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[threads] no slime for sacrificed - pen on paper

Artist of the montH "Euphoric, narcotic and pleasantly hallucinant..�

Arnaud Loumeau OVERDOSES ON COLOUR. NO!FIVETWELVE


[words by Alistair Stewart] The art of French illustrator Arnaud Loumeau conjures up an abstract kaleidoscopic tapestry of dreamlands populated with monsters and aliens playing a mystifying chess game in your mind. Born in Poitiers 30 years ago, he currently lives in Toulouse and is passionate about the Fluxus movement as well as primitive art. Influences include Mexican and Indian cultures, along with video games and pixel culture which figure prominently in his dreamy handmade drawings. Working mostly on graph paper, Loumeau uses a mixture of bright marker pens and indian inks to produce vivid colours - both mathematical and fluid at once. “I started drawing very young when I was bored at home” he recalls and a childish quality is obvious in his work - the sheer pleasure of colouring in, drawing monsters and aliens. Though they are handmade, the graph paper structure gives a pixelated quality as if remembering old 8-bit computer games re-imagined in colour. However, Loumeau gives his elaborate drawings a psychedelic twist, experimenting with the idea of memories, sleep and repetitive patterns with an almost robotic and obsessive artistic process to create an abstract expressions of his interests in contemporary visual culture. “Optical and abstract art interests me because they produce images that excite the retina and play with thought. Abstract forms communicate directly with the subconscious without getting through representation.” arnaud.loumeau@yahoo.fr

A5X4 - pen on graph paper NO!FIVETWELVE


*sigh

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HÉY NO!FIVETWELVE


NO!5IVE12Magazine.

for serious.. nah, JOKES!! NO!FIVETWELVE


eau so fresh.. NO!FIVETWELVE


I HAVE A TOTALLY POSTMODERN TATTOO OF A SCALENE TRIANGLE BECAUSE EQUILATERALS ARE JUST NOT CHAOTIC ENOUGH FOR ME (ISOSCELES TRIANGLES ARE SO MAINSTREAM) I AM A PUREST TOWARDS HELVETICA, BUT AS SOON AS I REALISED I WAS TYPING IN ARIAL I THREW UP. I BURNED ALL THE 7” VINYLS AND CONCERT TICKETS I BROUGHT WITH THE MONEY I PRETEND THAT IʼM DEPRIVED OF. INFACT, THIS IS A TOTAL WASTE OF TIME, BETTER SPENT TAKING INTROSPECTIVE PICTURES OF MYSELF AND PUTTING STUPID CAPTIONS ON THEM.

UNITE: Against Stagnant Culture NO!FIVETWELVE


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The Kollwitz Report Words by Lisa-Marie Hepton

‘Its my duty to voice the suffering of men, the never ending suffering heaped mountain high.’

Her work was memorable, powerful and dedicated to her moral principle. Kollwitz is more complex and interesting than just a simple anti-war artist. She uses her own experience which shows death haunted her from the beginning of her artistic work, therefore is convincing reality fused with expressive power. Society has changed a lot since Kollwitz time; nowadays it is not frowned upon for a woman to be outspoken and opinionated. It does make me think, is this why her art was so controversial? Kollwitz concerns were Berlin’s working class women, mothers, children and the victims of war. I also feel her art was a process of her mourning her grief for the loss of her son and grandson.

Kollwitz was born in 1867, in Konigsberg, Germany; she married Karl Kollwitz in 1891 and had two sons. Her husband was a physician, which gave her an insight into life of the working class. Kollwitz perspective then changed from the pain of others to herself when she lost her son, Peter in World War One, and then lost her grandson in World War Two. Kathe Kollwitz believed it was her duty to empathise the suffering of others through her work. The 20th century expressionist subject matter is based on the human condition through the First World War. Kollwitz was not scared about speaking out against the political injustice, society and insanity of the war. I will be exploring the moral strength of what this compassionate artist had to achieve, the political radicalism in the way she perceived the world, mostly emotionally rather than represent the physical world realistically. Kollwitz is best known for her graphic works, etchings, lithographs and woodcuts. The Media fully exploit social realism. As part of political progress, Kathe was encouraged to develop her skills in painting and drawing. Although her practice was in black and white, she did use touches of colour to complete her dramatic and emotion filled work.

Max Kilnger was one of Kollwitz influences. His most known work is a series of ten etchings ‘Paraphrases about the finding of a glove’, the etchings tell a story of a woman’s glove and its extraordinary travels through to being found by Kilnger. His impressive compositions and delicate details did show his vivid imagination and his psychological depth. His works are strong dark pieces which give a good idea of what he was thinking at the time. Kathe Kollwitz expression was always true to herself, guided by moral principle; her ideas were never compromised for success of society. Kollwitz who was socially conscious made her own mind up on what she thought was right or wrong and gave her own personal evaluation through her art. I think that every artist leaves a self conscious view in their work, and all art will be bias to there own point of view and how the artist is feeling at the time and their moral judgement. I definitely recommend readers that you pop down to your local library and pick up a copy of Kathe Kollwitz, Woman and Artist By Martha Kearns.

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多Dr. Lakra? Dr. Lakra, born Jeronimo Lopez Ramirez, is a Mexican Artist and tattooist and currently lives in Oaxaca, Mexico. He is currently being exhibited at the drawing centre, New York, and has had work exhibited in many prestigious institutions such as MoMA, New York, Ica, Boston, and at the Saatchi gallery. He substitutes skin as a canvas for old magazines, dolls, any old vintage style images and objects, and transforms them into tattooed dolls, ladies and voodoo toys. He uses ink and paint as his media to create these Gothic pieces of art. His style is incredibly macabre and is from many sources of popular culture. He is fascinated by what most people find grotesque and almost creepy.

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Dr Lakra in his studio Photo: Daniel Hernandez

Lakra goes as far as giving mummified hands, old naked china dolls and death masks his dark, tattoo touch. His work is representative of the Mexican day of the dead, and also has many other influences, such as gory medical illustrations from before photography was invented, and Gothic art. He mixes popular culture and vintage objects to create undeniably incredible, time warped artworks.

! Untitled (Yokohama Doll)

When looking at Lakras art work, even if you find these kind of things usually too freaky to look at, they are fascinating and almost hard to tear your eyes away from. The intricate detail is the same as a tattoo. I definitely recommend seeing Dr Lakra's work next time it is in town. Louise Cooke !

Especial a Go Go, 2003

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Beaverbrook,  Lord ‘Buy  old  Masters.  They  fetch  a  be5er  price  than  old  mistresses.’

- Analysed

Woman Holding A Balance, Johannes Vermeer

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REVIEW’D! James ‘Jameson’ Riley had this to say...

Delineation TBC Various artists The Crypt Gallery Downward into the crypt. The uneven steps lead towards brick lined passages glowing auburn through flaking whitewash and dust of ages. The air thickens, the weight of stone presses eardrums. Alcoves harbour iron concepts, their insides dark and still, their outsides pitted and weathered; their scale surpasses their size. Lines scratched and torn through paper, patterns born from crumbling bones on silk shrouds hang with their shadows in reverence. The process is made and re-made with manic ritual until the aesthetic is lost and eyes are discarded, the action is made pure from the beautiful. Naked bodies bent in spirals, hidden figures laugh or cry, but keep their secrets. A wall of degrading memory, slow like winter sunrise, distant like a dream. A sentimental keepsake of a happier time. Figures stare like ghosts, stand with sketched bodies between definitions, obelisks to the exploration of creation. Television’s stark light flicks and blinds, its hum amplified by brickwork chambers, it grows and beams hypnotic till the air fizzes and dissolves. Light now grows and beckons back towards the surface. Squinting in forgotten glare and stumbling back to Saturday afternoon.

