyzed for spatial and temporal distributions. Correlations between species concentration and meteorological factors, such as wind direction, were also investigated.

2:00 - 2:15

“The Infrared Spectroscopic Study Of Perfluorocarbons For Their Use As Terraforming Gases On Mars” Ramsey L. Smith and Vernon R. Morris, Department of Chemistry Howard University, Washington, DC 20059

Abstract Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) have become of major interest in the study of terrestrial global warming and Martian terraforming due to their long atmospheric lifetimes and their cross sections that are in the infrared absorption windows of CO2 and H2O. The perfluorocarbons that will be studied are hexafluoroethane and octafluorocyclobutane. In order to better understand the greenhouse properties of these gases, the high resolution spectra of each gas has been measured using a Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer over a path length of 15 cm. The range of measurement covered in this study was between 400 to 4,000 cm-1 with a resolution of 0.05 cm-1. 94


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS FTIR spectroscopy has been used to determine infrared line intensities and band shapes of the PFCs while varying the temperatures and mixing ratios to simulate measurements under the atmospheric conditions of Mars at different stages of the terraforming process. The temperaturedependant spectra between 298 K to 196 K was collected for mixtures of each PFC with appropriate amounts of Ar and CO2 to observe the broadening effect that each gas has on the spectra. The spectral region between 800-1400 cm-1 is the particular focus in this analysis because infrared radiation this region is not strongly absorbed by the main atmospheric gases on Mars, CO2, Ar and N2.

2:25 - 2:50

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deep Impact: A Pump Probe Experiment Of A Comet 9p/ Temple 1 With A Space Craft And The Keck Telescopeâ&#x20AC;? William M. Jackson* and Micha Galz, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis Anita L. Cochran, McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin Karen J. Meech, University of Hawaii Hien Tran, Keck Observatory, USA Abstract

Deep Impact was a NASA mission to intercept the periodic Comet 9P/ Temple 1 with an impacting space craft that weighed 364 kg at an impact velocity of 10.3 km/s. This was the pump that triggered a response consisting of the release of gas and dust. The probe consisted of a variety of earth and space instruments, which includes the space craft that released the impacting space craft. In this talk we will report on the UV-Visible spectra that were obtained using the High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) and the 20 meter KECK-1 telescope on Mauna Kea. This spectrometer has a resolving power of / of ~ 83,000 and covers the spectral range from 304 nm to 588.6 nm. Twenty four spectra were recorded in 54 orders over three days. The analysis of this data and the implications of this about the nature of comets will be discussed. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under grant # NAG5-12124 and the Chemistry Division of the National Science Foundation under grant CHE0503765.

95


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 2:50 – 3:05

“Photodissociation Of 1, 2-Dibromomethane At 234 NM And 267 NM By Means Of Ion Velocity Imaging”

Jamila R. Greene*1, Jianhua Huang2, William M. Jackson2 and Joseph S. Francisco1 1Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906, 2 University of California, Davis, CA 95616 Abstract The photodissociation dynamics of 1, 2-dibromoethane was studied at 267 nm and 234 nm using an ion velocity imaging technique and time of flight mass spectrometry. The photochemical products, ground Br (2P3/2) and spin-orbit excited Br (2P1/2) atoms, were observed with resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization. Ion images of Br and Br* were taken at 267 nm and 234 nm to obtain the translational energies of the fragments. The translational energy and angular distributions deduced from the image indicate that C2H4 Br2 dissociation at 267 occurs on the hot ground state, while the dissociation at 234 nm occurs on the repulsive excited state. Other possible dissociation pathways will be discussed. We gratefully acknowledge NASA grant # NAG5-12-124 and NSF grant # CHE0503765 for their support.

3:05 - 3:20

“Dynamic Light Scattering Study Of N-(2-Hydroxypropyl) Methacrylamide Systems” Tedric D. Campbell and Oliver Steinbock* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4390 Abstract

We perform dynamic light scattering (DLS) monitoring of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) solution to determine its translational diffusion coefficient Dt. The hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of the molecules is derived from Dt using the Stokes-Einstein equation. At a wavelength of 830 nm, DLS measurements are performed on precursor solutions varying the sample temperature. Based on data obtained, features of related HPMA hydrogels are discussed. Additionally, we show scanning electron micrographs of fluid filled channels within the porous biomaterials. These scaffolds have potential applications in nerve guidance.

96


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 3:20 – 3:35

“Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation For The Structural Elucidation Of Oligosaccharides”

Latasha Lamotte1, Milady Ninonuevo1, Kate Lancaster1 and Carlito B. Lebrilla1, 2 1University of California in Davis, Department of Chemistry, Davis, CA 95616 2School of Medicine, Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 Abstract The structural elucidation of oligosaccharides remains a major challenge. Mass spectrometry provides a rapid and convenient method for structural elucidation based on tandem mass spectrometry. Currently ions are selected and subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) to obtain structural information. Unfortunately, N-linked oligosaccharides are relatively large compounds and are not amenable to fragmentation using CID. In this report, we illustrate the use of infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) to obtain structural information for large N-linked oligosaccharides. The IRMPD and CID behavior of oligosaccharides were compared for highmannose, complex, and hybrid type oligosaccharides. Fragmentation was observed with N-linked oligosaccharides that could not be obtained through conventional CID in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. O-linked and N-linked glycans of similar sizes were compared. It was found that cross ring cleavages were observed only for N-linked oligosaccharide. The mannose branch points of N-linked oligosaccharides are apparently more susceptible to cross-ring cleavages.

3:40 – 3:55

“Surface Modification Of Polymer Substrates By Excimer Radiation”

Emanuel Waddell1*, Josh Campbell1, Branden Reid2, and James McKee3 1University of Alabama at Huntsville Department of Chemistry, Huntsville, AL 35899 2Morgan State University, Department of Physics, Baltimore, MD 21251 3University of Alabama in Birmingham, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Birmingham, AL 35294 Abstract The surface modification of polymers has applications in fields such as biomedical devices, prosthetics, cellular growth, and adhesion science. Surface modification of polymer substrates is typically achieved by “wet- chemical” treatments that involve a number of time-consuming steps. Recently we have investigated the ability to pattern polymer substrates via laser ablation under different chemical atmospheres. In this one-step process, polymers are micro-machined while simultaneously chemically modifying the surface. As an extension of this research, polymer 97


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS substrates are exposed to UV incoherent radiation under different chemical atmospheres. The surface modification is monitored by contact angle measurements, which provide an indication of the degree of surface wettability. In addition to contact angle measurements, the modification process is monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, which measures molecular vibrations on the surface of the polymer as opposed to the bulk polymer. This surface sensitive technique proves to be valuable in relating surface wettability to the chemical groups present on the surface. In this presentation, we investigate the affect of 222 and 282 nm radiation on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polycarbonate. The wettability of the surfaces are characterized by a homebuilt contact angle goniometer that utilizes a IEEE 1394 camera to collect a digital image of the drop and a simple routine to measure the contact angle. Preliminary data and future applications will be presented.

3:55 – 4:10

“Identifying Dioxin Deposited In Ground Beef Using 1H-NMR“

Akintunde Akinyemi and Shawn M. Abernathy*, Ph.D. Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059 Abstract Dioxin (Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins or PCDD) was deposited in trace amounts in store purchased ground beef through the combustion of PVC and identified by NMR. The absorbed dioxin was extracted from the ground beef sample using cyclohexane. Resonance peaks were found in the 1H-NMR spectra of the extracts in the region from 7.00 to 7.50 ppm giving initial verification of the present of dioxin in the meat product. Comparison of the empirical 1H-NMR spectra to 1,2,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and monohydroxylated TCDD NMR spectra in the literature confirmed that dioxin had been deposited in the ground beef. A sample of meat was also spiked with the dioxin 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD), purchased from NIST, to serve as reference. The cyclohexane extract of this reference sample substantiated the preliminary results that dioxin was introduced in the ground beef sample via the combustion of PVC.

98


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS “Study Of Nanostructured Materials By Magnetic Resonance Methods”

4:10 – 4:25

Tracee Harris1, Marsha King2, Donald White3, Feng Cheng1, Natalia Noginova1* 1Norfolk State University, Centers for Materials Research, Norfolk, VA 23504 2South Carolina State University, Department of Chemistry, Orangeburg, SC 29117 3

Tuskegee University, Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee, AL 36088

Abstract Magnetic resonance methods were used to investigate the effects of magnetic impurities in nanostructured materials. Proton NMR and spin dynamics was studied in liquid and solid suspensions of Fe2O3 and Co nanoparticles and analyzed together with ESR data in the same materials. Significant changes in the shape of the line and relaxation kinetics were observed with increase of concentration of nanoparticles. Relaxation kinetics can be described as the sum of two exponentials with the time constant of fastest one depending strongly on nanoparticles concentration. Analysis of the experimental results allows us to estimate local fields induced by magnetic nanoparticles and parameters of nanoparticles interactions.

4:25 – 4:40

“Structure-Activity Relationships For Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons From Fourier Transform Infrared And Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopy Data” James Grainger, Angela Ragin, Zheng Li and Donald G Patterson, Jr Division of Environment Health Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Abstract

Structure-activity relationships (SAR) demonstrate the significance of substituents located in meso regions of exceptional reactivity for carcinogenic activity in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Human exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) has been shown to generate correlations with data from international investigators regarding adverse health effects since products resulting from carbon-based fuel combustion for heating, cooking, transportation and industrial processes are global. A majority of carcinogenic hydrocarbons can be classified as anthracene derivatives in the simplest SAR model. The meso-region theory proposes that the chemical and biochemical pathways of activation for both unsubstituted PAHs and mesosubstituted PAHs are essentially the same. Formation of highly reactive carbonium ions in a region of exceptional reactivity would be projected to result in reactions with critical nucleophiles to initiate a chain of cellular episodes that lead to cancer. Experimentally determined Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) spectroscopy 99


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS band frequency and chemical shift trends for PAH parent compounds and metabolites were evaluated for structure-activity correlations. Continuing structure-activity studies will attempt to explain spectroscopic correlations among the differential tumorigenic potencies of “bay region” and “fjord” substructures and why specific covalent sites are targeted with high efficiency.

Tuesday, AM Session Chair

9:00-9:15

Technical Session 3 9:00 - 11:30 Chemical Engineering

Westwood Room

Dr. James Mitchell Howard University Presenters “Bimetallic Layered Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization And Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis”

Nancy N. Kariuki*, Wang Xiaoping, Myers J. Deborah, and Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Engineering Division 9700 S Cass Ave, Lemont, IL, 60439 Abstract Successful development of a low-cost, high activity, durable oxygen reduction electrocatalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells will enable the commercialization of this power source for automotive and stationary applications. One approach in this area is the exploration of non-Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts to maintain high electrocatalytic activity, in comparison to platinum, for the oxygen reduction reaction with reduced cost and improved durability. While extensive studies on the preparation of a variety of metal nanoparticles have been reported, there is growing interest in the development of methods for the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles which stems from the unusual electronic, optical, and chemical properties due to new bifunctional or synergistic effects. Our approach is to design layered (core-shell) bimetallic nanoparticle system composed of base metal core and noble metal shell. In this approach, first, the cost reduction is achieved by utilizing inexpensive base metals for the bulk of the nanoparticles. Second, improved durability is achieved by protecting the base metal particle core with a noble metal shell. Third, high electrocatalytic activity is achieved by choosing a base metal that will modify the electronic properties of the overlying noble metal shell to promote the adsorption and dissociation of the oxygen molecule, and electron transfer to the adsorbed species This presentation describes a strategy in the synthesis of layered bimetallic nanoparticles composed of base metal core-noble metal shell. First, the base metal core nanoparticles are prepared using polyol method. The surface charge of the base metal core nanoparticles is then adjusted using pH, followed by adsorption of the shell metal ions and subsequent reduction of 100


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS them on the surface of the base metal core particles. Layered core-shell nanoparticles of different sizes and compositions are obtained by controlling the concentration of metal precursors and other reaction conditions. Techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) are used for characterization of the nanoparticles. The electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reactivity (ORR) is determined by forming polymer electrolyte-catalyst ink, and supporting this ink on a rotating disk electrode (RDE) followed by determination of kinetic current for ORR. The correlation of size-electronic structureelectrocatalytic activity relationship and implications to the design of highly active fuel cell catalysts will also be discussed. ʺResearch funded by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38.ʺ

9:15-9:30

“Microemulsion Synthesis Of Particles For Controlled Release Applications” Kelly J. Cross* and Michael T. Harris School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 Abstract

Microemulsion is a convenient technique to prepare a thermodynamically stable, optically isotropic solution of two immiscible liquids (such as water and oil). A microemulsion consists of micro domains of one or both liquids stabilized by an interfacial film of surfactant. In this research, a reliable process for the preparation of reverse micelle structures encapsulating an aqueous KMnO4 solution and for the preparation of core-shell structured silica nanoparticles from the prepared micelle is studied. A non ionic surfactant was investigated to suspend the aqueous KMnO4 solution in the oily, organic continuous phase. Various oily organic solvents and cosurfactants are analyzed to identify the most chemically advantageous system for micellization. Solvent ratios are manipulated to observe and assess the particle size range. Finally a thin porous silica layer is coated on the micelle via the sol-gel method. Ammonium hydroxide is utilized as a base catalyst in a TEOS saturated micelle solution to construct the thin layer coating. Characterization of the micelle and silica core-shell structured micro particles was performed using TEM and dynamic light scattering to investigate the morphology and size distribution, respectively.

101


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 9:30-9:45

“The Effects Of Laser Pulse Energy, Geometric Confinement And Material Stiffness On The Extent Of Damage From Laser-Induced Cell Lysis In A Microfluidic Chip” Marlon Thomas*†, Amy Stacy‡, G.P. Li‡, §, Mark Bachman§, Chris Sims±, Nancy Allbritton‡,±, Vasan Venugopalan†,‡ †Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science ‡ Department of Biomedical Engineering ±Department of Physiology and Biophysics § Department of Electrical Engineering University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 Abstract

Our lab is developing a hybrid microfluidic/optical device, fabricated from polymeric materials such as poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to perform single cell analysis. This device utilizes a novel cell lysis technique called laser-induced cell lysis which enables very rapid cell lysis. To assess the viability of cells cultured in the microchips and to measure the spatial extent of damage following laser-induced cell lysis, adherent rat basophilic leukemia cells (RBLs) and a series of viability assays are used. These assays include the fluorescent dye calcein AM, which stains viable cells and propidium iodide which stains non-viable cells. Using the RBLs and the viability assays, we explored the effects of laser pulse energy, geometric confinement and material stiffness had on the extent of damage in the microchip. It was observed that PDMS microfluidic chips produce smaller areas of damage than both PMMA microfluidic chips and open Petri dishes when using the same laser pulse energy. The extent of damage in the PMMA microfluidic chip was between that of the PDMS microfluidic chip and the Petri dish. The mechanical compliance of PMDS absorbs mechanical energy from the cavitation bubble that may lead the observed smaller damage zones. The rigidity of PMMA relative to PDMS is likely responsible for the larger damage zones.

9:50-10:05

“Diesel Emissions Control Technologies”

Steven B. Ogunwumi*1, Roychelle Ingram-Ogunwumi2, Jimmie Williams3 1,3Corning Incorporated, Crystalline Materials Research, Corning NY 14831 2 Corning Incorporated, Diesel Technology Development, Corning NY 14831 Abstract Air pollution emitted from diesel exhaust gases have been linked to serious environmental problems. These gases have been implicated in acid rain, ozone and urban smog formation. As a result, there is an increased demand by health and environmental regulations to abate diesel emissions such as NOx, PM, CO and HC. A conventional three way catalyst for NOx, CO and HC 102


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS is effective for gasoline engines, but fails to provide NOx reduction under the lean-burn (oxygenrich) conditions of diesel exhausts. Diesel engines offer fuel economy and are considered to be efficient power sources of transportation; thus, there is an increased interest in finding a practical solution to remediate diesel emissions. The most attractive solution for the removal of NOx would have to be environmentally benign. This paper gives an overview of technologies being developed to address diesel emissions. A variety of NOx and PM solutions are reviewed.

10:05-10:20

“CO2 Sequestration In Coal Seams: Effects Of Carbon Dioxide On Coal And Its Structure”

Ryan N. Favors*1,2 and Angela L. Goodman1 1National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh, PA 15236 2Purdue University, Chemistry Department, West Lafayette, IN 47907 Abstract The capture and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) can reduce greenhouse gas emissions generated from fossil fuel combustion. The storage (or sequestration) of CO2 has many options, of which sequestration in coal-seams has been deemed as promising. Carbon dioxide is a good plasticizer for many coals. Exposure to CO2 gas changes subsequent CO2 diffusion rates and CO2 adsorption isotherms. Here we report the nature and relative significance of CO2 interactions with coal using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out at temperatures ranging from 328 K to 383 K and CO2 pressures ranging from 0.35 MPa to 0.60 MPa. Coal samples were selected from the Argonne Premium Coal Program. Studies were preformed on as received as well as dried coal samples. Kinetic studies reveal that subsequent CO2-coal sorption is much faster than the initial uptake and the amount of CO2 sorbed increases. There was also evidence that dried coals have a slower initial uptake than as received samples. Therefore exposure of coals to CO2 under these conditions results in changes in coal physical structure. The energy of adsorption for as received coals (~20 kJ/mol) and dried coals (~11 kJ/mol), were estimated using the Van’t Hoff equation, was consistent with physisorption.

103


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 10:20 – 10:35

“Ceramic Monoliths In Automotive Emissions Control”

Roychelle Ingram-Ogunwumi*1, Steven B. Ogunwumi*2, Jimmie Williams3 1 Corning Incorporated, Diesel Technology Development, Corning NY 14831 2,3Corning Incorporated, Crystalline Materials Research, Corning NY 14831 Abstract Nitrogen oxides (NOx), Carbon monoxide, (CO) and Hydrocarbons (HC) from automobile emissions pose serious health hazards to the environment. NOx gases are considered to be highly toxic and are partially responsible for the appearance of smog and acid rain. In addition, CO is toxic and some HC may be carcinogenic. As a result, legislation has enforced a stringent regulation of these emissions. The development of the three way catalyst (TWC) has helped to resolve this problem with the standard gasoline car. The standard gasoline combustion engine operates in a stoichiometric fuel/air regime. Thus, a conversion efficiency of more than 95% NOx to nitrogen can be attained by operating near or close to stoichiometry. This presentation provides an overview of the automotive catalyst technology. Information is provided on the development of the catalyst substrate supports, catalyst technology, and emissions chemistry.

10:40 – 10:55

“Analytical Nonlinear Model Predictive Control Using Third - Order Volterra-Laguerre Models”

Abigale L. Antoine*, and Robert S. Parker Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 Abstract Model Predictive Control (MPC) is one of the primary control algorithms used in industrial practice. It is a class of optimization-based control schemes that utilizes a process model to predict future plant behavior and computes the inputs necessary to drive a process to a set-point. The development of a model predictive control algorithm typically involves selection of a process model, which can effectively capture system dynamics, objective specification, constraint incorporation, and implementation. Linear MPC utilizes linear process models, linear or quadratic objectives, and linear constraints, while nonlinear MPC (NMPC) utilizes nonlinear process models, objectives and/or constraints. Compared to other controllers, the MPC algorithm handles process dynamics and multivariable systems more efficiently, and has the capability of handling constraints. A major concern in designing a model-based controller is the selection of an appropriate process model. Though linear models are often used, there is a marked decrease in their predictive capabilities as the degree of system nonlinearity increases. Additionally, solution of NMPC problems by gradient-based techniques may lead to local minimization, which can result in suboptimal performance. Optimal performance is only guaranteed when global minimization is achieved. This research utilizes the nonlinear third-order Volterra-Laguerre (VL) discrete time 104


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS model to derive an analytical solution to the NMPC problem for Single-Input-Single-Output processes. VL models are formed from the projection of Volterra kernels onto the orthonormal Laguerre basis to reduce the noise sensitivity and model parameterization of Volterra models. Compared to other nonlinear models, VL models are efficiently identified, and have a convenient mathematical structure. The state space equations for the third-order VL model in terms of Δu(k) are as follows: l(k + 1) = A(α )l(k) + B(α ) ∆u(k) + B( α )u(k - 1) y(k) = C l(k) + l (k)Dl(k) + [l (k)E1l(k)]l (k) + [l (k)E 2 l(k)]l 2 (k) + [l (k)E 3l(k)]l3 (k) T

T

T

T

T

1

Matrix A and vector B depend only on the Laguerre filter pole, α. Vector C, symmetric matrix D, and matrices Ei are model parameters, calculated by minimizing the mean-square error between the Volterra model output and the Volterra-Laguerre model predictions. The Laguerre state is given by l(k), and y(k) is the nonlinear Laguerre model output at time step k. The input is u(k), and Δu(k) is the input change. The following unconstrained nonlinear optimization problem is solved analytically, over the prediction horizon, p, using a standard two-norm objective function: 2

2

min J(k) =|| Γ y (r (k + i) - y(k + i | k)) ||2 + || Γ u ∆u(k | k) ||2 ∆u(k|k)

The desired set-point is r(k+i), and y(k+i|k) is the predicted output over the horizon, 1≤ i ≤ p. The weighting matrices for the output and input are Γy and Γu , respectively. The third-order nonlinearity of the model results in a sixth order polynomial objective function. To determine the necessary condition for optimality, the objective function is differentiated with respect to Δu(k|k) and set equal to zero. The resulting off-line generated polynomial, depending on current time information only, can be solved numerically to obtain the optimal control, Δu(k|k). This algorithm will return the global minimum of the objective function at each function call; superior control can be achieved versus gradient-based NMPC. In the nominal case, the VL model described both the plant and model, and the algorithm tracks set-point changes without resorting to an on-line numerical optimization. Future studies will examine the mismatch case where the plant is a polymerization reactor model (Congalidis et al. AIChE, J. 1989).

105


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 10:55 – 11:10

“Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation Of Pulsatile Blood Flow Through Left Coronary Artery”

Sahid Smith1, Shawn Austin1 and G. Dale Wesson*1,2 1 Florida A&M University Department of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Tallahassee, FL 32310 2 Florida A&M University, Biological and Agricultural Systems Engineering Program, Tallahassee, FL 32307 ABSTRACT The onset of coronary heart disease may be governed by distribution and magnitude of hemodynamic shear stress in the coronary arteries. This study numerically examines pulsatile blood flow through the left coronary artery system. A triphasic waveform is employed to simulate pulsating flow. Five non-Newtonian models, as well as the usual Newtonian model, are used to describe the viscous shear-thinning behavior of blood. It was found that the blood viscosity model selected greatly affects the magnitude of the wall shear stress (WSS) prediction. The most realistic prediction was found to be that of the Generalized Power Law model. This model agreed best with the apparent viscosity vs. shear rate profile data. The Newtonian viscosity model performed poorly. Conversely, the patterns of wall stress displayed little affect by the blood viscosity model selection. The results show the magnitude of the WSS was always greater in the interior of the LM (ranging from 0.75 Pa to 7.0 Pa during the cardiac cycle), than the interior of the LAD or LCX (ranging from 0.47 Pa to 3.2 Pa in the LAD and 0.20 Pa to 1.4 Pa in the LCX during the cardiac cycle). This would suggest that LAD and LCX are more susceptible than the LM to the development of the atherosclerotic legions that lead the coronary artery disease. The results also show the WSS is greater near the entrances of the LAD and LCX (on the interior walls) than the remainder of the vessels, which hints the formation of atherosclerosis is not likely to occur near interior bifurcation walls. It is concluded that when using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to numerically investigate blood velocity profiles within small arteries, such the coronary artery system examined in this work, great care should be taken in choosing a blood viscosity model. It is suggested hat the Generalized Power Law model be the viscous shear thinning model of choice. When using CFD to investigate only patterns of wall shear stresses, the model selection is not as crucial and the simple Newtonian model will suffice but when the magnitude of WSS is of great importance, as in the case of the determining the development of coronary artery disease, the model selection is key.

