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ᐃᒻᒥᓂ ᐅᐱᒍᓱᒃᐸᓪᓕᐊᓂᖅ ᐱᕈᖅᐸᓪᓕᐊᕗᖅ ᐊᕐᕕᐊᓂᑦ Pilot program helps students in Arviat Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Vol 24 No 21

News ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓱᓕᑦᑎᓂᖅ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓯᓚᑦᑐᖅᓴᕐᕕᖓᓂ Grad day for Kivalliq campus

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Nunavut's Award-Winning Voice of Kivalliq

ᐊᐅᓚᖁᑎᒥᑦ ᐱᔪᑦ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ

Taking the flag in Rankin

Community ᓇᐅᔮᓂ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᑦ ᐳᓚᕋᖅᐳᑦ ᒫᓂᑑᐸᒧᑦ Naujaat cadets visit Manitoba

Sports ᐊᕿᔭᖅᑎᕐᔪᐊᕌᓗᐃᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᑦᑎᐊᖅᐳᑦ ᔪᓗᓇᐃᕝᒥ Soccer stars shine in YK

photo courtesy of Joshua Pearlman

"It’s time to let the younger guys take over." – Noel Kaludjak, race organizer and coordinator of the Kivalliq Challenge, on his decision to retire, page 3.

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2 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16, 2018

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Pilot program raises student attendance ESTEEM earns solid reviews at Arviat high school by Darrell Greer

Northern News Services

Arviat

A program still in its infancy is beginning to pay big dividends this school year at John Arnalukjuak High School in Arviat. Principal Romeo Fournier said the Empowering Students Through Elders Education and Mentorship (ESTEEM) program is a collaborative effort between both Inuit and non-Inuit staff members at the school. The program was conceived when staff members were devising methods to increase school attendance and began reflecting on why a student would want to be in school, he said. “The approach gave us food for thought and a chance to reflect upon what we’re offering our students,” said Fournier. “If I were a student, would I want to come to this school? What kind of programs would help me if I had anxiety issues or challenges with my reading or my math – or would this school be able to support me if I were experiencing some challenge outside of the school?” “We really started focusing on the needs of our students, rather than just trying to come up with ways to push them all back inside,” he continued. “We started to identify our students need to feel empowered, that they belong, that they’re connected to their culture and elders. And, most importantly, what we want from our students when they leave high school is to become leaders within the community and at the territorial and national levels.” The unique student-centred and trauma-informed ESTEEM program has produced a spike in overall attendance and has had a positive effect on a number of individual students with the introduction of initiatives such as the Pilimmaksarniq centre, which Fournier said is like a living room space in the school. The centre is named after the Inuit value of skill acquisition and refinement. “It was actually our vice-principal, Nancy Uluadluak, who came up with the name because she felt very strongly that this alternative space should be a place where students can acquire the life skills they need,” said Fournier. “It’s designed to be a place for students to get some of the support they need to cope with their challenges and also where they can focus on their academics, try to get caught up with some work, and get things finished so they can succeed academically.”

ᓯᐊᕈᓪ ᓂᑉᒍᐊᓯ ᐅᖃᓕᒫᖅᐳᖅ ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐃᓄᒃ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓯᕿᓂᖅ ᔮᓐ ᐊᕐᓇᓗᒃᔪᐊᖅ ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᐊᕐᕕᐊᓂᑦ ᑕᖅᑭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥ. ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑏᑦ ᐊᖏᓂᖅᓴᒥ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᒃᓴᖃᒃᑲᓐᓂᖅᑎᑕᐅᓕᖅᐳᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᐅᑉ ᒥᒃᓴᓄᑦ ᐅᕘᓇ ᔮᓐ ᐊᕐᓇᓗᒃᔪᐊᖅ ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖓᑕ ᓄᑖᖑᔪᒥ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᖅᑎᑦᑎᓕᕐᓂᖅ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᓂᑦ ᐅᕘᓇ ᐃᓄᑐᖃᖅᑎᒍᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐅᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓂᖅᓴᓄᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᓕᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᓂᐅᔪᒥ.

photo courtesy of Gord Billard

Cheryl Nibgoarsi reads the script of Inuk and the Sun at John Arnalukjuak High School (JAHS) in Arviat this past month. Students have greater input into school affairs under JAHS’s new ESTEEM program. Fournier said providing an alternative space is in answer to those students having challenges in class – rather than being sent to the office and their parents called – and provides a space where they can develop coping skills and learn how to self-regulate. “We owe a big thanks to various families, community groups

and businesses that have donated product or given us access to resources,” he said. “The Grade 12 graduating class played a large part in how the space was to be laid out, which was our way of empowering them to leave a legacy behind.” Fournier said the staff is cognizant about growth over time with the ESTEEM program; taking small, manageable goals to slowly build capacity, and having things grow at a natural, organic rate. He said the approach has been going great so far. “The ESTEEM program is designed to create a more student-focused school, so there’s been a lot of input from our students, and a lot of listening and consulting with our local staff members,” he said. One student who had not been attending school reached out to Fournier, who invited the family in to show them the space and explain its advantages, including having at least two staff members on-site, supervising the room at all times. The student came back, attended the room regularly and worked with the guidance counsellor and vice-principal. “I’m happy to say the student went from being inside the alternative space every day to slowly starting to request to be brought back to class, and is now on track to graduate,” said Fournier. The student likely would have continued skipping class and most likely would never have graduated were it not for the ESTEEM program, he said. These little success stories – and there have a been a few of them this year – allow staff to see the benefits of the program continuing in the future. “We have another alternative space which is basically a wellness room focused on student inclusion and specialized support,” he said. “Students who may have behavioural issues, are on special educational plans, or who consistently get in trouble in class are brought into this wellness room to meet with elders, and work closely with our student support assistants and student support teacher. “It’s a space where students can go – if they’re having emotional or behavioural challenges – to regroup, get some coping strategies and direct assistance from elders and staff, and eventually go back to class,” he continued. “The other alternative would have been to send them home, so, between these two spaces and other initiatives, we’ve been able to slowly steer the ship in a different direction.”


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photo courtesy of NAC

Tiana Gordon receives a Perseverance Award from chair of trades Sandy Napier during the Kivalliq campus of Nunavut Arctic College’s grad ceremonies on April 26, 2018.

Grads noted Kivalliq Listed below are the graduates of other Nunavut Arctic College programs in Kivalliq communities outside of Rankin

photo courtesy of Noel Kaludjak

Leo (Dali) Kaludjak is lifted high on his machine after taking the flag in the Senior Division of the Kivalliq Challenge snowmobile races in Rankin Inlet on May 8.