The Crypt Gallery St Pancras Church Euston Road London NW1 2BA Tel/Fax: 020 7388 1461 email: info@cryptgallery.org.uk NO!FIVETWELVE


Walid Ra’ad Whitechapel Gallery Walid Ra’ad is a Lebanese artist, historian and theologian whose works centre around modern Lebanon (1975 - present) and its conflicts. He founded The Atlas Group, which purports to ‘research and document the contemporary history of Lebanon’. This is manifested through a variety of media some of which are found, some produced by Ra’ad, some of which under the guise of invented characters such as Dr. Fakhouri. Raad utilises fictional characters and the fictionalisation of events in his work as vehicles for expressing collective experience, and while they are fictional Ra’ad insists that this does not mean that they are untrue or that the events never happened,

ʻUnknown/Whitechapelʼ - from Whitechapel Gallery, 2011

On display at the Whitechapel Gallery is a selection of works produced by The Atlas Group including photos, documents and videos. Upon entering the space the first pieces that come into view are a series of A1 photos entitled ‘Secrets of the Open Sea’, each one is a different shade of blue but all seemingly monochromatic though not pure or featureless, they seem to have a small degree of distortion or texture. They make me think of the sky at different times of the day. Focusing on them makes you feel like you are looking straight upwards through the baking Middle Eastern air, or at the grey washed blue of the desert sky just before sunset. These emotions are distinctly offset by the ‘reality’ behind each image. All supposedly found under the rubble of demolished houses in Beirut the photos were taken to France where they were examined. Embedded in each one were grainy black and white photos of men and women in small groups all of whom have drowned in the Mediterranean Sea. Other works include documentation of Dr Fakhouri’s, who studied the bets made by historians on photo finishes of horse races, photos of car engines that were blown up during the various wars and conflicts in Lebabnon and an excerpt from a government surveillance video in which the cameraman diverts the camera away from the target and onto the sunset to record it setting. Throughout his work Ra’ad experiments and plays with the concept of history and moments in time, the documentation and perspective attached to them. He tackles these issues from a largely fictional perspective, perhaps to embody the times and struggle into metaphorical people and events or perhaps to deal with or analyse experiences that he witnessed while growing up. Historians must always rely on the account of others when researching certain periods in time and the first question that they must ask is ‘is this source a reliable one?’, to me Ra’ad is saying that this does not matter as any bias or slant from a source will have its historical reasons and motivations, and so has an inherent truth to it. Walid Ra’ad is a professor of Cultural Studies and with a lot of his work I feel that you would need to be equally qualified to glean the meanings behind it, the complex theorizing and calculation are meaningful and profound but lack accessibility and I would be interested see if the work resonates with other people from Lebanon. I also feel that the arresting subject of a country gripped for decades by war, the examination of documentation and experiences from different people during that time and all of history, has become cold and a bit boring. James Riley

The website: http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/

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NO!5IVE12Magazine. *The London based forum for critical exchange for cultural information relating to art practice and a number of other things.

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Words: Nadia Natour Richard Wright (he’s an artist!) Richard wright is a British artist and musician who won the turner prize in 2009. he was born in London but moved to Scotland when he was young this lead to him going to Edinburgh College of Art from 1978 to 1982 than went on to study at Glasgow School of Art from 1993 to 1995 Studying for a Master of Fine Art. Wright decorates architectural spaces with many complex designs. His has a wide range of art which can be made on paper, from print on poster paper and large scale works that can include thousands of hand drawn and painted marks. The main attraction to his work is that his paintings are often short-lived, only surviving the length of an exhibition. On 7th December 2009 Richard Wright received the turner prize for his Golden Fresco on the walls of Tate Britain’s. Richard Wright exhibition has been to multiple places worldwide this all started in 1994 at Transmission Gallery, Glasgow and since then he has continued to exhibit. Wright also has Permanent work in places like MoMA, New york and London.

Richard Wright the creator of the amazing Fresco in gold leaf was the winner of the prestigious UK art prize. The prize money of £25,000 was also awarded to Wright. Even though this work has been awarded it will be painted over and lost forever. The Golden Fresco which seen from distance makes out an abstract shape and if seen from close range you can make out shapes that suggest sunburst or clouds.

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Hirst,  Damien (on  winning  the  Turner  Prize) Its  amazing  what  you  can  do  with  an  E  in  A-­‐level  Art,  twisted  imaginaGon  and  a  chainsaw.

Richard Wright has his first major solo exhibition in United States in the Gagosian Gallery. The main attraction of this show is the incredibly detailed and graphic work which is painted onto the gallery wall. In this exhibition has also shown paper based art by Richard Wright. This work was only created for the 2004 exhibition in Gagosian Gallery in United States. The art work on the wall can only be seen for the period of the show and could never ever been seen again. This makes Richard Wright’s work so attractive to go and view.

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Untitled 2004 paper work art by Richard Wright.

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Untitled 2004 very detailed wall painting for Gagosian Gallery in United States.

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Some of Richards Wright’s work has been painted directly on to the architecture. This can be awkwardly placed in a complex location. These art works combine graphic imagery and detailed patterning. This work has been done in the corner of a wall to give it a mirror look on a wall.

Untitled 2002 by Richard Wright.

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Ingres,  J.  A.  D. Drawing  is  the  true  test  of  art.

EXHIBITIONS [Words by Katrina Quirona]

HONEY IM GIFT

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Walking into the first room, I look at the walls and at first glance I see beautiful paintings of a forest scenery, intense greens as well as intricate detail. Glaring closer and becoming engulfed by the large scale paintings I noticed something within it, supposing they were petals blown away but with a second look I realise they were idle figures that were either being carried away by the birds or lifelessly leaning on a tree branch.

This painting named ʻbetween leavesʼ were amongst the ones that I found most interesting at the show, the painted dots add an energy to a serene scene of one bird gracefully passing the figure onto the other. It is as though the birds are dealing with life and death, how it is up to mother nature when we do eventually pass on or become born.

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LUCINKA SOUCEK First time encountering Lucinka Soucek始s work, I thought it was a nice change to see woodcuts and prints being used as a medium, as I rarely see these in an artist始s exhibition nowadays. This show in particular focused on journeys made around London mainly during public transport, I like how the woodcuts give an aged effect to her art but once you realise what the subject is it始s almost a futuristic turn-the recognisable colours as well as the surroundings make it easy for you to relate and even be part of her art. Intentional or not, the fact that the colour black is being used for the crowds and parts of the objects, for me, add a sense of melancholy and absence particularly for the crowds. As even though we do travel on the same train as others we may not even acknowledge them as being there because they are just strangers who we do just spend a brief time with.

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Soucek describes her work as a way of focusing on the repetition of everyday life in addition to centralising particular traits and moods, which is where the idea of melancholy came to mind. It can also be shown how we unknowingly analyse one another but we can also watch figures from behind, rarely seeing a face which may give an expression or add personality to the passer-by.

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SINTA WERNER NETTIE HORN I had previously seen Wernerʼs ! work at a show held at the UCL and I remember being deeply intrigued by her large scale, black and white photographs. These were either cut up, folded or corrugated which formed interesting collages bringing a mix of whatʼs being documented in the photo as well as a surreal manipulation of the surroundings. This collage, ʻConstructed Visibilities IIIʼ is a good example of how easily Werner has manipulated the building into a more surreal piece of architecture. Within the main space of the gallery consisted of Wernerʼs site specific installation which is almost her way of bring us into her work a step further, as what she has done is visually altering our reality. Perceiving us to see something which is not really there. It reminded me of some other illusion that I had stumbled across through internet sources. !

