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cational Opportunities for Nunavut & NWT

Junior kindergarten in the NWT

Inuk heart surgeon a Canadian first

Aurora College forges ahead

Educational Opportunities for Nunavut & NWT

Scholarships for students


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Degrees of Success


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'I just felt this need to help people' Canada's first Inuk heart surgeon reflects on her path to the operating room by Derek Neary

Northern News Services

Ottawa

Donna May Kimmaliardjuk, Canada's first Inuk heart surgeon, can piece a vital organ back together but she can’t create more hours in a day. Yet, despite the incredible demands of her work and education schedules, she somehow finds time to grant numerous media interviews and she has already begun offering guidance to another young Inuk who aspires to enter the medical field. "I was very fortunate to have very strong role models, being my parents, but I realized that perhaps not everyone has a role model in their life. So if my story can be a source of positivity, or, dare I say,

even an inspiration for just one person out there then to me that's worth it for talking about myself and my journey," she said of the incredible media interest in her feats. Word of her accomplishments prompted one mother to contact Kimmaliardjuk and ask if she would be willing to talk to her Inuk daughter, who is also aiming to become a doctor. They arranged to meet. "She's very keen and eager and has a good head on her shoulders," Kimmaliardjuk said of the teen, adding that they set a date to meet again months later." Now in her fourth year of residency at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Kimmaliardjuk attained her medical degree at the University of Calgary. She has a little

over two years of residency remaining to become a fullyqualified heart surgeon and then she plans to pursue a specialty within the field that will require another two years of training. NUNAVUT CONNECTIONS Kimmaliardjuk was born in Winnipeg and, as an infant, lived briefly in Chesterfield Inlet. "The majority of my family is in Chesterfield Inlet or Rankin Inlet, but I do have family in Iqaluit, I have family in Arviat, Baker Lake ... I've been up (to Nunavut) to visit a few times since," she said. "My mom can pretty much tell you, oh yeah, we have a cousin or an auntie or a great aunt or great uncle in a community." She and her family moved

photos courtesy of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute

A fourth-year resident at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Donna May Kimmaliardjuk performs open-heart surgery under the supervision of a senior surgeon. She is qualified to take on basic cardiac operations and will tackle more advanced surgeries with another couple years of training.

On the Cover

Jayden Smith, a student at Sir John Franklin High School in Yellowknife, demonstrates his aptitude in the automotive service category at Skills Canada NWT's territorial skills competition in 2017. photo courtesy of Skills Canada NWT

to Ottawa while she was young so she and her brother could attend elementary and high school. "They wanted my brother and I to have better educational opportunities," she said. The passion to be a health worker was sparked at age six when she asked her father why she'd never met his dad. Her father explained that her grandfather died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – commonly known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease – when her father was still a boy. "I remember having the thought, 'I don't want to lose my parents to illness. I don't want them to die, and I don't want other kids' parents to die.' Kids should have a mom and a dad," she said. "So I just felt this need to help people." Upon earning her high school diploma, she relocated to Kingston, Ont., to attend Queen's University, where she graduated with a bachelor of science. At age 28, she has spent much of her life in learning environments, which she has found much to her liking, although there were some significant adjustments between high school and university in terms of the larger class sizes and not knowing the professors as well as her high school teachers. Medical school, on the other hand, felt like a great fit. "When I learned about the heart, I fell in love with it. I loved everything about it. I loved seeing open-heart surgeries. I loved the ability to be able to have an immediate impact on someone's life, hopefully for the better," she said. Kimmaliardjuk said she hopes that other young people will strive to find their niche in whichever field brings them gratification. "To do something that makes you happy and that is fulfilling your full potential, I think is so valuable and will get you so far in life," she said. "It doesn't mean far as in financially wealthy, necessarily, or famous or recognized, but doing something that's meaningful and makes you happy is what's important."

Donna May Kimmaliardjuk is Canada's first Inuk heart surgeon. She has family in several Nunavut communities and briefly lived in Chesterfield Inlet as a child.

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A TYPICAL DAY IN THE LIFE OF DONNA MAY KIMMALIARDJUK

-Arrives at hospital at 6:30 a.m. to do rounds -Meets with operative team at 7:30 a.m. to go over a checklist and review roles -While surgical patient is being prepared for surgery and put under anesthesia – about an hour – she grabs a quick bite to eat, visits a few more patients and mentally prepares for the operation -First surgery begins around 8:30 a.m. and, depending on the complexity, usually lasts four to six hours -A second surgery is often performed each day, preceded by another team meeting, checklist review, patient visits, looking through emails and a meal -Work in the operating room wraps up between 6-8 p.m. most days -Before leaving hospital, she spends an hour to 90 minutes meeting with the next day's two surgical patients and/or reviewing their medical records -Goes home and squeezes in at least an hour of reading and studying -Surgical residents are on call five to seven days per month, meaning they may need to rush to the hospital during a night emergency or on a weekend -A "light" work week is 60 hours; most entail close to 80 hours and she has put in up to 110 hours of work in a single week -"I'm (at the hospital) between 12 to 14 hours per day, five to seven days per week, so I don't have a lot of time for social life or extracurriculars, but you learn to adjust and make it work," Kimmaliardjuk said.