Air brakes Naujaat: Jackie Katokra Barnaby Kopak Tommy Mablik Bernie Malliki Marcel Mapsalak Joseph Mapsalak Rena Taparti Travis Taparti Gabriel Tinashlu Lee Ann Tungilik

Roaring to victory at the Kivalliq Challenge

College Foundation: Arviat: Joe Aulajut Esther Emily Gibbons Stacey Kritiqliluk Angela Mukyungnik Avis Mukyungnik Erica Qiyuayuk Kristy Suluk

Champions crowned and race organizer steps down after five years of running Kivalliq Challenge by Darrell Greer

Fur production: Arviat: Lillian Arnalak Hilary Iblauk Elizabeth Pingushat Amber Price Linda Sheetoga Melinda Suwaksiok Saporah Ulayok

Northern News Services

Rankin Inlet

ABE Essential skills: Baker Lake: Vera Angidlik Jean Anirniq Tina Nookiguak Jerome Uqayuittuq Delma Uquqtuq Office administration: Coral Harbour: Michelle Angutittauruq Joanne Bruce Deanna Ell Vicki Gibbons Please see Top, page 8

Leo (Dali) Kaludjak returned to the winner’s circle by capturing the Senior Division of the Kivalliq Challenge snowmobile races in Rankin Inlet on May 8. The races were scheduled to run in Rankin on May 5 and 6, but bad weather forced the championship heat in the Senior Division to be moved to May 8 from its originally scheduled time. Troy Makpah captured the Junior Division crown (18 years of age and younger), while Ross Tatty grabbed the checkered flag in the Master’s Division (35 and older). A total of $42,000 in prize money was handed out between the three divisions this year. Race organizer and coordinator Noel Kaludjak has been running the Kivalliq Challenge races for the past five years. He said this year’s track was about 5.1 kilometres long and stayed very smooth for the racers despite the weather.

The juniors ran an eight-lap race, while the masters ran a 10-lap race. The Senior Division ran eight laps per heat in the qualifying heats, with the semifinals being 10 laps and the championship final 20 laps. The number of racers in the Master’s Division was way down this year, with only six taking part, said Kaludjak. “The number may have gone down because I lowered the top prize to $3,000 from $5,000 the previous year, but we also lowered the entry fee from $300 down to just $150 this year,” he said. Noel said the competition was fairly close this year, especially in the Junior Division. He said there were a couple of wipeouts and one minor injury. “The Senior Division was very, very fast this year,” he said. “Last year’s winner (Nanaouq Tanuyak) didn’t even make the finals this year. I think there may have been something wrong with his machine because he just wasn’t racing that fast.” The weather was not great for this

year’s senior final, but everything worked out in the end and the crowds were extremely enthusiastic. Race organizer steps down Noel announced before the races that he would be stepping down from running the Kivalliq Challenge after this year’s winner was crowned. “Next year I want to enjoy the races by just watching and taking lots of pictures and, besides, it’s time to let the younger guys take over,” he said. “The first few years were just awesome, but the past couple of years it was all starting to get to me. I almost didn’t do it this year, but, I thought, no, I’ll do it one more year and then step aside.” “I’ll still help out here and there,” he continued. “But it’s time for someone else to take control of the event because I won’t be around forever.” bf l A ᒪᓕᒃᓴᕐᓂᖅ m4WZz 8


Meet the Rankin grads 4 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16, 2018

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NAC graduation for Kivalliq campus held on April 26 by Darrell Greer

Northern News Services

Rankin Inlet

Listed below are the graduates (and their fields of study) honoured during graduation ceremonies for the Kivalliq campus of Nunavut Arctic College in Rankin Inlet on April 26. Office administration: Carmen Kusugak Kathleen Netser Benoit Sateana Management studies: Elizabeth Aglukark Chantelle Napayok-Kaludjak Lois Suluk-Locke Odelia Tartak Diploma: Keisha Aliyak Keegan Burton Denise Graham Leah Kadlun Daisy Panika Melissa Siusangnark Municipal government program: Roxanne Sateana

photo courtesy of Nunavut Arctic College

Odeliah Tartak receives her certificate in management studies from campus dean Matthew Ayres during graduation ceremonies for the Kivalliq campus of Nunavut Arctic College in Rankin Inlet on April 26.

Pre-apprenticeship carpentry: Certificate: Tristen Dias Douglas Gordon Tiana Gordon Jaden Sigurdson Manuel Ukutak Pre-apprenticeship electrician: Annie Buscemi Tyrese Dias

Kyler Kabvitok Kelly Malla Susie Wiebe Pre-Apprenticeship oil heat systems technician: Derek Ehaloak Innosar Issakiark Johnny Kaviok Kyle Maclean Jon Maktar Joanasie Quassa Pre-Apprenticeship plumber: Kenny Enuaraq Gavin Kilikavioyak Michel Oolateeta Award winners: Illagiiktut Limited Award: Highest academic standing in management studies: Certificate: Elizabeth Aglukark Diploma: Daisy Panika Highest academic standing in trades program: Annie Buscemi Perseverance Award in Trades Sponsored by Sandy and Colleen Napier: Joanasie Quassa Kennedy Napayok Inspirational Award: Tiana Gordon Susie Wiebe Agnico Eagle Award: Kathleen Netser (office admin)


KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16 2018

Nunavut's Award-Winning Voice of Kivalliq

Nunavut's award-winning voice of Kivalliq – Published Wednesdays ¥∂‡ç Ä¿Ω‰ÕÇœÀé´ú æƒúΩÇπÖÊíÇπØÀÒ ≤ሠï·∆¿Í´ – ÇÔ¿∞°úΩÖ¿ÖÙ·çâÒ áˆîπÍ´ NORTHERN NEWS SERVICES LIMITED 100% Northern owned and operated Publishers of: • Nunavut News/North • Inuvik Drum • Kivalliq News • Yellowknifer • NWT News/North • Hay River Hub Member of: • Manitoba Community Newspapers Association • Canadian Community Newspapers Association • Alberta Press Council Editor: Darrell Greer Associate Editor: Mikle Langenhan Box 657, Rankin Inlet, NU X0C 0G0 Phone: (867) 645-3223 Fax: (867) 645-3225 Toll free: (855) 447-2584 Email: kivalliqnews@nnsl.com Website: www.nnsl.com/kivalliqnews Founder and President: J.W. (Sig) Sigvaldason jsig@nnsl.com Publisher, CEO: Bruce Valpy valpy@nnsl.com Chief Financial Officer: Judy Triffo Managing Editor: Mike W. Bryant bryant@nnsl.com Kivalliq Advertising Representative: advertising@nunavutnews.com Call collect: (867) 873-4031 Fax: (867) 873-8507 Publishing Office: Box 2820, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2R1 Phone: (867) 873-4031 Fax: (867) 873-8507 Email: nnsl@nnsl.com Website: www.nunavutnews.com ᐱᕙᓪᓕᐊᔪᓕᕆᔨ: ᑎᐊᕈ ᒍᕆᐅ ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑑᓕᕆᔨ: ᒪᐃᑯ ᓛᐃᓐᕼᐊᓐ Box 657, ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᖅ, ᓄᓇᕗᑦ X0C 0G0 ᐅᖃᓘᑎᖓ: (867) 645-3223 ᓱᑲᔪᒃᑯᑦ: (867) 645-3225 ᐊᑭᖃᖏᑦᑐᖅ: (855) 447-2584 ᖃᕆᑕᐅᔭᒃᑯᑦ: kivalliqnews@nnsl.com ᖃᕆᑕᐅᔭᒃᑯᑦ: www.nunavutnews.com ᐱᕙᓪᓕᐊᔪᓕᕆᔨᒍᑎᓂᒃ ᐱᒋᐊᖅᑎᑦᓯᓯᒪᔪᖅ ᐊᖓᔪᖄᖑᑉᓗᓂᓗ: J.W. (Sig) Sigvaldason – jsig@nnsl.com ᑐᓴᒐᒃᓴᓂᒃ ᓴᖅᑭᑎᑎᔨ ᑐᑭᒧᐊᒃᑎᑎᔨᓪᓚᕆᐅᑉᓗᓂᓗ: Bruce Valpy – valpy@nnsl.com ᑮᓇᐅᔭᓕᔭᓕᕆᔨᒻᒪᕆᒃ: Judy Triffo ᐱᕙᓪᓕᐊᔪᓕᕆᔨᓄᑦ ᐊᖓᔪᖄᖅ: Mike W. Bryant – bryant@nnsl.com ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᐅᐃᕆᓴᐅᑎᓂᒃ ᓂᐅᕕᐊᒃᓴᓂᒃ ᑐᓴᒐᒃᓴᓕᕆᔨ: ᑎᐅᕆ ᑖᐱᓐ – advertising@nunavutnews.com ᑲᓕᒃᑳᕈᓐᓇᖅᐳᓯ ᐅᕗᖓ ᐊᑭᖃᖏᑦᑐᖅ: (867) 873-4031 ᓱᑲᔪᒃᑯᑦ: (867) 873-8507 ᑐᓴᒐᒃᓴᓂᒃ ᑎᑎᕋᕐᕕᒃ: Box 2820, ᔭᓗᓇᐃᕝ, ᓄᓇᑦᓯᐊᖅ X1A 2R1 ᐅᖃᓘᑎᖓᑦ: (867) 873-4031 ᓱᑲᔪᒃᑯᑦ: (867) 873-8507 ᖃᕆᑕᐅᔭᒃᑯᑦ: nnsl@nnsl.com ᖃᕆᑕᐅᔭᒃᑯᑦ: www.nnsl.com