106


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 11:10 - 11:40

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Characterization Chemistry Of Ultrapure Nanomaterialsâ&#x20AC;?

James W. Mitchell* and Jude Abanulo CREST Nanomaterials Characterization Science and Processing Technology Center Howard University, Chemical Engineering Department, Washington, DC, 20059 Abstract The synthesis of nanomaterials and the fabrication of nanotechnology devices present some of the most formidable and exciting challenges in chemical characterization science. Characterization research across a broad range of chemical regimes must underpin nanomaterials R&D and this is addressed in the CREST Center for Nanomaterials Characterization Science and Processing Technology (NCSPT). The research investigations contribute to the advancement of the chemical knowledge base underpinning the unequivocal comprehensive determination of the chemical status of nanomaterials. Characterization science also advances the development of methods for processing new nanomaterials with clearly definable chemical identities and technologically useful properties. The merit of the research includes generating chemical information that provides the intellectual foundation for verification of the directed synthesis and fabrication of nanomaterials. Additionally, this basic knowledge generating capability from characterization science helps to elucidate the unknown chemical transformations that nanomaterials undergo as these substances get exposed by processing to generate nanostructured devices. Predictably, the placement of the nanosciences and engineering on a platform for practical exploitation and impact on the US economy strongly depends on the ability of device scientists and process engineers to define completely the chemical nature of nanostructured devices. This is the vitally important area of broad impact for the research investigations. The center addresses the major generic challenges to the advancement of the characterization research of nanomaterials. First, a central analytical laboratory facility has been constructed for use by researchers in the Nanomaterials Characterization Science and Processing Technology Center. This facility is also available for use by researchers within the region served by NCSPT. In the related area of the development and fabrication of nanotechnology devices, new concepts, creative device engineering designs, and controlled processes are required for transforming known starting nanomaterials into integrated structures and components. For nanotechnology device development, high-tech characterization science is even more indispensable than stated previously for nanomaterials R&D. Both the initial chemical status of starting nanomaterials and transformations during intermediate stages of the processing must be controlled. An initial device technology example under investigation within the Center includes the fabrication of buried Schottky barrier IR photo detectors exploiting silver nanoparticles in an n-type silicon nanocomposite matrix. An overview of this and other research is provided.

107


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Tuesday, AM

Technical Session 4 9:00 - 10:20 Organic Chemistry I

Brentwood Room

Session Chair 9:00-9:20

Presenters “Synthesis And Characterization Of SF-PPV-I: C10H24 Side Chain” Taína D. Cleveland, James Haliburton, Sam Sun Ph.D* Norfolk State University, Center for Material Science, Norfolk ,VA 23504 Abstract

Organic or plastic photovoltaic materials may offer the versatility of lightweight, flexible shape and cost-effective renewable solar energy. Also organic and polymeric conjugated semiconducting materials may be used for the development of high-efficiency photovoltaic cells. The objective of this experiment is to synthesize sulfone derivatized acceptor (n-type) conjugated poly(1,4phenylenevinylene (SF-PPV-I) with a C10 side chain. The procedure followed in this investigation consisted of five steps the following include Williamson synthesis, dibromomethylation reaction, phosphate ester synthesis, oxidation and polymerization. The reaction conditions and the result will be further discussed. The characterization procedure is analyzed through proton NMR and elemental analysis.

9:20-9:40

“Synthesis And Photophysical Characterization Of Near-Ir MetalloPhthalocyanine And Their Protein Conjugates”

Vera Verdree, Guif Su, Serhii Pakhomov, Michael Allen, Robert Hammer, and Steve Soper Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Abstract Recent advances in the development of DNA technologies have led to our improved understanding in the organization of complex biological systems. Automated DNA sequencing methods determine the order of nucleotides in DNA based on the detection of fluorescently labeled biomolecules. The use of near-IR dyes for bioanalytical applications has become a promising alternative to visible dyes because of the decrease in background noise, i.e. Raman scattering, and the use of inexpensive instrumentation such as diode lasers. Phthalocyanine compounds are novel dyes that exhibit a number of unique properties making them attractive for genomic applications. Phthalocyanine compounds have superior chemical and photochemical properties due to the rigidity of the structure. These dyes possess extinction coefficients (105 L/mol·cm) and have similar absorption and emission maxima for single source excitation and emission. Fluorescence lifetimes are on the order of a few nanoseconds and coordinating a different metal in the cavity alters the lifetime of each dye. An understanding of the photophysical 108


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS properties of the dyes is crucial in developing fluorescence probes for bioanalytical applications. Here we evaluate the spectral and photophysical properties of near-IR metallo-phthalocyanine dyes that have been synthesized as fluorescent labels. A method to covalently label oligonucleotides and other biomolecules using carbodiimide labeling chemistry forming an intermediate highly reactive toward primary amines has been developed. Absorption and emission spectra, fluorescence lifetimes and the use of these dyes as fluorescent probes will be presented.

9:45-10:05

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Synthesizing Novel Fluorescent Supports For Immunosensor Applicationsâ&#x20AC;? Wraegen A. Mealy, Suzanne M. Ruder, Ph.D.* Virginia Commonwealth University Department of Chemistry, Richmond, VA, 23284 Abstract

Biosensors are becoming increasing useful and essential outside of the laboratory setting. Many examples of biosensors have been described, yet few are readily available; thus there is an ongoing effort within the scientific community to develop practical biosensors. Currently efforts involve the development of sensors that work by a direct method of detection which will increase the sensitivity, selectivity, and reliability of the sensors results. The focus of this research is to construct new solid supports that will selectively immobilize active antibody (Ab) at the surface. These surfaces can then be used for immunosensor applications and ultimately allow for the detection of both small and large antigens (Ag). To this end novel linkers were synthesized based on Sonogashira cross-coupling to form rigid aromatic systems that will act as fluorescent probes capable of immobilizing active Ab. These linkers contain either a hydrazine or hydrazide moiety capable of covalently binding Ab through the oxidized carbohydrate region. The formation of the covalent hydrazone bond should be detectable by fluorescence spectroscopy due to literature precedent which indicates that carbonyl containing moieties can be identified by fluorescence spectroscopy upon derivatization with hydrazide containing compounds. The synthesis of the novel linkers, solution phase fluorescent studies, and Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform-Infared spectroscopy data will be presented.

109


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Tuesday, AM Session Chair

10:30-10:45

Technical Session 5 10:30 - 11:30 Chemical Education

Brentwood Room

Dr. Murphy Keller, III United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Presenters “Touching The Future: A Chemistry Course For Teachers Of The 21st Century”

Barbara Burke1, Brenda Olsen2, Janeen Volsey1, Edward Walton1* 1California State Polytechnic University, Department of Chemistry, Pomona, CA, 91768 2Diamond Ranch High School, Science Department, Pomona Unified School District, Pomona CA Abstract To strengthen the science competency of K-6 new teachers, we redesigned our chemistry course for students who will be elementary school teachers. This new course includes several innovations such as the use of the ACSʹs Wonder Science as a ʺtextʺ that offers hands-on assignments, studentdeveloped stories about people, events, and ideas, a teaching field experience, and fully integrated the lecture and the laboratory. The laboratory experiences have been modified to be investigative. The course offers a model for teaching science. Evaluation data show that the modifications have improved the student learning, and through this course our prospective K-8 teachers are not only competent in content, but are also comfortable with teaching science.

10:45-11:00

“Integration Of Professional Development Into The Chemistry Curriculum”

Gloria Thomas Department of Chemistry, Mississippi State University, MS State, MS 39762 Abstract Creativity, innovation, communication, service, ethics … all trademarks of a professional chemist. Yet, how much of these areas of professional development are included in the traditional chemistry curriculum? Which of these tools and skill sets for academic success are omitted from classroom learning? How prepared can the emerging chemist be without exposure to these vital areas? This presentation will provide details about the integration of such professional development and academic success topics into the Mississippi State University’s undergraduate chemistry 110


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS curriculum and the interdisciplinary NSF-sponsored Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Site.

11:00-11:15

“Introduction Of Environmental Science Project Into The Middle School Classroom – Challenges And Successes”

Richmond J. Ampiah-Bonney, Julian F. Tyson* University of Massachusetts, Department of Chemistry, 701 Lederle Graduate Research Center, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 Abstract The ability of middle school students to exhibit interest and perform creditably in science subjects is greatly enhanced by the introduction of environmentally relevant science projects and extra attention and mentoring by scientists and educators from the community, to augment the efforts of the science teacher. As part of an NSF-funded project, a team comprising of faculty and graduate students assisted science teachers in selected local middle schools with ill-equipped science laboratories to undertake science projects based on the distribution of arsenic in the environment and consequential health implications. Students were introduced to the scientific method and to many bench top science experiments, and assisted to select projects on which they worked in small groups. Their experimental results and conclusions were presented in science fairs organized by the science teachers with the assistance of the graduate student associated with that class. Marked improvements in students’ performance in science and general attitudes towards matters of environmental importance were observed.

11:15-11:30

“Student And Faculty Fellowships At DOE Laboratories “ Linda Phaire-Washington, PhD* Argonne National Laboratory, Division of Educational Programs, Argonne IL 60439 Abstract

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) implemented an interagency cooperative activity (http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2005/nsf05573/nsf05573.jsp) to fund fellowships for faculty and internships for students at Argonne National Laboratory and other DOE laboratories. Applications are online (www.scied.science.doe.gov). Placements begin in January 2006. Faculty and students are encouraged to apply to the appropriate programs and laboratory that best suit their research interests! This presentation will discuss details of the internships/fellowships and major research projects available at Argonne National Laboratory. Faculty Fellowships: Typically, faculty members are the engine for building stable inter111


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS institutional research pipelines. Therefore to build long-term research collaborations, that include students, faculty are encouraged to apply to the Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program. The FaST program will support a team comprised of one faculty member and 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 undergraduate students. Faculty members pre-select students. The program provides hands-on experiences in DOE mission-related research. The FaST Program (www.scied.science.doe.gov/scied/fast/about.html) is particularly appropriate for junior faculty seeking tenure or senior faculty seeking sabbatical leave. Once sabbatical leave is granted, faculty should apply to the Faculty Sabbatical Program. Details, application procedures for the Faculty Sabbatical Program is located at: www.scied.science.doe.gov/scied/FSP/about.html. Students Internships: Students at four-year institutions should apply to the SULI Program (Student Undergraduate Laboratory Internship) at www.scied.science.doe.gov/scied/erulf/about.html. Community College students should apply to the CCI Program (Community College Institute of Science and Technology) at www.scied.science.doe.gov/scied/CCI/about.html. During the 10-week residential programs, students reside on the Argonne site and conduct research with worldrenown scientists and engineers - on projects related to the laboratoriesĘš research programs. Students also participate in educational enrichment activities including career planning, safety training, seminars, and Laboratory tours. Research at Argonne: The DOE laboratories each offer different research opportunities. Argonne National Laboratory established five major research clusters, comprised of interdisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers. These include: a) The Nano Cluster including Nano-biotechnology and projects supportive of the Center for Nanoscale Materials and the Consortium for Nanoscience Research; b) The Energy and Environment Cluster - Argonne scientists and engineers are developing advanced batteries and fuel cells, as well as advanced electric power generation and storage systems for R&D in transportation, hydrogen, advanced fuel cycle and environmental science; c) Petascale Computing and computational sciences including projects previously under the Argonne Theory Institute and the Virtual Fabrication Lab; d) The Accelerator R&D Cluster includes projects at the Advanced Photon Sources, IPNS, ATLAS, RIA, and other major scientific accelerator systems used primarily in physical research; e) National Security including research in the nuclear fuel cycle, biology, chemistry, and systems analysis and modeling. The research helps to detect chemical, biological and radioactive threats and identify their sources. See http://www.dep.anl.gov/catalog/catalog.htm .for an overview of the research programs at Argonne.

112


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 11:30-11:45

“Establishing Connections Between Chemistry And Societal Needs Through Project-Based Analytical Labs”

Charles Hosten Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059 Abstract Project based labs have been introduced into the Analytical Laboratory. The projects were chosen so as to be relevant to our students and bear on their career interests. The projects are divided into two broad areas covering human health issues and environmental issues. The lab also includes a service learning component which is meant to make students examine the relationship between chemistry and societal needs. As an example one project has students conduct test for lead in drinking water and paint samples form old houses in close proximity to the Howard University campus. Washington DC lead poisoning rates are among the worst in the nation and the incident rates for Wards 1, 4, and 5 (located near to Howard University) are among the worst in the District of Columbia. This revised curriculum results in students who are more aware of precision, accuracy, and error in measurements. It also broadens the horizons of minority students entering the field of chemistry so that they can make connections with human needs outside the classroom.

11:45-12:00

“National Energy Technology Laboratory – Minority Mentoring & Internship Program (MMIP)”

Murphy J Keller III, Ph.D.* United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA Abstract The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is a multipurpose science, technology, and energy laboratory owned and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL has three locations in Morgantown, West Virginia; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Tulsa Oklahoma. The primary mission of the NETL is to assure that U.S. fossil energy resources (coal, natural gas, and oil) can meet our nation’s increasing demand for affordable energy without compromising the quality of life for future generations of Americans. The NETL MMIP offers intern employment opportunities for minority students that provide work directly related to the students’ educational programs and career goals. These internships provide hands-on research opportunities at a state-of-the-art national laboratory for projects conducted off-site, depending on the students’ interests and experience. We are especially interested in students majoring in chemistry, engineering and geology.

113


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Thursday, AM Session Chair Presenters 9:00-9:15

Technical Session # 6 9:00 - 11:00 Polymer Organic Chemistry Dr. Malika Jeffires-El, Iowa State University

Westwood

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sugar-Substitutedpoly(P-Phenylene Ethynylene)S In The Development Of Biosensors For Pathogensâ&#x20AC;?

Dana L. Broughton*1, John J. Lavigne1, Belma Erdogan2, James N. Wilson2, Uwe H. F. Bunz2 1University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29208 2Georgia Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332 Abstract

Due to the increased risk of bio-related terrorist attacks by the use of virulent pathogens, the detection of pathogens through a rapid and accurate test is desired. The project described herein uses sugar-substituted poly(p-phenyleneethynylene)s (PPEs) in an effort to detect biological entities. Carbohydrates covalently attached to the polymer backbone are designed to bind to lectins causing in a change in the optical properties of the polymer. To demonstrate the concept, PPEs substituted with glucose are designed to bind to the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A). The development of a novel signal transduction mechanism by which the desired polymer-analyte interactions lead to enhanced emission from polymer aggregates will be presented.

114


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS “Detection And Discrimination Of Small Molecules Using A CrossReactive Polythiophene”

9:15-9:30

Marc S. Maynor and John J. Lavigne* University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29210 Abstract The use of conjugated polymers as sensors for organic and inorganic ions will be presented. While there is significant precedence to use conjugated polymers as sensors, the utility of such polymers has not been fully appreciated and capitalized upon. Conjugated polymers hold advantages over traditional small molecule sensors in that they have a built-in transduction mechanism and their multivalent nature increases the effective concentration of binding moieties thereby enhancing analyte complexation. In particular, HT-2,5-poly(thiophene-3-propionic acid) (1) has been used in conjunction with multivariate statistics for the discrimination and identification of numerous small molecule amines (20 amines, 47 replications each) with high classification accuracies (98%, 940 total samples). Progress has also been made towards using cross-reactive polymer 1 for the detection and differentiation of metal ions and initial results will be discussed

9:30- 9:45

“Discrimination And Quantification Of Biogenic Amines Using A Conjugated Polymer-Based Sensor Array”

Toby L. Nelson, Caroline O’Sullivan, John J. Lavigne* University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29208 Abstract Progress towards the generation of a conjugated polymer-based sensor array for the detection and quantification of biogenic diamines is presented. The biogenic amines of interest are those generated from the decay of proteins as they relate to the spoilage of foods. Initial efforts have focused on using a single carboxylated poly(thiophene) in different solvents to generate array diversity. This cross-reactive conjugated polymer demonstrates analyte specific chromic response attributable to planarization/deplanarization of the polymer backbone, pi-pi interactions between polymer chains and scattering of visible light all caused by multiple polymer-diamine interactions. The observed spectral response is dictated by the length and rigidity of the tether between the amine moieties. Multivariate statistics are employed to deconvolute subtle variations in the spectra data. Classification accuracies greater than 90% have been achieved as well as concentration trends.

115


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 9:50 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:15

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Design And Synthesis Of Novel Biomaterials: A Structure-Property Approachâ&#x20AC;?

David A. Olson, Yue Yang, Benjamin A. Pierce, Andrew H. Brown, and Valerie V. Sheares* The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Chemistry, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290 Abstract. Biomaterials, synthetic substances contained in therapeutic or medical devices that are in contact with biological tissue and fluids, typically involve the use of synthetic polymers. While the polymers used have already helped to make an enormous impact on the healthcare industry, several limitations are left to be addressed. Specifically, materials with tunable solubility, crystallinity, reactivity, and degradability are required. We will discuss our efforts toward developing material that address these limitations: polyester-based biodegradable elastomers, functional cyclic monomer-based polyesters, polyurethane elastomers, and amine-functionalized gene delivery vectors. Polyester-based biodegradable elastomers. Biodegradable polyesters have significant potential for biomedical applications including tissue engineering, drug delivery, and biosensors. The most commonly used materials for these application have been poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA), poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) and poly( caprolactone) (PCL) and their copolymers. However, many medical devices are implanted in dynamic environments of the body, which require elastomeric materials to minimize irritation of surrounding tissue. Furthermore, degradable materials can be especially advantageous when only temporary mechanical support is needed. We will describe the synthesis of amorphous prepolymers by the polycondensation of trans- hydromucconic acid (HMA) and ethylene glycol (EG) dimmers, trimers and tetramers. These prepolymers were subsequently thermally crosslinked to form amorphous elastomeric materials. The ability to tune the water uptake, crosslinking density, thermal and mechanical properties of these materials will be demonstrated. Functional cyclic monomer-based polyesters. This work led us to the synthesis of new aliphatic polyester that would meet three criteria. First, polar functionality must be incorporated into the material. Next, unsaturation is desired in each repeat unit to serve as a site for further functionalization or crosslinking. Finally, the ability to synthesize materials with several different functional groups in the same macromolecule is desired. These requirements led us to design new functionalized dicarboxylic acid monomers that can subsequently be polymerized with a diol via polycondensation. The dicarboxylic acid is formed by the Diels-Alder reaction of fumaric acid with a functionalized diene. Past work in our laboratories has also yielded a variety of functionalized 1,3-butadienes which were previously polymerized using chain growth techniques. This versatile approach allowed for the preparation of linear homo- and copolymers with number average molecular weights of 14.0 x 103 g/mol. Glass transition temperatures were near -20 C. Polyurethane elastomers. 116


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS We are also investigating polyurethane elastomers (PUE)s. In this work, a well-known aliphatic diisocyanate, hydrogenated 4,4’-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (HMDI), along with aminefunctionalized diols will form the “hard” segments for a series of aliphatic PUEs. The diisocyanate and the chain extender have the symmetry required for improved mechanical properties and are aliphatic, which could eliminate any possible carcinogenic by-products upon degradation of the poly(ester urethane) copolymers. The amine-functionalized diols are also cyclic so as to improve the thermal properties. The chain extenders can also be quaternized, as ionization has been shown to improve mechanical properties of PUEs.

10:15-10:30

“Molecular Level Studies On Interactions Between A Pet Surface And Model Ink Components To Understand Adhesion”

William Johnson*1, Cheryl Loch1, Priya Varadan2, Ralph Priester2 and Zhan Chen1 1 Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 2 Flint Ink Corporation, 4600 Arrowhead Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 Abstract To ensure packaging inks and coatings produce graphics with superb quality on various substrates such as paper, polymer film, foil, board and metal, it is necessary to understand detailed molecular interactions at the interface between inks and these substrates. This is very challenging because such an interface is buried: it is difficult to selectively probe such an interface between two bulk media. We applied sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to study molecular structures of interfaces between a model polymer, poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and individual as well as mixtures of model ink components to understand adhesion properties between ink and polymer substrates. Such ink components include urethanes, nitrocellulose, plasticizers, and adhesion promoters. SFG is a monolayer surface/interface sensitive vibrational spectroscopic technique which can provide molecular structures of buried interfaces in situ. The SFG results have been correlated to adhesion measurements. Our results indicate that the PET-ink interactions are very complicated. Various factors, such as segregation and ordered alignment of ink components at the interface, interfacial hydrogen bonding, as well as interfacial Van der Waals interactions play roles in adhesion. The strong adhesion of the ink on polymer substrates is achieved by a cooperative effect of the individual ink components.

117


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS

Thursday, AM Session Chair

Technical Session # 7 9:00 - 10:25 Environmental Chemistry I Dr. Steven Ogunwumi, Corning Incorporated

Brentwood

Presenters 9:00-9:20

“An Assessment Of In-Vehicle Volatile Organic Compounds During Afternoon Rush Hour Commutes In Houston Metropolitan Areas”

Siobhan L. Tarver*, Felicia L. Conley, Renard L. Thomas, and Bobby L. Wilson NASA University Research Center for Biotechnology & Environmental Health, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004 Abstract According to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are known to be hazardous air pollutants. Several of these compounds are highly associated with vehicle emissions resulting from combustion processes and exhaust from tailpipes. Concentrations of in- vehicle VOCs were examined throughout daily commutes during high traffic density periods in Houston, TX. Sampling periods were conducted between the hours of 3:00 and 6:00 p.m. Air quality inside a vehicle was monitored for detectable concentrations of VOCs during a sampling period from June 30th – July 25th. This study involved two traveling options: a high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane or standard freeway lanes. Samples were collected using 6 liter Silonite® canisters and were analyzed by a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer system programmed with a modified version of the EPA’s TO-15 method. A total of 23 hydrocarbons were detected, 8 of which are identified as hazardous air pollutants, and 6 typically resulting from vehicle emissions. VOCs detected included benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, 1, 3-butadiene, and methylene chloride. Mean in-vehicle concentrations during traffic commutes were higher for toluene and 1, 3-butadiene. 1, 3-Butadiene was observed to be significantly higher in traffic commutes as compared to all other commutes. The concentrations of methylene chloride and 1, 3-butadiene were found to be highest while traveling in the HOV lane. Ethylbenzene was consistently detected in all commutes, but the concentrations could not be quantified since they were found below calibration levels.

118


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 9:20-9:40

“Detection Of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Derivatives In Environmental Samples”

Aidee Gonzalez, Exequiel Tostado, Mary Lee, Noe Ramos and Krishna L. Foster California State University, Los Angeles, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Los Angeles, CA, 90032 Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are carcinogenic pollutants formed in incomplete combustion processes, including the burning of fossil fuels. They have been carefully monitored in environmental water, air and soil samples for decades. Less attention has been paid to the characterization of PAH derivatives in the environment, which because of there polarity, may be more toxic to humans and readily transported throughout the environment. This paper will present quantitative, specific, and sensitive liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) methods for the detection of benzo[a]pyrene quinones in environmental samples. A combination of chromatography retention times, MS spectra, and MS/MS spectra has been used to identify BaP-1,6-quinone, BaP-3,6-quinone, and BaP-6,12-quinone standards in aqueous solutions. The 3σ limit of detection of BaP-1,6-quinone is 4 ng ml-1, and a linear calibration has been performed over four orders of magnitude. Results for the analysis of BaP-3,6quinone and BaP-6,12-quinone are comparable. The new technique was used to detect BaP quinones in Pyramid Lake in Southern California during a 2003 wildfire. Laboratory techniques designed to characterize PAH derivatives more thoroughly will be discussed.