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Left: Along the Sight Lines, Werner Right: Another example of a site installation

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Frida  Kahlo By  Teodora  Todorova  

Bacon,  Francis ‘The  job  of  the  ArGst  is  always  to  deepen  the  mystery.’  Frida  Kahlo  was  born  1907  in  Coyoacan  (Mexico  City),  the  daughter  of  a  German  father  and  a  Mexican  mother.     Her  work  was  largely  considered  Surrealist,  something  she  has  always  protested.  In  an  interview  of  her  in  1938   she  settled  the  question  of  the  theme  in  her  paintings,  “I  was  considered  a  surrealist.  That  is  not  correct.  I  have   never  painted  dreams.  What  I  depicted  was  my  reality.”    The  myths  she  created  time  and  again  in  her  pictures,   including  her  numerous  self-­‐portraits,  were  her  reality.  And  it  is  difficult  to  imagine  a  more  dramatic  reality  than   hers.              In  1925  she  was  seriously  injured  in  an  accident,  which  she  claims  to  have  taken  her  ability,  to  possess   virginity  or  to  lose  it,  away  from  her.  Rationalising  her  misfortunes  in  such  a  manner  was  her  first  step  in   cultivating  an  image  of  a  sort  of  beyond  sexual  or  A-­‐sexual  being,  which  she  would  later  on  be  increasingly   characterised  by.  She  died  as  a  convinced  communist  in  1954,  the  last  painting  on  her  easel  was  an  unfinished   portrait  of  Joseph  Stalin.          In  almost  all  of  her  self-­‐portraits,  Kahlo  is  depicted  in  Mexican  clothes  and  pre-­‐Columbian  jewellery,  exhibiting   on  one  hand  her  credentials  as  a  member  of  Mexico’s  indigenous  community,  and  on  the  other  overlaying,   increasing  and  giving  an  eccentric  effect  to  her  femininity.    Her  husband,  the  painter  Diego  Rivera,  valued  not  only   these  costumes,  but  also  her  long  black  hair.  On  the  1940  “Self-­‐portrait  with  Cropped  Hair”,  Kahlo  parts  with   these  attributes  of  femininity.  She’s  portrayed  herself  sitting  up-­‐right  on  a  yellow  chair  on  an  orange-­‐red  floor,   wearing  loose  masculine  attire.  The  floor  is  covered  with  her  black  hair,  which  has  just  been  cut  off,  and  seems  to   be  taking  a  life  of  its  own,  curling  around  her  feet  and  the  legs  of  the  chair.  Kahlo  here  rejects  the  stereotypical   feminine  image  by  laying  aside  and  destroying  the  symbol  of  her  beauty  and  sensuality.            A  line  from  a  Mexican  popular  song  at  the  top  of  the  picture  explains  why  she  has  taken  this  step:  “Look  when  I   loved  you,  it  was  because  of  your  hair;  Now  that  you’re  shorn,  I  don’t  love  you  anymore.”But  what  remains,  while   it  seems  to  be  marked  by  the  pain  of  the  separation  of  her  husband,  is  at  the  same  time  the  expression  of  great   self-­‐confidence.  Kahlo  stares  out  of  the  portrait,  at  the  beholder-­‐  questioningly,  with  a  look  of  curiosity  and   wonder.  She  stares  from  big  eyes  beneath  dark  eyebrows  which  grow  together  to  form  a  unibrow,  that’s  a  woman   who  translates  strong  physical  and  emotional  torments  into  pictures  of  incredible  precision  and  yet  tells  not  only   of  pain  but  also  of  its  conquest  through  Art.  However,  Frida  Kahlo  seems  to  have  never  attached  any  importance   to  preserving  proportion  and  perspective;  she’s  interested  in  details,  such  as  the  seemingly  live  hairs  on  the  floor,   which  together  with  her  concentration  on  the  themes  of  pain  and  desire  and  death,  allow  for  this  unique  form  of   self-­‐presentation.            Kahlo’s  strength  of  will  has  often  been  the  topic  of  discussion  within  Art  circles,  and  indeed  it  is  striking  how   her  torments  brought  to  life  an  Art  of  survival  which  radiates  precisely  this  quality.  Compelling  as  Frida  Kahlo’s   life  story  was,  what  remains  are  pictures  that  bear  it’s  stamp,  albeit  with  “relaxed  cruelty”,  as  Diego  Rivera  called   it,  taking  up  valid  feminine  themes,  including  sex  as  for  example  in  the  unusual  depiction  of  female  sexual  organs.     These  are  self-­‐depictions  without  any  narcissism,  giving  insight  into  her  physical  and  emotional  state.  In  fact  these   works  of  Art,  in  spite  of  their  highly  individual  syntax,  are  not  hermetic,  and  expose  before  the  eyes  of  every   beholder,  his  or  her  own  mortality.  

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Bowen,  Elizabeth ‘Art  is  the  only  thing  that  can  go  on  ma5ering  once  it  has  stopped  hurGng.’

Gilbert  and  George,  White  Cube.  

When  I  first  entered  the  space,  nothing  stuck  me.  I  was  straight  away  drawn  to   the  middle  of  the  room  and  all  I  could  see  was  organised  frames  arranged  in   an  idenGcal  manner  around  the  room.  As  I  wondered  around  looking  for  a   deeper  meaning  to  the  work,  I  found  nothing.  From  the  colours  to  the  medium   that  was  used,  I  found  it  very  bland.  The  ‘artworks’  didn’t  excite  me,  nor  did  it   raise  any  quesGons  but  just  leg  me  disappointed.   In  an  effort  to  find  something  more  interesGng,  I  headed  downstairs,  and  I   found  nothing  but  the  same.  As  in  the  past,  they  had  presented  postcards.  I   didn’t  understand  the  reason  for  the  return.  By  the  looks  of  the  ‘work’,  it   seems  more  developmental  rather  than  an  actual  outcome.  Even  if  the   medium  had  been  different  and  actually  had  a  centre  piece,  that  would  have   been  more  of  a  success.     NO!FIVETWELVE


In  my  opinion,  they  were  addressing  homophobic  views  which  have  been   explored  by  other  arGsts  and  then  in  previous  works  and  to  me  this  was  not   needed.  From  the  Gme  I  got  there  to  the  Gme  I  leg,  my  thoughts  did  not   change,  nor  did  I  have  any  emoGonal  response  to  the  pieces  and  I  don’t  see   anyone  who  could  engage  to  this  exhibiGon.  I  didn’t  enjoy  it  one  bit  and  do  not   recommend  anyone  to  go  the  White  Cube  in  Mason’s  Yard  for  this.     Anastasia  Evangelou   NO!FIVETWELVE


Demarco,  Richard Art  is  for  everyone  –  paint  like  music  is  the  most  internaGonal  thing  I  know.

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO AND WHEN YOU SHOULD DO IT (RIGHT NOW) List  of  15  paintings  you  must  see  while  you’re  in  London 1.  Sunflowers  –  Vincent  Van  Gogh  (The  National  Gallery)   2.  Metamorphosis  of  Narcissus  –  Salvador  Dali  (Tate  Modern) 3.  The  Three  Dancers  –  Pablo  Picasso  (Tate  Modern) 4.  The  Snail  –  Henri  John  Matisse  (Tate  Modern) 5.  Nevermore  –  Paul  Gauguin  (The  Courtauld  Gallery) 6.  Three  Studies  for  Figures  at  the  Base  of  a  Crucifixion  –  Francis  Bacon  (Tate   Britain) 7.  Adam  and  Eve  –  Lucas  Cranach  the  Elder  (The  Courtauld  Gallery) 8.  The  Lady  of  Shalott  –  John  William  Waterhouse  (Tate  Britain) 9.  Queen  Elizabeth  I  “The  Ditchley  portrait”  –  Marcus  Gheeraerts  the  Younger   (National  Portrait  Gallery) 10.  The  Arnolfini  Portrait  –  Jan  van  Eyck  (National  Gallery) 11.  Madame  de  Pompadour  –  Francois  Boucher  (Wallace  Collection) 12.  The  Linley  Sisters  -­‐  Thomas  Gainsborough  (The  Dulwich  Picture  Gallery) 13.  The  Fighting  Temeraire  –  Joseph  Mallord  William  Turner  (National  Gallery) 14.  The  Laughing  Cavalier  –  Frans  Hals  (Wallace  Collection) 15.  A  Bar  at  the  Folies-­‐Bergere  –  Edouard  Manet  (The  Courtauld  Gallery) NO!FIVETWELVE


Art students have feelings too.