opinions ᓄwhmK5

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, mw 16, 2018 5

Community input a valuable commodity Northern News Services

Community input is a valuable commodity. It’s been quite refreshing to see Coun. Kelly Clark-Lindell soliciting community input as Rankin Inlet’s hamlet council moves cautiously and, hopefully, realistically forward on a new community centre. The needs of our community are many, and while an elder’s facility should be at or near the top of everyone’s wish list, a community centre would fight social isolation. Ditto a number of the other suggestions that have made their way back to Clark-Lindell. However, whether 80 per cent or 10 per cent of the ideas sent to the councillor prove themselves to be feasible, the fact she’s been actively seeking input from community members is a refreshing change of pace. Yes, council sessions are open to the public. That’s a crutch so many councillors of the past decade have leaned upon that there should be a silver variation hanging in council chambers to serve as a reminder to the average person. Were council to meet during the evening hours, the open-to-the-public notion would carry a bit more weight, but, not so with afternoon meetings that preclude the attendance of the vast majority of the working public. And don’t get me started on the number of times hamlet council has historically gone in-camera to debate issues that fall outside of the Municipal Act’s guidelines for doing so –

the habit of which made even me a the arena side of the community’s current building for hockey games stranger to council chambers. There is a tangible malaise con- than it is to enforce them on the cerning being open and accountable community centre side during Pakalto the public affecting all levels of lak Tyme. However it goes about happening, government these days, and muniand no matter who signs cipal governments are far the cheques to construct from immune to that mindit at the end of the day, a set. new community centre is In fact – given the reluca project Rankin Inlet has tance or outright refusal of to get right the first time. the Government of NunaThat is why public convut and the various Inuit sultation and community associations to let their input is so vital to the proemployees and members cess. We can’t afford to sit on a hamlet council – mess this one up. an argument can be made DARRELL No matter what the final that they feel the negative GREER wish list of programs and effect of that malaise both infrastructure includes, directly and indirectly, making them even more vulnerable than one would have to view maximizing space as one of the main keys to its most. And, to be brutally honest, there success. Having the ulu-making space of is only so much any council can achieve in a community without the afternoon become the fur-workmuch of a tax base, and one’s sense ing and sewing space of the evening of public accountability is certainly is paramount to the success of any not enhanced when one is almost multi-functional building. Hopefully, Clark-Lindell is compilalways playing with house money. Still, elected office by its very ing a significantly-sized list of ideas nature has to be held to a higher on viable programming and utilizing standard if it is to have any chance space for maximum impact that can be applied to numerous programs of balance or success. All too often here in the North, and developments moving forward. And, to wax philosophical: the actions are taken or not taken depending on their difficulty and the thoughts and needs of the communamount of possible backlash that ity are best materialized by the cooperation of the many, rather than surrounds them. Case in point: it is far easier (and the direction of the few, and an much safer to one’s current employ- engaged community greatly increasment or political future) to enforce es its chances of becoming a sucmaximum capacity regulations in cessful community.

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Dave Wiseman delivers free Tim Hortons coffee and hot chocolate courtesy of the Northern Store’s Quick Stop to the players and coaches taking part in a pond hockey tournament on Williamson Lake in Rankin Inlet on May 2.


6 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16, 2018

news

ᓄá·∆¿ÖÀî

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, mw 16, 2018

ᐊᖁᓐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓄᑖᖑᔪᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓯᕗᓪᓕᖅᐹᒥ ᐱᒋᐊᕈᑕᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᒥ ᐱᕗᑦ ᑐᙵᕕᖃᑦᑎᐊᖅᑐᒥ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᐅᓂᖓᓂ ᐊᕐᕕᐊᓂ ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖓᓐᓂ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᖅ, ᓱᓕ ᐱᒋᐊᓕᓵᕐᓂᖓᓂ, ᐊᑭᓕᖅᓱᐃᕙᓪᓕᐊᕗᖅ ᐊᖏᔪᓂ ᑮᓇᐅᔭᓕᐅᖅᑕᐅᓂᖏᓐᓂ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᖓᓐᓂ ᔮᓐ ᐊᕐᓇᓗᒃᔪᐊᖅ ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᐊᕐᕕᐊᓂᑦ. ᐃᓕᓴᐃᔩᑦ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᑳᖓ ᕉᒥᐆ ᕗᐊᓐᓇᐃ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᖅᑎᑦᑎᓕᕐᓂᖅ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᓂᑦ ᐅᕘᓇ ᐃᓄᑐᖃᖅᑎᒍᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐅᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓂᖅᓴᓄᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ (ESTEEM) ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᖅ ᑲᑐᔾᔭᐅᓪᓗᓂ ᐊᒃᓱᕈᕈᑕᐅᕗᖅ ᐅᑯᓇᓂ ᑕᒪᒃᑭᓂ ᐃᓄᖕᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᖃᓪᓗᓈᓄᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᖅᑎᓄᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖕᒥ. ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᖅ ᐃᓱᒪᒋᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᖅᑎᐅᔪᑦ ᐃᓱᒪᒃᓴᖅᓯᐅᕆᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᔾᔪᓯᐅᔪᓂ ᐊᖏᒡᓕᒋᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᐅᐸᑦᑎᐊᖃᑦᑕᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᓱᒪᒃᓴᖅᓯᐅᕆᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᖃᓄᐃᒻᒪᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕈᒪᓇᔭᕐᓂᖓᓂ, ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ. “ᑐᕌᖓᓂᐅᔪᖅ ᐅᕙᑦᑎᓐᓂ ᑐᓂᓯᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐃᓱᒪᒃᓴᖅᓯᐅᕈᑎᒃᓴᓂᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐱᕕᒃᓴᖃᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᑭᓱᓂ ᐊᑐᐃᓐᓇᖃᖅᑎᑦᑎᓂᑦᑎᓐᓂ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᓐᓄᑦ,” ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᕗᐊᓐᓇᐃ. “ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᐅᓐᓂᕈᒪ, ᑭᓱᒥᑦ ᐅᐸᒍᑎᖃᕈᒪᓇᔭᖅᐳᖓ ᐅᕗᖓ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖕᒧᑦ? ᖃᓄᐃᑦᑐᓂ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᓂ ᐅᕙᓐᓂᑦ ᐃᑲᔪᕋᔭᖅᐸᑦ ᖁᓱᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐊᑲᐅᙱᓕᐅᕈᑎᖃᕈᒪ ᐊᒃᓱᕈᕈᑕᐅᔪᓂᓪᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᐅᖃᓕᒫᕐᓂᓐᓄᑦ ᓇᐃᓴᐅᓯᕆᓂᕐᒧᓪᓘᓐᓃᑦ – ᐅᕝᕙᓘᓐᓃᑦ ᐅᓇ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᒃ ᐅᕙᓐᓂ ᐃᑲᔪᖅᓱᐃᔪᓐᓇᕋᔭᖅᐸ ᐊᑐᕐᓂᖃᕈᒪ ᐃᓚᖏᓐᓂ ᐊᒃᓱᕈᕈᑕᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᐅᑉ ᓯᓚᑖᓂ?” “ᑕᐅᑐᒃᑕᑐᐊᖃᑲᐃᓐᓇᓕᓚᐅᖅᐳᒍᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑏᑦ ᐱᔭᕆᐊᓕᖏᓐᓂ, ᐅᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᐅᙱᑦᑐᒥ ᐃᓱᒪᓇᓱᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᐊᔭᐅᕆᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓗᐊᓄᒃᑲᓐᓂᖅ,” ᐅᖃᒃᑲᓐᓂᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ. ᓴᓇᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᖅᑎᑦᑎᓕᕐᓂᖅ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᓂᑦ ᐅᕘᓇ ᐃᓄᑐᖃᖅᑎᒍᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐅᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓂᖅᓴᓄᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᓕᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑏᑦ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᖅᓯᕚᓪᓕᕈᓐᓇᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᖃᕐᓗᑎᒃ ᐃᓕᖅᑯᓯᖓᓐᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᓄᑐᖃᖏᓐᓄᑦ, ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ.

“ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᓐᓂ ᐱᔪᒪᔭᕗᑦ ᕿᒪᐃᒍᑎᒃ ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᓯᕗᓕᐅᖅᑎᙳᕐᓗᑎᒃ ᓄᓇᓕᖕᓂ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑕᒪᒃᑭᓂ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᑭᒡᓕᐅᔪᓄᑦ,” ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᕗᐊᓐᓇᐃ. ᐊᔾᔨᐅᙱᑦᑐᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᒧᑦᑐᕌᖓᓂᖃᖅᑐᒧᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᒃᓱᕈᖅᓯᒪᔪᒥᐅᖃᐅᔾᔨᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᖅᑎᑦᑎᓕᕐᓂᖅ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᓂᑦ ᐅᕘᓇ ᐃᓄᑐᖃᖅᑎᒍᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐅᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓂᖅᓴᓄᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᖅ ᓴᖅᑭᑎᑦᑎᓯᒪᕗᖅ ᖁᑦᑎᒋᐊᖅᓯᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑕᒪᐃᑎᒍᑦ ᐅᐸᑦᑎᐊᖃᑦᑕᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐱᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᒃᑐᐃᓂᖃᖅᐳᖅ ᖃᔅᓯᒐᓚᖕᓄᑦ ᐊᑐᓂ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᐅᔪᓄᑦ. ᕗᐊᓐᓇᐃ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑐᓂᓯᓂᕐᒥ ᐊᓯᐊᒎᖅᑐᒥ ᐃᓂᒃᓴᖃᖅᑎᑕᐅᓂᕐᒥ ᑭᐅᔾᔪᑎᐅᕗᖅ ᑕᐃᒃᑯᓄᖓ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᐊᒃᓱᕈᕈᑎᖃᖅᑐᓄᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᐊᕈᓯᖏᓐᓂᑦ – ᑎᑎᕋᕐᕕᓕᐊᖅᑎᑕᐅᙱᖔᖅᖢᑎᒃ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᑳᖏᑦ ᐅᖃᓗᒡᕕᐅᓇᑎᒃ – ᐊᒻᒪ ᑐᓂᓯᓪᓗᓂ ᐃᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᕙᓪᓕᐊᑎᑦᑎᔪᓐᓇᕐᓂᖏᓐᓂ ᑲᒪᒋᔭᖃᕈᓐᓇᖅᓯᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᔪᙱᓐᓂᐅᔪᓂᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᓕᑦᑎᓗᑎᒃ ᖃᓄᖅ ᐃᒻᒥᓂᒃ-ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑎᑦᑐᓐᓇᕐᓂᖏᓐᓂ. ᐊᑕᐅᓯᖅ ᐊᖏᓛᖑᔪᒥ ᐃᓚᒋᔭᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᒥ ᐱᓕᒻᒪᒃᓴᕐᓂᖅ ᐱᓕᕆᕕᐅᕗᖅ, ᕗᐊᓐᓇᐃ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᓲᕐᓗ ᐃᒡᓗᑉ ᐃᓄᖃᕐᕕᒋᔭᖓᑎᑐᑦ ᐃᓂᐅᔪᖅ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖕᒥ. ᐱᓕᕆᕕᒃ ᐊᑦᑎᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᕗᖅ ᐃᓄᐃᑦ ᐱᓐᓇᕆᔭᖏᓐᓂ ᐊᔪᙱᓐᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᕐᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐋᖅᑭᒋᐊᑦᑎᐊᖅᓯᓂᐅᔪᒥ. “ᐃᓕᓴᐃᔩᑦ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᑳᖓᑕ ᑐᖓᓕᖓ, ᓈᓐᓯ ᐅᓗᐊᑦᓗᐊᒃ, ᐃᓱᒪᒋᔭᖃᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥ ᐊᑎᖓᓐᓂ ᓴᙱᔪᒥ ᐃᒃᐱᒍᓱᖕᓂᖃᓚᐅᕐᒪᑦ ᐅᓇ ᐊᓯᐊᒎᖅᑐᒥ ᐃᓂᐅᔪᖅ ᐃᓂᐅᓪᓗᐊᖅᐳᖅ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑏᑦ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᕋᔭᕐᓂᖏᓐᓂ ᐃᓅᓯᕐᒧᑦ ᐊᔪᙱᓐᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᐱᔭᕆᐊᓕᒥᓂᑦ,” ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᕗᐊᓐᓇᐃ. “ᓴᓇᓯᒪᕗᖅ ᐃᓂᐅᓪᓗᓂ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᓄᑦ ᐃᑲᔪᖅᓱᐃᓂᖅᑖᕈᓐᓇᕐᕕᒋᔭᖓᓐᓂ ᐱᔭᕆᐊᓕᖏᓐᓂ ᑲᒪᒋᔭᖃᕈᓐᓇᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐊᒃᓱᕈᕈᑎᒋᔭᒥᓂᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ, ᐊᒻᒪᑦᑕᐅᖅ, ᑕᐅᑐᒃᑕᑐᐊᖃᑲᐃᓐᓇᕈᓐᓇᕐᓗᑎᒃ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕈᑎᒥᓂᑦ, ᐊᙳᑎᓇᓱᐊᕐᓗᑎᒃ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᒃᓴᒥᓂᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐱᔭᕇᖅᓯᓇᓱᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ

ᐲᑕ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᔪᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᑦᑎᕗᖅ ᐳᕌᓐᑎᓐ ᑰᓕᒥ, ᓴᐅᒥᖓᓐᓂ, ᐊᒻᒪ ᕕᓕᑉ ᐅᑲᑦᓯᐊᕐᒥ ᐱᓕᕆᑦᑎᐊᒃᑲᓐᓂᕐᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᐊᖅᓵᕋᐅᑎᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᔮᓐ ᐊᕐᓇᓗᒃᔪᐊᖅ ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᒦ ᐊᕐᕕᐊᓂᑦ ᖃᖓᒃᑲᓐᓂᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ. ᐃᓄᐃᑦ ᐃᓕᖅᑯᓯᖓᓐᓂ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᓄᖕᓂ ᐃᓚᐅᑎᑦᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᖏᔪᒥ ᐊᑐᕐᓂᖃᐅᑎᖃᕐᔪᐊᖅᐳᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᐅᑉ ᓄ ᑖᖑᔪᒥ ESTEEM-ᒥ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᒥ.

photo courtesy of Gord Billard

Peter Aulatjut teaches Brandon Curley, left, and Phillip Okatsiak the finer points of the arm-pull at John Arnalukjuak High School in Arviat earlier this semester. Inuit culture and student inclusion play large roles in the school’s new ESTEEM program. ᐱᓕᕆᑦᑎᐊᕈᓐᓇᕐᓂᐊᕐᒪᑕ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᓂᖏᓐᓂ.” ᐊᑕᐅᓯᖅ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᐅᔪᖅ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕆᐊᖃᑦᑕᙱᓯᒪᔪᖅ ᐅᐸᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᕗᐊᓐᓇᐃᒧᑦ ᖃᐃᖁᔨᓪᓗᓂ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᐅᔪᒧᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᓚᒌᖏᓐᓂ ᑕᑯᑎᑦᑐᒪᓪᓗᓂᒋᑦ ᐃᓂᐅᔪᒥᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐅᓂᒃᑲᐅᑎᓪᓗᓂᒋᑦ ᐊᑲᐅᓂᐅᓂᐅᔪᓂᑦ, ᐃᓚᖃᖅᑐᒥ ᒪᕐᕈᓪᓗᐊᓂ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᖅᑎᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᐃᓂᒋᔭᖓᓐᓃᓪᓗᑎᒃ, ᓇᐅᑦᑎᖅᓱᖅᐸᒡᓗᑎᒃ ᐃᒡᓗᕈᓯᐅᔪᒥ

ᖃᖓᓕᒫᑦᑎᐊᒃᑯᑦ. ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎ ᐅᑎᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ, ᐅᐸᒐᔪᒃᖢᓂ ᐃᒡᓗᕈᓯᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐱᓕᕆᖃᑎᖃᖅᖢᓂ ᒥᐊᓂᖅᓯᔨᐅᔪᒧᑦ ᐃᓅᓯᓕᕆᔨᐅᔪᒧᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᓕᓴᐃᔩᑦ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᑳᖓᑕ ᑐᖓᓕᐊᓂ. “ᖁᕕᐊᑉᐳᖓ ᐅᖃᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᖅᑎᐅᔪᖅ ᐃᓗᐊᓃᓚᐅᕐᓂᖓᓂ ᐊᓯᐊᒎᖅᑐᒥ ᐃᓂᐅᔪᒥᑦ ᖃᐅᑕᒫᒥ ᓱᒃᑲᐃᑦᑐᒥ ᑐᒃᓯᕋᖅᐸᓪᓕᐊᓂᖓᓂ ᐅᑎᖅᐸᓪᓕᐊᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᐊᕈᓯᕐᒧᑦ,

ᐊᒻᒪ ᒫᓐᓇ ᑐᕌᖓᓂᖃᑦᑎᐊᖅᐳᖅ ᐃᓱᓕᑦᑎᓛᓕᕐᓂᖓᓂ,” ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᕗᐊᓐᓇᐃ. ᐅᑯᐊ ᒥᑭᑦᑐᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᑦᑎᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐅᓂᒃᑲᐅᓯᐅᔪᑦ – ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᖃᔅᓯᐊᕐᔪᖕᓂ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᓯᒪᔪᒥ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒎᔪᒥ – ᐱᔪᓐᓇᖅᑎᑦᑎᕗᖅ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᖅᑎᓂᑦ ᑕᑯᓂᖏᓐᓂ ᐱᕙᓪᓕᕈᑕᐅᔪᓂᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᓂ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᖏᓐᓇᕐᓂᐊᕐᓂᖓᓄᑦ ᓯᕗᓂᒃᓴᒧᑦ, ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ.


KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16 2018

photo story

ᓄphoto stories

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, mw 16, 2018 7

Coral, Rankin shine in YK

Keneisha Sammurtok of Rankin Inlet, front in red, moves the ball against an Ecole St. Patrick High School player during the U15 Super Soccer championship game won by St. Patrick’s.

AJ Curley of Rankin Inlet (front in black) deals with some heavy pressure from an Ecole St. Patrick’s High School player.

SOCCER Feature

ᑕᑯᔭᒃᓴᐃᑦ Northern News Services

The Kivalliq was wellrepresented at this year’s Super Soccer event in Yellowknife, with the Coral Harbour girls claiming the U19

by James McCarthy Yellowknife

Sanisha Nakoolak of Rankin Inlet plays the ball in during Rankin’s loss to Ecole St. Patrick High School in the Super Soccer U15 girls' championship game in Yellowknife on May 6.

banner and the Rankin Inlet girls taking silver in the U15 bracket. The Rankin boy’s U19 team also put in a strong showing at the annual event.

Dawn Siutinuar, left, of Coral Harbour moves the ball forward as Coral closes in on the U19 Super Soccer championship banner in Yellowknife on May 6.

Madison Bruce of Coral Harbour turns on the speed to head down field during girl’s U15 playoff action.


ᒪᓕᒃᓴᕐᓂᖅ ᐊᐅᓚᖁᑎᒥᒃ news

8 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16, 2018

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, mw 16, 2018

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ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᒧᑦ ᐋᖅᑭᒃᓱᐃᔨ ᓄᖅᑲᖅᐳᖅ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᓄᑦ ᑕᓪᓕᒪᓄᑦ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑎᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ

ᑭᖑᓪᓕᖅᐸᖅᓯᐅᑎᓄᐊᓚᐅᙱᒻᒪᕆᒃᑐᖅ ᕌᔅ ᑕᑎ ᑭᕕᒃᑕᐅᕗᖅ ᓵᓚᖃᕐᓂᖓᓄᑦ ᐊᔪᙱᓛᖑᔪᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ, ᓯᑭᑑᖓ ᐊᐅᓚᖁᑎᖓᓐᓂ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓯᑭᑑᒃᑯᑦ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᖃᓄᐃᖅᑰᕐᓂᕐᒪᑦ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓚᐅᙱᒻᒪᑦ ᒪᐃ 5-ᖑᑎᓪᓗᒍ. ᓱᒃᑲᔪᒥ.” ᓯᓚᖓ ᐱᐅᑦᑎᐊᓚᐅᙱᒻᒪᑦ ᑕᒪᑐᒧᖓ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒧᑦ ᑭᖑᓪᓕᖅᐹᖅᓯᐅᑎᖏᓐᓄᑦ, ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᑭᓱᓕᒫᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᑦᑎᐊᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᐃᓱᐊᓂ ᐊᒻᒪ ᖁᙱᐊᖅᑐᑦ ᐊᓕᐊᓇᐃᒍᓱᑦᑎᐊᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ. ᓅᓪ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᓯᕗᓂᐊᓂ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᓂᑦ ᓄᖅᑲᕐᓂᐊᓕᕐᓂᖓᓂ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑎᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᖅᑎᐅᔪᖅ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᐅᕌᓂᒃᐸᑦ. “ᐊᕐᕌᒎᓛᖅᑐᒥ ᐊᓕᐊᓇᐃᒋᔭᖃᕈᒪᒐᒪ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥᑦ ᖁᙱᐊᑐᐃᓐᓇᕐᓗᖓ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᔾᔨᓕᐅᕆᕐᔪᐊᕐᓗᖓ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ, ᒪᒃᑯᖕᓂᖅᓴᐅᔪᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᖔᕆᐊᖃᓕᖅᐳᑦ” ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ. “ᓯᕗᓪᓕᐅᔪᑦ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᑦ ᐱᐅᑦᑎᐊᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ, ᑭᓯᐊᓂ Grise Fiord ᑭᖑᓪᓕᐅᔪᑦ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒐᓴᐃᑦ ᐅᕙᓐᓄᑦ ᐃᓗᐊᕈᓐᓃᖅᐸᓪᓕᐊᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ. ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ Sachs Harbour Tuktoyaktuk ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ ᐱᓕᕆᙱᑲᓴᑦᑎᐊᓚᐅᖅᐸᒃᑲ, Resolute Aklavik ᑭᓯᐊᓂ, ᐃᓱᒪᓚᐅᖅᐳᖓ, ᐋᒃᑲ, Inuvik Fort McPherson Arctic Bay Eagle P Pond Inlet Tsiigehtchic ᐊᑕᐅᓯᐊᒃᑲᓐᓂᕐᓗᖓ ᐱᓕᕆᓂᐊᖅᐸᒃᑲ Nanisivik Ulukhaktok ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓄᖅᑲᓕᕐᓗᖓ.”Dawson City Paulatuk “ᓱᓕ ᐃᑲᔪᖃᑦᑕᕐᓂᐊᖅᐳᖓ Fort Good Hope Colville Lake Mayo ᐅᕙᓂ ᑕᐃᑲᓂᓗ” photo courtesy of Noel Kaludjak Cambridge Bay Norman W ells Kugluktuk Carmacks Taloyoak ᐅᖃᕆᐊᓪᓚᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ. “ᑭᓯᐊᓂ Igloolik Ross Tatty is lifted up Umingmaktok in triumph after taking the Master's Deline Tulita ᐊᓯᐊᓂ ᐊᐅᓚᑕᐅᔭᕆᐊᖃᓕᖅᐳᖅ Gjoa Haven Hall Beach Kugaaruk Division flag of the KivalliqBathurst Challenge snowmobile races in ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑕᒫᓃᖏᓐᓇᓛᙱᓐᓇᒪ Whitehorse Inlet ᑕᐅᕗᖓᓕᒫᖅ.” W rigley Rankin Inlet on May 5. ELLESMERE ISLAND

PRINCE PATRICK ISLAND

Beaufort Sea

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CORNWALLIS ISLAND a n n e l

DEVON ISLAND

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SOMERS E T ISLAND

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PRINCE OF W ALES ISLAND

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BAFFIN ISLAND

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Junior Division:

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Rankin Inlet Listed below are the top racers in each of the three divisions of the Kivalliq Challenge in Rankin Inlet on May 5, 6 and 8.

r

Gulf

Top racers

Senior Division: Leo (Dali) Kaludjak Jarvis Towtongie Randy Eecherk B.J. Tanuyak Brian Tanuyak Tyrese Dias Brandon Oolooyuk Darren Tanuyak

en

a

BATHURST ISLAND

1

Coronatio

n Gulf

M a ck e n

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Great Bear Lake

3

Tamara Kolit Shaylene Murphy Wendy Netser

ds

P

VIC TORIA ISLA ND

W atson Lake

Grads, from page 3

AXEL HEIBERG ISLAND

Magnetic North Pole

nel han ck C

ᔫᓂᐊᑦ ᐃᖏᕐᕋᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ 8-ᓂ-ᐅᐃᔾᔮᕐᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ, ᐊᔪᙱᓛᖑᔪᑦ ᐃᖏᕐᕋᓪᓗᑎᒃ 10-ᓂ-ᐅᐃᔾᔮᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ. ᐃᓐᓇᕐᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐃᖏᕐᕋᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ8-ᓂ ᐅᐃᔾᔮᕐᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᐊᑐᓂ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᓂᑦ, ᑭᖑᓪᓕᖅᐹᒧᑦ ᓯᕗᓂᖓᓂ 10-ᓂ ᐅᐃᔾᔮᕐᓂᖃᖅᖢᑎᒃ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓵᓚᖃᕐᔪᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᑭᖑᓪᓕᖅᐹᖓᓂ 20-ᓂ ᐅᐃᔾᔮᕐᓂᖃᖅᖢᓂ. ᐅᓄᕐᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᔪᓂᑦ ᐊᔪᙱᓛᖑᔪᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᑦᑎᒃᐸᓪᓕᖅᓯᒪᕐᔪᐊᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ, 6-ᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂ ᐃᓚᐅᖃᑕᐅᓪᓗᑎᒃ, ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᖃᓗᔾᔭᖅ. “ᐅᓄᕐᓂᖏᑦ ᐊᑦᑎᒃᓯᒋᐊᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐊᑦᑎᒃᓯᒋᐊᓚᐅᕋᒃᑯ ᖁᑦᑎᓛᖑᔪᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᐅᓯᐊᖓᓂ $3,000-ᒧᑦ $5,000-ᒥ ᐊᕐᕌᒎᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥ, ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᐊᑦᑎᒃᓯᒋᐊᓚᐅᖅᐸᕗᑦ ᐃᓯᕈᑎᐊᓂ ᐊᑭᖓᓂ $300-ᒥ $150-ᑐᐃᓐᓇᒧᑦ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ,” ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ. ᓅᓪ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᖅ ᖃᓂᒌᒃᑐᑕᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ, ᐱᓗᐊᖅᑐᒥ ᔫᓂᐊᓂ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᓂ. ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᖃᔅᓯᐊᕐᔪᖕᓂ ᐱᕐᕈᓗᐊᕿᓂᑕᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᑕᐅᓯᕐᒥ ᐋᓐᓂᖅᑐᖃᒐᓛᒃᖢᓂ. “ᐃᓐᓇᕐᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᖅ ᓱᒃᑲᔪᒻᒪᕆᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ,” ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ. “ᐊᕐᕌᓂ ᓵᓚᖃᖅᑎᐅᔪᖅ (ᓇᓇᐅᖅ ᑕᓄᔭᒃ)