9: 50-10:10

“Source Identification Of BTEX In Indoor Parking Facilities In Houston, Texas” Gabriel.A.Kristanto*, Felicia Conley, Renard Thomas, and Bobby Wilson Environmental Toxicology Program-Chemistry Department, Texas Southern University, Houston-TX 77004 Abstract

Concentration of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes (BTEX) in indoor parking facilities have been assessed. These indoor parking facilities include attached garages, commercial underground and ground parking facilities. In term of waste minimization, the first step of waste reduction is by source identification. The objective of this study is to identify source BTEX by determining BTEX, toluene and benzene, and toluene and m,p-xylene ratios. It is found that the main source of BTEX in commercial underground and ground parking facilities is automobile emission while organic solvents and other materials stored are the main sources in the attached garages. Keywords: indoor air pollutant; BTEX, m,p-xylene, toluene, benzene, ratio 119


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 10:10-10:25

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Measurement Of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Hemoglobin Adducts In A Cohort Of Smoking And Non-Smoking Human Subjectsâ&#x20AC;?

Angela Ragin, Selvin Edwards, Charisse Walcott, Donald G. Patterson, Jr, and James Grainger National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment and encompass a class of chemical carcinogens which play a significant role in the onset of a number of human cancers. Many PAHs are produced and released into the environment from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, industrial production of petroleum products and automobile exhaust. The principal routes of human exposure to PAHs result from cigarette smoke and dietary intake. PAH exposure studies have generally been conducted via analytical methods utilizing HPLC/ fluorescence or GC/MS measurement of hydroxy-PAH metabolites in urine. These metabolites have a detection window of approximately 72 hours following exposure. PAH adducts with proteins, however, potentially generate an extended window (120 days) for analytical measurements because they integrate the biological effective dose over the lifetime of the protein. Protein adducts are considered potentially valuable biomarkers for assessment of PAH exposure, with a preponderance of studies using hemoglobin or serum albumin as target macromolecules. We have developed a gas chromatography mass spectrometry method for analyzing isomeric benzo[a]pyrene tetrols resulting from hydrolysis of PAH-hemoglobin adducts. Using our method, we applied mass retention time and fragmentation parameters to the analysis of derivatized benzo[a]pyrene tetrol isomers. We have observed the occurrence and distribution of isomeric BaP tetrols derived from benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE) hemoglobin adducts extracted from the blood of a cohort of smoking and non-smoking human subjects. We are developing a quantitative gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry method for assessment of human exposure to PAHs through isotope-dilution measurements of hemoglobin adducts levels.

120


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 10:10-10:25

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Volatile Organic Compound Determination Of The Seabrook Air Monitoring Projectâ&#x20AC;?

Latrice B. Babin*, Siobhan L. Tarver, Gabriel Kristanto, Felicia L. Conley, Renard L. Thomas, and Bobby L. Wilson NASA University Research Center for Biotechnology & Environmental Health, Texas Southern University, Houston TX 77004 Abstract Seabrook, Texas, a residential community located in the southeast fringes of Houston Texas, the fourth largest metropolis of the United States, is adjacent to a major industrial complex of petrochemical plants, chemical plants, refineries, hazardous materials storage facilities and the intertwining of pipelines. This cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location provides a unique situation for examining the potential exposure of large and varied mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions into the neighboring residential communities. The close proximity of residential communities to industrial complexes and their emission sources provides an opportunity to (1) provide baseline data characterizing ambient air quality, (2) establish VOC spatial and temporal profiles for industrial based residential neighborhoods, and (3) assess the potential risk of human exposure to VOCs. Samples were collected as 72 and 168 hours time-weighted averaged samples (6 liter and 15 liter canisters respectively). The Agilent 6890 GC/MS instruments with 5973 mass detector equipped with an Entech Autosampler and 7100 Preconcentrator were used to analyze the samples. The ten most common VOCs found were chloromethane, 1,1-dichloroethene, methylene chloride, benzene, trichloroethylene, 1,3-dichloro-1-propene, 1,2-dibromoethane, ethylbenzene, toluene, and styrene. Of particular interest is the 1 ppb level of benzene that was determined as the ambient background concentration of this compound. Preliminary results are presently undergoing review and QAQC for accuracy and completeness.

121


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Thursday, PM Session Chair

Technical Session # 8 1:00 - 3:00 Westwood Pharmacological Organic Dr. Alfred Williams, North Carolina Central University

Presenters “Synthesis Of A Fluorescent Peptide For The Biochemical Assay Of 10:30-10:45 Yopt Protease” Laurel A. Royer*, Richard A. Gibbs Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Abstract Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the Black Plague, as well as other pathogenic yersinia species (Y. pseudomonas and Y. enterocolitica) harbors a 70 Kb plasmid that encodes for an injectosomal system called a type III secretion system (TTSS). This secretion mechanism is responsible for the release of six effector proteins called Yops (Yersinia outer membrane proteins YopH, YopO, YopP, YopE, YopM and YopT) into the cytoplasm of the host cell. These effector proteins have been implicated in the disruption of the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton of the invaded cells. Additionally, they function to inhibit pathogenic phagocytosis and interrupt the normal processes of the Rho family of small GTPases. As a result of ongoing work in our lab, we are specifically interested in YopT. YopT belongs to a unique class of cysteine proteases that share a conserved catalytic triad (Cys/His/Asp). YopT recognizes a polybasic amino acid sequence and carries out a proteolytic cleavage near the C-terminus of RhoA, Cdc42, and Rac1 resulting in the removal of the geranylgeranyl lipid modification responsible for membrane anchorage. The cleavage results in the irreversible detachment of these proteins from the membrane blocking their biological activity. Here we report on the design and synthesis of a fluorescently-labeled farnesyl peptide analogue that will serve as a substrate for YopT in a fluorescent assay. Such an assay will allow for the discovery of YopT inhibitors, which may block Yersinia infection of cells.

10:45-11:00

“Rational Design And Synthesis Of Substituted Carboranes As Serine Protease Inhibitors” Michael F. Z. Page, Satish S. Jalisatgi, M. Frederick Hawthorne* University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Los Angeles, CA 90095 Abstract

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) highlights the past three decades of research featuring icosahedral carboranes (dicarba-closo-dodecaboranes). Attractive features of carboranes include their low toxicity and remarkable chemical and thermal stabilities. Similarly, these features make 122


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS boron containing clusters attractive hydrophobic pharamcophores, and drug delivery agents. Utilizing FLEXX, a computational modeling program, we evaluated the bending of various rationally designed hydrophobic carborane derivatives, as flexible ligands, in the active site of serine proteases. Computationally, these compounds demonstrated favorable interactions in the S1, S2, and S3 pockets of α-human thrombin. Described herein is the synthesis and characterization of these potential hydrophobic pharmacophores.

11:00-11:15

“Neural Zinc Finger Factor-1 Protein Fragments For Metal Binding Studies” Niall D. Lue Sue*1, Sarah L. J. Michel2, and Holly J. Cymet1 1 Morgan State University Department of Chemistry Baltimore, MD 21251 2 University of Maryland Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy Baltimore, MD 21201 Abstract

Neural zinc finger factor 1 (NZF-1) is a neural-specific transcription factor that contains six copies of a unique zinc binding domain, each 25 amino acids in length with a consensus sequence of Cys-X4-Cys-X4-His-X7-His-X5-Cys. The NZF-1 domains are relatively unstructured in the absence of zinc. In the presence of zinc(II), the three cysteines and one histidine coordinate with the metal and the domain adopts a characteristic loop structure. Iron is present in the body where it participates in numerous biological functions. It is the purpose of this research to explore a possible mechanism for the toxicity of iron through its potential interference with zinc binding to the NZF-1 domains and the effect this has on the DNA binding properties of the NZF-1 protein. Two fragments of the NZF-1 protein are under investigation. One is comprised of a single zinc binding domain and the second fragment is comprised of a tandem repeat of two linked domains. Previous research has shown that at least two tandem domains are required for specific DNA binding. The affinities of the zinc binding domain for Zn(II), Fe(II) and Fe(III) were established by measurement of their respective dissociation constants using UV-vis spectroscopy. The effect of zinc substitution by iron on the DNA-binding properties of the protein was monitored by fluorescence anisotropy. Results of these studies and their significance will be discussed.

123


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 11:15 -11:30

“Design And Synthesis Of Dithiocarbamate Ester Analogues As Potential Lipoxygenase Inhibitors In Suppression Of Prostate Cancer”

Oladapo Bakare Ph.D.*, and Priscilla B. Walker Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington, D.C. 20059 ABSTRACT Prostate cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. 5Lipoxygenase plays an important role in the stimulation and activation of PC cell growth. Dithiocarbamate esters (DTCE) has an alluring platform for the inhibition biologically active enzymes. DTCE consists of an elongated fatty chain which has been shown to inhibit rabbit heart carbonyl reductase (RHCR). DTCE also possess dithiocarbamate functional group which has been shown to inhibit ovarian carbonyl reductase activity as well as ovulation. The ester functional group, which is present in DTCE, is used specifically for spectroscopic analysis such as Gas Chromatographic Mass Spectrometry. Therefore, DTCE possess the indispensable functional groups shown to inhibit cancer-activating enzymes, such as lipoxygenase. Aberrant kinase activity is presumed to contribute to plethora diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. It is reported that the inhibition of 5-lipooxygenase triggers massive apoptosis in both androgen-sensitive and androgen-refractory human prostate cancer cells within hours of treatment. Androgens play an important role in the development, growth, and progression of PC. We are suggesting the synthesis of novel dithiocarbamate fatty ester analogues could potentially become a suppressor of pro-inflammatory mediator expression via rarefication of MAPK pathway. The experimental design of DTCE and shortly thereafter biological testing of these innovative analogues, will contribute momentously to the design, revelation and process of lipoxygenase inhibitors.

11:30 -11:45

“Ternary Particle Vaccine For Effective Delivery To Pulmonary System” Treniece L. Terry*1, Ali K. Salem1,2, Victor G.J. Rogers1 University of Iowa, Department of Chemical Engineering1, Department of Pharmacy, Division of Pharmaceutics2 Iowa City, IA 52242 Abstract

The pulmonary system has gained increasing interest as a convenient and non-invasive route for drug delivery to the systemic circulation. Systemic applications (formulations for nonrespiratory complications) hold enormous potential, as the lungs provide a vast surface area (100 – 140 m2) for drug absorption along with a rich blood supply. However the success of systemic pulmonary drug delivery relies on the particles ability to reach the deep lungs. Traditionally, 124


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS particles capable of achieving this typically have diameters ranging from 2 – 5 m. Aerosol efficiency can be enhanced by the fabrication of highly porous particles with low mass densities. Additionally, by increasing their size (> 5 m), these large but light particles can be deposited more efficiently than smaller, nonporous particles. By coupling this delivery route with a controlled release polymeric carrier, the opportunity for prolonged and enhanced therapeutic delivery can be provided. DNA-based therapeutics holds a great promise for treatment of human diseases, such as cancers, viral infection and inflammatory disorders. This therapy is hampered by their limited cellular uptake and short half-lives. To maximize their intracellular penetration, cationic polymers, such as polyethylenimine (PEI) is used as a non-viral vectors. Encapsulating these particles into a biodegradable polymer can provide both sustained release as well as target delivery to organs specifically. Here we present research on techniques to fabricate large, porous polymeric particulates encapsulationg PEI-DNA complexes within poly (lactic acid) (PLA) - polyethylene glycol (PEG) aerosol. PLA has been thoroughly investigated and established as an effective drug carrier, with the ability to provide a tunable release profile; however, its hydrophobic surface leads to rapid opsonization and clearance by alveolar phagocytic cells. Incorporating the hydrophilic PEG into the polymer backbone, will provide “stealth” properties and render the particles less susceptible to immediate phagocystosis. The effects of surfactant, temperature and polymer molecular weight on particle morphology, size and density will be studied. The effects of particle morphology on transfection efficiency will also be studied using a macrophage cell line.

11:45 -12:00

“Synthesizing Novel Fluorescent Supports For Immunosensor Applications” Wraegen A. Mealy, Suzanne M. Ruder, Ph.D.* Virginia Commonwealth University Department of Chemistry Richmond, VA, 23284 Abstract

Biosensors are becoming increasing useful and essential outside of the laboratory setting. Many examples of biosensors have been described, yet few are readily available; thus there is an ongoing effort within the scientific community to develop practical biosensors. Currently efforts involve the development of sensors that work by a direct method of detection which will increase the sensitivity, selectivity, and reliability of the sensors results. The focus of this research is to construct new solid supports that will selectively immobilize active antibody (Ab) at the surface. These surfaces can then be used for immunosensor applications and ultimately allow for the detection of both small and large antigens (Ag). To this end novel linkers were synthesized based on Sonogashira cross-coupling to form rigid aromatic systems that will act as fluorescent probes capable of immobilizing active Ab. These linkers contain either a hydrazine or hydrazide moiety capable of covalently binding Ab through the oxidized carbohydrate region. The formation of the covalent hydrazone bond should be detectable by 125


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS fluorescence spectroscopy due to literature precedent which indicates that carbonyl containing moieties can be identified by fluorescence spectroscopy upon derivatization with hydrazide containing compounds. The synthesis of the novel linkers, solution phase fluorescent studies, and Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform-Infared spectroscopy data will be presented.

Thursday, AM Session Chair 10:30-10:50

Technical Session # 9 10:30 - 11:50 Environmental Chemistry II Dr. Angela Winstead, Morgan State University

Brentwood

Presenters “Ion Chromatographic Anaysis Of Hanford Tank Waste For Analytes Of Low Level Concentrations Using Suppressed Conductivity Detection: Linear Verses Quadratic Calibration Fits Revisited” Asopuru Okemgbo* Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. 222-S Laboratory, MSIN T6-30 Richland, WA 99325

Abstract The 586-square-mile Hanford Site located along the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State, played a pivotal role in the nation’s defense for over 40 years, and accumulated over 60 million gallons of nuclear waste in 177 large underground tanks. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford is engaged in the worldʹs largest environmental cleanup project that includes retrieval, treatment, and disposal of radioactive tank waste. Characterization of waste is required to meet regulatory requirements, waste treatment undertakings, tank waste safety issues, and support tank closure activities that include constituent inventories in the residual waste and data to determine release rates that support risk assessment calculations. Ion chromatography using suppressed conductivity detection, a method used in the measurement of key analytes in the Hanford waste, has low linear dynamic range and as such requires non-linear calibration such as quadratic fit for some analytes. However, at low level analyte concentrations as can be encountered in Hanford tank closure projects, quadratic fit shows more inherent changes that are dependent on the scatter of the data points compared to linear plots. This presentation will evaluate the pros and cons of using linear and quadratic calibration fits in measuring low level analyte concentrations.

126


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 10:50-11:10

“Phytoextraction Of Arsenic From Soil By Leersia Oryzoides”

Richmond J. Ampiah-Bonney1, Guy R.Lanza2, Julian F. Tyson*1 1 University of Massachusetts, Department of Chemistry, Amherst, MA 01003 2 University of Massachusetts, Department of Environmental Sciences, Amherst, MA 01003 Abstract The potential of rice-cut grass (leersia oryzoides) for the remediation of arsenic-contaminated soil was studied in a pot-experiment. Grown in soil spiked with arsenic to a concentration of 50 mg kg1, leersia oryzoides absorbed up to 212 µg g-1 into its shoots and 173 µg g-1 in its roots, giving a shoot:root quotient of 1.23 and phytoextraction coefficients up to 11.0. With a total of 132 plants growing in soil with a surface area of 180 cm2, the calculated total arsenic taken up by shoots is 120, 130 and 128 grams per hectare at 6 weeks, 10 weeks and 16 weeks respectively. The small difference in shoot uptake after 6 weeks suggests that when used for phytoextraction, mowing leersia oryzoides every six weeks will ensure constant uptake of arsenic due to regeneration of the shoot.

11:15 -11:35

“The Use Of Otolith Microchemistry To Monitor And Evaluate The Movement Of Coral Reef Fish In South Florida Waters”

Trika L. Gerard*1, Dave Jones2, Monica Lara2 1National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NMFS SE Fisheries, Miami, FL 2U Miami, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Miami, FL Abstract Stable isotopic ratios of carbon and oxygen, embedded in the otolith of teleosts fish, have been well documented as useful tools for providing a wealth of information on environmental variations and habitat use of fish throughout their life history. Valuable data produced from stable isotope analyses include information about habitat temperature and salinity, migratory patterns and habitat use and metabolic rates. In this study, we are investigating spatial and temporal isotopic differences in fish from various sites within Florida Bay and between Florida Bay and adjacent waters. It is believed that snapper larvae settle and complete the juvenile phase of their life history in the sea grass beds and mangrove habitats of Florida Bay, before migrating to the reef tract as young adults. Thus, identifying isotopic trends in otoliths of fishes from Florida Bay will allow us to distinguish what portion of the Bay the juvenile phase of the fish was spent. Measurements of 18O/16O and 13C/12C ratios in the sagittal otolith carbonate were obtained from juvenile gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus ) collected in 2001-2004 from various locations within Florida Bay. Results indicated significant spatial variations between Florida Bay and other surrounding marine ecosystems (F= 210.0264; df=4; p<2.0000e-0004). Temporal isotopic differences were also observed. The results from a second study analyzing trace elements from the otoliths of these same fishes show a similar separation of 127


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS individuals to several nursery regions within South Florida. Combining the results of both studies yields a very high assignment rate of individuals to their nursery region. The data produced from this study will lead toward our mission of exploring migratory patterns and habitat use and how these patterns relate to the size-age structure of these fish. Future developments from this study will allow us to assess ontogenetic and environmental transitions. Ultimately, we are optimistic that we will afford fisheries managers with possible impacts of ecosystem change as a result of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

11:35 – 11:55

“Trace Metal Analysis Of Lake Houston Water Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS)”

Edidiong Obot*1, Charmaine Little1, Aref El-Demerdash2, Renard Thomas2, Bobby Wilson3 1Space and Environmental Science Internship Program (SESIP) 2Environmental Research Technology Transfer Center (ERT2C) 3SESIP Program Director Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004 Abstract During the summer months of 2005, sampling cruises have been carried out on Lake Houston to assess trace metal distribution in the lake. Lake Houston is surrounded by a rapidly growing population density. Most of the lakeʹs catchment area is drained by San Jacinto River. Identification and quantification of trace metals in Lake Houston, as well as the fate of those trace metals in that ecosystem, are important environmental scientific issues. Eighteen elements, including Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb (trace metals) and Al, Ba, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, S, Sr (major metals), were determined in several locations on the lake. For each of the water samples, the total fractions have been analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The data for the samples collected in the Northern and Eastern parts of the lake, especially at the inflow of San Jacinto River, metal concentrations were compared to measurement near the outflow points.. Analysis of the data revealed that high levels of Aluminum, Vanadium, Strontium, Manganese, Iron, and Barium are present in Lake Houston water samples. When we compared the concentration of each element to that of the EPA guidelines, we concluded that concentrations of some trace metals did not conform to the EPA guidelines. In summary, we were able to use the ICP-MS to properly determine the concentration of trace metals in Lake Houston’s water samples.

128


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Thursday, PM Session Chair 3:00-3:20

Technical Session # 10 3:30 - 5:00 Modeling and Simulation Dr. Vernon Morris, Howard University

Westwood

Presenters “Theoretical Investigation Of Band Gaps Of ∏-Conjugated Polymers For Photovoltaic Applications” Anu Bamgbelu1 and Suely M. Black*1 1Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504 Abstract

Electronics and photonics technologies have opened their materials base to organics, in particular pi-conjugated polymers. The goal with organic-based devices is primarily to benefit from a unique set of characteristics combining the electrical properties of semiconductors with the typical properties of plastics. Geometries and band gaps of Alkoxy and amine derivatized Poly- [phenylvinylene] (PPV) oligomers of up to four units have been systematically studied using both ZINDO and B3LYP Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. On the basis of the fully optimized DFT geometries of neutral forms of PPV oligomers, excitation energies were obtained at the DFT and ZINDO levels, and extrapolated to the excitation energy value of the infinite chain. Both the ZINDO//B3LYP/631G* band gap (2.7eV) and the DFT//B3LYP/6-31G* band gap (2.1eV) obtained from extrapolation of the oligomers’ calculated values are in reasonable agreement with the experimental value (2.5eV). The influence of substituent, choice of basis set and theoretical method on the results are discussed.

3:15-3:30

„Quantum Monte Carlo Study Of The Electronic Properties Of The First Row Transition Metals“

Ainsley A. Gibson, Floyd A. Fayton, Gordon J. P. Taylor, Jose Gonzalez and John A. W. Harkless* Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington DC 20059 Abstract The ionization potentials, electron and proton affinities along with small metallic[n=2-4] cluster energetics of the 3d-block transition metals are investigated using various levels of electronic structure theory. The ab initio methods used in solving the time independent non-relativistic Schrodinger equation include Hartree-Fock (HF), post Hartree-Fock [CI, CISD, CCSD, CASSCF, MRCI, MP2 and MP4] methods, and quantum Monte Carlo(QMC) methods, both Variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). Density Functional Theory(DFT) with the B3LYP functional is also used in these calculations to obtain results for comparative analysis. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in order obtain a higher level of accuracy in the 129


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS calculations. An Ahlrichs TZV basis set is used for the transition metals and a cc-pVTZ basis is used for hydrogen.

3:30-3:45

“Time Dependent Dft Study On Homo-Lumo And Excitation Energies Of Polythiophene”

A. C. Sykes1, S. M. Black1, and S. Sun 1 Norfolk State University, Center for Materials Research, Norfolk, VA 23504 Abstract Conjugated polymers have become more of an interest to scientists lately because of their narrow energy gaps, chemical stability, and high conductivity upon doping. These properties allow for possible transparency in the visible region of the spectrum as well as for potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Polythiophenes are of particular interest, and this paper reports results for 3-alkoxythiophene oligomers studied by electronic structure methods to obtain equilibrium atomic geometry, and electron energy structure. The results provide initial understanding to model the properties with increase in chain length of the substituted polythiophene. Calculations of the optimal geometries of oligomers of up to five units were carried out using Jaguar 4.2 computational chemistry software. The gas phase structures were obtained using the density functional theory with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional, and 6-31G* basis set. The optimized geometries were then input into the Gaussian® 03 computational software to obtain Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) excitation energies. TDDFT excitation energies, as well as B3LYP HOMO-LUMO energy gaps were extrapolated to obtain the polymer’s excitation energy. The calculated values compare very favorably to experimental with results.

3:45-4:00

“Theoretical Investigation Of Acceptor Molecule In An Organic Polymer For Solar Cell Application”

Brandy A. Langston1 and Suely M. Black*1 1Norfolk State University, Center for Materials Research, Norfolk, VA 23504 Abstract Along with the increasing demand for inexpensive sources of energy, the conservation of natural resources has also been a lingering concern. An appealing alternative to current energy-generating processes is the harvesting of solar energy through the use of polymer-based photovoltaics. Several outstanding factors illuminate the desire for organic polymeric materials over currently used inorganic materials for the production of solar cells. Since a suitable organic material is required for the construction of these devices, these materials may be investigated at the molecular level. This study concentrates on the oligomers (up to three repeat units) of a suitable electron acceptor component of an organic donor-acceptor pair for the generation of electrical current in solar cells. 130


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS The excitation energies of the oligomers are obtained from the HOMO-LUMO energy differences of geometrically optimized molecules. The acceptor in a –Bridge-Donor-Bridge-Acceptor- (-B-D-BA-) block copolymer system is an electron withdrawing alkyl-sulfone derivatized polyphenylenevinylene (SF-PPV). This acceptor has been experimentally investigated in the novel nano-phased separated block copolymer system and preliminary theoretical results for structure and energy gap are compared to experimental results. These computations are based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) employing the B3LYP hybrid function. Gaussian basis sets, 3-21g* and 631g* are used to obtain the optimal geometric conformation suitable for the system under investigation. The energy gap value obtained theoretically was 2.44eV was found to be in close agreement with the value obtained experimentally which was reported to be 2.4eV. Theoretically, both the HOMO and LUMO values extrapolated were found to differ by about 1eV but these inaccuracies were found to have no apparent effect on the overall accuracy of the final energy gap value obtained.