Degrees of Success

Source: Donna May Kimmaliardjuk

Stories by

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Derek Neary Features Writer


Degrees of Success

4 Monday, March 5, 2018

Junior kindergarten takes root in NWT Program enters its fourth year; now offered throughout the Territory

by Derek Neary

Northern News Services

Hay River

Holly Beaulieu can attest to the value of junior kindergarten. Her four-year-old son Rhett is enrolled in the program in Hay River. She has seen tremendous progress in his abilities since he started. "Not just academically but even in is behaviour and socially. He's not as shy. He's a little more outgoing," Beaulieu said. "He's more structured, even at home with me. He knows to put away his toys. He

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knows how to write his name now and other words. It's just amazing what he knows." As a full-time working mom, Beaulieu said she wouldn't be able to teach Rhett all these lessons and skills on her own. The junior kindergarten program, which is optional for youngsters, is in its fourth year and carries a $5.2 million budget in 2017-18. This is the first year, however, that junior kindergarten is offered throughout the NWT. Each community's district education authority decides whether their

TRAINING FOR JUNIOR KINDERGARTEN EDUCATORS SINCE PROGRAM LAUNCHED

-Indigenizing play-based learning -Inclusive schooling -Self-regulation -Building language skills -Literacy and numeracy in play-based learning Source: Department of Education, Culture and Employment

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EXPANSION AND PARTICIPATION

-In 2016-2017 20 schools opted to offer junior kindergarten (JK) programming, which resulted in 114 children enrolled. Based on the overall population of 4-year-olds within those 20 communities, the participation rate was approximately 94 per cent. -During the current school year, the first year all schools in the NWT offer JK programming, there are 506 children enrolled. Based on the overall population of 4-year-olds in the NWT, the participation rate is approximately 85 per cent. Source: Department of Education, Culture and Employment

schools will offer half- or fullday programming. This year, 26 schools are offering fullday junior kindergarten while 15 schools are offering halfday, according to the Department of Education, Culture and Employment. In addition to early learning and socialization, junior kindergarten saves the average NWT family $10,000-$12,000 per year in childcare costs, said Rita Mueller, assistant deputy minister with the Department of Education, Culture and Employment. "It's just the most wonderful research, evidence-based, play-based program ever out there," Mueller said. "We're at the forefront in Canada in the kind of things we're doing for young children."

BUMPY BEGINNINGS Not everyone is a proponent of formal, structured learning at such an early age. "I feel like putting kids in school at three and four years old is not the right thing to do," said Julie Lys, a longtime member of the Fort Smith District Education Authority. "I think kids need to know who they are – education is a powerful thing, it's a mind-changer. Putting them in at such young ages into a system of bureaucracy is not a good thing." In addition, Lys, like some others who spoke out when junior kindergarten was introduced, felt Aboriginal Head Start was being infringed upon by the new programming. "I think if (education department officials) said,

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photo courtesy of Harry Camsell School

Dressed imaginatively, junior kindergarten students Miya Taylor-Dumas and Sophie Friesen review dots in a book at Harry Camsell School in Hay River. 'We're going to take the curriculum from Aboriginal Head Start and put that in junior kindergarten, I would have bought into it a bit better," said Lys. "We do have the cultural programs here (in Fort Smith) that are really good in the community but I do wish that they had listened to us when we said, 'Can we use the curriculum from Aboriginal Head Start?' They still steamrolled it through." In retrospect, the GNWT could have communicated in a "more meaningful and col-

laborative way" when initially introducing the junior kindergarten program to allay fears that Aboriginal Head Start, which exists in eight NWT communities, may be jeopardized, said Mueller. "And that was not ever the intent," she said, adding that the education department funds Aboriginal Head Start in partnership with the federal government. "We continue to offer whatever supports we can to Aboriginal Head Start. We'll continue to fund them ... Their success is very important to us.

The really exciting thing about Aboriginal Head Start is their mandate is from zero to six years of age, so they can offer programming at an earlier age than junior kindergarten can. "I really sincerely have hope for our department and Aboriginal Head Start, and now our schools, to work together in a much more cohesive and co-operative way to say, 'How do we best serve the families in these communities?' I have hope for that and I'm starting to see evidence of that."


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Thirty years of environmental technology Nunavut Arctic College program has more female than male students for first time by Derek Neary

Northern News Services

Nunavut

This academic year marks the 30th anniversary of the Environmental Technology Program (ETP) at Nunavut Arctic College, and also the first year that more women have enrolled than men. Rankin Inlet's Anu Boucher, one of those female students, said her interest in hunt-

ing, the environment and animal welfare continued to grow after graduating high school. Her friends with environmental occupations encouraged her to consider the environmental technology program at Nunavut Arctic College. "I think my favourite thing about the program is the variety of courses gives students exposure to different areas of the environmental field," said

Jamal Shirley, manager of research design and policy development with the Nunavut Research Institute, explains to Avery Keenainak, a first-year student in the environmental technology program, how to record soil moisture measurements. The data collected is part of a circumpolar research program studying the effects a warming climate may have on Arctic plants.

Boucher. "With this exposure we can better decide on a career to pursue upon graduation. Our instructors also acknowledge the value of having field experience, so we get to spend a lot of time going on land trips." Boucher, who's in the second year of the twoyear program, sees herself immersed in further studies after graduating. She wants to learn about the tourism sector and eventually become selfemployed, she said. "ETP gave me the on-theland experience I need to prepare for the conditions in the Arctic, and has also opened many doors career wise, so I will be able to work and save money until I start my own business," she said. Sanikiluaq's Mick Appaqaq, also in his second year of the program, registered for the environmental technology program after graduating from the Nunavut Sivuniksavut college program in Ottawa. He said he was inspired to learn the details of Article 5 in the Nunavut Land Claim Agreement, which pertains to regulating the environment and wildlife. "We, as a class, have learned a great variety of material pertaining to the environment of Nunavut, the laws and regulations, and on-the-land skills," said Appaqaq. "However, over the past year and a half, our class has come together as a family over the course. This has to be my greatest impression as I did not know of any of (the other students) personally, and although we have our differences, we created a bond that if we ever come across any obstacles, we will overcome them as a team." Appaqaq said he envisions