linto M'C

ᓕᐅ (ᑕᓕ) ᖃᓗᔾᔭᖅ ᐅᑎᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᓵᓚᖃᖅᑎᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᐊᖕᒪᓗᖅᓯᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒧᑦ ᐱᓪᓗᓂ ᐃᓐᓇᕐᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓯᑭᑑᒃᑯᑦ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᓂᑦ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᒪᐃ 8-ᖑᑎᓪᓗᒍ. ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᑦ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑕᕆᐊᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᒪᐃ 5 ᐊᒻᒪ 6-ᒥ, ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᓯᓚᑦᑎᐊᕙᐅᙱᑦᑐᒧᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐃᓐᓇᕐᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓅᑕᐅᓂᖓᓄᑦ ᒪᐃ 8-ᒧᑦ ᑕᐃᑲᙵᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᓂᐊᓚᐅᖅᑕᖓᓂ. ᑐᕈᐊᐃ ᒪᒃᐸ ᐱᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᔫᓂᐊᓂ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᕈᑕᐅᔪᒥ (18-ᓂ ᐅᑭᐅᓕᖕᓂ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑐᖔᓂ), ᕌᔅ ᑕᑎ ᐱᓪᓗᓂ ᐊᐅᓚᖁᑕᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᔪᙱᓛᖑᔪᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ (35 ᐊᒻᒪ ᐅᖓᑖᓄᑦ). ᑲᑎᓪᓗᒍ $42,000ᓂ ᓵᓚᖃᐅᓯᐊᓂ ᑮᓇᐅᔭᓂᑦ ᑐᓂᐅᖅᑲᖅᑕᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᐱᖓᓱᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ. ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐋᖅᑭᒃᓱᐃᔨᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑎᔨᐅᔪᖅ ᓅᓪ ᖃᓗᔾᔭᖅ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑎᓯᒪᕗᖅ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᓂᑦ ᖄᖏᖅᓯᒪᓕᖅᑐᓄᑦ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᓄᑦ ᑕᓪᓕᒪᓄᑦ. ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ ᐃᖏᕐᕋᕕᒋᔭᖓ 5.1 ᑭᓛᒥᑑᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑕᑭᓂᖓᓂ ᐊᒻᒪ ᖃᐃᕋᐃᓐᓇᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᓱᒃᑲᓴᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ.

Gameti

Repulse Bay

W ekweti

Fort Simpson Edzo Rae Nahanni Butte Fort 1 Jean Marie Providence Fort Liard Yellowknife River Trout Lake Great Slave Lutselk'e Kakisa 3 Lake Fort Resolution Enterprise Hay River Fort Nelson

Troy Makpah Quinton Issaluk Connor Camphaug Brandon Tatty Dion Tanayuk Qasaluaq Kaludjak Qalujjaq Komaksiutiksaq 37

Queen Maud Gulf

Master’s Division: Ross Tatty Ricki Issaluk Derek Zawadski

AROUND Kivalliq

Baker Lake

Cape Dorset

SOUTHAMPTON ISLAND

Coral Harbour Rankin Inlet Whale Cove

trait er S

Evans Stra

it

Fish

Fort Smith

with Darrell Greer

Fort Chipewyan

Arviat

Lake Athabasca

Johnny Issaluk Arsene Karlik Junior Kaludjak Timothy Panika

Hudson Bay

James Bay


KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16 2018

amazing on-the-land stories

ᑲᔾᔮᕐᓇᖅᑐᓂᒃ ᓄᓇᒥ ᐅᓂᒃᑳᑦ

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, mw 16, 2018 9

ᐊᑭᓯᔪᖅ: ᕌᔪ ᐊᓕᕙᑕᖅ

ᐸᖕᓂᖅᑑᒥᐅᖅ

ᐅᓇ ᐊᔾᔨᓕᐅᖅᑕᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ 2015-ᒥ. ᐃᕐᓂᒪ ᕿᒻᒥᐊ ‘ᐳᕈ’ ᐊᓯᕙᕆᐊᖃᑕᐅᖃᑦᑕᕐᒪᑦ ᐅᕙᑦᑎᓐᓂ. ᐃᑲᔪᖃᑦᑕᖅᖢᓂ ᓇᑦᑏᑦ ᓄᓇᔾᔭᖏᓐᓂᒃ ᕿᓂᓕᕌᖓᑦᑕ ᐊᐳᑎᐅᑉ ᐊᑖᓂ ᐊᒡᓗᖏᓐᓂ.

WINNER: ROGER ALIVAKTUK Pangnirtung

A picture from 2015. My son's husky 'Bro' likes hunting with us. Helps us find seal dens under the snow. This is the pup he led me to.

A helping hand on the land Do you have an amazing story from your adventures on the land? Tell us your story and show us your photos for a chance to win $100. Each week, we will pick one story from those submitted to editor@nunavutnews.com, or by mail to Nunavut News, PO Box 28, Iqaluit, NU, X0A 0H0. Entries

will be placed on our Facebook page. The story and photo with the most combined Likes and Shares at the end of the week wins. This week's winner is Roger Alivaktuk. Congratulations!

ᔮᑯᓖᓐ ᑕᐃᐹᓇ

ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥᐅᖅ

ᐊᓈᓇᒐ ᐋᓂ ᑕᐃᐹᓇ ᐅᓂᒃᑳᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᐃᕐᖑᑕᒥᓄᑦ ᓚᑏᓴᒧᑦ ᖃᓄᖅ ᐊᑖᑕᖓ ᓂᕐᓕᓚᐅᕐᓂᖓᓂᒃ ᐅᓗᐊᒍᓕᖕᒥᒃ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ. ᐅᓂᒃᑳᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᑕᐅᑐᒃᖢᑎᒎᖅ ᓂᕐᓕᓂᒃ ᕉᓯᒥᐅᕆ ᑎ ᓱᕕᒃᓴᖅ ᕕᒃᑑᕆᐊ ᓄᓗᒃ ᖁᓛᒎᖅᑐᓂᒃ, ᖁᑭᕆᐊᓚᐅᖅᓯᒪᖕᒪᑦ ᒥᒃᓯᖏᓐᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᖃᒪᓂ’ᑐᐊᒥᐅᖅ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥᐅᖅ ᐊᑕᐅᓯᕐᒥᒃ ᑲᑕᒃᑐᖃᕐᓂᖅᖢᓂ ᓯᓚᒥᑦ, ᐅᐱᕐᖔᒃᑯᑦ 2016-ᒥ. ᓂᑰᓪ ᑐᓗᖅᑐᖅ ᐱᖃᑎᖃᖅᖢᓂ ᓯᕗᓪᓕᖅᐹᒥᒃ ᑐᒃᑐᑕᖓᓐᓂ ᐸᓂᑯᓗᒐ ᔫᓯᐸ ᐃᖃᓗᓚᐅᖅᓯᒪᖕᒪᑦ ᓇᓕᒧᑲᓴᒃᑕᒥᓂᒃ ᐊᕐᕌᓂ ᐊᔾᔨᓕᐅᖅᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐄᐳᓗ 28, 2018-ᒥ. ᐅᖓᑖᓂ.

JACQUELINE TAIPANA ROSEMARY T SUVISSAK Baker Lake

Nicole Tuluqtuq with her first catch on April, 28 2018.

VICTORIA NOOLOOK

Rankin Inlet

Rankin Inlet

My panik Josepha caught a fish half her size a couple years ago.

My mother Annie Taipana telling her granddaughter Latieshia how her father caught a Canada goose in Rankin Inlet. She's telling her they were migrating when he shot it and it fell from the sky, spring 2016.