4:00-4:15

“Prediction Of Excited States For Carbon, Nitrogen And Oxygen Systems Using Quantum Monte Carlo” Floyd A. Fayton Jr, Ainsley A. Gibson, and John A.W. Harkless* Department of Chemistry, Howard University Washington, DC 20059 Abstract

Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) refers to a class of ab initio methods that use a stochastic simulation to solve the many-body Schrödinger equation. QMC differs from post-Hartree Fock methods in that it includes electron correlation explicitly. Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) and Variational Monte Carlo (VMC) are applied to elucidate the thermodynamic and electronic properties of reactions of nitrogen plasma with carbon in an oxygenated environment. In order to reach that goal, excited states of the atomic and binary compounds of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen were estimated in order to illustrate the ability to accurately describe the range of reactions that may occur. These structures include, CN, NO, CO, N2, O2, C2, and selected excited states of the constituent elements. In order to show the accuracy of various electronic structure techniques (DMC, VMC, B3LYP/6-31G*, MP2/6-31G*, and CI/6-31G*) values were compared against experiment.

131


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 4:15-4:30

“Ab Initio Insight On The Interaction Of Ascorbate With Li+, Na+, K+, Be2+, Mg2+, And Ca2+ Metal Cations”

Reeshemah N. Allen, M. K. Shukla, and Jerzy Leszczynski Computational Center for Molecular Structure and Interactions, Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217 Abstract The structures and interactions of ascorbate with Li+, Na+, K+, Be2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ metal cations were studied at the density functional theory level employing the B3LYP exchange correlation functional and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The interactions of the metal cations at the different basic sites of ascorbate were considered. Tomasi’s polarized continuum model was used to evaluate the influence of aqueous solvent on the relative stability of different complexes. The interaction energies for the complexes were corrected for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) using the counterpoise method. The AIM theory was used to characterize the electron density distribution involved in the binding interaction between ascorbate and the metal cations. In the gas phase, the most preferred position for the interaction of Li+, Na+, and K+ cations is found to be between the O2 and O3 sites of urate, while all divalent cations Be2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ prefer binding between the O1 and O2 sites of urate. However all of the metal cations possessed the largest binding energy toward the O6 and O7 sites.

4:30-4:45

“An Oniom Investigation: Modeling The Adsorption Of 2-Methyl-4Nitroaniline (Mna) Onto The Hydrogen-Terminated 2 X1 Si (100) Surface” Dr. Suely M. Black1, 2* and Sheena M. Inge1 1 Center for Materials Research, 2 Department of Chemistry Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Va. 23504, Abstract

Materials obtained by deposition of organic layers on inorganic substrates may lead to the development of novel devices. Combination of non-linear optical properties of MNA with processability of silicon may lead to applications in electronic devices preparation and design. This study aims to determine the orientation of MNA on the H/Si (100) surface. The long-term goal is to determine the least expensive, yet reliable, theoretical method and model system to describe the adsorption of organic molecular compounds on inorganic surfaces. The inorganic surface was modeled by a limited number of silicon atoms from the infinite crystal with the dangling bonds terminated with hydrogen atoms. The Si31H46 cluster was used in this investigation. The organic and inorganic systems were optimized with different theoretical approaches, and then brought together for constrained geometry optimizations using ONIOM, a multi-theory level method. The 132


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS results are strongly dependent on the theoretical approach as well as the constraints applied to the Silicon cluster. The Density Functional Theory and the 2nd order Moller-Plesset Theory were utilized during this investigation to compare and contrast the individual methods. The system’s bond lengths, dipole moments, and energies were computed. The Density Functional Theory was applied with three different basis sets, 6-31G**, 3-21G**, and 3-21G while the 2nd Moller-Plesset Theory with the 6-31G**. The final orientations displayed the differences that the 2nd MollerPlesset Theory and the Density Functional Theory in handling long-range interactions such as van der Waals forces. The adsorption energies were calculated by subtracting the individual energies from the combined systems. The final adsorption energies were 3.263 kcal/mole for the DFT using 6-31G**, 7.844 kcal/mole for the DFT using 3-21G**, and 41.35 kcal/mole for the DFT using 3-21G. The final adsorption energy for the MP2 using a 6-31G** basis set was 31.81 kcal/mole. Each of the above mentioned H-Si/MNA system had the Silicon atoms constrained. The constrained bulk calculation for the DFT method had an adsorption energy of 22.53 kcal/mole using a 3-21G** basis set. The MP2, for the constrained H-Si cluster using a 6-31G** basis set, yielded an adsorption energy of 20.70 kcal/mole. The other computed properties will also be discussed.

4:45-5:00

“Nitrosyl Sulfuric Acid Structure And Spectroscopy: Comparison Of Experimental Results And Quantum Chemical Calculations” Vernon R. Morris and Serenella Linares Department of Chemistry Howard University Washington, DC 20059

Abstract There are two compelling reasons for the study of Nitrosyl Sulfuric Acid (NSA). First, it may provide an additional heterogeneous mechanism for stratospheric aerosols active in the ozone depletion mechanism. Second, it may be the primary component of the mode III particles in the atmosphere of Venus. Highly accurate structural and spectroscopic information on NSA is not readily available due to the difficulty encountered in isolating it as a pure substance from environmental samples and laboratory slurries. Additionally, the specific mechanism for the formation of NSA in the atmosphere remains unknown. Quantum chemical calculations have been used to obtain geometrical structures, harmonic frequencies, and enthalpies of formation for two isomers of NSA. Three of the most probable formation reactions for NOHSO4 have been analyzed. A comparison between the computed IR frequencies of crystals synthesized in our laboratory and the experimental spectrum are presented.

133


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Thursday, PM Session Chair 3:15-3:30

Technical Session # 11 3:30 - 5:00 Biochemistry Dr. Derrick K. Rollins, Iowa State University

Brentwood

Presenters â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mutagenicity Of N-(Deoxyguanosin-8-Yl)-1-Aminopyrene Adduct In Simian Kidney Cellsâ&#x20AC;? Danielle L. Watt and Ashis Basu* University of Connecticut, Department of Chemistry Storrs Mansfield, CT 06269 Abstract

N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-1-aminopyrene (AP-dG) is the major DNA adduct formed in a cell following metabolism of 1-Nitropyrene, a carcinogenic nitro-aromatic compound found in grilled food and environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust and coal fly ash. Nitroreduction is the major metabolic pathway resulting in the formation of AP-dG. HO

O2N

NADPH

cytochrome c

+ HN

DNA

H 2N

O

N HN

1-Nitropyrene

Nitrenium ion

O

OH

N N

NH

N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-1-aminopyrene

AP-dG is reported to induce frame shift mutations in Escherchia coli and induce DNA polymerase stalling. In addition, base substitutions, predominantly G to T transversions, are observed in APdG induced mutations in E. coli. To investigate the mutagenicity of AP-dG in mammalian cells, a short fragment of DNA containing the adduct was chemically synthesized in a non-repetitive CGC sequence. The adducted oligonucleotide was incorporated in single stranded pMS2 DNA and then introduced into simian kidney cells, where the DNA replication and repair systems were expected to process the DNA adduct. The progeny DNA molecules were isolated and the mutagenic effect of AP-dG was studied. The targeted G to T transversion was observed in addition to other base substitutions. Therefore, AP-dG is mutagenic in monkey kidney cells.

134


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 3:30-3:45

“Stoichiometric Inhibition Of Amyloid -Protein Aggregation With Peptides Containing C  -Disubstituted Amino Acid Amyloid Protein Aggregation Inhibition”

Marcus. A. Etienne1*, Cyrus K. Bett1, Jed. P. Aucoin1, Tim. J. Jensen1, Robin. L. McCarley1, Ted. Ajmo2, Donna. Herber2, David. Morgan2, and Robert. P. Hammer1* 1Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, 2Alzheimer Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612 Abstract The -amyloid peptide (A ) is thought to aggregate via a nucleation process where micellar aggregates propagate to form oligimers (protofribrils) which then polymerizes into insoluble fibrils. This fibrillogenic process has been linked to the pathogenesis associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have previously shown that novel peptide based inhibitors consisting of C disubstituted amino acids incorporated at alternating positions in the hydrophobic core of A (KLVFFA) were capable of binding to the A sequence. The current study elucidates the aggregation mechanism in the presence of the peptide based inhibitors. Using these inhibitors, we have discovered an alternate A nucleation pathway. Our experimental results showed that in the presence of the peptide based inhibitors, A aggregation was facilitated more rapidly as compared to the control. CD, SFM, and TEM results showed that we are capable of forming stable micellar aggregates that orient in -sheet secondary structures. MTT cell viability assays, using PC-12 cells and cortical rat neurons, of the -sheet aggregates indicated a reduction in A cytotoxcity. In vivo assays were performed where inhibitors were injected into the hippocampus of mice that were previously infected with The in vitro results were in good correlation to in vivo studies which showed reduction of amyloid plaque.

3:45-4:00

“Spectroscopic Studies Of A Prokaryotic Nitric Oxide Synthase With Magnetic Circular Dichroism”

Ryan D. Kinloch1, Masanori Sono1, Jawahar Sudhamsu2, Brian R. Crane2, and John H. Dawson*1 1University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29210 2Cornell University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Ithaca, NY 14853 Abstract Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-arginine to nitric oxide (NO) and citruilline via an N-hydroxy-L -arginine intermediate. Mammalian NOS has been studied quite extensively, while other eukaryotes and some prokaryotes appear to express proteins comparable to the mammalian form of NOS. A clone of an NOS-like protein from the thermostable 135


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS bacterium Geobacillius stearothermophilus (gsNOS) has been characterized spectroscopically using electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism. Spectral comparisons of various ligand complexes of gsNOS in the presence of the L-arginine substrate and the N-hydroxy-L-arginine intermediate, including the key oxyferrous intermediate, with analogous mammalian NOS complexes lead to greater insight into the catalytic mechanism of NOS and its homologs.

4:15-4:30

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Increasing Specificity In The Identification Of Biological Particles Using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS)â&#x20AC;?

Erica L. McJimpsey*1, Paul T. Steele2, Keith R. Coffee2, David P. Fergenson2, Vincent J. Riot2, Bruce W. Woods2, Eric E. Gard2, Matthias Frank2, Herbert J. Tobias2, Carlito B. Lebrilla1 1University of California-Davis, Department of Chemistry, Davis, CA 95616 2Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry Group, Livermore, CA 94550 Abstract Recent threats with Bacillus anthracis, anthrax, have heightened global concern over bioterrorism and underscored the need for early detection. A field deployable, Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) instrument is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the real-time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere through an aerodynamic lens for focusing and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is probed by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Those particles with appropriate fluorescence are desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are then analyzed in a dual polarity, time-offlight mass spectrometer. During a field deployment at the San Francisco International Airport, ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores. Nonetheless, few are believed to be spores. Further separation of background particles from potentially biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Although this enabled some level of species differentiation, mass signatures were limited to peaks under 300m/z. Identification of microorganisms using mass spectrometry demands robust detection due to the limited number of large mass, taxonomically relevant molecules within a single cell. Therefore, observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity. For this purpose, the well-established technique of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for bulk samples is being studied and applied to the analysis of individual aerosol particles in BAMS. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would otherwise fragment under normal irradiation. Additionally, instrumental design modifications allowing for higher mass ion transmissions have been incorporated. Results from a modified BAMS system comparing MALDI and laser desorption/ionization techniques for biologically relevant particles will be presented. 136


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS â&#x20AC;&#x153;Block-Oriented Adaptive On-Line Modeling For Time Varying Systemsâ&#x20AC;? Derrick K. Rollins*1, 2, Stephanie Loveland1, and Ola Shadiya1 1Iowa State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ames, IA 50010 2Iowa State University, Department of Statistics, Ames, IA 50010

4:30-4:45

Abstract The development and maintenance of accurate predictive models for dynamic systems are highly challenged by system complexity, limited information (i.e., data), changing cross and time correlation structures and changing model parameters. Thus, for a model or modeling method to achieve long term success in implementation into a real system, it must be phenomenologically sound and adaptive, as well as being capable of immediate update from recently obtained process data (i.e., plant data). A model is phenomenologically sound when its structure accurately captures physical input and output relationships, and the stochastic behavior of process and measurement noise. On-line adaptive methods are critical to success because process variations that cause changes to noise correlation structures and model coefficients are frequent in real systems. A common occurrence in non-adaptive, off-line, model identification is the requirement of a new model by the time the model is ready for implementation due to significant process variations. For a method to have on-line adaptive abilities, it must be capable of using process data (which have a low signal to noise ratio, and limited range over the operating space) to update its fitting performance. Most approaches in the systems engineering literature are discrete-time (DT) methods that take a state space approach. Model building typically estimates exogenous (physical) structure, stochastic structure, and model coefficients simultaneously under some optimization criterion, such as minimum SSE. However, the approach of this work is a continuous-time (CT), closed form one, which separately builds and updates exogenous and stochastic model structures using expert knowledge off-line (a human) and on-line (an algorithm). A critical advantage of a CT approach over a DT approach is that it is able to make effective and immediate use of data that are taken infrequently and at different sampling times. This may not be a critical advantage, say in a chemical process, where all variables are sampled often and at the same time, but it can be in an application like blood glucose modeling when inputs such as food intake occur infrequently and out of sequence with glucose measurements. Our block-oriented, gray box approach determines all model structures off-line in separate stages using, preferably, statistically designed data, but can also use plant data for this step. This step also produces estimates of all model coefficients based on the process conditions contained in the off-line data set. Note that, we obtain the stochastic model structure using results from autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation analysis. In the online mode, model accuracy is tested frequently, and the model is updated using a knowledge driven algorithm and recent plant data. This talk will present results from a real distillation process. In this study a series of daily tests will be run, where the model from the previous day is no longer valid at the start of the day due to a change in an unmeasured disturbance variable (such as feed composition). During the first part of each day, data will be collected under limited changes in input variables and used to automatically update the model. The output data in the second part of the day will be compared 137


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS predicted values from the updated model. We will evaluate both simulation predictions from the model and one-step-ahead (OSA) predictions.

4:45-5:00

“A Novel Data Mining Method To Identify Assay-Specific Signatures In Functional Genomic Studies”

Derrick K. Rollins, Sr.*1, 2, Dongmei Zhai1, 2, Jack W. Guidarelli1, and Ramon Gonzalez3 1Iowa State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ames, IA 50010 2 Iowa State University, Department of Statistics, Ames, IA 50010 3Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251 Abstract As a dimensionality reduction technique, principal component analysis (PCA) has proven to be a useful tool in functional genomic (FG) studies, especially in the analysis and interpretation of DNA microarray data. However, most current methods require identifiable structures in two dimensional loading plots which may not exists, are based on eigengenes (EGs), and have critical limitations in identifying assay-specific signatures. Therefore, this talk presents a novel PCA-based approach that overcomes these limitations. The proposed method (PM) applies eigenassay (EA) type eigenvectors and demonstrate their superiority over the commonly used EG type eigenvectors. Another unique contribution of the PM is the development of ranked genecontribution plots and the use of their distinctive features to identify assay-specific signatures. Inflection points and regions of maximum curvature in these plots provide cut-offs to define both the complete set of genes composing a signature and the best subset. The strengths of the PM are demonstrated using a simulation study, and two studies of real DNA microarray data – a study of classification of human tissue samples (Genome Res. 12, 1112-20, 2002) and a study of E. coli cultures with different medium formulations (Biotechnol. Prog. 19, 612-23, 2003). The PM effectively identified assay-specific signatures in ranked groups of genes from the full data set in a more efficient and simplistic procedure than current approaches. Although this work demonstrates the ability of the PM to identify assay-specific signatures in DNA microarray experiments, this approach is also very valuable for similar studies in areas such as proteomics and metabolomics.

138


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS

Session Chair

Technical Session # 12 9:00 - 11:50 Materials Chemistry Dr. Jimmie Williams, Corning Incorporated

Presenters 9:00-9:15

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carbon Nanotube Synthesis For Thermal Interface Applicationsâ&#x20AC;?

Friday, AM

Westwood

Baratunde A. Cola*1, 2, Jun Xu1,2, Placidus Amama1,2, Changrui Cheng1, Xianfan Xu1,2, and Timothy S. Fisher1, 2 1School of Mechanical Engineering 2 Birck Nanotechnology Center Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 Abstract The trend of increasing microprocessor power density accelerates the need for advanced heat dissipation schemes. As a result of this trend, reducing the heat sink/processor chip interface thermal resistance is pivotal in allowing for reliable chip operation. In this study carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are explored for their potential as a low resistance, dry thermal interface material. CNT synthesis conditions are varied in attempt to elucidate the effects of synthesis parameters and CNT structure on the thermal performance of CNT array interfaces. A photoacoustic technique is used to investigate the resistance to heat flow of an interface created by sandwiching a CNT array synthesized atop, and adhered to a silicon (Si) substrate between the Si substrate and a copper (Cu) disk. The photoacoustic technique is a minimally intrusive technique that involves laser heating of the sample, and the indirect determination of the samples temperature gradient from a pressure (acoustic) signal. From this information the thermal resistance of the CNT interface is determined. The thermal resistance of Si-CNT-Cu interfaces is measured for CNT arrays of different structure, grown from different recipes. CNT arrays around 10 um in height and of moderate density demonstrated the best thermal performance. In general, the addition of the CNT array to the Si-Cu interface is observed to reduce the interface resistance by more than 100%. This reduction in resistance is thought to be the result of the increased contact area provided by the CNT array, and the intrinsically high thermal conductivity of the CNTs.

139


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 9:15-9:30

“Temperature Dependence Of Orbital Mediated Tunneling” Bryan Wiggins, Brett Gyarfas, and K W Hipps* NSF REU Program (Grant #0453554) Summer 2005 Materials Science program Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 Abstract

Electrical conduction through molecules is primarily via tunneling -- either resonance or through space. In this study we provide the first data on the temperature dependence of resonance (orbital mediated) tunneling through individual orbitals in a molecule. The redox active cobalt(II) phthalocyanine (CoPc) monolayer on gold was chosen as the subject of this study because both its scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image and its orbital mediated tunneling spectra (OMTS) are well understood. Spectra were measured in the range from 300K to 100K in two completely separate experiments for both CoPc on Au(111) and clean Au(111). As predicted by conventional theories, the OMTS band due to the first unoccupied orbital of CoPc narrows as temperature decreases, but that its area remains constant. On the other hand, the OMTS band associated with the first ionization of the ring increases in intensity by about 25%. This second result is completely unexpected in the context of the above mentioned conventional theories. In order to understand this behavior, a more complex model of the resonant molecular tunneling process is required. The Hipps laboratory is presently exploring such a theoretical model and plans to develop supportive experimental which includes the present results.

9:50-10:05

“Ptcda Doped Metal (Cu, Zn, Ni) Phthalocyanine Thin Films For Photovoltaic Cells”

Harold D. Cooper *1 and Kang Seo1,2 1Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504 2 Applied Research Center, Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, VA 23606 Abstract We have investigated the fundamental growth behavior of metal-phthalocyanine (MPc) doped with perylene-3, 4, 9, 10 -tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) deposited on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) substrates under high vacuum. The ultra high vacuum (UHV) organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD) chamber provided a slow growth rate that allowed the organic materials to grow in very thin layers, keeping the system contamination free. This particular design of OMBD system allowed us to use spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) for real time monitoring of the growth process. The ellipsometric measurements gave us the thickness of each organic layer at deposit, along with the optical constants n and k values. Next these organic thin films were characterized by grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and ultraviolet – 140


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis). GIXS technique gave the orientation of each deposited layer on the substrate. AFM confirmed changes in the morphology of the surface of the sample. The UV-Vis spectrum showed that doping CuPc with PTCDA was an improvement in its absorption region by expanding it from 400-800nm. These techniques were evidence that the family of phthalocyanine is useful for the construction of photovoltaic cells.

10:05-10:20

“Ceramic Substrates For Chemical Processing”

Jimmie L. Williams Corning Incorporated, Crystalline Materials Research, Corning, NY 14831 Abstract The success of cordierite monoliths as catalyst supports for automotive and diesel exhaust aftertreatment has given rise to their use in other catalytic applications. For many of these applications the requirements are not as severe as for automotive e.g. high temperature thermal shock and low expansion. Therefore many types of materials can be used. Substrates can be either metal oxides or non-metal oxides with high or low surface area. They can be washcoated with a high surface area metal oxide as support for deposition of catalyst or coextruded directly with catalyst as active body. The use of monoliths in multi-phase reactors is of interest as possible replacement for slurry and fixed bed reactors. Monolith reactors offer the advantage of thinner walls, high geometric surface area, low pressure drop, good mass transfer, and ease of product separation. This paper describes processing and application of monoliths for the chemical processing and refining industries.

10:20-10:35

“Measurement Of The Optical Properties Of Donor And Acceptor Derivatized Ppv Block Copolymers”

Kizzy M. Winston*, Carl E. Bonner, Sam-Shajing Sun, and Chang Zhang Norfolk State University, Center for Photonic Materials Research, Norfolk, VA. 23504 Abstract Recent measurements of the photocurrent and mobility of conjugated polymer based photovoltaic cells ahs bee performed. Two types of PV cells were prepared and compared, one with the active layer containing electron donating and electron withdrawing derivatized PPV polymers blended together and one with the active layer composed of those covalently bonded PPV block co-polymers in a DBAB arrangement. The DBAB block has been shown to increase the exciton dissociation rate, and an increase in the mobility, photocurrent, and efficiency in these polymer based photovoltaic in comparison with the devices constructed with the acceptor/donor blend.

141


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 10:35-10:50

“Sol-Gel Synthesis Of Thick Ta2o5 Films For Photonic Band Gap Materials” Nicholas Ndiege*, Tabitha Wilhoite, Vaidyanathan Subramanian, Mark A. Shannon and Richard I. Masel** Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL-61801 Abstract

Advances in microelectro-mechanical systems has generated an ever growing demand for novel insulating material applicable to high temperature systems. Photonic bandgap materials are appealing for such applications, specifically Ta2O5 due to its high index of refraction, refractory nature and negligible absorbance in the infrared region. The challenge faced in the realization of such materials is the synthesis of crack free Ta2O5 films whose thickness is in the order of a quarter wavelength of the incident infrared radiation. This work seeks to investigate the effect of addition of polyvinyl pyrollidone (PVP) as a binder material in the sol gel synthesis of thick, uniform and crack free Ta2O5 films. Incorporation of PVP into the sol precursor has enabled uniform and crack free films with thicknesses of up to 2.4 microns to be realized. Chemical probing of the precursor was conducted via TGA, FTIR, and NMR analysis of the sol to elucidate the processes behind this film formation. The calcined oxide films were characterized via SEM, XRD and XPS.