photos courtesy of Nunavut Arctic College

Pre-nursing students Gina Paniloo and Brenden Angotingoar conduct an experiment to measure and compare the energy content of various foods using a calorimeter at the Nunavut Arctic College campus in Iqaluit. himself in the environmental field "for the foreseeable future," but he also has political ambitions, though he would need to first attend university to better grasp the science of politics, he said. Second-year environmental technology program students were in Quebec City in December for Arctic Change 2017, an annual science conference hosted by ArcticNet. They, like their program predecessors, have also been working with researchers on long-term projects –such as examining berry productivity data – for close to a decade. That initiative is part of a circumpolar study examining effects of climate change on Arctic plant life. HEALTH AND TEACHING PROGRAMS Nunavut Arctic College's health department offers prenursing, nursing (BScN Arctic nursing), social service worker and home and continuing care programs. There is an updated curriculum in place this year for first-year social service worker students. Course material has been altered to be more culturally relevant to the North. The college will expand its social service worker program in September to offer it in Cambridge Bay and Iqaluit. The Nunavut Teacher Education Program is offered jointly through Nunavut Arctic College and the University of Regina. The program runs each year in Iqaluit and on a rotational basis in Nunavut's other communities, as does the

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INUIT GAINS IN EDUCATION

Inuit have been achieving higher levels of education over the past decade, according to data from the 2016 census. The following are the highest levels of education attained by Inuit, as reported in 2016 compared to 2006: Bachelor's degree/masters/PhD: 5.3% vs. 3.9% College diploma: 18.7% vs. 16.9% High school diploma: 18.5% vs. 13% Apprenticeship certificate: 5% vs. 3.6% No certificate, diploma or degree: 43.9% vs. 50.8% Source: Statistics Canada

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NUNAVUT ARCTIC COLLEGE GRADUATES IN 2017

Nunavut teacher education program – 21 Environmental technology program – 5 Bachelor of science, nursing (Arctic Nursing) – 3 Source: Nunavut Arctic College

Community Teacher Education Program. That program is currently underway in Rankin Inlet, Kugaaruk, Clyde River, Pond Inlet, Sanikiluaq and Taloyoak. Baker Lake and Gjoa Haven will host the Community Teacher Education Program in the next academic year. The college also offers a variety of other programs, including adult basic education, across the territory. Nunavut Arctic College continues to study options for forming a partnership with a southern-based university to establish more degree programs. A shortlist of institu-

tions has been established: McGill University, the University of Prince Edward Island, Carleton University, First Nations University of Canada, the University of Regina, Dalhousie University and Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador. Potential degree programs that could result from such a partnership could include public administration, media and communications, business administration/commerce with a focus on entrepreneurship, general science and environmental science, technology, social work, public and mental health and other health technology programs.


Degrees of Success

6 Monday, March 5, 2018

Many options in trades

Newly-minted journeyman plumber plans to keep earning more designations One NWT tradesman Roberts Plumbing and Heat- room learning. by Derek Neary REGISTERED who successfully made the ing, which their father, Art, got Journeypersons are responfact APPRENTICES BY Somba K'e/Yellowknife jump from apprentice to red- off the ground in 2009. sible for everyone they superHundreds of apprentices seal journeyman in 2017 was Neil spent his two months vise and Roberts said he feels FILE PROGRAM IN THE NWT in numerous trades are plying Yellowknife plumber Neil of in-class training for each of that it’s his due diligence AS OF JANUARY 2018 Northern News Services

their talents in communities across the NWT. They're aiming to earn Northwest Territories Apprenticeship and Occupation certification and become part of a skilled workforce. That certification applies to 53 trades and 25 occupations.

Roberts. His older brother Kevin went through the apprenticeship program several years ago. As a journeyman, Kevin trains others who are breaking into the occupation, as he did by helping Neil learn the craft in their family business,

the four years of apprenticeship at Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) in Edmonton. He entered postsecondary school with some established challenges in reading and writing, but the staff at the institution were accommodating, he said. “It’s not that I have a problem learning. I retained most of it. I was a high-80s student. If I’m going to school I’m there to pass, not to fool around,” he said. The courses he took helped him better understand blueprints and code books, working with various gasses, hydraulic heating systems, venting and draining. “At the end of it, all the information you do learn, it shows up little bits at a time,” he said of applying his class-

fact FILE photo courtesy of Neil Roberts

Neil Roberts of Yellowknife completed his four years of apprenticeship and became a red-seal journeyman plumber last year.

to check everyone’s work to ensure customers will be happy. He also says his learning journey is far from over. “Plumbing is a start,” he said. “I can branch out in lots of ways through plumbing. I can go steamfitting. I can get my higher gas ticket then I can do tons of things; I can go into refrigeration. You can do whatever you want and specialize in whatever you want. Right now, I’m probably going to get into an oil burner’s course.” Having been exposed to numerous trades through his family business, he has a natural curiosity to grasp more, he said. “It’s not just your plumbing trade you get. You learn how to fend for yourself, really,” he said.

APPRENTICESHIP APPLICATIONS PER YEAR

2014-15: 132 2015-16: 83 2016-17: 101 2017-18: 49 Source: Department of Education

Auto Body Technician - 5 Automotive Service Technician - 25 Cabinetmaker - 3 Carpenter - 53 Cook - 8 Crane and Hoisting Equipment Operator - Mobile Crane - 2 Electrician (Construction) - 71 Floor covering Installer - 1 Gasfitter A - 4 Glazier - 3 Hairstylist - 3 Heavy Equipment Mechanic (transport trailer) - 1 Heavy Equipment Technician - 51 Housing Maintainer - 7 Industrial Mechanic (millwright) - 12 Instrument Technician - 5 Machinist - 2 Oil Heat Systems Technician - 4 Outdoor Power Equipment Technician (marine equipment) - 1 Outdoor Power Equipment Technician (recreational equipment) - 6 Painter and Decorator - 1 Parts Technician - 22 Plumber - 5 Plumber/Gasfitter B - 35 Powerline Technician - 5 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic - 2 Roofer - 3 Sheet Metal Worker - 3 Sprinkler Systems Installer - 1 Steamfitter and Pipefitter - 1 Welder - 27 Total - 372 Source: Department of Education