The twentieth century saw massive changes in what it meant to be an artist. With a handful of notable exceptions, if you chose the life of an artist there were few options open to you. You could work commercially in a purely functional capacity, designing patterns for ceramics or fabric, making drawings for scientific research such as anatomy for surgeons or flowers for botanists, paint wealthy landowners portraits with their dogs, regalia and pomp, or strike out alone on a path of likely poverty and persecution exploring your chosen mediums and philosophies with little hope of reward or recognition. In the last hundred years however, art has come to be valued far higher than as a trophy for affluent families (although that sector still remains as a major source of capital in the market), art and art movements have pushed the boundaries of our understanding of the world, from giving voice to cultures and communities around the world, to exploring the deepest of philosophical quandaries. Art exploded into a myriad of styles, no longer bound by tradition or conformity to material or technique, giving birth to a myriad of new industries and breathing life into many others. The arrival of ‘cool’ was a great gift to the capitalistic system, it is by nature unquantifiable and subjective so it provides an endless variation of new desirables for production by the . None of which would have had any place in the art and music are the language of ‘cool’ and the development of both arts has been intrinsically linked, perhaps the constant re-invention of both has been driven by the ever-escalating demand for new products. To say that the depths of the human construct and the vast questions of life have been scrutinized and chewed over until they are a pulpy mess on the floor of a gallery is due to the drive of capitalist economics is perhaps too simplistic of an analogy. However, the arts and the economy have somewhat of a symbiotic relationship, feeding off each other while at the same time trying not to acknowledge each other’s existence. It is with this in mind that I get to the point. Today in the UK, like many other countries around the world, we find ourselves faced with a grim economic situation. The coalition government’s policy of heavy public sector cut backs has the potential to be our 9/11 for this decade. Banks have become more cautious about lending money to and investing in small businesses, there is the threat of rising inflation and interest rates as well as the weakening of the Pound to compound the issues. Government funding of Universities is to go from £7.1bn down to £4.2bn p.a. by 2014, a reduction of 40%. The Arts Council England (ACE) will have to cope with cuts of 30% to its government grants, 50% to its administration costs and 15% to national museums (although they will remain free to enter).. by 2014. The policy of cuts in itself is hard to argue against when you examine the nations accounts and the level of debt the UK economy is in. Public borrowing for the year 2010-2011 is £150billion, that’s BILLION, as in £6bn more than the entire budget for defence, law and order, housing and environment, transport and industry, agriculture and employment. Interest alone on UK plc debt for the same period was £44bn (equal to the GDP of Cameroon in 2010 [International monetary fund figures]), borrowing to this level is unsustainable and needs to be dealt with. There is much debate as to what is best way of reducing the debt is, but there are 3 main options; increase taxes, reduce spending, increase productivity or a mixture of 2 or all 3. All that being as it is, it is the opinion of many people that the best art is born out of misery, in which case we should prepare ourselves for a period of great creativity.

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websites/blogs/banter !

http://www.booooooom.com/ A site that’s packed full of energy and inspiration, allowing you to view all types of art from graphic design to film. Created by Japanese Canadian artist Jeff Hamanda, this blog is definitely one to subscribe to.

http://dearie.me/

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A site that’s only just started two years ago it features graffiti and street art from London’s Brick Lane - so be ready to see work from artists like Nathan Bowen. Fear not; if you’re feeling anticultural be assured that it also presents work from other parts of the world.

http://theeverydayart.tumblr.com/ One of the most popular art blogs on the cult site tumblr. An art stimulating site with posts of classic fine art work, along with illustration, digital art, sculpture in addition to any other form of art.

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http://www.contemporaryartdaily.com/ Great site if you want all you need to know on contemporary art and blogging as well as featuring artwork that never fails to excite the interests. What’s a bonus is that, from this site, you can find out about upcoming exhibitions and events. Also, it gives reviews on the month just incase you feel like you’ve missed out on anything. NO!FIVETWELVE


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Have  something  to  say?  Well  don’t  say  it   out  loud!  Send  it  to  us  via  the  inter-­‐web   at:  no!5ive12mag@commiepress.org.uk NO!FIVETWELVE


GAMES at the barbican Cory Arcangel

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Excitement was the first thing I felt before I saw anything as the background sounds of the bleeping and the blooping of game consoles played. Brooklyn-based Cory Arcangel a media artist with a pull towards video games, media manipulation and the internet, projected his work of bowling games along the curving wall itself creating it into a virtual bowling alley, showing the graduation of change through the years of technology. Evidence of how far we have come along from the pixellated screens to the smooth crisp lines and bold flashing lights that created a key distraction for the missing piece of sound of pin balls clattering. The piece created a slow start of questions as to why he left out the piece of sound and what was his thought process when creating this. His work is the creation in which we are able to explore his world and fascination of modern gaming culture with a twist. ‘Beat the champ’

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Danielle Crawford-Lugay NO!FIVETWELVE


Anouilh,  Jean ‘Life  is  very  nice,  but  it  has  no  shape.  It  is  the  purpose  of  Art  to  give  it  shape.’

Look at Claude Monet... His gardens in Giverny... Claude Monet. When in his garden, Monet liked to be exceedingly well dressed.

Nympheas (1915)

Claude Monet is one of the greatest Impressionist artists of all time. I found reading about his background really interesting. From an early age, Monet had always been interested in art, which his father did not agree with, but nothing seemed to stop him so he began studying at the Le Havre School of Arts. Monet did not always have an easy life. He ran into a lot of financial difficulties and even tried to commit suicide. However, in my opinion, Monet always seemed really determined to succeed in life, so as when his paintings got denied by the Royal Academy, he did not give up, he just worked harder at developing his Impressionistic style. This turned out to be a success as he produced his famous painting ‘Impression Sunrise’,1873. Monet was obsessed with the changing effects of light and often painted a series of the same subject to capture it, swapping canvases as the day progressed. I think Monet’s personality really reflects in his work, his paintings to me show elegance and are very unique. To me, his work is very recognisable because of his thick application of paint and small brush strokes of colour, which add texture to his paintings. Another thing I noticed from Monet’s paintings is that he painted what he saw, not what he knew should be there. I find that his work has a very natural appearance and the colours he uses give a very soft touch. Monet’s work is very inspirational when looking at Fine art. It really helps me when producing my own paintings. I like how Monet mainly focuses on landscapes and uses his own garden as inspiration, which features willows and water lilies. Looking at his painting techniques really inspire me to use them in my own work. I like the way he studies his subject intently and I think considering that, will really help me with my own work. Another technique Monet used is impasto, in which I use in my own work.

The Garden in Flower (1900)

Looking through Monet’s painting’s really inspired me with my own work to do similar. One of my favourite paintings is “Water Lilies”. I really like the use of colour. I think the bright but very natural colours he has used, in my opinion, are all made up of the right tones. All of Monet’s paintings link together, for example, the way he always produced landscapes or scenery, and has done a series of paintings capturing the light from every angle to me, makes him such a unique artist. Gabriella Cocchiarella

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Artaud,  Antonin ‘No  one  has  ever  wri5en,  painted,   sculpted,  modeled,  built  or  invented   except  to  literally  get  out  of  hell.