10:55 -11:10

“Computational Analysis Of Platinum Oligomer And Polymer Ground States And Triplet States”

Tomekia Simeon1, Jean-Philippe Blaudeau2*, and Jerzy Leszczynski1 1Jackson State University, Department of Chemistry, Jackson, MS 39217 2Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 Abstract The set of materials based on based on platinum-acetylide Л-conjugated oligomers has prompted great interest in recent years for their potential applications in photonics. In these compounds the Л –orbitals of the ligands are conjugated with the d orbitals of the Pt, allowing for charge migration along the oligomers. We are interesting in understanding the role of the platinum in the photophysical properties. For this study, we used density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate the geometry, molecular orbitals and vibrational spectra of the ground state and lowest energy singlet and triplet states. From the results, it has been concluded that most of the transition is aligned along the actelylene phenyl axis and the LUMO electronic density is predominately due to the phenyl rings. 142


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 11:10-11:40

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Surface Plasmon Resonance In Nano Probing Interactionsâ&#x20AC;? Jude C. Abanulo and James W. Mitchell* Nanotechnology Center, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059

Abstract We report on the development of the first integrated optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor that combines an optical and electrochemical interrogating technique in sensing electrochemically addressed layers over a gold film. This device brings together the advantages of the analytical technique of surface plasmon resonance and of cyclic voltammetry on a single chip that exhibits portability, miniaturization capability and compatibility with optical fibre. The integrated optical chip allows the potential introduction of a large number of sensing pads on a single chip thus allowing the acquisition of precise information about a test compound while simultaneously monitoring different test compounds in the same sensing area. The integrated optical surface plasmon resonance (IOSPR) devices were applied in the study of the oxidation of gold and the removal of the oxide layer in real time. The optical response to the oxidation process was similar to those reported in the literature using ellipsometry and or reflectance spectroscopy. Here the IOSPR device performed better, giving transmittance changes of 60 % in response to the formation of an oxide film. The introduction of a monolayer of copper onto the gold surface of the device via the underpotential deposition process was monitored for the first time using the surface plasmon technique. Here the response and performance of the device was compared with other reported studies in the literature, which combined an optical and electrochemical technique for similar analysis. The IOSPR device performed better with 10 % change in transmittance in comparison to a change of 1 % reported for reflectance measurements. In response to our present research focus in nanotechnology, the system is being readapted to study SPR and its application in sensing and enhancing detection systems. Ag and Au are noble metal nanoparticles, well known for their strong interactions with visible light through the resonant excitations of the collective oscillations of the conduction electrons within the particles. This phenomenon induces a strong absorption maximum, called the surface plasmon resonance. The resulting local electromagnetic fields near the particle can be many orders of magnitude higher than the incident fields. This local-field enhancement and strong scattering of the incident light have been proven to be very unique for biomolecular manipulation, labeling, detection and as Plasmon waveguides. The recent discovery of single-molecule sensitivity of Raman scattering enhanced by resonantly excited metal nanoparticles has caused a renewed interest in surfaceenhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and its application to molecular detection, a research focus presently undertaken at the Howard University Nanotechnology Characterization Center.

143


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 11:40 – 11:55

“Application Of Recyclable, Polymer-Immobilized Iodine(III) Oxidants In Catalytic C–H Bond Functionalization” Eric W. Kalberer, Salena R. Whitfield and Melanie S. Sanford* Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 930 North University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Eric W. Kalberer, Salena R. Whitfield and Melanie S. Sanford* Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Abstract This presentation will describe the palladium-catalyzed oxidative functionalization of arene and alkane C–H bonds using the polymer-immobilized iodine(III) oxidant poly-4-(diacetoxyiodo)styrene (PS–I(OAc)2) and its derivatives. These transformations have been applied to a wide variety of arene and alkane substrates, and the polymer-immobilized iodine(I) byproducts are readily recovered and recycled in these reactions.

144


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS Friday, AM Session Chair

Technical Session # 13 9:00 - 10:20 AM Brentwood Organic Chemistry II Dr. Shawn Abernathy, Chemistry Department, Howard University, Washington, DC Presenters â&#x20AC;&#x153;Synthesis, Characterization And Biological Studies Of Isoporphyrinsâ&#x20AC;?

3:00-3:15

Celinah Mwakwari* and Kevin M. Smith Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803 Abstract Due to their absorption at long wavelengths, isoporphyrins (1) (porphyrin isomers), are potential candidates as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment. They are also of both chemical and biological interest due to their unique redox behavior among porphyrin derivatives. Isoporphyrins are known to be very unstable with respect to transformation back to the fully conjugated porphyrin chromophore (2) except when a meso-carbon is germinally substituted (3) and for to this reason a detailed study of this macrocycle has previously been prevented. However, a synthetic route by way of open-chain tetrapyrrole precussors has been developed to afford the target compound as its metal complex form and other porphyrin derivatives. Stability studies have also been done to yield and characterize novel stable metal-free isoporphyrins. These compounds have also been studied for their biological properties applicable to photodynamic therapy, a binary modality for cancer treatment. The total synthesis, stability studies and biological applications will be presented. H

H 5

5

N

N

N

HN 15

20

NH

N

10

1

R

R

N

N

N

HN

20 N

HN

10 15

2

3

145

R= Me,


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 9:15-9:30

“Liquid Crystals And Self Assembled Monolayers: Improving On An Immunosensor Design”

Dwight A. Williams and Suzanne Ruder* Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Chemistry, Richmond, VA 23284 Abstract There is an increasing need for fast, accurate, repeatable, and economical methods for the analysis of environmental pollutants. Immunosensors utilizing surface immobilized antibodies (Ab) have recently emerged as a means of detecting a variety of environmental pollutants. The most common methods for immobilizing antibodies (Ab) onto solid supports are though self assembled monolayers (SAM) of long alkyl chains containing functional groups that are reactive towards the Ab at the terminus. Previous studies using this SAM method have shown great potential for the development of immunosensors. However, by changing the structure of the molecule that is used to immobilize the Ab onto the solid support, improvements in the functionality of the immunosensor may be achieved. The research presented here includes the synthesis of directionally polarized liquid crystalline (LC) materials containing Narylhydroxylamines that are capable of covalently binding active antibody, as well as forming SAM on gold electrode surfaces. The potential effectiveness of the synthesized LC materials to covalently bind Ab through the hydroxylamine and their potential surface characteristics will also be discussed. The key synthetic steps in preparing the LC materials are Sonogashira’s cross coupling reaction and a transition metal catalyzed reduction of the aromatic nitro group to the Narylhydroxylamine.

9:35-10:50

“Studies Toward The Synthesis Of Spiroisoxazolines”

Erick D. Ellis, Jun Wang and Ashton T. Hamme Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Engineering and Technology Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi Abstract A series of natural products isolated from the sponge of Verongida have been intensively studied due to the presence of alkaloids with one, or more bromotyrosine residues. Many of these alkaloid metabolites show interesting bioactivity and cytotoxic properties in tumor cell lines. 11Deoxyfistularin-3 (1) is cytotoxic against human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Many of these bromotyrosine natural products posses the spiroisoxazoline moiety. The purpose of this project was to find a synthetic methodology towards the synthesis of the spiroisoxazoline ring core. The synthesis of the 4,5-dihydroisoxazole precursor to an analogue of 11-deoxfistularin-3 was accomplished by using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition with a functionalized alkene. The synthesis of 2acetyl-4-methylene-pentanedioic acid diethyl ester was accomplished through the addition of sodium hydride to ethylacetoacetate which then reacted with 2-bromomethyl-acrylic acid ethyl 146


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS ester. The cycloaddition of 2-acetyl-4-methylene-pentanedioic acid diethyl ester with phenyl hydroximoyl chloride using triethylamine in dichloromethane afforded only the 5,5 disubstituted 4,5-dihydroisoxazole regioisomer. The synthesis of the spiroisoxazoline, 8-Methoxy-3-phenyl-1oxa-2-aza-spiro[4.5]deca-2,7-dien-6-one, was accomplished through the cyclization and alkylation of the decarboxylated isoxazoline precursor, 5-(3-Oxo-butyl)-3-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-isoxazole-5carboxylic acid ethyl ester. Acknowledgments: This research was financially supported by: NIH SCORE Grant Award Number SO6 GM008047-31, NIH-RCMI Grant Award Number G12RR13459-07S1, NSF-RISE Grant Award Number HRD0401730

9:50-10:05

“Development Of The Bridged Robinson Annulation And Its Application In Synthesis” Michael E. Jung*1, Hisham O. Eissa1, Andreas Maderna2 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 2Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Costa Mesa, CA 92626

Abstract A new acid-promoted condensation of ketones and cyclic enones has been developed producing bridged enones in good yield. These compounds have previously been accessible only through multi-step synthesis involving cycloadditions. The effects of the acid, solvent and the reaction time on the yield has been detailed. Additionally, an unprecedented rearrangement of the reaction products has been discovered producing lactones. The efficiency of this rearrangement has also been studied. Finally, the use of this reaction in the synthesis and structure determination of a new clerodane diterpene will be presented.

10:05-10:20

“Synthesis And Development Of Peptide Based Borono-Lectins (PBLS) For Selective Saccharide Sensing”

Dana L. Broughton*1, Yuejiao Zou1, John J. Lavigne1, Paul R. Thompson1 1University of South Carolina, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbia, SC 29208. Abstract Boronic acids are well established as efficient binders for carbohydrates in aqueous media. Defining a precise spatial orientation between two boronic acids is a common method used to obtain selectivity for binding different saccharides. Detection and quantification of simple monosaccharides is of interest for the treatment of diseases such as diabetes. In addition, more complex carbohydrates and glycoproteins have been associated with the presence of numerous cancers and other infectious diseases. Here we illustrate that Peptide based Borono-Lectins (PBL)s can be used to readily develop selective sugar binders. The peptide not only serves as a backbone/support on which to mount the boronic acids, but the amino acid side-chains introduce 147


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS additional diversity to aid in defining the sensor selectivity towards specific sugar containing molecules. Progress towards the development of dye displacement assays for sensor development will also be discussed.

Friday, AM Session Chair Presenters 10:30-10:45

Technical Session # 14 10:30 AM - 12:00 N Organic Chemistry III Dr. Zachary Cross, GlaxoSmithKline

Brentwood

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tri-Cationic Porphyrins: Synthesis, Structure And Interactions With DNA â&#x20AC;&#x153;

Kim Andrews and David R. McMillin* Purdue University, Department of Chemistry, West Lafayette, IN 47907 Abstract In conjunction with photodynamic therapy, porphyrins offer a promising non-invasive modality for targeting diseased cells or viruses. Selectivity is possible because the cytotoxic response extends only to the irradiated cell mass. An added bonus is that tumor cells are often unusually avid at taking up the photosensitizer [1]. Porphyrins are attractive sensitizers because they absorb well into the red end of the visible spectrum, i. e., at wavelengths that penetrate tissue relatively efficiently [1]. Hence, a new class of sterically non-demanding porphyrins have been synthesized via a microwave, one-pot methodology. Theses porphyrins are being used to identify, evaluate and characterize how DNA binding motifs that vary with the meso substituents on the porphyrins. In structural studies of an intercalated form of the Cu(T4) derivative, Williams and coworkers identified what may be the critical steric issue for an intercalated form of the porphyrin. In particular, clashes occur in the minor groove due to the fact that two pyridiniumyl groups have to wedge between the sugar-phosphate chains [2]. To strike a balance between electrostatic and steric forces, we have synthesized cationic tris (N-methyl pyridinium-4-yl) porphyrins since they have fewer bulky aryl substituents and yet preserve a charge of +3. Binding interactions of two new cationic porphyrin systems were characterized by a number of physical methods including absorbance, emission, CD spectroscopies as well as viscometry. It was observed that the binding interactions do indeed depend upon the base composition of the DNA. The decisive roles that structural rigidity and steric factors play in shaping adduct formation with DNA have become clear. [1] N. Lane, Sci. Am. 200 (No.1) (2003) 38. [2] L.A. Lipscomb, F.X, Zhou, S.R. Presnell, R.J. Woo, M.E. Peek, R.R. Plaskon and L.D. Williams, Biochemistry 35 (1996) 2818.

148


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 10:45-11:00

“Synthesis Of Water-Soluble N-Acyl Derivatives For Characterization As Bactericidal Agents “

Lakia M. Champagne*, William H. Daly Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Abstract Currently, natural polysaccharides are being utilized increasingly in the markets because they exhibit versatility, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and are found abundant in nature. The diversity of natural polysaccharides provides the chemist with a broad spectrum of raw materials that can be used in many different applications. Chitosan is a polysaccharide that displays excellent versatility and is recognized for it’s bactericidal properties, in that it is destructive towards the bacterium Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus Aureus. Innovative procedures to modify chitosan are proposed to optimize the polymer’s bactericidal properties. Optimization is achieved by substituting the backbone of chitosan with distinctive anhydrides and lactones, and by introducing an epoxide derivative of Quat-188 (N-3-chloro-2-hydroxyl propyl trimethyl ammonium chloride), to the polymer to render it water-soluble over an entire range of pH’s and enhance it’s bactericidal properties. Substituting the backbone of chitosan proceeds through a nucleophilic bimolecular substitution (SN2) mechanism. The products of the reaction are classified as N-acyl derivatives. The anti-bacterial activity of these water-soluble N-acyl derivatives was studied using the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Test, employing cell culture solutions of Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) and Staphylococcus Aureus (S. Aureus). This test indicates the minimum concentration necessary to inhibit the growth of a population of microorganisms. When MIC values obtained are lower than or equal to 32ug/mL, materials are classified as good inhibitory growth agents. Results obtained for some of the chitosan-lactone and chitosan-anhydride derivatives include MIC values as low as 16ug/mL. Therefore, these materials are promising as anti-bacterial agents for rendering Home-Care, Personal-Care, and other Surface-Care products more effective.

149


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS 11:00 – 11:15

“Controlling Factors For Rhodium-Catalyzed Enantioselective C-H Functionalization Versus Cyclopropanation” Michael G. Coleman and Huw M.L. Davies*, University at Buffalo, Department of Chemistry, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 Abstract

Enantioselective C-H functionalization by rhodium carbenoids is a broadly useful reaction for organic synthesis. Br cyclopropanation C-H functionalization

R

R

N2

+ Ar

CO2Me

Rh(II)

and/or

CO2Me

MeO2C

benzene double cyclopropanation

Ar

R

This presentation will define what factors govern selectivity for allylic C-H functionalization over cyclopropanation.

11:25-11:40

“A Review Of Microwave Assisted Organic Synthesis”

Zachary C. Cross* GlaxoSmithKline, Research and Development, Department of Chemical Development, Strategic Technologies, King of Prussia, PA 19406 Abstract This review highlights some of the most recent applications and trends in microwave assisted organic synthesis. The pharmaceutical industry is constantly working to improve research and development productivity. However, lead compound optimization and medicinal chemistry continue to be the bottlenecks in the drug discovery process. With drug patents near expiration in the next decade and an average cost of $800 million dollars to bring biologically active drugs to the market it is critical that new technologies which provide shorter reaction times, expansive reaction diversity, reagent and solvent economy, and reproducible results be investigated. The initial reports of microwave heating to accelerate organic chemical transformations were in 1986 by the groups of Gedye & Gipuere/Majetich. They used a domestic household microwave oven to perform the hydrolysis of benzamide to give the corresponding benzoic acid. In the last twenty years microwave chemistry has evolved from the standard “kitchen microwave” to dedicated systems such as the MARS and Discover platforms by CEM, MicroSYNTH/START and 150


TECHNICAL ABSTRACTS FlowSYNTH by Milestone, and the Emrys Advancer and Initiator platforms by Biotage. Examples of microwave assisted organic synthesis include C-C bond forming reactions, heteroatom bond formations, transition metal catalyzed carbonylations, asymmetric alkylations, and solid phase synthesis. The objective of this review is two fold the first is to provide current examples of known synthetic transformations which apply microwave technology, and the second is to help clarify the mystery factor that microwave chemistry still has.

11:40 – 11:55

“Synthesis Of Quaternary Salt Derivatives” Nicole Fleming*, Angela Winstead Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, Baltimore, MD 21251

CHEMISTRY AND ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES Are you interested in working in a dynamic, growth oriented environment and being part of a successful, global company? If so, then we would like you to consider joining our team. PPG Industries is a global supplier of coatings, glass, fiberglass and chemicals. The company has over 50 production facilities in the United States and 120 locations worldwide. Our company is offering several career opportunities in Chemistry and Engineering. PPG aims to be the leader in each of its major industries while generating superior, consistent financial performance. The company’s continuing emphasis on development of breakthrough products and processes, investment in highly productive manufacturing facilities and profitable global expansion combine to provide customers with the best services and products of highest quality. We are committed to providing a fulfilling workplace for our employees, creating an environment for continuous learning and embracing the ideas and diversity of others. The candidate must have a GPA of 2.8 or above and be eligible to work in the United States as a Permanent Resident or U.S. Citizen. Geographic flexibility is required. To find out more about PPG and see our full job descriptions, visit our website at www.ppg.com. An Equal Opportunity Employer

151


We’re making the world better, safer, healthier, stronger, smarter, cleaner, easier, quieter, greener, faster, cooler, clearer, bolder, brighter, wiser, neater, prouder, friendlier one discovery at a time. imagine. Making a difference – one discovery at a time. Imagine a place that lets you challenge “what if?” Imagine surrounding yourself with the tools, facilities, and freedom that make changing the world a reality. At Argonne National Laboratory, you’ll partner with world-class talent and enjoy a freedom that allows you to improve the world we call home. Imagine that. Visit our web site at www.anl.gov to learn more about our exciting career opportunities. Argonne is an Equal Opportunity Employer and we value diversity in our workforce.

www.anl.gov


POSTER ABSTRACTS

Wednesday, PM

Exhibitor Mixer/Poster Session 5:00 - 6:30 PM

California Ballroom

Posters (ʺTitle,ʺ Presenter, Co-Author(s), Affiliation 1

“Transfection Of The Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (Ahr) Into The A Human B-Cell Lymphoma (SKW 6.4)” Andre’ P. Clay, Robert B. Crawford*, and Norbert Kaminski* Center for Environmental Toxicology and Department of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 Abstract

2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminate that produces suppression of primary antibody responses as measured by a decrease in immunoglobulin M (IgM) by B-cells. This lab has established that suppression of IgM by TCDD is aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) dependent. This immune suppression by TCDD has been well established in animal models and the mechanism of immunosuppression of humans is not known. The SKW 6.4 is a human B-cell lymphoma when activated shows an increase in secreted IgM antibody response. This cell line does not express the AhR, confirmed by RT-PCR and by western analysis. Establishing a human model on the actions of TCDD on the B-cell will help elucidate the mechanism by which TCDD works. My objective is to first optimize the transfection efficiency by electroporation of the SKW 6.4 cell line and then to create a stable SKW 6.4 cell line that expresses the human AhR. Once the stable cell line has been identified and has a functional AhR (cyp1A1 induction by TCDD), I will start to characterize the effect of dioxin on the IgM secretion on the activated SKW 6.4 cell line.

2

“Optical Properties Of Molecules And Molecular Aggregates Adsorbed On Solid Surfaces. First Principle Study” Alexander V. Gavrilenko*, Vladimir I. Gavrilenko, Carl E. Bonner Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504 Abstract

Equilibrium atomic geometry of Ferrocene adsorbed on Si(111) surface is studied using density functional theory. Equilibrium atomic geometry is obtained through total energy minimization method. Electron energy structure and optical properties are calculated using generalized gradient approximation method with ab initio pseudopotentials. Modifications of electronic surface structures of Si(111) caused by the adsorption of molecules as well as charge transfer between 153


POSTER ABSTRACTS molecules and solids are studied. Calculated optical absorption spectra are interpreted in terms of inter-molecular and molecular-solid interactions. Results of the calculations are discussed in comparison with experimental data.

3

“Polymers Made From Replenisabe Resources: Polyurethanes Based On Oleochemical Polyols” Anna-Gay Nelson1, Dr. George Armstrong*2 1Tougaloo College, Natural Science Department, Tougaloo MS, 39174 Abstract

Polyurethanes are the single most versatile family of polymers due to their extensive hydrogen bonding, which causes them to be great insulators, elastomers, block copolymers and soft rubbery polymers. Polyurethanes were synthesized based on 4, 4-diisocyanato diphenylmethane (MDI), butanediol, and soft segments containing oleochemical polyols (pripol 2033 and polyTHF) made from fatty acid dimers (replenisable resources). These polyurethanes were optimized for novel synthesis to get high modulus and good toughness. The polyurethanes were synthesized by reacting a polyol and butanediol in the presence of a catalyst. They were characterized and analyzed by the Size Exclusion Chromatography method of the HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) and physical properties by the Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). From the synthesis of polyurethanes that shows varying characteristics in their durability, hardness, flexibility, and elasticity, the IR Spectrum was used to depict if the polyurethanes were accurately prepared. The isocyanate group of the MDI has a very strong absorption peak between 2000-2500 1/cm; these peaks were not present in the absorption spectra of the synthesized polyurethanes, hence were accurately prepared. Water absorption studies of the polyurethanes showed that the soft segment reduced the absorption of water into these polymers. All the polyurethanes synthesized in the study had no absorption for the isocyanate group showing that the reactions were complete. It was also noted that the synthesis reaction with polyTHF produced a better polymer than that of pripol. The polyurethane with a high polyol content produces a more flexible and brittle polymer than a reaction with a low polyol content.

4

“Enzyme-Catalyzed Polyester Degradation: I) Protein Engineering Of Fusarium Solani Cutinase For Hydrolysis Of Polyesters “ Arthur W. Martin, Richard A. Gross Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences Polytechnic University, 98 Tech Place, Brooklyn, NY 11201 ABSTRACT

The goal of this study is the development of cutinases with extraordinary activity for hydrolysis of polyesters. While many polyesters were studied, a primary target was the efficient hydrolysis of 154


POSTER ABSTRACTS poly(ω-hydroxyfatty acids). The model polymer used for this work was synthesized by lipasecatalyzed ring-opening of ω-pentadecalactone. This polymer was designed to have similar properties to polyethylene. However, since it is built from “fuel latent” molecules, its degradation will provide hydroxyfatty acid that, after esterification, will be useful in liquid fuel formulations. The other goal of this work was to embed the developed enzymes within polyesters to “trigger” or accelerate their degradation. Examples of where this concept could be used include for selfcleaning surfaces or the release of bioactive materials from particles or films. The design and construction of genes that encode recombinant cutinases obtained from Fusarium solanii was performed at DNA2.0. Growth, induction and purification of Fusarium solanii Cutinase variants expressed in Pichia pastoris was performed. Cutinase variants were assessed for their hydrolytic activity of films consisting of poly(ω-pentadecalactone), poly(ε-caprolactone), poly(lactic acid), poly(hydoxy butyrate-co-hexanoate) by weight loss measurements. The structures and distribution of water soluble products was determined by an LC system equipped with a photodiode array and on-line mass detectors. The series of cutinase variants was also assessed for its activity to hydrolyze poly(ethylene terephthalate). Water soluble degradation products formed were analyzed by fluorescent spectroscopy. The fluorescent species were created by hydroxylation of the symmetric terephthalic acid ions to create one isomer of hydroxyl- terephthalic acid which can be excited at 315 nm and characterized by emission at 425 nm. The novel protein engineering strategy used in the design of cutinase variants lead to a high fraction of active variants in round one and large improvements in round two. The cutinase variants from Fusarium solani pisi expressed in Pichia pastoris was successfully transformed to secrete at high levels, the wild-type cutinase from Fusarim solani along with 76 variants first round cutinase and 94 second round cutinase. SDS-PAGE analysis and p-nitrophenyl butyrate assays have shown that the His-tag labeled wild-type, along with 76 first round cutinase variants and 94 second round cutinase variants from Fusarim solanii are secreted by Pichia pastoris in high purity. Cutinase activity tested by the hydrolysis of p-Nitrophenol Butyrate resulted in a 3-5 fold increase in activity of second round over first round variants. The activity of these variants were also studied on polyesters such as poly(pentadecalactone), poly(ε-caprolactone), poly(lactic acid) and poly(ethylene terepthalate). This provided an opportunity to explore structure-activity relationships for a broad range of polyester substrates. Polyester degrading activity in round two was improved over round one, for all polyesters examined except for poly(lactic acid), in which there was an actual decrease in activity for round two. In depth analysis of weight loss measurements demonstrated that in round two, poly(pentadecalactone) degradation reached 35% as compared to 11% for the wild type (3-fold improvement). Variants with activity greater than the wild type for poly(ε-caprolactone) degradation was 12% and 40% in rounds one and two, respectively. A poly(ε-caprolactone) degrading variant with an eight fold improvement was developed. Poly(ε-caprolactone) has proven to be an excellent model substrate for designing variants with improved activity for poly(pentadecalactone) degradation. Analysis of the water soluble products from poly(pentadecalactone) by LC-MS has shown peak area produced for variants to be in accordance with weight loss measurements, in addition almost equal amounts of monomer and dimer were formed for most variants. On the other poly(ε-caprolactone) water soluble products consisted of monomer, dimer, trimer and tetramer for some variants, with monomer being the predominant degradation product. In the case of poly(lactic acid) degradation, weight loss measurements indicated that variants with activity greater than the wild type was < 10% in round 1 and statistically insignificant in round two. Of the 10% of variants that was active 155


POSTER ABSTRACTS as much as 75% degradation was achieved. Furthermore, LC-MS was able to confirm water soluble degradation products of lactic acid monomer, and diastereoisomers of both LL and DL dimer. For poly(ethylene terethphalate) hydrolysis, 50% of variants were more active than wild type cutinase in round one as opposed to 80 % in round two when analyzed by fluorescent spectroscopy. Some variants with high polyester degrading activity also showed exceptional thermal stability up to 100o C. Up to 35% activity was retained in first round variants at 100o C (1 h) when normalized to 37o C.