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Monday, March 5, 2018 7

Skills Canada can open doors to careers One gold-medallist pursues future in carpentry, another aims to become red-seal mechanic by Derek Neary

Northern News Services

Nunavut

On April 29, scores of eager Nunavummiut will descend on Iqaluit to compete in the 13th annual territorial skills competition. Hosted by Skills Canada Nunavut, the youth – high school level and beyond – will exhibit their talents in a variety of areas, including photography, cooking, public speaking and robotics. Among last year's crop of competitors was Iqaluit's Sam Kuluguqtuq, who won the gold medal in cabinetmaking. Kuluguqtuq, now a student in Algonquin College's carpentry and renovation technician program in Perth, Ont., said, during the competition he stood in front of a table full of building supplies and was given his instructions and time limit. He chose to put together a gun rack, which took him most of the day, although he finished an hour before deadline. He wound up with a mark of 97 per cent. "He (the judge) said everything was perfect except for one of the sides was off by a couple of millimetres," Kuluguqtuq recalled, adding

that the gun rack now hangs in his family's cabin. Prevailing in his category meant he advanced to the national skills competition, which was held in late May and early June in Winnipeg. There were many more competitors in Manitoba's capital – upwards of 20 in his category – and a lot more equipment there, he recalled. "Everything was way more intense," Kuluguqtuq said. "It was crowded ... you feel more pressure because everybody's watching you." In addition, Kuluguqtuq's chisel broke, which slowed him down and he never quite completed the project. "My cabinet didn't go the way I wanted it to," he said, adding that he didn't let the hurdles ruin his day. "Overall it was a very good, well-organized competition. In general it was a very good experience doing all these different things." Kuluguqtuq has an uncle in Pangnirtung who owns a carpentry and construction business. "I think being in the woodshop and working with wood in general got me into carpentry," he said, adding that Janis Devereaux, executive

photo courtesy of Will Hopkins

Pond Inlet's MichaelAngelo Kunnuk was the winner in outdoor engine repair at the 2017 Skills Canada competition in Iqaluit. He has his sights set on becoming a red-seal mechanic.

director with Skills Canada Nunavut, encouraged him to take a shot at the Skills Canada competition last year. He said he plans to compete in the post-secondary level at Skills Canada this year. Kuluguqtuq has been working on a house in the first year of his two-year college carpentry program. "That's given me more of a hands-on experience along the way," he said. MAKING ENGINES PURR MichaelAngelo Kunnuk of Pond Inlet is largely selftaught in the art of fixing engines. He became proficient enough at repairing the components to win the outdoor engine repair category at last year's Skills Canada territorials. Since age 11, he has been honing his skills, primarily by working on snowmobiles but he also dabbles in boat motors and all-terrain vehicles. His aunt's husband has given him some pointers over the years too. "When I look at it, I know right away what the problem is. I don't really use the instructions," Kunnuk said. He envisions himself in a

photo courtesy of Will Hopkins

Sam Kuluguqtuq was Nunavut's top cabinetmaker at Skills Canada territorials last year. He has moved on to Algonquin College in Ontario, where he is enrolled in the first year of a two-year carpentry and renovation technician program. career where he can put those skills to work. "After I graduate I'm trying to become a red-seal mechanic," said Kunnuk, who is in Grade 12. At the Skills Canada Nunavut competition, he worked on pull-start and secondary-clutch motors, neither of which posed any problems for him, he said. At nationals, he admitted to being nervous as he tackled engines from a snowmobile, a motorcycle, a two-stroke engine and a generator. While in Winnipeg for nationals, he picked up tips in making measurements and working with pistons and cylinder bores – skills that can help him in the future. In addition to the annual territorial skills competition, Skills Canada Nunavut holds career fairs and afterschool skills clubs, participates in trade shows, pays visits to schools and holds workshops, and promotes National Trades and Technology Week.

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WINNERS FROM THE 2017 TERRITORIAL SKILLS COMPETITION

Esthetics - Meeka Koomuk, Arviat Baking - Hayley Totalik, Taloyoak Cabinetmaking - Sam Kuluguqtuq, Iqaluit Carpentry - Ethan Tanner Harvey, Kugluktuk Cooking - Andrew Clark, Iqaluit Cultural Sewing - Kristine Oyukuluk, Arctic Bay Electrical Installations (secondary) - Michel Oolateeta, Pond Inlet Electrical Installations (post-secondary) - Kimberly Smith, Iqaluit Graphic Design - Natalie Maerzluft, Iqaluit Hairstyling (secondary) - Mallory Okatsiak, Arviat Hairstyling (post-secondary) - Desiree Autut, Rankin Inlet Job Demonstration - Shia Strowbridge, Iqaluit Job Search - Abigail Atienza, Iqaluit Outdoor Engine Repair - MichaelAngelo Kunnuk, Pond Inlet Photography - Damaris Nutarasungnik, Arviat Plumbing (post-secondary) - Bengamin Kusugak, Arviat Public Speaking - Chidinma Umenwofor-Nweze, Iqaluit Video Production - Ethan Tassiuk & Kevin Mikiyungiak, Arviat Workplace Safety - Carter Lear, Cambridge Bay Robotics - Hayden Ahle & David Aglukark, Iqaluit Source: Skills Canada Nunavut


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8 Monday, March 5, 2018

Aurora College offers new programs Students and staff forge ahead as foundational review for NWT post-secondary institution nears conclusion by Derek Neary