[EAT YOUR OWN FACE] Words: Christopher Jones

Arthur Suydam is an American comic book artist and musician. His work has graced magazines such as Heavy Metal, Epic Illustrated and National Lampoon. His comic book work includes Batman, Conan, Tarzan, Predator, Aliens and Death Dealer. His 2000's work includes the series Marvel Zombies for Marvel Comics. Suydam has contributed work to many publications, including Heavy Metal, House of Secrets, House of Mystery, Penthouse Comix, Epic Illustrated and National Lampoon, as well as international sci-fi and comic anthologies. His own projects include Arthur Suydam: The Art of the Barbarian, Skin Deep, The Alien Encounters Poster Book, Visions: The Art of Arthur Suydam, Mudwogs, Mudwogs II, Bedtime Stories for the Incarcerated, Libby in the Lost World and The Adventures of Cholly and Flytrap .Arthur Suydam's comic book work includes such titles as Batman, Conan, Tarzan, Predator, Aliens and Death Dealer. Recently, his work has primarily been on covers, including for Marvel Zombies, Ghost Rider,

Hellstorm, Moon Knight and Wolverine for Marvel Comics, as well as covers for the much-anticipated crossover of Marvel Zombies vs. The Army of Darkness and Raise the Dead for Dynamite Entertainment. Suydam also created the box art for the game Touch the Dead, and provided the cover art to the Mickey Spillane (with Max Allan Collins) novel Dead Street. Suydam was the Artist Guest of Honor at Dragon Con. Arthur Suydam is an American illustrator who is known to create weird and wonderful imagery either transcribed directly from somebody else’s art work which he then takes and using his own diversity and imagination uses the work and creates an entirely different piece from it ready to create from, I am talking about his illustrations that he created for an alternate version of the marvel characters readjusting them and recreating them as anti-heroes by changing them in to flesh eating zombies, which are using their super powers for bad and wiping out the whole of humanity to satisfy the “hunger”. His work is eye catching in numerous ways one of them being in the way that they are NO!FIVETWELVE


portrayed, the images are created in such details that the horror aspect of his pieces are totally gripping and in my opinion makes the onlooker study the work for a large amount of time as I think that including so much detail and portraying peoples childhood heroes in such a way somewhat shocking and can be a lot to take in as these characters have never been seen in such a way before, they are shown ripping humans apart and totally mutilating them before eating there entire bodies and are even shown at times to fight over the corpse as the apparent hunger is unbearable. Another eye catching and vivid thing about these pieces are the colouring that is used, as these super heroes all have such eccentric costumes with bold mark making and bright colouring so that they are appealing to children, this makes them very bold and outstanding, the fact that Suydam decided to keep the original concept clothing and personas is a great appeal to me and other fans of the genre as the transformation of these heroes was so unexpected that even though this came as a great shock to the fans not only the concept art but the transition of the story it was still eagerly awaited and in my opinion Arthur Suydam has done them every justice and more. One thing that greatly interests me in this artists is the fact that he says that all his work that has been created has been influenced by times in his life and experiences he has encountered, I also like the way he quotes himself to have limitless imagination as this is quite fascinating as to me this would suggest that he draws his inspiration from everything around him which would give him limitless possibilities in his creative lifestyles. He is obviously a very prestigious graphic novel illustrator as he has been hired by some of the world’s biggest comic book corporations such as marvel and dc, which is an achievement in its own as they are often regarded as rivals as it seems that both are constantly striving for recognition over one another.

Look out, Marvel Zombies!!

This is a piece taken from the marvel zombie’s series it is one of the first front covers, we can see all the usual popular characters such as spider man, wolverine, captain America and the x men all transformed into flesh eating monsters, even though the likeness has been changed we can still recognise all these characters as their original selves, this too me shows dedication that the artist has kept some sort of the original likeness to keep the fans happy and to create his own sort of pastiche to the work which in my opinion creates in itself a fitting tribute to the original artist. In my opinion Arthur suydam is an artist with diverse passions, Suydam has a rare ability to tune himself to the feel and flavor of any area of art, style, history and character. His settings are as beautiful and as haunting as his stories are terrifying yet beautifully written. The techniques he has gained and developed over the decades breathe a life and magnetism into his characters, as though the artist serves merely as a medium to channel them. Genius tempered with technique.

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Ged  Quinn  (born  1963,  Liverpool)  is  an  English  arGst.  He  studied  at  the  Ruskin  in  Oxford,  the  Slade   School  of  Art  in  London,  the  Kunstakademie  Düsseldorf,  and  the  Rijksakademie  in  Amsterdam.He   specialises  in  allegorical  painGngs  that  include  contemporary  images  (generally  on  controversial  topics   in  Western  cultural  history)  in  idyllic  scenes  based  on  classical  painGngs  such  as  the  pastoral  works  of   Claude  Lorrain  and  Caspar  David  Friedrich.  For  instance,  his  Cross  in  the  Wilderness  introduces  a   miniature  Spandau  Prison,  the  iconic  jail  for  Nazi  war  criminals,  into  a  forest  scene  based  on  Der   Chasseur  im  Walde  by  Friedrich,  a  leading  painter  in  German  RomanGcism.  Another  painGng,  Darkening   of  the  Green,  places  the  controversial  HM  Prison  Maze  into  a  rural  landscape.  Quinn  has  exhibited   internaGonally  in  many  shows  including  Language  of  the  Wall  at  the  Museum  of  Contemporary  Art  in   Ljubliania,  Slovenia,  The  Real  Ideal  at  the  Millennium  Galleries  in  Sheffield,  and  Showcase  at  the  City  Art   Centre  in  Edinburgh.  He  is  represented  by  Wilkinson  Gallery  in  London.  Quinn  was  also  the  keyboard   player  in  the  Liverpool  group  The  Wild  Swans.  He  was  one  of  the  three  original  core  members,  along   with  Paul  Simpson  and  Jeremy  Kelly,  and  played  on  their  Zoo  Records  12"  single  The  RevoluGonary   Spirit/God  Forbid  released  in  1982.  He  was  also  involved  when  the  group  reformed  in  1986,  although  he   leg  shortly  agerwards  to  pursue  his  art  career.  A  retrospecGve  2CD  collecGon  called  Incandescent  with   Quinn  appearing  on  all  tracks,  was  released  in  2003  by  Renascent  Records.  However  Quinn  did  not   appear  on  either  of  the  band's  two  albums  for  Sire  Records  later  in  the  nineteen  eighGes.  In  the  interim   between  the  Wild  Swans  Mks  I  and  II  he  was  also  a  member  of  another  Liverpool  band,  The  Lotus  Eaters   (new  wave)  and  co-­‐wrote  their  hit  single  The  First  Picture  Of  You. Title:      Hopelessly  Devoted  To  You     Work  Type:  pain7ng   Date  of  work:  2008   Materials:  medium:  oil support:  linen Measurements:   extent:  61x49.5  cm Collec7on:  Liverpool  Biennial