5

“Predicting Biologically Important Properties Using Solubilities And The Abraham General Solvation Model” Chelsea K.A. Givensa, Stephanie Keownb, Dawn M. Stovallb, Kaci R. Hooverb William E. Acree, Jr.*b and Michael H. Abrahamc aNASA University Research Center, Texas Southern University Houston, Texas 77004, USA bDepartment of Chemistry, P.O. Box 305070, University of North Texas Denton, TX 76203-5070 (USA) cDepartment of Chemistry, University College London London, WC1H 0AJ (UK) Abstract

The Abraham General Salvation Model is used to calculate the numerical values of the solute descriptors for 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzoic, 2-chloro-5-nitrobenzoic acid, and ascorbic acid from experimental solubilities in organic solvents. The mathematical correlations take the form of log (CS/CW) = c + e·E + s·S + a·A + b·B + v·V log (CS/CG) = c + e·E + s·S + a·A + b·B + l·L where CS and CW refer to the solute solubility in the organic solvent and water, respectively, CG is a gas phase concentration; E is the solute excess molar refraction; V is McGowan volume of the solute; A and B are the measures of the solute hydrogen-bond acidity and hydrogen-bond basicity; S denotes the solute dipolarity/polarizability descriptor; L is the logarithm of the solute gas phase dimensionless Ostwald partition coefficient into hexadecane at 298 K. The remaining symbols in the above expressions are known solvent coefficients, which have been determined previously for a large number of gas/solvent and water /solvent systems. The Abraham General Salvation Model was then used to predict difficult to find biological properties by using easily determined chemical properties. Examples of the difficult to find biological properties were tissue/air partition coefficients, tissue/blood partition coefficients, and skin permeation. The easily determined chemical properties consisted of saturation solubilities, partition coefficients, and chromatographic retention times. The Abraham General Salvation Model was found to describe the experimental solubility data of 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzoic acid, 2-chloro-5-nitrobenzoic acid, and ascorbic acid to within overall standard deviations of 0.067, 0.113, and 0.110 log units, respectively. 156


POSTER ABSTRACTS 6

“The Synthesis And Analysis Of Magnetic Nanoparticles” Apollonia McMillan1, Dr. Kelley Bradley2, and Dr. Antony Jeeverajan2 1NASA University Research Center, Texas Southern University, Texas 77004 2 Human Adaptation & Countermeasures, NASA-JSC, Houston, Texas 77058 Abstract

It’s very difficult to study the effects of microgravity. The cost and time for doing so is tremendous. The synthesis of magnetite on the nanoscale has recently become a field of intense study. Because of their technological and fundamental importance, the development of uniformsized particles is being pursued. The purpose of this experiment is to determine the best centrifuge conditions that will yield a high, even distribution of the smallest nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were synthesized from iron (II) and (III) chloride, and analyzed by using an Atomic Force Microscope. It was previously thought that the centrifugation process was for either too long or too fast; however, it was discovered that it is best to either centrifuge the particles faster or longer. References • • • •

• • •

7

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atominc_force_microscope>. 7 June 2005. Berger, Patricia and Lesinsky, G.C. “Preparation and Properties of an aqueous ferofluid”. Journal of Chemistry Education. 1999: 943-948. How AFM Works. <http://stm2.nrt.navy.mil/how-afm/how-afm.html>. 7 June 2005. Lee, Seung-Jun and Kim Jong-Duk. “Synthesis and Characterization of Superparamagnetic Maghemite Nanoparticles Prepared by Coprecipitation Technique”. Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials. 204: 147-150. Magnetite. <http://en.wikipedia.org?wiki?Magnetite>. 8 June 2005. Seer, John. Lab Notebook. Tiefenauer, L.X. Kuhne, G. and Andres, R.Y. “Antibody-Magnetite Nanoparticles: In Vitro Characterization of a Potential Tumor-Specific Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging”. Bioconjugate Chem. 1993:347-352

“System Identification For Type 2 Diabetics” Amber L. Strohbehn1 and Derrick K. Rollins*1, 2 1Iowa State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ames, IA 50010 2 Iowa State University, Department of Statistics, Ames, IA 50010 Abstract

This talk will present research results in system identification for type 2 diabetic (TTD) subjects. In system identification, the goal is to develop a predictive model that can accurately map input behavior to output response. Thus, in system identification, one is interested in determining how inputs affect response behavior and not necessarily why. A secondary goal of system identification is often to determine cause and effect relationships between inputs and outputs to control output 157


POSTER ABSTRACTS response behavior by manipulating inputs. This research applies a continuous-time block-oriented system identification approach that has successfully modeled physical and biological systems. While TTD research has obtained general knowledge from highly controlled clinic studies for minimizing the effects of lifestyle behavior on high blood glucose levels, it has failed to produce an ability to accurately predictive glucose levels for a type 2 individual given their behavioral profile such as eating time, eating amounts, types of food eaten, exercising time, type of exercise, type of stress, amount of stress, etc. Having this predictive ability at their disposal, a medical worker could find a personalized behavioral profile that could significantly lower the patient’s HbA1c level as well as determine the impact of certain choices. For example, one could estimate the rise of their HbA1c from eating one additional cookie per day. Since TTD people do not all produce the same amount of effective insulin, it is not possible to know this for an individual without an effective way to model the individual. Therefore, the basic objective of this research is to demonstrate that through aggressive data collection of the major variables that affect glucose level of a TTD subject, that this approach is able to accurately model their glucose level. This model will provide knowledge on specific ways that lifestyle changes for the individual can optimize (i.e., minimize) glucose level. This work modeled the second author, who is TTD, over a four-week period and this talk will present these results that compare predicted glucose values from the model with measured values of the subject. Upon successful completion of this research, future phases will investigate issues of efficient and simple data collection, model building, and training of medical personnel to use this approach to reduce glucose levels of their patients.

8

“Synthesis And Characterization Of Polymethylmethacrylate And Poly(Methylmethacrylate Co-1H, 1H, 4H-Hexafluorobutyl Methacrylate)” Crystal D. Brown1, Dr. George Armstrong*1 1Tougaloo College, Natural Science Department, Tougaloo, MS 39174 Abstract

In this project we studied the difference in the physical properties of solution polymerized PMMA and precipitated polymerized PMMA, as well as the difference in the physical properties of PMMA and MMA/HBMA (1H,1H, 4H-Hexafluorobutyl methacrylate) copolymers. For the synthesis of the polymer, free radical polymerization was used. Surface tension was measured using a dyne test fluid method. A method was developed to calculate the molecular weight of synthesized polymethylmethacrylate by analyzing them against polystyrene standards. The solutions were run at 0.5ml/min in THF using the HPLC with a Size Exclusion column. The vinyl polymer, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), was synthesized by solution and precipitation polymerization. The polymer was very hard and rigid. When solution polymerization was done the polymer was in solution. Precipitation polymerization resulted in a polymethylmethacrylate in precipitate. According the data, sample 1, solution polymerization containing benzene, has the lowest molecular weight, 11,660 and sample 5 a precipitation polymerization polymer, containing the same amount of methylmethacrylate as sample 1 has the highest molecular weight at 56,729. These results clearly show that higher molecular weights are 158


POSTER ABSTRACTS obtained in precipitation polymerization. The surface energy of PMMA is 41 dynes/cm. When tested, the surface energy the polymethylmethacrylate was found to be higher than that of the MMA/HBMA (1H, 1H, 4H-Hexafluorobutyl methacrylate) copolymer. Increasing the amount of 1H, 1H, 4H-Hexafluorobutyl methacrylate in the copolymer should give lower surface energy. According to the data obtained, there was very little difference in the FTIR spectra of the solution and precipitation polymerization methods. The same results were evident in the FTIR spectrum of polymethylmethacrylate and MMA/HBMA (1H, 1H, 4H-Hexafluorobutyl methacrylate) copolymers. It can also be concluded that precipitation polymerization results in higher molecular weight averages. In the determination of the surface energy, the results showed that the PMMA copolymers have very similar surface energy measurements. On the contrary, the copolymer and the PMMA have slight differences in their surface energy measurements. Increasing the amount of 1H, 1H, 4H-Hexafluorobutyl methacrylate in the copolymer should give lower surface energy.

9

“Using ADMET Predictor To Measure Parameters Of Heterocyclic Molecules” Carmine Leggett and Leyte Winfield, Ph.D.* Spelman College, Chemistry Department, Atlanta, GA 30314

Abstract There are increasing efforts to improve research in the organic synthesis of molecules that are intended for medicinal purposes. Many techniques are used to explain the rationale behind the design of a molecule. Software is rapidly being developed to assist in this process, enlarging the arena of computer aided drug design. The software has the ability to predict the structure activity relationship (SAR) of compounds. The technology was utilized to compile information regarding the biochemical and physical properties of many organic molecules synthesized in research laboratories. The absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and toxicity (ADMET) properties of drug-like chemicals can be determined from its molecular structure, using the ADMET Predictor®. The software was used to determine various physiochemical properties of some heterocyclic molecules in this research. Our hypothesis: By altering the structural and electronic nature of the 3-N-aryl substituent of template 1, a set of molecules with varied lipophilicities can be generated. The results of the studies will be presented.

10

“Observing The Products Formed From Heated Motor Oil Using High Resolution NMR” Carmela Wingfield, Debbie Lee, and Shawn M. Abernathy*, Ph.D. Howard University, Chemistry Department, Washington, DC

Abstract In this investigation, the effect of temperature on various motor oils and transmission fluid was examined using NMR spectroscopy. Motor oil is used to lubricate the moving parts, i.e. piston, in combustion engines. Overtime, a breakdown in the oil viscosity occurs due to the raise in temperature and friction generated from the movement of the pistons. During this process, the 159


POSTER ABSTRACTS motor oil undergoes changes in which different residual chemical products are formed. Several motor oil products were heated over an array of temperatures and examined by 1H and 13C NMR as well as UV-vis spectroscopy. The spectra obtained, at the designated temperatures, were compared to examine the products formed as the oil viscosity changed.

11

“A Comparative Study Of Harris County National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Outfall Screening Data” Carla L. Wyatt, Oscar Criner, Sherri Dunlap, Lee Graham Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas 77004 Abstract

Harris County, has a population of 3.6 million, and is the third most populous county in the United States. There are over 30 municipalities within the county, including the City of Houston, which is the fourth largest city in the country. Over 1.2 million people live in unincorporated areas of Harris County who along with the individuals in the incorporated areas rely on the more than 2,500 miles of channels which encompass 21 watersheds to provide flood damage reduction. The purpose of this study is to create a historical timeline of water quality outfall data collected at selected watershed locations in the unincorporated areas of Harris County. This timeline will be based upon data collected from screening information used to obtain the original National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the Houston-Harris County area (which regulates stormwater quality). The NPDES regulations require that municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4) serving a population of 100,000 or more and certain industrial activities (including some construction activities) obtain NPDES permit coverage for storm water discharged to waters of the United States. As a result the timeline will be established using the data collected over a five year period. This data was used to satisfy the NPDES permit application requirement for issue date 2000. The goal of looking at the fives years of NPDES outfall sampling analytical data is to establish a timeline to quantitative water quality since the inception of the NPDES stormwater program to present conditions. The examined data will establish trends of pollutants in different watersheds with varying development patterns to discern if clear trends can be established. The timeline will be based on the time series of water quality screening data of outfalls for the period of record and be based upon, matching known sampling sites relative to past screening information with ambiguous location information recorded. In addition the information will be used to look at development patterns such as impervious land covering’s impact on water quality based on land use changes due to commercial and residential development and other urban land use changes.

160


POSTER ABSTRACTS 12

“Intercalation Of Small Molecules Into Organic Solids” Danyell C. Coleman and Alicia M. Beatty*, Department of Chemistry, Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS 39762 Abstract

The goal of the research is to study the intercalation of small molecules into hydrogen-bonded organic host solids. The synthesis of the host complex is carried out by deprotonation of 3, 5pyrazoledicarboxylic acid (H2PzDCA) with primary amines such as benzylamine, octylamine, and isopropylamine. The structure of these complexes shows hydrogen bonding between repeating units of the HPzDCA anion. This forms a layered structure with the help of hydrogen bonding between HPzDCA and the ammonium ions, leading to bilayer patterns. The host complexes were characterized by NMR and melting point. Having the host complexes in hand, a number of guest molecules are currently studied to test their intercalation capabilities. Two methods of intercalation are solid-solid and liquid-solid. The guest-host intercalation is preformed by using sonication techniques. The intercalations between the quest molecules and the host complexes will be analyzed by performing DSC and TGA techniques.

13

“The Purification Of Pam In The Biosynthetic Pathway Of Taxol” Dominique Hopkins, Karin Klettke, Dr. Kevin D. Walker* Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 Abstract

Phenylalanine aminomutase (PAM) is an enzyme that converts 2S-α-phenylalanine to 3R-βphenylalanine by catalyzing the migration of NH2 from C2 to C3. This migration is the first step of the semi-synthesis of Taxol from Baccatin III, a precursor of Taxol that is found in the needles of the English Yew tree. Taxol increases the quantity of tublin within microtubules. The microtubules create spindle fibers which conduct the transporting of the chromosomes to each pole of the cell. As a result of increasing the tubulin with Taxol, the microtubules become stabilized which interrupts and prevents the mitosis of a cell. Since α- phenylalanine is a primary metabolite utilized by the enzyme, PAM shows to be important to research since several other plant enzymes also utilize this substrate. Characterizing the properties of PAM may help advance the understanding of other plant amino mutases. Characteristics of that have been discovered so far are: it’s a protein of 698 residues with a calculated molecular mass of 76,530 Da. The recombinant enzyme has a pH optimum of 8.5, a kcat value of 0.015s^-1, and a km of 45 +/- 8 um for 2S-alphaphenylalanine (1). Purification using Ni affinity and salt anion exchange column was used with PAM to obtain a concentrated pure enzyme stock. This stock was used to help characterize PAM through various enzymatic studies. The purified and concentrated protein was also submitted for protein crystallization so x-ray diffraction analysis could be performed. All of this information can 161


POSTER ABSTRACTS begin to be pieced together which will help researchers become one step closer to the goal of increasing the yield of Taxol in the natural biosynthetic pathway. 1.

14

Walker, Kevin D “Cloning, Heterologous Expression, and Characterization of a Phenylalanine Aminomutase Involved in Taxol Biosynthesis” Journal of Biological Chemistry. 24 December 2004

“Using NMR To Observe Dioxin Absorbed In Store Purchased Ground Beef” Darrell Maxwell, Healey LeCator, Shawn M. Abernathy*, Ph.D. Howard University, Department of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059

Abstract Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (dioxins) are highly toxic halogentated aromatic hydrocarbons inadvertently introduced into the environment. In general, dioxins are produced by the incineration of coal, waste, wood, PVC (polyvinyl chloride) and other fuel sources. Dioxins are emitted into the atmosphere as exhaust particles and deposit onto environmental surfaces. The toxins are ultimately introduced into our beef supply from grazing cattle, where it accumulated in the fatty tissues of these animals. The intent of this qualitative investigation is to deposit trace amounts of dioxin into store purchased ground beef via the combustion of PVC piping and identify it using NMR. The dioxin absorbed into the ground beef was extracted using cyclohexane. 1H NMR spectra of the extracts will be acquired to determine whether dioxin(s) has been absorbed in the meat. Resonance peaks in the region from 7.00 to 7.5 ppm’s verify the presence of dioxin in the meat product. Additionally, 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2, 3, 7, 8-TCDD) was used as reference material to confirm the presents of dioxin absorbed in the meat.

15

“Synthesis And Characterization Of Funtionalized Polypyrrole And The Impact Of Anti-DNP Antibodies On Nanofiber Conductance.” Darkeyah Reuven and Ishrat M. Khan, Department of Chemistry, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314 Abstract

Synthesis, modification and characterization of electronic conductive functionalized poly(pyrroles). To develop DNP functionalized conductive nanofibers. These will be evaluated as biosensor material to determine whether changes in the electrostatic charges from surface adsorption of anti-DNP antibodies can be detected, and this will be quantified for specificity and sensitivity. The resultant system will potentially offer the advantages of label-free bioaffinity sensing and real-time detection of single molecule. In addition, to being environmentally stable, relatively easy to process and biocompatible.

162


POSTER ABSTRACTS 16

“The Use Of Microwave Heating To Study The Mechanism Of Heat Flow In An Immiscible Liquid System” *Dawn Walker and Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University Baltimore, Maryland 21251 Abstract

Information about how heat is transferred between two phases of an immiscible liquid system is not fully understood. The hydrophobic effect has been suspected to affect the heat flow between the polar and nonpolar phases of this system. The hydrophobic effect is a process that occurs at the interface of the immiscible liquid, but the heat that is transferred and absorbed between the phases is the “effect” of the process. The features of the CEM MDS-2000 microwave can be utilized to study the heating trends of any immiscible liquid system. The microwave’s flexibility has allowed the integration of a multi-temperature measuring device and multi-cavity sample vessel. The multi-cavity vessel has openings, which permit specific regions of the immiscible liquid to be measured. The measurement of the temperature in different regions is practical and essential to this study of understanding how heat flows in an immiscible liquid system.

17

“Determination Of Corrosion Inhibitors In Synthetic Black Liquor“ Esinam Glakpe and Preet Singh Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30318

Abstract: Corrosion is an unavoidable occurrence in the pulp and paper mill industry that contributes to downtime and required equipment replacement. Research to determine the cause and preventative methods for corrosion are of high interest in order to reduce the amount of financial loss incurred in industry. Prior work has revealed that the organic components of black liquor used in the pulping process contribute to corrosion. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of water soluble extractives in synthetic black liquor on 516-GR70 carbon steel corrosion. The extractives evaluated were catechol, pyrogallol, and β-sitosterol. The data recorded for each trial run was a potentiodynamic polarization scan. The results of this test were used to determine the superior chemical inhibitors for carbon steel in solution. In addition to varying the extract in solution, the effect of temperature on corrosivity was evaluated by varying the temperature between two settings for each trial. Pyrogallol was found as the best inhibitor at low temperatures and β-sitosterol was selected for high temperatures.

163


POSTER ABSTRACTS 18

“Analytical Investigation Of The Importance Of Vitamin B12 For Vegetarians & The Elderly” Evelyn A. Wolfe, Ph.D.*, Nikisha Joseph , Kelesha Sarjeant, Tricia Edmund, Jerome Williams, Angela Bruno St. Francis College Chemistry & Physics Department, Brooklyn Heights, New York 11201 Abstract

HPLC was used to investigate the concentration of vitamin B12 in spinach, soy, milk, cheddar cheese, veggie burger and meat. This information is necessary since vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly may cause dementia, chronic fatigue syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, peripheral neuropathies, Alzheimer’s disease, muscular dystrophy and neurological aging. It acts as a cofactor for methionine syntase in the conversion of homocysteine to methionine, thus lowering blood levels of homocysteine. A 5 µmol/L increment in total plasma homocysteine has been associated with a 49% increase in all-cause of mortality among individuals 65–72 years of age, and as many as 20% of people over age 65 have low vitamin B12 levels. Correcting the deficiency can help older people resume full and normal lives. Scientific research also shows that vegetarians are healthier than meat-eaters However vitamin B12 is a genuine issue for vegetarians since only animals can ingest the microorganisms that produce this chemical. Vitamin B12 is a complex organometallic compound and is a member of the vitamin B complex group. It is a water-soluble vitamin that consists of several natural organometallic derivatives based on a trivalent cobalt ion, Co (III) bound to a corrin ring. A Lunar HPLC column which gave a more hydrophobic analysis was used, and a linear calibration model was generated based on the chromatographic peak heights produced by a series of vitamin standard solutions. The calibration model was then employed as a reliable determination of the different food items. This study confirmed that the only reliable source of vitamin B12 is meat, dairy products, and veggie burger.

19

“Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR) Of Antibacterial Fatty Acids” Ezekeil H. Hudson II*1, Brooke Woodard2, and Shavon Clark3. Texas Southern University, 3100 Cleburne, Houston, TX 77004, Department of Chemistry, Texas Southern University Abstract

Networking bacteria essentially is the basis of gram-positive bacteria conclusively transmitting communication mechanisms cell-to-cell. This signaling phenomenon is now indisputably known as quorum sensing. In initiating the emergence of bacteria upon rigid surfaces, a quorum must be reached in order to form biofilm. Biofilim will not be achieved until a desired quorum population at large has unanimously reached a critical level. Many chemicals present in bacterial entities will act as signaling derivatives for bacterium. In gram-negative bacteria acylated homoserine lactones 164


POSTER ABSTRACTS (acyl-HSL) are the active signaling derivative. However, in gram-positive bacteria, it is typically found to be fatty acids. A group of fatty acids known to be active in that respect will be used to create a table for structure activity relation ships. SYBYL 7.1 (Tripos, Inc. St. Louis, MO) software will then be used to build structures, achieve energy minimizations, and construct conformational analogs. Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), a module of SYBYL 7.1, will then be used to derive models correlating structure and activity relationships of fatty acids. The outcome of this research will enable us to elucidate the chemical nature and structural requirements for designing novel chemicals that exhibit much more potent activity and selectivity towards bacterial quorum sensing thereby providing a new tool for controlling undesirable biofilm formation.

20

“Profiling TE 10β-Acetyltransferase Of The Taxol Biosynthetic Pathway: Assessment Of The Regio- And Substrate Specificity And In Vivo Production Of Baccatin III In E. Coli” Erin Merriweather, Catherine Loncaric, Kevin D. Walker* Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 Abstract

The 10β-acetyltransferase on the biosynthetic pathway of the antineoplastic drug, Taxol, catalyzes the regiospecific transfer of the acetyl group of acetyl coenzyme A to 10-deacetylbaccatin III. We demonstrate that in addition to acetyl group transfer, the over expressed enzyme also catalyzes the exchange of propionyl and n-butanoyl from the corresponding coenzyme A thioester to the hydroxyl group at C10 of the cosubstrate. Also in vivo studies revealed that E. coli, producing endogenous acetyl coenzyme A and over expressing the recombinant acetyltransferase, can convert exogenously supplied 10-deacylbaccatin III to baccatin III.

21

“Investigation Of Air Tolerance Of Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) In Polymer Grafting” Geoffrey O. Okelo, Xinhui Lou, and Lin He Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 Abstract:

We report a systematic investigation of ATRP reaction kinetics in the presence of limited amount of air. The study is carried out by pre-immobilizing thiolated ATRP initiators, 2mercaptoethyl bromoisobutylamide on Au surfaces. 2-Hydroxyethyl-methacrylate (HEMA) is the chosen monomer for our study, and the Cu (I)/bispyridine-based complex with various additives is used as the system catalyst. The film thickness upon reaction termination is measured using an Ellipsometer and is used to evaluate the grafting efficiency. A comparison of polymer growth in 165


POSTER ABSTRACTS the presence/absence of Ar-purging is carried out to understand the radical quenching effect of oxygen. Our results show that the synthesis of PHEMA films in a limited amount of air at room temperature can be achieved with the addition of Cu (0) as the reducing reagent. The presence of Cu (0) removes the residual oxygen molecules in solution and controls the rate of polymerization with its oxidized form Cu (II) ions. In addition, an increase in polymer thickness is experienced. The optimal amount of Cu(0) in solution and the corresponding ratio of Cu (0)/Cu (I)/Cu (II) is examined, and the reaction kinetics is investigated. Overall our study shows the feasibility of eliminating the cumbersome purging process and makes the ATRP reactions more portable and time-efficient.