Northern News Services

NWT

In some respects, 201718 was a tumultuous year for Aurora College with a comprehensive review underway, but, despite that, the college launched new programs and students continued to achieve. A housing maintainer program, combining preapprenticeship and apprenticeship levels of instruction, was offered for the first time through the Thebacha campus in Fort Smith this academic year. It's aimed at addressing housing needs in communities and is designed to be an entry point to apprenticeship. Also at the Thebacha campus, a 14-week camp cook program, specifically requested by the Arctic Winter Games committee, was introduced. Students will serve a two-week practicum during the Arctic Winter Games in the South Slave in March, preparing up to 900 meals three times a day for athletes and coaches. In Inuvik, new developments include a two-year practical nurse diploma program and a 10-week merging arts and crafts with technology and

manufacturing program. Inuvik was also the site of a new early childhood development diploma program in 2016. The second year was added to enable participants to earn a diploma. Vivian Koe, of Aklavik, was one of the students who seized that opportunity. A mother of two, Koe said the diploma will make her eligible to teach junior kindergarten. Some of the courses explored learning through play, early childhood philosophy, program planning for different age groups and children's brain development from birth to age 12. There was also a cultural component which brought in Inuvik elder Sarah Jerome to teach. "That was the most awesome course. We sure learned a lot from her," Koe said of Jerome. "In the end, I'm glad I came back to do the second year. She wishes others would chase after their educational dreams, she said, and she has high hopes for her daughters' futures. "The reason I chose to come to school too was to be a role model for them. When they're older, they can think

photo courtesy of Aurora College

The 2017-18 early childhood development certificate program class at Aurora College in Inuvik includes, front row, from left, instructor Jim Arsenault, Vivian Koe, Mary Jane McDonald, Kimberly Neyando, Erin Felix and Dave Porter, chair of the School of Education. Back row, from left, Shannon Vaneltsi, Danielle Gruben, Kristen Lucas and Tara Greenland. about going to school, and they can think about doing what I'm doing," she said. MINE TRAINING CENTRE NEARS COMPLETION The $10-million Centre for Mine and Industry Training in Fort Smith is expected to be complete by the end of March. All the existing mining and heavy equipment operator courses at the Thebacha

campus will shift to the new facility. The structure, funded by the federal and territorial governments, will feature simulators, mining equipment, several vehicle bays and classrooms. While mining and industry training roars ahead, the fate of the teacher education program and the social work program remain uncertain. Registration for both programs has been suspended since the GNWT announced a $1.9-million budget cut to Aurora College last year. Meanwhile, the results of a foundational review for the college should be known by March 31, according to Andy Bevan, assistant deputy minister with the Department of Education. The foundational review examines the college's governance and operations structure and will analyze future job trends and the corresponding programs that will

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AURORA COLLEGE 2017 GRADUATIONS FROM DEGREE, DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Environment and natural resources technology diploma - 3 Traditional arts certificate - 3 Business administration certificate - 18 Business administration diploma - 12 Office administration certificate - 18 Aboriginal language and cultural instructor certificate - 3 Aboriginal language and culture instructor diploma - 6 Early childhood development certificate - 13 Bachelor of education - 2 Community health representative certificate – 1 Personal support worker certificate - 12 Social work diploma - 3 Bachelor of science in nursing - 11 Post graduate certificate in remote nursing - 9 Source: Aurora College

be offered at Aurora. "We expect the review to make recommendations that provide clear direction for the future development of Aurora College," said Bevan. "Based on

the review and the subsequent departmental response, the college will develop a long-term strategic plan and the government will start implementing the recommendations."


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Monday, March 5, 2018 9

Wired for a trades career Leland Chinna basks in Skills Canada experience en route to journeyman status fact FILE

2017 NWT TERRITORIAL SKILLS COMPETITION GOLD MEDAL WINNERS

Auto Service - Austin Brown Baking - Karis DeKwant Carpentry (secondary) - Luke Heal Carpentry (post-secondary) - Andrew Wittlinger Cooking - Max Goering Electrical wiring - Robert Heron Graphic design – Emily-Ann Andrews Hairstyling (secondary) - Jillian Riles Hairstyling (post-secondary) - Jade Edjericon Millwright - Darren Coe Photography - Niva Stephenson Plumbing - Matthew Miller Small-powered equipment - Jacob Klengenberg Traditional sewing - Gloria Ann Ruben TV/Video production - Carson Asmundson & Benjamin McGregor Welding (secondary) - Aidan Ogilvie Welding (post-secondary) - Torin Dowe Workplace safety - Anusha Sivakumar Source: Aurora College

by Derek Neary

Northern News Services

Somba K'e/Yellowknife

Leland Chinna is a threetime competitor at Skills Canada NWT's territorial competition, and electrical wiring is leading to bigger and better things. Chinna, who hails from Fort Good Hope, rigged up electrical boxes at the competition from 2015 to 2017. He would construct the boxes to specified dimensions, and using electrical conduit or cables, wire them according to code. He always enjoyed the experience, he said. "I have some friends that I've met over years, through school and other people doing electrical, and I've been telling my friends from Inuvik and other parts of the North that

they should try to compete (in the territorial skills competition) too," said Chinna. He isn't sure if he'll be at this year's competition, scheduled for April 27 to 28 in Yellowknife. His focus has been on completing his academics at school in Red Deer, Alta., with the prospect of earning journeyman status in March. "I'm that close. I can see over the hill," he said, chuckling. The amount of work in trades school far surpasses what was required of him in high school, said Chinna, 26, whose first three years of classes were in Fort Smith. "There's lot of early mornings and late nights, studying on the weekends," he said. "It's stressful but worth it."

photo courtesy of Leland Chinna

Leland Chinna, who's from Fort Good Hope, is a fourth-year electrical apprentice on the verge of becoming a journeyman. He has competed at the Skills Canada NWT territorial competition three times. photo courtesy of Skills Canada NWT

Jayden Smith, a student at Sir John Franklin High School in Yellowknife, demonstrates his aptitude in the automotive service category at Skills Canada NWT's territorial skills competition in 2017. Chinna's interest in an electrical career was sparked by his exposure to trades through his work at Ekati mine. He was stationed in the process plant in 2011 and said he was captivated by the tasks electricians were completing on site. "I'm coming from a small community and there aren't many people doing these types of things," he said. "The main interest, the things that are influencing me, are to become a role-model type person for the people back home and the surrounding communities. It doesn't matter where you're coming from – if I can do it, you could do it too." During his progression as an electrical apprentice with Dominion Diamond Cor-

Through long term partnerships with northern communities, Actua provides locally and culturally relevant science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programming that builds confidence and inspires youth to follow their dreams. By integrating coding and digital skills content within STEM programs, Actua equips northern youth with skill sets and mindsets to pursue exciting careers.