10 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16, 2018

sports & recreation Îé¯≤ú & ÄÎÖ∏ÙÄÕÍ≤Ò

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, mw 16, 2018

Naujaat cadets earn silver stars Ten members complete expedition training at Turtle Mountain, Manitoba

photo courtesy of Lloyd Francis

Canoeing was one of the favourite activities among a group of 10 Naujaat cadets who took their silver star training at Turtle Mountain Provincial Park in Manitoba on May 5 and 6. by Darrell Greer

Northern News Services

Naujaat

A group of 10 Naujaat cadets took a significant step up the achievement ladder by completing their silver star expedition training at Turtle Mountain Territorial Park just outside of Winnipeg earlier this month. Jean Siusangnark was also able to make the trip in the capacity of a staff cadet. Capt. Lloyd Francis said cadets do their silver star training at the end of their third year in the program, before moving onto gold star training at the end of their fourth year. Cadets in their fifth or sixth year of the program can apply to regional, national or international expeditions. “If you do one of those three now, you qualify to be a staff cadet on the expeditions,” said Francis. “They changed it to kind of put in more leadership roles for the older cadets and keep them interested in the program.” Along with Siusangnark – who completed a regional expedition – Warrant Officer Jack Kopak also completed a regional competition and Chief Warrant Officer Terance Mapsalak did an international expedition. “All three of them are qualified to be staff cadets on our expeditions now,” said Francis. Travelling away from Naujaat often means different things to different cadets. A trip to Winnipeg can be old hat for some cadets, while for others it is a first time experience. Master Cpl. Melanie Kaunak, 15, said she

enjoyed hiking and learning new skills during the silver star expedition. It was a lot of fun, she said, but it was also quite challenging. “The hiking was kind of tough,” said Kaunak. “Finishing the silver star training has me really looking forward to when I take my gold star training,” she said. “It will probably be a lot different from this, but I’m still looking forward to it.” Master Cpl. Darryl Angotingoar, 14, said he was really into the canoeing on the trip. He had learned to canoe about three years ago, and it was fun getting the chance to do it again, he said. “I remembered a bit of what I learned the first time and I like being out on the water,” said Angotingoar. “The hiking was fun – we went about 10 kilometres – but it was challenging. There were some hills on the trail, so there was a lot of climbing while we hiked.” For Master Cpl. Bridgette Malliki, 15, one of the coolest things about her trip to Turtle Mountain was celebrating her birthday on the expedition. She said it’s a Naujaat tradition to throw water on people on their birthday, and being away on silver star training didn’t give her a break from the custom. “Fooling around and having my birthday there was cool, but just the travelling itself was cool to me,” said Malliki. “This was my first time at Turtle Mountain and it was nice, but it

was also hot. It was +20 C while we were there and that took a bit to get used to.” Lance Cpl. Jeannie Katokra, 16, enjoyed the canoeing the Naujaat cadets got to do at Turtle Mountain. She said this was her first time to ever canoe and she really enjoyed the experience. “This was my first time down south, so it was a little different for me,” said Katokra. “We played ball tag on the water when we were canoeing – you had to throw the ball into the other person’s canoe – and I liked that the most. I didn’t really meet many cadets from the other corps because I just liked hanging out with my own group.” For Cpl. Heather Inaksajak, 15, the trip to

Turtle Mountain represented two firsts. She said it was her first trip out as a cadet, and it was also her first trip down south. “I really liked the hiking, even though it was kind of tough,” said Inaksajak. “I like doing physical activities, so the hiking was pretty good for me. The place had nice scenery and all that stuff, but I also found it kind of hot. I liked being in the city more than out at the park.” Master Cpl. Victor Kridluar, 15, said he enjoyed the expedition and being at the park the most, but he liked at least one thing about the time they spent in Winnipeg. “We went out to eat at Boston Pizza and that was good,” said Kridluar.

Ä¿∏≤ÖÒé≤ ÖÀ∏Ú≤ÒãÇÀÒ á∂ªÖÊπÍ´ DAMARIS NUTARASUNGNIK

Community: Arviat School: John Arnalukjuak High School Subject: Photography Damaris is this edition’s student of the week for earning a silver medal in photography at the recent Nunavut Skills Competition in Iqaluit. Way to zoom-in on your skill-development goals, Damaris!!

photo courtesy of 3055 RC ACC

Capt. Lloyd Francis, from left, Master Cpl. Victor Kridluar, Master Cpl. Heather Inaksajak and Master Cpl. Bridgette Malliki are ready to take on a 10-km hike during silver star training at Turtle Mountain Provincial Park in Manitoba on May 5 and 6.

Student of the week


KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16 2018

alternatives

STREET talk with Darrell Greer

ᐊᔾᔩᑦ

kivalliqnews@nnsl.com

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, mw 16, 2018 11

íÇÒπÇéÀ∏∂Òê î

Horoscopes May 16 to May 22

What’s one thing you learned, or improved upon, at the Skills Nunavut Competition?

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, if you are seeking pleasure, try some healthy pursuits. These can include exercise, soothing baths, hiking trips, or other activities that benefit the mind and body. The world is your oyster! TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Try to be as perceptive as possible when dealing with individuals in the days to come, Taurus. This will help you help them as effectively as you can. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Your confidence may surprise you this week and you may feel like there is nothing you cannot do, Gemini. Others will respond positively to your advice. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, if you are commanding enough, you can accept a position of leadership in the near future, even if you haven't yet had authority over others. This is a turning point! LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Take shifting emotions in stride, Leo. There is no right or wrong way to feel. If something does become troublesome, talk it out with a confidante. It's all gravy!

Damaris Nutarasungnik: “I learned a lot more about photography.”

Sarah Bruckschwaiger: “I learned that interest drives achievement.”

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, a long to-do list may leave you wondering why you decided to take on so much. Consider the ways you can lighten your load and approach remaining tasks one by one.

Meeka Koomuk: “I learned a lot more about aesthetics at the competition.”

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, your efforts will soon begin to bear fruit. You may feel like you have finally begun to realize your goals. Just don't steer off path and take time to reflect on your success. You got this! SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Take time to reflect on your relationships this week, Scorpio. Such reflection can help you ensure you let others know just how much they mean to you. Remember: live love give love! SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Take pride in your accomplishments and those of your associates, Sagittarius. You have collectively been working hard and deserve all the recognition you get. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Look for ways to be more independent this week, Capricorn. Explore different events or possibilities where you can hang solo. You can use some time alone. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, you may find yourself dealing with mixed feelings that you can't get to the root of. Relieving stress can ease any worries you have. Take a breath and reflect!

Blair Aulatjut: “I improved my editing, and got more comfortable in front of the camera.”

Mallory Okatsiak: “I learned how to do ‘up-dos,’ and I increased my self-confidence.”

Paulie Issumatarjuak: “I improved my camera technique.”

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 A greater sense of clarity is coming your way, Pisces. Good for you. Remind yourself to be inspired by the sights and people around you. You cannot fail!

PLAYER OF THE WEEK Îé∏≤Ò ÖÀ∏Ú≤ÒåÒ á∂ªÖÊπÍ´

SGT. LEXIE ANAWAK Nunavut's Award-Winning Voice of Kivalliq

Community: Rankin Inlet Sport: Marksmanship

CHILLIN’ WITH DAD

photo courtesy of Eddy Sandy

Alfred Voisey and his 10-year-old son, Deryk Sandy, take in a heat at the Kivalliq Challenge snowmobile races this past week in Rankin Inlet.

Lexie is this edition’s player of the week for her outstanding contributions to the 3019 RCACC’s marksmanship team, including the completion of her marksmanship instructor program in Whitehhorse this past summer. Way to stay focused on your goals, Lexie!


12 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, May 16, 2018

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, mw 16, 2018

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