22

“Characterization Of Maldi Sample Prepared By Different Deposition Methods Using Surface Profiling Techniques, Microscopy And Mass Spectrometry“ Harrison K. Musyimi, Steven A. Soper* and Kermit K. Murray* Department of Chemistry and Center for BioModular Multi-Scale Systems (CBM2) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803

Abstract Sample preparations in matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is critical for optimal performance. Most often, sample preparations are plagued with inhomogeneity and sweet spots thereby increasing analysis time and hence a bottleneck in high throughput sampling. Sample preparation has also been reported as important in improving the limits of detection, sensitivity and mass resolution. However, MALDI mechanism still remains less well understood and most of the work reported does not offer sufficient explanation to the observed phenomena. We will describe the characterization of samples prepared using different deposition techniques in efforts to investigate the influence and extend of sample morphology on performance and success of MALDI experiments. Samples prepared using traditional dried droplet method, electrospray and nebulization were characterized and studied using surface profiling techniques, microscopy and mass spectrometry. Preliminary results showing trends from samples prepared using different deposition techniques will be presented.

23

“Industrial Products From Renewable Resources: Industrial Lubricants Based On Soy Bean Oil” Jennifer Fisher1 and Dr. George Armstrong*1 1Tougaloo College, Natural Science Department, Tougaloo, MS 39174 Abstract

Industrial Lubricants are extremely important is any industrialized society. The science of tribology is a study of friction and wear. Lubricants prevent or reduce wear. All moving parts of manufacturing machinery, automobiles, transportation vehicles, etc. depend on lubricants for 166


POSTER ABSTRACTS proper functioning. Most lubricants based on nonrenewable resources (petroleum) will eventually run out. The development of lubricants from renewable resources is an important endeavor. We prepared lubricants based on soy bean oil (renewable resource) by transestefication of soy bean oil with ethanol, and then re-transesterification of the fatty acid ethyl esters with longer chain alcohols, including a perfluoro alcohol. The lubricants were evaluated for reduction of friction in comparison to soy bean oil and paraffin oil.

24

“Optimization Of Insitu Chemical Oxidation Via The Elucidation Of Key Mechanistic Processes Impacting Technology Maturation And Development Of Effective Application Protocol” Krystle D. Roberts, Dr. Mark E. Zappi*, John M. Harden, Dr. W. Todd French Mississippi State University Environmental Technology Laboratory Dave. C. Swalm School of Chemical Engineering Mississippi State, MS, 39762 Abstract

Over the past several years, insitu chemical oxidation (ISCO) has become a viable remediation option for the treatment of organic pollutants. This process involves the application of chemical oxidizers (for example, Fenton’s Reagent and ozonation) into soil resulting in the degradation of pollutants within a contaminated aquifer. While insitu chemical oxidation has recently been proven to be both economically and technically feasible for some sites, little research has been directed towards the understanding of functioning mechanisms and soil-oxidizer-pollutant interactions that dictate both the economic and technical performance of the process from site to site. Because of these current limitations, this research was undertaken to address this lack of knowledge related to ISCO application. The results of this effort are being used to develop design guidance and application protocols for ISCO. Using past research, several key known oxidizer scavengers were selected and soil specimens collected from across the US that have extremely high levels of one of the targeted scavengers and low levels of the others. This allows the project team to focus on which scavenging species is problematic to soil remediation using ISCO. Soil types under evaluation include ozonated filter sand (control), a high iron content soil, a high calcium content soil, a high organic content specimen, a biologically stimulated soil, a high pH soil, and an “average” soil. Each soil specimen is tested using both batch slurry reactors and packed columns. The following parameters are measured to evaluate soil-oxidizer compatibility impacts: soil bacterial levels, sorption capacity, permeability, oxidizer concentrations, and humic fraction composition and concentration. Recent work has been performed to determine the rate of oxidizer degradation within soil and groundwater matrices. Additional studies have been performed to determine the effects of oxidation on the permeability of the soil, adsorption characteristics of the soil, and biomass populations within the soil.

167


POSTER ABSTRACTS 25

“Synthesis And Molecular Structure Of A Bimetallic Salen Complex Containing Zn And La: A Disorded Nitrate Group Dancing Between Two Metal Centers” Dyers, Leon, Jr; VanDerveer, Donald,; Bu, Xiu, R Abstract

A new heteronuclear complex containing a ZnII-LaIII pair was prepared from a new acyclic compartmental mononuclear salen complex, [(N,N’-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,2cyclohexyldiamine)-N,N’,O,O’]zinc(II). Structurally, this 3d-4f system features a disordered nitrate group straddled between two metal centers. The crystal structure was determined through X-ray diffraction at 173K: Triclinic Space group:P-1, Z=2. a = 8.2714(17), b = 13.484(3) (1) nm, and c = 13.898(3) (1) nm, α= 79.89(3), β = 76.67(3), and γ = 72.43(3) º. V = 1428.6(5) nm3, Dx = 1.812 g·cm3. (∆ρ)max = 1.510 enm3, (∆ρ)min = -1.503 enm3. Consequently, two water molecules were coordinated with the metal centers in the apical positions via the syn-geometry.

26

“Preliminary Analysis Of Volatile Organic Compounds (Vocs) And Trace Metals Present In The Fresno Community Drinking Water” Lindsey S. Scott*1, Denae King, Ph.D2, Richard Hajek, Ph.D2, Renard Thomas, Ph.D3, and Lovell Jones, Ph.D2 1NASA University Research Center, Texas Southern University, Houston TX, 77004 2UT MD Anderson Cancer Center CURE Summer Intern Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, 77004 2UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Center for Research on Minority Health, Houston, TX, 77054 Abstract

A safe drinking water supply is a high priority issue for safeguarding the health and well being of humans (Leeuwen 2000). Fresno is a small unincorporated community with a racial/ethnic makeup of 50% Hispanic/Latino, 27% African American, and 22% White Non Hispanic. Preliminary data from key informants and focus groups suggest residential concerns with the quality of their drinking water. In order to address the concerns of the residents, an environmental justice study was put into action through community based participatory research. The purpose of this study was to determine if the Fresno Community residents are at risk of exposure to Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and trace metals through the utilization of their drinking water. Samples were collected from 10 residents in the Fresno community: 5 residents whose source of water was a private well, and 5 residents whose source of water was the Municipal Utility District (MUD) system. Each sample was obtained from the residents’ kitchen faucet according to EPA Method 524.2 for VOCs and 200.8 for trace metals. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry were used to analyze the VOCs and trace metals, respectively. VOCs bromochloronitromethane, tribromomethane, and methylene chloride, 168


POSTER ABSTRACTS disinfection by-products (DBPs) were detected in the drinking water at unacceptable levels from MUD System Sources. Specifically, methylene chloride exceeded the EPA’s Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) in three of the MUD System Sources. VOCs were not detected in the drinking water of residents who had private wells. The trace metals detected in the drinking water did not exceed the MCLs set by the EPA.

27

“Definition Of Optimum Temperature Range For Catalytic Materials” Marja N. Mullings* Georgia Institute of Technology School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Atlanta, GA 30332 Technology School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Atlanta, GA 30332 Abstract

Industrial catalysts often employ metal, metal oxides and other metal compounds. One of the initial indications of catalytic activity is based on the ability of a material to chemisorb certain species such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. The chemisorption of these species is studied at room temperature conditions. However, most catalytic reactions are carried out at elevated temperatures, and room temperature chemisorption may or not mimic the catalytic performance at elevated temperatures. At lower temperatures, the amount of species chemisorbed may be limited by the kinetic considerations (adsorption rate too low), whereas at higher temperatures thermodynamics may limit the amount of chemisorption. Thus, for a reactantcatalytic surface combination, there would exist an optimum temperature range over which a reasonable amount of chemisorption can be observed. This project is aimed at defining this optimum temperature range for a catalytic surface. The project involves measuring the amount of carbon monoxide adsorbed on a metal surface as a function of temperature in the range of 25 °C to 500 °C. This will be followed by repeating the measurements for a variety of metals as well as metal oxides and other materials. Gas chromatography will be employed to measure the amount of gas chemisorbed. The results are expected to define a useful temperature range for a variety of catalytic candidates.

169


POSTER ABSTRACTS 28

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Calculation Of Structures And Energetics For Mercury Compounds In The Gas Phase And In Solutionâ&#x20AC;? John A. Tossell*, Merle D. Zimmermann University of Maryland, Chemistry Department College Park, MD 20910 Abstract

In modeling the transport of Hg it is important to know the stabilities, reactivities, and properties of the Hg compounds which may be involved. This is a difficult problem since many Hg compounds are very dangerous to work with, which has understandably discouraged experimental study. Hg is also an element for which relativistic effects are very large, causing its chemistry to differ greatly from that of other elements in its group, like Zn or Cd. Quantum mechanical procedures now exist for calculating the properties of Hg compounds which are safe, quick in modern computational environments, and which give results which are often more accurate and reliable than those obtained in experimental studies. We have recently evaluated structures and energetics for HgO (a species proposed for the Arctic), HgS and their various oligomers, as well as their crystalline solids. The stability of monomeric HgO and HgS are enormously less than suggested by the tabulated experimental data, although the small oligomers of these compounds are much more stable than the monomers. The discrepancy between calculated and tabulated stabilities of the monomers is as large as 50 kcal/mol. HgO and HgS are also extremely reactive, adding H2O or H2S, as well as reacting with the walls of their silicate containing vessels. Thus, much of the reactivity of Hg compounds which is apparently gas-phase may actually occur on their containing surfaces. We have also calculated structures, energetics, and formation constants for several Hg-containing species in solution, including chlorides and sulfides. This allows us to constrain the stabilities of Hg complexes with both SH- and polysulfides. A coordinated approach of this kind makes possible a unified data base of energetics to replace the tabulation of energetics from numerous old and new, unreliable and reliable experimental data sources. This work was supported by NSF Grant EAR-0001031 and DOE Grant DE-FG02-94ER14467.

170


POSTER ABSTRACTS 29

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Extraction And Characterization Cruceriferous Vegetablesâ&#x20AC;?

Of

Isothiocyanates

From

Various

N. Paul Nolen1, Bernadette Early2, Ayesha J. Mindingall3, Monica Frazier3, Pamela M. Leggett-Robinson*4 1Department of Animal Science; 2Department of Biology, 3CBR/RCMI, 4Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee University Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088 Abstract Diets rich in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, brussel sprouts, bok choy, and cauliflower, have been shown to lower the risks of one developing several cancers such as lung, pancreatic, breast and prostate cancer.1-3 This decrease in cancer development has been attributed to a constituent of cruciferous vegetables, isothiocyanate, a derivative from the family of glucosinolates.3,4 Previous data show that the specific effects of a particular ITC on the metabolism of a given carcinogen must be determined independently as they vary from one carcinogen to another.2,5 Moreover, the effects of ITCs are dependent on the methods used to isolate the extracts, the specific carcinogen studied, and the target tissue involved.4 Methodology for analysis have not been uniformly applied and the actual chemistry of glucosinolates remains under investigation. Here we present data on the various methods for isolating ITCs from broccoli, cabbage, and bok choy as well as the proliferative effects of the isolated ITCs on prostate (PC-3) cancer cells. References 1. Ambrosone, C.B.; McCann, S.E.; Freudenheim, J.L..; Marshall, J.R.; Zhang, Y.; and Sheilds, P.G. J. Nutr. 2004, 134: 1134-1138. 2. Hecht, S. S. J. Nutr. 1999, 129: 768S-774S. 3. Matusheski, N. V. and Jeffery, E. H. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2001, 49: 5743-5749. 4. Fahey, J. W., Zalcmann, A. T., and Talalay, P. Phytochemistry 2001, 56: 5-51. 5. Zhang, Y. and Talalay, P. Cancer Res. 1994, 54: 1976s-1981s.

171


POSTER ABSTRACTS 30

“The Effectiveness Of Fecal DNA Versus Feather DNA In Mockingbirds As A Means Of Noninvasive Sampling” Phylesha A. White, Courtney E. Byrd, Casey L. Owens, Dr. Dorothy B. Engle* Department of Biology, Xavier University Cincinnati, OH 45207 Abstract

Employing noninvasive techniques, when performing studies on wild species, is important to collect accurate data without adversely affecting the normal behavior of the animal. This technique is essential for the study of mocking birds. Feathers have previously been the least invasive source for DNA testing. Unfortunately, this procedure involves capturing and plucking the bird, which could skew its normal activities. Potentially, the least invasive technique for obtaining DNA material would be to collect fecal samples since this does not involve capturing or plucking. This study compares the effectiveness of fecal DNA versus feather DNA in mockingbirds as a means of noninvasive sampling. Mockingbird samples were obtained from a population on Xavier University’s campus in Cincinnati, Ohio. The feather DNA was extracted and purified using the Buccal Amp DNA Extraction Kit provided by the Epicentre Biotechnology Company. The fecal DNA extraction kit was provided by the Extract Master Fecal DNA Extraction Kit also from the Epicentre Company. PCR was then performed using primers provided from the mocking bird species Mimus polyglottos. Finally, the amplified feather and fecal DNA samples were run simultaneously on an agarose gel electrophoresis to compare the effectiveness of the sources. It is hypothesized that the fecal DNA results will be as effective an analytical tool as mockingbird feather DNA. If this hypothesis is proven correct, mockingbird feces will provide a noninvasive source for mocking bird DNA, replacing feather DNA as a standard source.

31

“Synthesis And Properties Of Various Heptamethine Cyanine Dyes” Nikia Smith, Dr. Angela Winstead Chemistry Department, Morgan State University Baltimore MD 21251

Heptamethine cyanine dyes are Near infrared dyes (NIR) with characteristics of a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer acceptor. NIR dyes are detected in the 650 - 1000 nm range and by using them the natural biological factors in the cell will not interfere with the fluorescence intensity readings. Heptamethine cyanine dyes are synthesized with a reaction between bisaldehyde and a quaternary salt. The reaction takes only 3 minutes in the microwave compared to the 4 days it previously required. The use of benzene was eliminated completely for the process. Heptamethine cyanine dyes were synthesized with variations on the R- group and the X- group to further develop our fluorescent studies. The determination of which variation increases fluorescence, cell uptake, cell specificity, and quantum yield should be predicted from the newly synthesized dyes. 172


POSTER ABSTRACTS X

N

N

R

R

Heptamethine Cyanine Dye

The effect of chain length, polar groups and amino acid substitution were the concentration of the studies. Firstly, the effect of chain length on fluorescent intensity was studied using methyl, ethyl, and propyl R- groups. Secondly, the effect of polar groups was studied on ethanol and hexanoic acid substituted dyes. Thirdly, the effect of the X- group substitution was studied using tyrosine and serine. These studies will be useful in finding the highest fluorescing variation of the dye. Six variations of the heptamethine cyanine dye were successfully synthesized in the microwave, showing that numerous variations can be synthesized in a short time span at high yields ranging from 66- 95%. They all fluoresce in a 797- 787 nm range, with high intensity levels, proving their effectiveness as a near infrared dye. The solubility properties of each dye are also being studied to conclude which variation will more readily enter a cell.

32

“The Effects Of Alkylmethylimidazolium Chloride Salts On RNA Function” Lori D. Johnson, Naomi F. Campbell*, Erick D. Ellis, Ken S. Lee Jackson State University, Department of Chemistry, Jackson, MS 39217 Abstract

Ionic liquids are molten, organic salts and they are considered “green” solvents because of their unusual physico-chemical properties. These ideal solvents are non-volatile, non-flammable, have a high thermal stability, relatively inexpensive to manufacture, and have no measurable vapor pressure, thus replacing traditional volatile organic solvents. However, unlike the traditional volatile organic solvents, in depth research studies have not been done on the safety and/or biological effects of these molten salts. Therefore, we chose a common ionic liquid series, alkylmethylimidazolium chloride salts, to investigate its effects on RNA function. Hybridization studies and spermine binding assays were performed using Poly (A) and Poly (U) solubilized in either phosphate buffer or alkylmethylimidazolium chloride salts. Initial results showed both a decrease in hybridization and spermine binding when RNA was solubilized in the alkylmethylimidazolium chloride salts. Our results suggest that the molten salts interfere with the electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding that is necessary for the normal biological function of RNA.

173


POSTER ABSTRACTS 33

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Investigation Of The Interacting Partners Of Yeast COQ6: A Component Of The Multienzyme Complex Required For Coenzyme Q Biosynthesisâ&#x20AC;? Odi Osonkie* and Catherine F. Clarke University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 Abstract

The COQ6 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is predicted to encode a flavin-dependent monooxygenase involved in Coenzyme Q (Q) biosynthesis, based on sequence similarity to known enzymes. Recent evidence indicates that the proteins required for Q biosynthesis in yeast form a multienzyme complex, which is defined by Coq3 and Coq4. To investigate the interacting partners of Coq6, a strain containing a tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag on Coq6 was analyzed. The TAP tag, which enables highly specific purification of the target protein, is an integrated ~22 kDa C-terminal tag which consists of a calmodulin-binding peptide, a TEV protease cleavage site and two IgG-binding domains of Protein A. Growth curves indicate that the growth of the Coq6-TAP strain on a non-fermentable carbon source is superior to wild-type, and immunoblot analyses reveal an enhanced expression of the Coq6 protein in the Coq6-TAP strain, relative to wild-type. Furthermore, blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses show that the native Coq6 protein is present in a ~180 kDa complex in both wild-type and Coq6-TAP strains, demonstrating that the TAP tag does not alter the oligomeric state of native Coq6 protein. The Coq6 protein was purified from the TAPtagged strain by tandem affinity purification, and subsequent immunoblot analyses reveal that Coq3 co-purifies with Coq6. This indicates that a specific interaction exists between Coq3 and Coq6 in the polypeptide complex required for Q biosynthesis in yeast. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant GM45952 (to C. F. Clarke).

174


POSTER ABSTRACTS 34

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wittig Reaction: Conventional V.S Microwave-Assisted Methodâ&#x20AC;? Kristina Harkins1, Marc Remsay1, Dr. Yousef Hijji1 1Chemistry Department, Morgan State University Baltimore, MD 21251 Abstract

Ph Ph

P

Cl H 2C

Ph

p h o s p h o n u i u m s a lt

R 50% N aO H

R

R e f lu x O

R1

H

A lk e n e i s o m e r s

R1

A ld e h y d e o r K e t o n e

General Wittig Reaction The application of microwave dialect heating to the Wittig Reaction should increase the percent yield of alkenes, decrease the amount of reagents and solvents used and decrease the time required for synthesis. Optimal conditions for the microwave method were determined to be the following: 1:1 mole ratio, 1.0M, in dichloromethane, 5-30 seconds of heating, at 50% microwave power. The effect of a simpler, more efficient Wittig Reaction allows undergraduates to utilize the opportunity for perfecting other necessary skill sets such as structure determination and purification techniques. This method has been applied to six aldehydes with yields ranging from 50%-95%. Reference: 1. Experimental Organic Chemistry A Miniscale and Microscale Approach. John C. Gilbert, Stephen F. Martin, 2nd ed., Saunders College Publishing, 1998. 487-89 2. Sara Frattini, Monica Quai, Enzo Cereda, Tetrahedron Letters, 2001

175


POSTER ABSTRACTS 35

“Binding Of Chromium To Chromodulin Candidate Peptides As Studied To Mass Spectrometry” Rozlyn Nicole Chambliss*1,Junjie Gao2, Carolyn Cassady2 1Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088 2Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487

ABSTRACT The purpose of the research project was to sequence the chromium containing peptide LMWCr (aka chromodulin) which is important to diabetes and carbohydrate metabolism. A human genome search revealed the two candidate peptide sequences that were synthesized using the Advanced ChemTech 90 synthesizer. The samples that were generated by the synthesis were studied by MALDI/TOF mass spectrometry to determine the purity. The peptide structure DGEECDCGEE produced signals in the positive and negative modes. This peptide was used to examine the effects of the binding of chromium. In addition to chromium, cobalt and iron were used to enhance the knowledge about the binding affinity of transition metals to peptides. In the binding of chromium to the peptide the signals visibility decreased and basically went away on the mass spectrum in the positive and negative modes as chromium was added. Peptide signals did not go away with the addition of cobalt, therefore cobalt does not bind efficiently to the peptide. Iron was studied to gain knowledge on the addition of transition metals with the same charges as chromium. Iron was found to bind to the peptide and to produce abundant metallopeptide signals by mass spectrometry.

36

“The Influence Of Environmental Temperature On Aging In Drosophila: Ion Mobility Coupled With Mass Spectrometry Methods For Proteome Profiling” Renã A. Sowell*1, John F. Kellie1, Thomas C. Kaufman2, and David E. Clemmer1 1Indiana University, Department of Chemistry, Bloomington, IN 47405 2Indiana University, Department of Biology, Bloomington, IN 47405 Abstract

Parameters such as caloric intake, genetic manipulations, metabolic rate and environmental factors have been shown to influence lifespan in model organisms such as yeast, worms, mice and flies. Survivorship measurements of adult Drosophila melanogaster aged at different temperatures result in Oregon R strains that have mean lifespans of 110 days at 18 ˚C and 47 days at 28 ˚C. While theories related to these lifespan effects focus primarily on energy expenditure and metabolic rates, further insight into key biological pathways can be gained with more direct studies. The goal of this study is to elucidate mechanisms at the protein level that are responsible for lifespan extension at colder temperatures and lifespan reduction at higher temperatures. 176


POSTER ABSTRACTS Proteome profiling throughout Drosophila adult lifespan may provide biomarkers for increased longevity and/or delayed aging. Thus, populations of wild-type Drosophila are grown up separately at 18 ˚C, 24 ˚C, and 28 ˚C. Tryptic peptides from the heads of flies are analyzed by two hybrid approaches that combine strong cation exchange chromatography and reversed-phase liquid chromatography with either tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) or gas-phase ion mobility spectrometry MS/MS techniques. Profiles of protein expression over the course of adult lifespan are obtained in a semi-quantitative manner by using the number of unique peptides assigned to a protein and the peak intensities associated with specific peptides. Preliminary results will be presented for the effects of environmental temperature as a function of age on the Drosophila proteome.

37

“Alternative Approaches To Minimizing The Tin Requirement In Multi-Step Organostannane Mediated Reactions” Shavon L. Ford, Jill A. Muchnij, Robert E. Maleczka, Jr.* Dept. of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48825 Abstract

The use of organotin compounds in synthetic organic chemistry is useful. However, there are a number of drawbacks which include the cost, toxicity, and difficulty of removing tin byproducts from desired end products. These drawbacks are addressed by using tin in situ. A particular method which uses tin in situ is our proposed one-pot Stille/hydrostannation sequence, which is derived from the already established one-pot hydrostannation/Stille coupling. The big picture inspiration is the exploration of new natural products, such as superstolide A, which is a marine molecule. This molecule may be useful as an anti-cancer drug against such carcinoma as bronchopulmonary, lung, colon, and murine leukemia.