/ActuaCanada

@ActuaCanada

@actua_canada

poration, he's gradually been entrusted to take on more complicated assignments. "I get more job roles and a little bit more independence as far as work goes out in the field," he said, adding that he aspires "to move up into higher roles" with the company. "I see myself staying with Dominion Diamonds for as long as I possibly can, and maybe start working with the youth back home, maybe in the future on time off, or something," said Chinna. In addition to the territorial skills competition – which leads to national championship eligibility for gold-medal winners – Skills Canada NWT organizes career expos and exploration workshops as well as skills clubs and workshops in communities.

photo courtesy of Leland Chinna

Leland Chinna takes a medal-winning selfie after competing in the electrical wiring category at the Skills Canada NWT territorial competition in Yellowknife in 2017.


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Degrees of Success


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Degrees of Success

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Financial boost for students Numerous scholarships available North of 60

Northern News Services

Financial assistance is critical for many students who are pursuing career goals through post-secondary education. There are many avenues to funding in the NWT and Nunavut. The options for Nunavut students have expanded greatly this year with numer-

NWT

NWT Chamber of Commerce Scholarship Program Value: Up to $2,500 Available: As many as four Organization: NWT Chamber of Commerce Eligibility: Applicants must be NWT students attending an accredited post-secondary education institution full-time, enrolled in a business program and intending to return to work in the NWT after their studies are completed. Deadline: July UNW – Josie Gould Memorial Scholarships Value: $3,000 full-time/$1,000 part-time Available: 8 full-time/6 part-time Organization: Union of Northern Workers Eligibility: UNW members and their relatives are eligible to apply. Deadline: June 29 Smitty Muyers Memorial Scholarship Fund Value: up to $1,000 Available: Varies Organization: Yellowknife Elks Lodge #314 Eligibility: Applicants must be Canadian citizens or landed immigrants and a resident of Yellowknife, Ndilo, Dettah, Behchoko or the Ingraham Trail and enrolled in a recognized post-secondary institution.

ous new post-secondary scholarships through the Nunavut Tunngavik Foundation. Below is a list of numerous scholarships available to students North of 60. Those interested in applying should contact the organization offering the awards for full details. Applicants older than 25 must be members of good standing in either the Yellowknife Elks Lodge #314 or Yellowknife Royal Purple #143. Deadline: August 15 Marion Slaven Memorial Scholarship Fund Value: up to $1,000 Available: Varies Organization: Yellowknife Royal Purple #143 Eligibility: Applicants must be Canadian citizens or landed immigrants and a resident of Yellowknife, Ndilo, Dettah, Behchoko or the Ingraham Trail and enrolled in a recognized post-secondary nursing or medical program. Applicants above the age of 25 must be members in good standing of either the Yellowknife Elks Lodge #314 or Yellowknife Royal Purple #143. Deadline: August 15 Northwest Territories Power Corporation Scholarship Value: $1,000 Available: One per community that the power corp. services Organization: Northwest Territories Power Corporation Eligibility: Applicants must be high school graduates of the NWT and enrolled in a postsecondary institution. Deadline: Contact the power corp.

NNSL file photo

Lectro, the mascot for the NWT Power Corporation gives Maritza Reddecliff a hug during last year's Santa Claus Parade in Hay River. Power corp. is also giving out scholarships worth $1,000 for one candidate in every community it serves. KeTe Whii/Procon Joint Venture Scholarship Value: TBA Available: TBA Organization: KeTe Whii and Procon Joint-Venture Eligibility: Applicants must be beneficiaries of the Lutsel K'e Dene Band, Tlicho Government or the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and be enrolled full time in a post-secondary educational institution. Deadline: Contact Det'on Cho Corporation Sport North Scholarship Value: $1,000 to $1,500

Available: Multiple Organization: Sport North Eligibility: Applicants must have either completed one year of school in the NWT or be a mature student who has lived in the NWT for five years, shown commitment to the development of sport and completed the first year of post-secondary education in the field of education, sport, administration, recreation or sport sciences. Deadline: Aug. 15 Dr. Pierre Lessard Education Award Value: $2,000 Financial continued next page


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Financial from previous page