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Reviewed  by  Christopher  Jones This  painGng  shows  a  man  like  woman  or  maybe  a  transsexual.  The  woman  has  a  really  pale  complexion   and  sports  long  hair  while  wearing  a  bridal  head  dress.  The  painGng  shows  the  figure  bearing  its  breasts   but  on  the  other  hand  the  figure  also  has  some  defining  qualiGes  of  a  man  such  as  short  stubbly  facial   hair  and  a  moustache.  I  would  also  say  that  the  pose  that  the  figure  is  seen  sisng  in  is  quite  masculine   as  the  figure  is  sisng  straight  with  its  arms  crossed  quite  firmly.  Another  stereotypical  masculine  trait   that  the  figure  holds  is  the  fact  that  there  is  a  large  porGon  of  its  body  which  is  covered  in  ta5oos  which   the  pose  suggests  to  me  that  the  person  is  really  proud  of  its  body  art  and  is  quite  prepared  to   showcase  them  quite  freely  in  this  imagery  as  if  its  art  work  is  sesng  some  statement  about  its  own   personality.  The  figure  is  portrayed  to  have  ta5oos  in  the  middle  of  both  of  its  arms  and  on  both  lower   parts  of  its  arms  as  well,  on  its  hands  and  a  love  heart  shaped  ta5oo  posiGoned  on  its  leg  breast,  there   are  two  things  that  come  to  my  mind  when  I  think  about  the  possible  reasons  that  the  arGst  would  of   shows  this  in  such  a  way  the  first  of  them  being  that  the  figure  in  this  piece  in  not  frightened  to   embrace  its  masculinity  or  femininity.  Neither  is  it  afraid  to  combine  both  the  a5ributes  that  are  usually   accustomed  with  either  sex  and  combine  them  together  by  using  physical  ta5oos  only  with  feminine   designs  to  incorporate  both  features  from  a  man  and  a  woman’s  personality.  Or  another  possibility  is   that  the  figure  is  meant  to  perceived  as  something  in-­‐between  a  man  or  a  woman. Something  other  than  the  portrayal  of  the  figure  that  is  shocking  about  this  piece  is  the  slash  marks   decoraGng  its  torso  and  enGre  arms.  I  have  perceived  a  number  of  things  from  this  piece  one  of  them   being  that  this  bride  has  been  portrayed  in  this  way  as  the  arGst  probably  doesn’t  want  this  bride  to  be   perceived  as  a  typical  bride,  a  typical  bride  to  me  would  look  immensely  happy  and  really  beauGful,  if   the  image  is  meant  to  be  taken  from  the  brides  wedding  day  we  would  expect  her  to  be  ecstaGc  but  on   the  contrary  Ged  Quinn’s  bride  is  the  complete  opposite  and  this  is  probably  the  definiGve  reason  for   the  portrayal  of  the  brides  self-­‐harm    or  this  could  be  perceived  as  a  way  for  the  bride  to  vent  its   emoGonal  pain,  another  possible  reason  for  the  brides  afflicGons  could  be  the  pressure  these  days  to  be   good  looking  that  modern  day  society  has  made  the  bride  so  image  conscious  that  she  feels  ugly  and   una5racGve  and  self-­‐harm  is  a  way  to  ease  the  emoGon  pain  by  replacing  it  with  physical.  Another   definiGve  part  of  this  piece  is  the  word  “slut”  which  has  been  carved  into  the  bride’s  chest,  this  shows   to  me  that  the  bride  has  been  shunned  by  friends  or  possibly  a  partner  and  has  very  low  self-­‐esteem.   Another  possibility  why  the  bride  is  almost  half  masculine  half  feminine  is  that  the  gap  between  male   and  female  fashion  is  closing  therefore  a  blend  has  been  shown  in  this  piece. There  are  some  things  that  I  really  liked  about  this  painGng  and  others  that  I  wasn’t  so  fond  of  one  of   the  main  things  that  I  liked  about  the  piece  is  that  there  were  numerous  things  that  you  could  perceive   from  the  piece  and  what  the  arGst  has  done  here  is  made  each  individual  percepGon  correct  through   the  clashing  aspects  from  the  piece,  this  keeps  you  interested  in  the  piece  unGl  you  come  to  a   conclusion  of  your  own.  Something  that  I  thought  was  slightly  distasteful  in  my  opinion  was  how   graphic  the  piece  was  for  a  public  exhibiGon,  I  don’t  think  this  piece  would  have  been  suitable  for  a   young  child  to  see  also  a  lot  of  people  self-­‐harm  these  days  and  I  wouldn’t  want  anybody  to  get  any   ideas  neither  would  I  want  to  have  this  condiGon  glorified.    The  majority  of  Ged  Quinn’s  work  is  oil  on   linen  which  is  a  medium  that  I  have  never  really  experimented  with  for  a  number  of  reasons  one  of   them  being  the  drying  Gme  of  oil  paints  alone  is  a  long  Gme  so  I  wouldn’t  use  this  process  unless  I  had  a   vast  amount  of  Gme  for  a  piece.

 

Braque,  Georges ‘Art  is  meant  to  disturb,  science  reassures’

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Degas,  Edgar Art  is  vice.  You  don’t  marry  it  legiGmately,  you  rape  it.

[LEARN THIS] How to draw a portrait step by step. Firstly  when  seMng  out  to  draw  a  realis7c  looking  human  portrait  it  can  be  helpful  to  look  at   the  image  in  a  simplified  way  such  as  breaking  down  the  head  in  to  simple  shapes,  this  will  help   to  map  out  the  features  on  the  face  and  head  and  give  you  a  star7ng  point,  making  the  head  a   sort  of  cylinder  shape,  the  neck  would  be  a  couple  of  single  lines  depending  on  the  angle  that   the  head  was  presented.  So  at  this  stage  my  portrait  that  I  am  crea7ng  would  appear  like  this:

Once  you  have  established  the  shape  and   the  7lt  of  the  head  you  can  now  start  to   posi7on  the  features,  here  Is  were  you   will  find  the  rule  of  halves  as  a  useful   guideline,  firstly  divide  your  head  shape   into  half  horizontal  and  half  ver7cal,  the   ver7cal  line  acts  as  a  guideline  for  the   posi7on  of  the  features  on  either  side,   the  horizontal  line  marks  the  posi7on  of   the  eyes,  now  divide  the  space  between   the  brows  and  the  boUom  of  the  chin  in   half  to  find  the  posi7on  of  the  base  of   the  nose.  Finally  draw  a  line  half  way   between  the  nose  line  and  the  chin  to   establish  the  posi7on  of  the  lower  lip.

When  measuring  a  common  mistake  is  to  make  the  top  of  the  head  too  small  the  eye  line  is  set   half  way  between  the  top  of  the  head  and  the  base  of  the  chin.

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AWer  comple7ng  this  step  this  is  what  my  portrait  is  looking  like...

Here  we  can  see  the  features  have  been  lightly   drew  in  and  posi7oned  and  some  sort  of   general  shape  is  star7ng  to  be  established. AWer  doing  this  you  will  need  to  establish  were   the  hair  line  rests,  for  my  subject  this  isn't   per7cualry  difficult  as  the  subject  has  a  short   haircut

Here  I  have  added  the  hair  line  some  undefined   hair.  aWer  gaining  an  ini7al  shape  we  can  now   start  to  focus  on  capturing  a  likeness,  when   focusing  on  capturing  the  likeness  it  is   important  that  you  have  all  the  prepara7ons   and  features  in  rela7on  to  each  other  this  is   important  to  capture  the  individual  likeness,   the  most  common  mistakes  occur  when  the   ears  are  being  posi7oned  in  rela7on  to  the   eyes. I  am  going  to  start  to  define  slightly  some  of   the  features  on  my  portrait  in  order  for  me  to   realise  were  some  thins  are  I  can  then  begin  to   erase  my  guidelines.

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Now  I  have  penciled  in  some  of  the  details  I   have  erased  my  guidelines,  this  is  my  portrait   with  minimal  detail  and  erased  guidelines, I  have  cleaned  this  image  up  now  and  I  am   ready  to  start  adding  detail. The  best  way  to  tackle  the  drawing  the   human  face  in  detail  is  to  forget  what  you  are   drawing  and  just  focus  on  crea7ng  the   structure  of  certain  parts  of  the  figure,  you   should  do  this  by  focusing  on  the  light  and   dark  tones,  to  gain  realis7c  tones  you  should   firstly  focus  on  an  individual  part  of  the  face   and  try  and  dis7nguish  the  direc7on  that  the   light  hits  the  face  this  is  the  best  way  of   portraying  great  details  as  this  will  add  more   defini7on  than  drawing  individual  hairs  on   the  eye  brows  or  head  as  a  general  outcome   is  given  and  this  is  a  far  more  telling  process.

Here  I  have  began  to  add  some  light  and  mid   tones  from  the  direc7ons  that  the  light  has   been  hiMng  my  image.  From  this  image  we   can  see  some  shape  and  defini7on  star7ng  to   build  up.  

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I  have  added  some  darker  tones  to  my  portrait   now.  In  this  image,  we  can  see  the  difference   that  some  blends  of  tone  can  create,

I  started  to  work  in  to  my  piece  more  by   adding  tones  over  the  top  but   unfortunately  we  can  not  see  it  as  much   in  this  image.  I  also  added  an  ear  to  the   leW  side  of  the  image  to  try  and  balance   the  piece  out  but  I  am  probably  going  to   remove  it.

Upon  reflec7on  I  have  decided  that  I  am  going  to  leave  the  ear  out  and  try  and  compromise   with  some  back  ground  shading.