38

“Determination Of The Effect Of Breakage On Crystal Shape Distribution” Sheena Reeves*, Devkant Gandhi, and Dr. Priscilla Hill Department of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS Abstract

Crystallization is an operation that is vital to many solid processes because it is the step where particles are formed. Our work uses experiments to show the effect of operating conditions on particle properties. This work uses experiments, simulation, and theory to link the fundamental chemistry and physics to the development of the process flow sheet. The purpose of this project was to determine size and shape changes of different crystals agitated in a stirred vessel by changing the operating conditions. The operating environment included changes in the stirrer speed (rpm), the residence time, and the amount of crystals added into the vessel. After agitation, the crystals were extracted from the reactor, filtered, and counted. 177


POSTER ABSTRACTS An Olympus DP12 camera attached to a microscope was used to capture images of the broken crystals, and Image-Pro® Plus software was used to measure the attributes of the crystals. All information was recorded into a spreadsheet for further examination.

39

“Surface Tension From Pendant Drop Profiles: A Spherical Coordinate/ Finite Element – Based Algorithm” Samantha Sanders1, Michael T. Harris1 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Abstract

A nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm has been developed to determine interfacial/surface tension from the profiles of pendant drop and sessile drops. A spherical coordinate/finite element-based method is used to compute the theoretical drop profiles by solving the second order differential equation form of the Young-Laplace equation. An older version of the algorithm numerically computes the Jacobian entries of the nonlinear parameter estimation section of the code. The current version computes these entries analytically. This modification can decrease the computational time of the algorithm by an order of magnitude. Additionally, the current algorithm is developed to obtain more accurate surface/interfacial tension values from pendant drops of liquids that wet the nozzle. The algorithm is tested on several model liquid/air systems.

40

“Electrochemical Destruction Of Dichlorobenzene At Carbon-Felt Electrode In Lamellar Phase Of Aqueous Didodecyldimethyl-Ammonium Bromide” Yailouise Ndure* and Dr Maurice Iwunze Department of Chemistry, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251 Abstract

Dichlorobenzene is in a class of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). These compounds are carcinogenic. They are ubiquitous in the environment because of their uses in the past in power plants and because they are inert, unusually stable and water insoluble. We have attempted the destruction of dichlorobenzene electrochemically at carbon-felt electrodes in aqueous biodegradable didodecyldimethyl-ammonium bromide systems. It is seen that little or no conversion of the dichlorobenzene to plain benzene is obtained until the destruction potential reached 2.5 V. In fact, this potential corresponds to the oxidation potential of dichlorobenzene. At this potential, almost 85.1 % conversion was achieved. A discussion of this observation will be presented with regards to its implications to environmental detoxification of organic pollutants and “green chemistry.”

178


POSTER ABSTRACTS 41

“Medicinal Folklore Plants” Tiffany N. Taylor1, Monica Frazier2, Pamela M. Leggett-Robinson*1 1Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee University; 2CBR/RCMI, Tuskegee University Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088 Abstract

The purpose of this research was to test medicinal folklore plants for anti-microbial activity and characterize the component(s) responsible for the activity. Plants selected for this research, Hymenoxys odorata, bitter weed, and Solidago virgaurea, goldenrod, were chosen based on Alabama folklore. A 20% (w/w) solution of plant gum and methanol was prepared for each plant. During a bioassay, each plant was tested twice in the presence of 11 organisms. The antimicrobial susceptibility test showed that bitter weed displayed substantial antimicrobial activity. Further experimentation is being done to isolate and characterize the component(s) responsible for the antimicrobial activity. References [1] Chambers, Mary Lee, Personal Communication, June 2004. [2] Melzig, M. F. Wien Med Worchenschr. 2004, 154 (21-22), 523-527. [3] Singh, A. P. The lost Glory of Folk Medicine. http://www.siu.edu/~ebl/leaflets/glory.htm [4] http://www.redwop.com/images/funnel.gif. [5] http://userpage.fu-berlin.de/~agsystem/Hemmhoftest.jpg .

42

“Quantitative Analysis Of Commercially Bottled Water By ICP-MS”

Tamika Thompson*1, Andrea Oyewole2, Dr. Aref El-Demerdash2, Dr. Renard Thomas3, and Dr. Bobby Wilson4 1NASA University Research Center Internship Program 2Environmental Toxicology Ph.D. Program 3Environmental Research Toxicology Transfer Center4Principle Investigator and Provost, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX,77004 Abstract The purpose of this research was to provide a quantitative analysis of commercially bottled water by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The results were compared to set standards as well as to the prices other water samples that were tested. The water quality was evaluated based on FDA and FDDCA regulations. In addition, it was compared to EPA Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) for inorganic substances in drinking water. Cadmium was present in 179


POSTER ABSTRACTS all samples at levels above the standard. Iron and Calcium, which are necessary for good human health, were present in natural spring water in larger amounts than purified drinking water. No proportionality was found between the price of drinking water and the quality of it.

43

“Enriched Sol-Gel Synthesis Of Ta2O5 Thin Films “ Tabitha A. Wilhoite*, Nicholas Ndiege, Ravi Subramanian, Richard Masel. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Department of Chemical Engineering, Urbana IL, 61801 Abstract

The micro burner is a necessary component of many micro-electromechanical systems (MEMs), given that it serves as a heat source for portable systems. For example, a micro burner can be used in hydrogen generators for portable power, or as a heat source in winter clothing. The recent development of a micro burner with the ability to reach temperatures as high as 1200 degrees Celsius has occurred. At such extreme temperatures it has become imperative to develop a structural material that will separate the micro burner from the rest of the system’s components. In order to make the integration of this micro burner into MEMs practical, the structural material must exhibit properties of insulation and anisotropic thermal conductivity over a wide temperature range and with high mechanical strength. This work seeks to realize Ta2O5 as an effective insulating material for this micro burner. Ta2O5 films with a thickness of up to 1.6 microns has been demonstrated, this paper demonstrates the effects of enriching the sol with a powdered form of Ta2O5, which results in denser films with reductions in crack size and quantity.

44

“Electrophoretic Deposition And Characterizations Of Silver Nanoparticle Films” Uche C. Nwodo*, Patricia Tillman, and James W. Mitchell Howard University, Nanomaterials Characterization Science Center, CREST, Washington, DC, 20059 Abstract

Silver nanoparticles embedded in a matrix of n-type silicon can be used as a Schottky barrier detector (SBD) to sense infrared (IR) radiation in the 8-14 micron range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Such Ag/n-Si nanocomposite thin-films have been successfully deposited by other investigators by a reactive DC magnetron co-sputtering technique. In order to improve device quantum yields beyond those previously obtained, we propose the fabrication of films by electrophoretic deposition of silver nanoparticle on n-Si(111), and the subsequent embedding of the silver particulates in a Si matrix by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). 180


POSTER ABSTRACTS The focus of this project includes the development of a process for the EPD of silver that is compatible with subsequent fabrication of the semiconductor device. Utmost care is taken to formulate a silver medium and to exclude contaminants during the deposition process. The presence of impurities in the silver film is detrimental to the performance of photodetector. A commercially obtained silver nanoparticle (~ 10 nm) suspension, stabilized in ethylene glycol, was used to perfect the EPD process. Results are presented for the characterizations of this medium by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and laser Doppler electrophoresis (LDE) to determine particle size distribution and electrophoretic mobility of silver nanoparticles respectively. The stability of silver nanoparticles in aqueous and organic media was also examined by these techniques. Currently, the preparation of a stabilized ultrapure silver nanoparticle starting material was initiated because commercially available formulations are stabilized by reagents that preclude the fabrication of electronic, photodetector and semiconductor devices. For example, silver nanoparticles media with stabilizers including polymers, surfactants, and alkali metal solutions cannot be used. Progress on the electrochemical synthesis of ultrapure silver nanoparticles media will be discussed. Films fabricated electrophoretically with commercial formulations were subsequently characterized. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provided the morphology and distribution of silver on the n-Si(111) substrate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were used to verify the presence of silver and to determine the impurities in the silver film.

45

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Luminescent Siloles As Chemosensors For Trace Nitroaromatic Explosives And Aqueous Chromium (VI)â&#x20AC;? Victoria D. Crockett*1, Sarah J. Toal2, William C. Trogler2 1Tougaloo College, Department of Chemistry, Tougaloo, MS 39174 2University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, CA 92037 Abstract

Recent research has shown the potential application of inorganic nanoparticles for chemical and environmental sensing of carcinogenic chromium (VI) and explosive nitroaromatics. The method of detection is through electron-transfer quenching of the fluorescence of the silole colloid by the electron deficient analytes. Methylhydrosilole is functionalized by hydrosilation of allylamine and the colloid is prepared by the rapid addition of water to a tetrahydrofuran solution of the siloles. A minimum of 80% water is necessary to precipitate the silole amine colloid from tetrahydrofuran, and the luminescence continues to rise with higher water percentage. My research focused on controlling the ionic strength and pH of silole amine suspensions to create a better sensor for chromate by increasing colloid fluorescence intensity and colloid stability. Quenching of silole amine nanoparticle suspension with aqueous chromate was conducted. In addition, research will further test the application of polysilole then films as solid state detectors of trace nitroaromatic explosives. Detection of explosive nitroaromatic compounds is based on photoluminescence 181


POSTER ABSTRACTS quenching of polymers containing tetraphenyl metalloles, which are substituted silacyclopentadiene or germacyclopentadiene rings. From all aqueous suspension tests that have been conducted, it can be concluded that as there is an increase in the water percentage, there is also an increase in fluorescence intensity due to aggregation. From the ionic strength test that has been conducted, it can be concluded that no correlation can be determined on the relationship between ionic strength of silole amine suspension and fluorescence intensity of silole amine suspension. From the buffer test that has been conducted, it can be concluded that no correlation can be determined on the relationship between pH of silole amine suspension and fluorescence intensity of silole amine suspension. From the chromate quenching that has been conducted, it can be concluded that 10 mg/L silole amine suspension is the best detector for chromate. From the nitroaromatic detection that was conducted, it can be concluded that PDEBSi and PDEBSF are the best detectors for trinitrotoluene, PDEBSF is the best detector for dinitrotoluene, and PDEBSF is the best detector for picric acid.

46

Stepwise assembly of tetraamines via SN2 reactions with sulfamates and sulfamidates Joseph R. Atkins*, Stefan Kraft Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, Manhattan, KS 66502

Studies to develop efficient catalytic platforms for the hydrodechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds will be presented. The design of our catalyst is based on a tetraaza-nickel scaffold that is “decorated” with aryl groups in its periphery. We design systems that operate on pre-binding the substrate via л-л stacking followed by single electron reduction of the bound chlorinated target. The assembly of cyclam ligands (1) is conducted in a stepwise fashion to allow for diversity in the -stacking units. The establishment of C-N bonds via SN2 reactions proceeds under mild conditions utilizing sulfamates as nucleophiles and sulfamidates as electrophiles (eq. 1).

182


POSTER ABSTRACTS 47

“Synthesis Of Mixed-Valent Gold Bromide Perovskites” D’Vesharronne J. Moore*1, Dana E. Gheorghe2, Zhongjia Tang2 and Arnold M. Guloy2 1NASA University Research Center, Texas Southern University, Houston,TX, 77004 2Department of Chemistry, Center for Materials Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204 D’Vesharronne J. Moore*1, Dana E. Gheorghe2, Zhongjia Tang2 and Arnold M. Guloy2 1NASA University Research Center, Texas Southern University, Houston,TX, 77004 2Department of Chemistry, Center for Materials Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204

Abstract We report the syntheses, crystal structures and optical band gaps of Cs2Au2Br5.39Cl0.61, a new mixed-valent gold bromide chloride doped compound, and CsAuBr2.6Cl1.4, a chloride-doped tetrabromoaurate. Cs2Au2Br5.39Cl0.61 was synthesized by high temperature solid state reactions between Au, AgBr and CsAuBr2.6Cl1.4 at 500 °C. CsAuBr2.6Cl1.4 was crystallized from an acidic solution of CsBr, HAuCl4 and HCl. The new mixed-valent gold (I/III) halide, Cs2Au2Br5.39Cl0.61, crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I 4/mmm, with a = 7.6733 (9) Å, c = 11.1575 (18) Å, Z=2, and exhibits a band gap of 1.27(4) eV. The new tetrahaloaurate, CsAuBr2.6Cl1.4, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C 2/c, with a = 13.3682(22) Å, b = 6.3197(11) Å, c = 9.7977(17) Å, Z=4, and shows an optical band gap of 2.01 eV. The crystal structure of Cs2Au2Br5.39Cl0.61 features a perovskite-like structure that effectively results from the alternate arrangements of square planar AuBr4 and linear AuBr1.39Cl0.61 units. Differences in its structure and properties with those of the parent compound, Cs2Au2Br6, can be attributed to the effect of chlorine substitution. This is manifested in the slight decrease of the unit cell parameters and a slight increase of the band gap with the increasing electronegativity of the halogen.

48

“Incorporating Novel Methods To Teach General Chemistry To Non-Science Majors” Nichole L. Powell* and Gregory Pritchett Tuskegee University, Department of Chemistry, Tuskegee, AL 36088 Abstract

Introductory chemistry courses usually consist of a high enrollment of students with no prior chemistry background and an unfavorable perception of the subject. In addition, students are faced with a barrage of concepts which seem to be boring and irrelevant. At Tuskegee, we looked at teaching strategies which could be quickly and easily implemented with the overall aim of helping students become active participants in the learning process, aid knowledge retention, foster a positive attitude, and promote a life-long interest in science. Our pilot study incorporates the General Chemistry portion of a General, Organic and Biochemistry course with its corresponding laboratory course. The course is comprised of the traditional three-hour lecture and two hour laboratory. Laboratory topics were chosen so they 183


POSTER ABSTRACTS complemented the material being taught in the lecture. For select laboratory sessions, students were given only a brief introduction to the topic before conducting experiments. These laboratory sessions required students to work in groups to solve problems thereby incorporating cooperative learning with inquiry-based learning, and active learning. We present the preliminary results of this project.

49

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Preparation Of Supported Nanostructured TiO2 And Nitrogen Doped TiO2, And Applications To Photo Catalytic Disinfectionâ&#x20AC;? Kenneth K. Bota1, William N. Harris III13, Olivier K. Kainda1, Sharifeh Mehrabi2, David Collart2, Lebone Moeti3, Eric A. Mintz*1 Clark Atlanta University, Department of Chemistry, Atlanta, GA 30314 Clark Atlanta University, Department of Biological Sciences, Atlanta, GA 30314 3Clark Atlanta University, Department of Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30314 1

2

Abstract In recent years there has been considerable interest in the use of nanostructured semiconducting metal oxides, such as TiO2, as photocatalysts for the destruction of contaminants in water. More recently it has been shown that nanoparticles of TiO2 can be used for the photocatalytic disinfection of water with UV and near-UV irradiation. It has been shown that the bacterial cell wall is compromised under these conditions. Some authors have suggested that the nanoparticles of TiO2 may pierce the cell wall and photocatalytic destruction could occur from inside of the cell in addition to from the outside of the cell. Because of their small size, nanoparticles can be extremely difficult to remove from the water after photocatalytic disinfection has been carried out. In order to distinguish between photocatalytic destruction of bacteria occurring from the inside and the outside vs. from the outside only of the cell with nanostructured TiO2, and to provide ease of removal from water, we have prepared nanostructured TiO2 supported on alumina. In an effort to effectively utilize visible light, e.g. sunlight, we have also prepared doped nanostructured TiO2 on a metal oxide support. The nanostructured TiO2 on alumina was prepared by sol-gel techniques using alumina, Ti(iOCH(CH3)2)4, and ammonium hydroxide. Nitrogen doped TiO2 on alumina was prepared in a similar manner by using higher ratios of ammonium hydroxide and by the addition of other nitrogen containing compounds. Samples were then calcined at 400o C to produce predominantly an anatase phase of TiO2 on the alumina. The TiO2/alumina produced in this fashion has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, diffuse reflectance UV-VIS spectroscopy, and BET surface area. Bactericidal activity of TiO2/alumina suspension was tested by counting viable cells CFU (colony forming units) after TiO2/alumina treatment under visible and UV light. Zone of inhibition studies were also carried out after dropping TiO2/alumina suspensions over a lawn of bacteria on an agar plate followed by treatment with visible and UV light. Results of the synthesis and bactericidal activity will be reported.

184


NATIONAL CONFERENCE PLANNING COMMITTEES Darrell Davis General Chairman Dallas Chapter Dallas, TX Dr. John Harkless Technical Program Howard University Washington, DC

Ms. Ella Davis Registration Greater Delaware Valley Chapter Pfizer Center Square, PA Dr. Gloria Thomas Science Bowl and Science Fair Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS

Ms. Sandra Parker Career Fair Midland Chapter Dow Chemical Company Midland, MI

Mr. Steven Thomas Website Manager Michigan State University East Lansing, MI

Dr. Ronald Lewis Health Symposium San Diego Chapter San Diego, CA Ms. Linda Davis Teachers Workshop Committee for Action Program Services Dallas, TX

Dr. Anthony Dent Printed Materials Greater Delaware Valley Chapter Cheyney University of Pennsylvania Dresher, PA Ms. Felicia Connely Student Support Texas Southern University Houston, TX

Mr. Robert L. Countryman, CMP Forums, Workshops, Speakers, Hotel Liaison San Diego Chapter San Diego, CA

Dr. Simon Shannon National Publicity 3M St. Paul, MN

Dr. Marlon Walker Awards National Institute of Standards & Testing Gaithersburg, MD

Ms. Jacqueline Calhoun Conference Evaluation National Institute of Standards & Testing Gaithersburg, MD

Ms. Sandra Graff Hospitality & Special Services San Diego Chapter San Diego, CA

185


NATIONAL CONFERENCE PLANNING SUBCOMMITTEES Awards Committee Dr. Albert N. Thompson, Jr., Co-chair Spelman College Atlanta, Georgia

Ms. Brenda Brown NOBCChE Volunteer San Diego Unified School District San Diego, CA

Dr. Sharon Neal University of Delaware Newark, DE

Shirley Hall San Diego Chapter San Diego City Government San Diego, CA

Dr. Jesse Edwards Florida A & M University Tallahassee, FL 32307

Ms. Celeste Tyus NOBCChE Volunteer San Diego Unified School District San Diego, CA

Dr. Malika Jeffries-El Iowa State University Ames, IA Dr. Linda Meade-Tollin Arizona State University Tempe, AZ Dr. Levi Thompson University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI Registration Committee Ms. Felicia Barnes-Baird Greater Delaware Valley Chapter Rohm and Haas Company Spring House, PA Ms. Dorothy Haynes Greater Delaware Valley Chapter Rohm and Haas Company Spring House, PA

Technical Committee Dr. Marlon L. Walker NIST Gaithersburg, MD 20899 Dr. Alvin P. Kennedy Morgan State University Chemistry Department, Chair Baltimore, MD 21251 Dr. Douglas Willis Texas Southern University Houston, TX 77004 Dr. Jesse Edwards Florida A & M University Tallahassee, FL 32307 Dr. Malika Jeffries-El Iowa State University Department of Chemistry Ames, IA

186


NATIONAL CONFERENCE PLANNING SUBCOMMITTEES Mr. Murphy Keller U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA

Science Bowl and Science Fair Dr. Zakiya Wilson, Vice-Chair Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

Dr. Shawn Abernathy Howard University Washington, DC

Ms. Deyonna Trice, Pfizer, Inc.

Ms. Shea Jones EPA Waste Management Division Atlanta, GA Dr. Vernon Morris Howard University Washington, DC Audio Visual Aids Weldon Hall, Chair California Department of Health Berkeley, CA Health Symposium Betty S. Pace, MD, Co-chair University of Texas at Dallas Dallas, TX Finance Mr. Dale Mack Atlanta Metropolitan Chapter Atlanta University Center Atlanta, GA

Dr. Angela Winstead Morgan State University Baltimore, MD Dr. Emanuel Waddell University of Alabama at Huntsville Huntsville, AL Mr. Kevin Stacia Agilent Technologies, Inc. Dr. John Harkless Howard University Washington, DC 20059 Mrs. Ellen Hill Lawrence Livermore Natâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Labs (Retired) Huntsville, AL Mrs. Sandra P. Mitchell Enlightened Imagery Associates Lisa Batiste-Evans, Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA

187


NATIONAL CONFERENCE PLANNING SUBCOMMITTEES Teachers Workshops Ernestine Cole Journalist & Educator Los Angeles, CA Ms. Joyce Chesley-Dent NOBCChE Volunteer Dresher, PA Dr. Barbara Laval Astrobiology Institute â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NASA/UCLA Los Angeles, CA Ms. Nisha T. Laval Film Industry Los Angeles, CA Ms. Sheila Turner Marine Corp Recruit Depot NOBCChE Volunteer San Diego, CA Career Fair Exhibitors Mr. Darrell Davis Drug Enforcement Administration Dallas, TX Ms. Kiana Hamlett Drug Enforcement Administration Dallas, TX Ms. Mia Laws Northern Delaware Chapter Dupont Company Wilmington, DE

Proceedings Ms. Dinah R. Campbell Chair Ewing, NJ Dr. Alison Williams NY/ NJ Chapter Princeton University Princeton, NJ Ms. Gwen Evans San Francisco Bay Area Workforce Concepts, Inc. Danville, CA Dr. Tommie Royster Rochester Chapter Kodak Rochester, NY Student Support Felicia Connely Texas Southern University Houston, TX Rita Ware Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC Ms. Deatrice Washington Drug Enforcement Administration Dallas, TX Ms. Susan Gordon Drug Enforcement Administration Dallas, TX

Mr. Henry Beard NOBCChE Volunteer Philadelphia, PA 188


NATIONAL CONFERENCE PLANNING SUBCOMMITTEES National Publicity Ms. Sharonda Benson Kennedy King College Chicago, IL Dr. Anthony Dent Cheyney University of Pennsylvania Dresher, PA

Mr. Robert Murff Eli Lilly Indianapolis, IN Ms. Sandra Parker Dow Chemical Company Midland, MI

Dr. Jeffrey Eummer Martin University Indianapolis, IN

Mr. Steven Thomas Website Manager Michigan State University East Lansing, MI

Ms. Tamiika Hurst University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI

Dr. Keith Williams Wayne State University Detroit, MI

Ms. Kim Jackson Procter & Gamble Company Cincinnati, OH

189


Postdoctoral Research Awards Senior Research Awards Opportunities for research in all areas related to

Chemistry and Chemical Engineering National Institutes of Health US Army Natick Soldier Center National Energy Technology Lab

Participating laboratories include:

Naval Research Laboratory Air Force Research Laboratory Environmental Protection Agency Edgewood Chemical & Biological Center US Army Night Vision Laboratory US Department of Homeland Security National Institute of Standards & Technology (and NIH/NIST Joint Program) Army Medical Research & Materiel Command Army Research Laboratory (and Joint Program with US Military Academy)

● Annual stipend – $38,000 – $65,000; Higher for senior researchers ● ● 12-month awards renewable for up to 3 years maximum ● ● Relocation, professional travel, health insurance ● ● Annual application deadlines February 1, May 1, August 1, November 1 ● Detailed program information, including instructions on how to apply, can be found at www.national-academies.org/rap Applications must be submitted online. CVs will not be accepted. Questions should be directed to the NRC at: TEL: (202) 334-2760; E-MAIL: rap@nas.edu NRC representatives will be available at the NRC booth in the exhibit hall.


1

The

2

world wants thinner electronics.

We’re getting it all on tape.

3M has pioneered a whole new technology: Microflex Circuits – the world’s leading massproduced electronic circuits on tape. They’re thinner, smaller, highly reliable, and allow for more connections than rigid circuit boards. They’ll go anywhere a designer can dream up: phones, pagers, laptops and printers. We expand the possibilities because we make the leap

©3M 2006

For further information, visit our careers home page on the Internet: http://www.3m.com/careers

© 2006 NAS (Media: delete copyright notice)

NOBBCHE 7 1/8" x 10" bw

from need to...


CONFERENCE NOTES

191


CONFERENCE NOTES

192


NOBCChE 33rd Annual Conference | Los Angeles, CA | April 9 - 15, 2006  

The 33rd Annual Conference of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers "The Secr...