Available: Varies Organization: Stanton Territorial Health Authority Eligibility: The award is for health-care professionals who have lived and practised in the NWT for a minimum of three years and intend to return to the North to continue to work after completing studies, with a preference given to study in obstetrics/ gynecology. Deadline: December Don Jossa Architectural Scholarship Award Value: $1,500 Available: Up to four Organization: NWT Association of Architects Eligibility: NWT high school graduates or students in their final year of high school who have a minimum four years of schooling in the NWT and will be pursuing architectural studies. Deadline: April 1 Jim Bourque Scholarship Value: $1,000 Available: One Organization: Arctic Institute of North America Eligibility: This scholarship honours the legacy of the late First Nations activist James W. Bourque. Applicants must be enrolled in post-secondary training in education, environmental studies, traditional knowledge or telecommunications; and be a Canadian aboriginal student. Deadline: July 15 Linda Gray Memorial Award Value: $500 Available: Two Organization: The Tree of Peace Friendship Centre Eligibility: Applicants must be Indigenous residents of Yellowknife, Dettah or Ndilo and attending a post-secondary institution in the fall. Deadline: June Royal Canadian Legion (Alberta-NWT Command) Bursary Value: $1,000 Available: One Organization: Royal Canadian Legion Eligibility: For any person "who is serving or has honourably served in the Canadian Armed Forces," or their dependents. Based on financial need and satisfactory academic achievement. Deadline: March 15 Akaitcho Territory Government Scholarships Value: $1,000 Available: 10 Organization: Akaitcho Territory Government Eligibility: Applicants must be Dene First Nation Treaty 8 members of Lutsel K'e, Deninu Kue, Yellowknife or Smith's Landing and enrolled in full-time studies at an approved post-secondary institution. Deadline: September Marilyn Sanderson Memorial Scholarship Value: $1,000 Available: One Organization: Akaitcho Territory Government Eligibility: Applicants must be a Dene First Nation Treaty 8 member registered to the five Akaitcho Dene First Nations, pursuing post-secondary education or training within the First Nation in business management or accounting and intending to return to the First Nation community for employment. Deadline: September Bessie Silcox Scholarship for Dene Students Value: $500 Available: One Organization: Dene Nation Eligibility: Applicants must be Dene students enrolled in postsecondary education and pursuing a career in business and administration, education or social services. Deadline: Open year-round

photo courtesy of Nunavut Sivuniksavut

Students in the Nunavut Sivuniksavut college program in Ottawa are eligible for scholarships from Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. and other sources. These 2017-18 Nunavut Sivuniksavut students display their certificates after completing the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training course. Front row, from left, instructor Tracey Foster, Lindsey Qanguq, Maria Kayasark, Jen Taqtu, Jennifer Kadluk and Parr Josephee. Middle row, from left, instructor Cecile Guerin, May Ningeongan, Natasha Qamaniq, Tooma Laisa, Nadine Okalik, Leanna Wilson, Saveah Ilgok, Patricia Kablutsiaq, Darla Evyagotailak, Savannah Killiktee and instructor Brigitte Bill. Back row, from left, instructor Angelique Dignard, Simeonie Kisa-Knickelbein, Augatnaaq Eccles, Bertrum Elatiak, Jonas Aningmiuq, Lawerance Greenley and Jonathan Pitseolak. Organization: Dehcho Divisional Education Council Eligibility: Applicants must have lived in the Deh Cho region and attended a Deh Cho school. They must be enrolled in a full-time post-secondary education program. Deadline: Open year-round Stephen Hamilton Rowan Memorial Scholarship Value: $1,000 Available: Varies depending on funding Organization: Dehcho Divisional Education Council Eligibility: Applicants must have attended a Deh Cho school and be enrolled in a post-secondary program. Deadline: January Dehcho First Nation Annual Scholarships Value: $1,000 to $2,000 Available: 20 Organization: Dehcho First Nation Eligibility: Applicants must be Dehcho First Nation members pursuing education in Dene traditional knowledge, aboriginal language, aboriginal governance, business, early childhood education, engineering, computer science, fine arts/ performing arts, medicine, short-term courses, social work or teaching. Deadline: July 31 Phoebe Nahanni Memorial Scholarship Value: $12,000 (multi-year) Available: One Organization: Dehcho First Nation Eligibility: Applicants must be Dehcho Dene descendants pursuing a doctorate, masters or undergraduate degree in the sciences, law or political science. Deadline: July 31 Mary Cazon Memorial Award Value: $3,000 Available: Two Organization: Dehcho First Nation Eligibility: Awarded annually to two Dehcho Dene post-secondary students pursuing studies in environmental sciences, health and wellness and/or naturopathy. Deadline: July 31

Chief George Kodakin Environment Scholarship Value: $500 Available: Two Organization: Dene Nation Eligibility: Applicants must be of Dene descent and enrolled in a post-secondary education program in the science, environment or resource management fields. Deadline: Open year-round

Mitch Landry (Corbeau) Memorial Award Value: $3,000 Available: Two Organization: Dehcho First Nation Eligibility: Awarded annually to two Dehcho Dene post-secondary students pursuing studies in environment and resource management, humanities/social sciences, aboriginal languages and/or linguistics. Deadline: July 31

Danny Bodvarson Scholarship Value: $1,500 Available: One Organization: NWT Aboriginal Golf Association Eligibility: Applicants must be aboriginal NWT residents enrolled in post-secondary education, pursue excellence in sport and enjoy and promote music. Deadline: Oct. 31

Albertine Rohd Memorial Award Value: $3,000 Available: Two Organization: Dehcho First Nation Eligibility: Awarded annually to two Dehcho Dene post-secondary students pursuing studies in native studies, women/gender studies, political science and/or education. Deadline: July 31

Dehcho Divisional Education Council Scholarships Value: $1,000 Available: Five

MSS Ltd. Nursing Bursary Value: $1,500 Available: Two

Organization: MSS Ltd. Eligibility: Applicants must be enrolled in the NWT nursing program through Aurora College. Deadline: Aug. 15 Norman Wells Operations Sahtu Aboriginal Scholarship Value: $3,500 per year for college or technical school; $4,500 per year for university Available: Two Organization: Imperial Oil Resources Eligibility: Applicants must be Sahtu beneficiaries and must be registered in full-time studies in a discipline relevant to the oil and gas industry at a recognized educational institution. Deadline: Aug. 31 Continued on next page


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Eligibility: Applicants must be enrolled fulltime in an Aurora College diploma program, entering their second or subsequent year and demonstrate academic improvement. Deadline: Nov. 8