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AWer  I  have  layered  my  colours  I  added  some  neck  structure  and  upper  torso,

The  only  way  to  perfect  this  process  is  prac7ce. Also  some  textured  paper  and  conte  crayons  create  a  nice  effect  when  used  in  this  medium  the   texture  in  the  paper  also  creates  some  light  tones  with  you  having  to  so  it  becomes  more   effec7ve.

Christopher  Jones

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Alexander,  Hilary ‘To  the  accountants,  a  true  work  of  art  is  nothing  more  than  an  investment  that  hangs  on  the  wall.’

you LITERALLY have to see this... Tate  Britain  9  August  2010    –    31  July  2011

Romance  is  in  the  air  in  the  Clore  Gallery,  a  major  new  display  presents  RomanGc  art  in  Britain,  its  origins,   inspiraGons  and  legacies.  Drawn  from  Tate's  collecGon,  it  showcases  major  works  by  Henry  Fuseli,  JMW  Turner,   John  Constable  and  Samuel  Palmer,  as  well  as  newly-­‐acquired  works  by  William  Blake.  From  Turner's  reinvenGon   of  landscape  to  Blake's  visionary  histories,  the  display  reveals  the  imaginaGon  and  innovaGons  of  a  generaGon   defined  by  belief  in  creaGve  freedom,  rather  than  tradiGon  or  style.  In  addiGon,  two  rooms  look  at  the  legacy  of   The  RomanGcs,  presenGng  work  by  Graham  Sutherland  and  others.

The  romanGcs  exhibiGon  appeals  to  me  because  there  is  some  really  well  painted  pieces  in  the  collecGon  all   oozing  with  emoGon,  also  the  exhibiGon  is  free  and  looks  really  inspiraGonal  so  that  is  why  I  would  declare  this  as   a  must  see  in  the  Tate  Britain.

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Paul Booth

Name:  Paul  Booth Na<onality:  American   Loca<on:  New  York,  California Born:  1968  (42) Review  by  Christopher  Jones. Booth  was  a  professional  at  a  young  age.  He  began  his  own  sign  making  shop  at  the  age  of  fiWeen  and   subsequently  learned  airbrushing  and  Repo  work.  When  he  got  his  first  taUoo,  his  daughter's  name,  his  interest   was  piqued  and  he  wanted  to  learn  more  about  what  there  was  to  the  medium.  Booth  has  now  been  taUooing  for   over  twenty  years,  and  in  that  7me  he  has  worked  on  mul7ple  celebri7es  and  rock  bands,  including  Fred  Durst,   Slayer,  Slipknot,  Mudvayne,  Pantera,  The  Undertaker  (of  WWE  fame),  Superjoint  Ritual,  Adrenaline  Crew.  Booth  is   widely  considered  a  master  of  the  art  form Paul  booth  has  been  a  taUoo  ar7st  for  nearly  two  decades  and  a  painter  before  that,  following  years  of  public   appearances  and  having  won  numerous  amounts  of  interna7onal  awards,  he  is  now  a  household  name  with  a  two   year  public  wai7ng  list.  In  2000  together  with  the  world  renowned  Swiss  taUooists  fillip  and  Ti7ne  Leu,  he  ini7ated   the  interna7onal  Areusion  experiment,  bringing  together  leading  taUoo  ar7sts  from  around  the  world  to  create   one  off  works  of  art,  Also  winning  an  award  for  his  documentary  on  the  movement.  In  2002  his  macabre  style  and   his  taUooing  of  numerous  major  metal  bands  led  rolling  stone  magazine  to  dub  him  “  the  king  of  rock  taUoos”  he   is  devoted  to  the  horror  genre  and  has  had  a  long  rela7onship  with  film. One  thing  that  seriously  aUracts  me  to  Paul  booth  as  an  ar7st  is  the  fact  that  the  majority  of  his  work  is  created  in   a  black  and  grey  tonal  medium  which  i  personally  create  the  bulk  of  my  own  work  in  as  I  think  that  this  medium   can  show  a  greater  amount  of  detail  in  any  piece  as  any  mistake  can  add  depth  to  the  piece  were  as  with  colour   one  mistake  can  ruin  the  whole  piece  if  the  colour  scheme  becomes  accidentally  tainted.  Booth’s  realism  aspect  is   never  lost  no  maUer  the  size  of  the  work  that  he  creates  his  aUen7on  to  detail  is  inspira7onal  to  me  as  an  ar7st  as   I  wish  to  obtain  the  skill  of  photo  realism  in  my  journey  and  ar7sts  like  Paul  booth  inspire  me  to  strive  on  and  try   to  not  only  to  beUer  myself  as  an  ar7st  but  to  become  more  pres7gious  then  them  not  only  in  recogni7on  but  in   talent  as  well.  His  uses  of  tone  shows  every  aspect  of  the  piece  in  high  detail  and  most  pieces  could  be  directly  

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transferred  on  to  another  medium  other  than  skin  and  immediately  be  exhibited  because  of  booth’s  massive   reputa7on. Another  thing  which  interests  me  deeply  in  Paul  booth  is  his  dedica7on  to  the  horror  genre  portrayed  in  artwork,   this  is  one  of  my  favourite  genres  as  I  love  the  striking  effect  that  this  style  of  artwork  can  purely  generate  alone.   Booth’s  work  is  shocking  yet  majes7c  at  the  same  7me  through  his  use  of  figura7ve  art  he  can  easily  portray  for   example  real  femininity  and  gruesome  terror  which  is  not  an  easy  thing  to  do  as  each  aspect  clash  with  each   other.  His  realism  aspect  in  his  work  ac7vates  our  senses  instantly  ac7va7ng  our  terror  reflex  and  has  oWen  been   known  to  shock  onlookers  and  even  though  the  viewer  maybe  somewhat  in7midated  by  the  piece  I  think  that  this   is  a  fiMng  tribute  to  his  talent  and  professionalism.  In  my  opinion  some  of  his  hand  piece  taUoos  have  a  real  3D   effect  established  within  them  and  have  has  poten7al  to  transform  somebody’s  hand  into  a  realis7c  looking   monster. In  my  opinion  Paul  booth’s  style  is  directly  inspired  by  the  work  of  H  R  Giger  as  by  just  looking  at  the  two  styles  we   can  instantly  see  a  valid  comparison  in  colour  scheme  and  style,  both  ar7sts  create  monsters  which  look  both   lifeless  and  soulless  but  this  style  has  become  instantly  renowned  as  their  own  as  the  blend  of  their  thoughts  is   easier  to  respond  to  an  idea  form  rather  than  finished  pieces.  One  of  the  major  differences  between  the  two   ar7sts  works  and  can  only  be  dis7nguished  upon  reflec7on  is  that  Paul  Booth’s  crea7ons  look  organic  as  if  they   would  have  major  organs  and  maybe  even  embezzle  human  characteris7cs  as  Giger’s  work  looks  metallic  and   almost  robo7c  at  7mes.  

       An  example  of  Paul  booths  work.                      An  example  of  H  R  Giger’s  work. With  these  two  pieces  of  work,  we  can  see  that  both  have  a  similar  style  through  paying  aUen7on  to  the  eyes  and   characteris7cs  of  the  imagery  they  both  look  like  creatures  not  to  be  messed  with  and  both  have  an  eerie   temperament  to  them. To  me  it  appears  that  Booth  is  almost  con7nuing  Giger’s  legacy  through  his  artwork  and  taUooing  is  helping  to   keep  a  fresh  contemporary  outlook  to  his  imagery  without  making  the  biomechanical  style  over  shadow  the   artwork.

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Lawrence Stephen Lowry (November 1, 1887 February 23, 1976) was an English artist born in Barratt Street, Old Trafford, Manchester. "I believe every human creature is an island," he said. "Had I not been lonely, none of my work would have happened." It has become fashionable in the art world to look down on Lowry as a naive painter who could only paint industrial landscapes full of ridiculous scampering matchstick people. Nothing could be further from the truth: actually Lowry was a deeply sophisticated artist with an enviable precision of drawing (if you look closely, his figures are subtly individuated, not generic) and with a far greater range of subject than is generally supposed. It’s high time his work was thoroughly reassessed.

! Manchester City vs Sheffield United by L S Lowry ! Some of Lowry's earlier paintings were inspired by his travels through the streets of Manchester during his time working as a rent collector. It is estimated that he produced over ten thousand works of art, from a simple 'doodle' to a major oil painting on canvas. Later part of his life, he seemed to have concentrating on stick figures either in group or as lone figures. During this time he produced large amounts of pencil sketches which are now collected by various collectors and are valued very high. ‘Accidents interest me—I have a very queer mind you know. What fascinates me is the people they attract. The patterns those people form an atmosphere of tension when something's happened.... Where there's a quarrel there's always a crowd.... It's a great draw. A quarrel or a body.’ Behind the familiar images of factory workers and northern industrial city scapes that have made LS Lowry one of Britain's most easily recognized and frequently reproduced painters, there is a much darker, sadder group of work rarely seen by the public.

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Vincent Van Gogh 30 March 1853 - 29 July 1890

We've all heard this sad story. Vincent van Gogh lived a short, deeply tormented life, throughout which he sought (in vain) his place in the world. He died, by his own hand, feeling his life was a miserable failure. Unbeknownst to Vincent, the work he did pioneered the Expressionistic style and, 150 years after his birth, his name would be world famous. In the late 1880s, he began to paint sunflowers in vibrant chrome yellow, one of his most recognizable paintings, as seen below

Van Gogh’s Sunflowers is one of his most famous series of works. He completed two separate series of still life paintings of Sunflowers the first in Paris in 1887 and the second in Arles at the yellow house. Often synonymous with happiness and light, for Van Gogh Sunflowers also brought meaning of new hope for building his artist community . The National Gallery website has an interesting section on Van Gogh’s Sunflowers which details Sunflowers as symbols of happiness and covers this period in Van Gogh’s life. Van Gogh's disobedience drove his creativity towards new horizons. Although categorized as a Post-impressionist, Van Gogh pioneered the style of Expressionism and had a very important influence on 20th century art. He influenced many artists and art movements. Vincent van Gogh shot himself in 1890 at the age of 37 after completing more than 2,000 works of art.

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i!M!A!G!i!N A !T i! O N!

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Bing,  Rudolf

Orozco...  or  maybe  not.

‘It  is  much  worse  to  be  a  mediocre  ar=ist  than  to  be  a   mediocre  post-­‐office  clerk’

“Witty, funny, intelligent” or “It makes you think”. This is how Gabriel Orozco's show at Tate modern has been tagged by the majority of art reviews. Obviously building on Duchamp's legacy, Orozco's work is full on from beginning to end. And if you thought that being an artist requires skill and imagination then you could end up being labelled as “old fashioned” or “stuck in the past”. The first room is the one least spoken of, probably because it feels so invisible, as if there was nothing actually displayed in it. There was in fact some things displayed, and they appeared to be watercolour paint splatters made by a 3 years old, I actually thought that the ones I did when I was 3 were much better but anyway.... Continue along the show and you will find some tall white sheets with black words written on them. Regretfully any attempt to make a sentence out of those written word won't go very far. The simple explanation behind this work is for when Orozco saw some obituaries and collected the headlines of some of them to display them as such. Sounds nice and conceptual? This reminds of one of our recent lecture on writing and art or, including writing in art. Well I could personally understand calling written text an artwork as long as it makes sense. Carry on along the corridors if you dare to and you'll end up in the main room where you'll find some of his pathetic attempts at being a photographer. As if taking so many images of the same thing could indeed achieve this, a pair of matching yellow scooters becomes rapidly unexciting, short of mind numbing. But the masterpiece of the show actually stands in that very same room, “Empty shoe box” which is just that. Of course I

was unable to resist the temptation to kick the goddamn thing at first sight, this most unusual “performance” of mine took place right under the eyes of a gallery attendant who seemed just as puzzled by my actions as she was by the box itself. And if found objects weren't meaningless enough, how about found objects that have been modified by someone else? This how I would explain “La DS” and the “Lift”, found objects which were adapted to the artist's vision by third party, more or less the equivalent of Vincent Van Gogh having the idea for painting a landscape and asking someone else to do it for him, sure this is actually common practise these days, but that reason alone is no longer good enough. Overhyped by galleries, curators and magazines, this is a show of no skills and to those who reply that it's the idea that is important, I shall ask what the idea is. At this point, there is usually silence since the ‘artist’ himself hasn't got a clue. Conceptual at the base is meant so that the artist has a concept in mind while doing the work. Arte Povera which was a post WW2 Avant Garde movement was justifiable because the country of Italy was then pretty much broke (poor art). However, anyone who exhibits at Tate Modern will be someone who is far from broke and therefore what could be the justifications for going showing some pieces of broken tires or a ball of plasticine? I think that it should be considered that there aren't any justifications, or concepts but only pretentiousness from the rich amongst the poor, pretentious conceptual art also where the viewer is the one who ends up making the concept for the artist's lack of skills and/or ability to think, this must be it, the viewer is the real artist. CATCH OROZCO AT THE TATE MODERN UNTIL 25 April.. or maybe not. NO!FIVETWELVE


MAJOLI In January, 2011, anti-government demonstrations flared up in many Tunisian towns and cities forcing President Ben Ali to flee the country. As an attempt to establish stability, three days after Ali's flight, Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi established a new coalition government. Unhappy with the fact that the new government retained many members of the former ruling party, demonstrations intensified. The previous month, fruit vendor Mohamed Bouazizi, had set himself on fire to sign of protest the government's confiscation of his cart. As word of Bouazizi's suicide spread, thousands of workers, students and humanitarians took to the street to voice opposition to the regime they claimed was oppressive and corrupt. Following the crises in Tunisia, anti-government demonstrations have developed in Yemen but most noticeably Egypt. After eighteen days of intense demonstrations, on Friday February 11th, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak relinquished power and left the country. On the evening of February 10th, anti-government demonstrators were disappointed after Mubarak announced that he was still intending to retain the office of president until September elections. Having believed that Mubarak was going to announce his resignation, the joyous throng of demonstrators in Tahrir Square became agitated. Thousands more antigovernment demonstrators took to the streets on Friday and early in that evening it was confirmed that Mubarak was gone and that the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces was now in control. For more than two weeks thousands of demonstrators had flooded central Cairo, the vast majority of whom persisted in their demand that President Mubarak relinquish power without delay. Though marred by fighting between pro-Mubarak and anti-government supporters, as well as violence against journalists, an overwhelming feeling of unity abounded, the demonstrators being comprised of Egyptians of all ages and social backgrounds. Alex Majoli has been documenting events during the past weeks.

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Martin Creed: ‘Mothers’

This piece was daunting from the outset. As I entered, it struck me and hit me with great effect but not in a literal way. Martin Creed’s 'mothers' is a neon sign which rotates anti clock wise on a iron column. I liked the way this piece effected me. 'Mothers' starts raising questions from when you enter, such as why mothers? Does this work have a grander meaning or is it simply mothers make the world go round.          As I walked around the work it evoked feelings of insignificance and fear. It Made me feel small and it could easily sweep me away. The neon sign slowly got faster and builds up to quite a speed. Most who where around stepped back. It captured my attention and held it for the entirety of my viewing. I like this work because it had an impact on me. This also impressed me. I had low expectations of Creed, and didn't think it would have the effect it did.     In the past I have slated Creed's work, yet I admire this piece. Mothers has an effect on you. Creeds work normally has no effect on me; this on the other hand has inspired me. This work is a must see. Visit it today. Or whenever. Damhlaic Lee

NO!FIVETWELVE


NO!FIVETWELVE


No!FiveTwelve