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Sahtu Renewable Resources Board Scholarships Value: $2,000 for first year, $2,500 for second year, $3,500 for third and fourth year, $5,000 for graduate studies Available: Ongoing Organization: Sahtu Renewable Resources Board Eligibility: Applicants must be Sahtu Dene or Metis or an NWT resident who completed at least two years of their high school education in the Sahtu Settlement Area. Applicants must also be enrolled in a full-time post-secondary program with an average of 70 per cent or higher in the last year of study. Deadline: Open year-round Association of Mackenzie Mountains Outfitters Scholarship Value: $1,000 Available: Up to five Organization: The Association of Mackenzie Mountains Outfitters Eligibility: Applicants must be from Mackenzie Valley communities and enrolled in studies in an environmental field at the post-secondary level. Applicants enrolled in a certified guide school or in the aviation industry will also be considered. Deadline: May 31 Shehtah Nabors LP/Indspire Scholarship Value: $3,000 Available: 12 Organization: Shehtah Nabors Limited Partnership and Indspire Eligibility: Applicants must have an average of at least 75 per cent during full-time studies at a post-secondary institution, ideally with the intention of pursuing employment in the oil and gas industry. The scholarships are open to Dene descendants from Denendeh. Deadline: Feb. 1, June 1 and Nov. 1 Aurora College Board of Governors Student Leadership Award Value: $300 Available: Three (one for each of Aurora Col-

ONE Student Financial Support Program Value: “Top up� funding for post-secondary students Available: Varies Organization: Tlicho Community Services Agency Eligibility: For Tlicho citizens attending an approved full-time program at a designated post-secondary institution. Deadline: Year round

photo courtesy of the Charpentier family

The Luke Charpentier Memorial Fund offers $2,500 toward post-secondary or trades students from the City of Yellowknife with their studies. lege's campuses) Eligibility: Applicants must be enrolled at Aurora College and are assessed on the impact they have had on their peers and the school. Deadline: Feb. 28 Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. Scholarship for Aurora College Students Value: $1,000 Available: Two Eligibility: Applicants must be residents of the NWT and be enrolled in at least four courses in the first or second year of a two-year Aurora College program and have maintained an average of 70 per cent or higher. Deadline: Oct. 15 Enbridge Pipelines (NW) Inc. Aurora College Bursaries Value: $1,000 Available: Two Organization: Enbridge Pipelines (NW) Inc.

Helen Parker Bursary in Social Work Value: Up to $5,000 yearly Available: Varies Organization: The Muttart Foundation Eligilibility: Must be registered in the second year of the Aurora College social work program and an NWT resident for at least two years. Deadline: Oct. 15 ATCO Developmental Studies Scholarship Value: $1,000 Available: Two Organization: ATCO Eligibility: Must be a student of the developmental studies and access program at an Aurora campus learning centre. Deadline: Contact ATCO ATCO Continuous Academic Effort Scholarships Value: $1,000 Availability: One for the Beaufort Delta and one for the Sahtu Organization: ATCO Eligibility: Must be enrolled in full-time developmental studies at an Aurora campus learning centre Deadline: February Canada Post bursaries Value: Varies Available: Varies

Organization: Canada Post Eligibility: Established to encourage aboriginal students enrolled in diploma programs in management studies at Aurora College and Nunavut Arctic College. The bursaries are administered and presented by the colleges on behalf of Canada Post. Applicants must be of NWT aboriginal ancestry, enrolled in the second year of study at one of the Northern colleges and demonstrate excellence in the first year of study. To apply, students must submit a brief biography and an official transcript from their first year, along with references. Deadline: Year-round Town of Inuvik Scholarship Value: $1,000 Available: One Organization: Town of Inuvik Eligibility: Must be enrolled full-time in Aurora College's office administration certificate program, Aurora campus. Preference may be given to an applicant from Inuvik. Deadline: March 31 Igal Roth Memorial Community Planning Scholarship Value: $1,000 Available: Three Organization: Department of Municipal and Community Affairs, GNWT Eligibility: Intended for Northerners who wish to pursue a career in community planning and assist qualifying students in obtaining postsecondary education in planning for potential employment in the NWT. Applicants must have resided in the NWT for at least two years, be attending an approved university or college planning program and show proof of acceptance as a full-time student. Deadline: Prior to commencement of classes. Leo Norwegian Memorial Scholarship Value: $1,000 Available: One Organization: Dehcho Land Use Planning Committee Eligibility: Intended for a resident of the Deh Continued on next page


Degrees of Success Continued from previous page

Cho region who is enrolled in a post-secondary program that will further their studies and experience in environmental science, land-use planning, geography, natural resource management or a related field. Deadline: July 31 NWT Law Foundation Graeme Garson Scholarship Value: Up to $20,000 Available: Varies Organization: NWT Law Foundation Eligibility: Offered to NWT students attending law school with debt reduction or income supplementation when they return to the territory to work. Students can receive $2,000 per year for three years while attending law school and $7,000 per year after returning to the territory to work for two years. Applicants should be residents of the NWT for at least three years, attended a secondary school in the NWT and intend to return to the NWT after completing their education. Deadline: May 15 John U. Bayly Q.C. Memorial Fund Value: $1,000 Available: One Organization: NWT Law Foundation Eligibility: Must be a resident member in good standing of the NWT bar and seeking to upgrade mediation skills. Deadline: Dec. 31 NWT Tourism Scholarship Value: $1,500 Available: One Organization: Northwest Territories Tourism Eligibility: Awarded to a qualified NWT student attending a post-secondary institution in an accredited tourism and hospitality program. Deadline: July 27 NWT SPCA Scholarship Value: $500 Available: One Organization: NWT SPCA Eligibility: Meant to reward those who dedicate their spare time to the betterment of animals. Applicants must be a high school graduate, planning to attend a post-secondary educational institution in a program relating to the betterment of animals, have some involvement in the community and have average academic standing. Deadline: June 30 Bursary for Post-Secondary Studies in French Value: $1,000 per semester, to a maximum of $2,000 per school year Available: Multiple Organization: Department of Education, Culture and Employment Eligibility: For NWT students 25 years and under who are doing their post-secondary studies in French at a Canadian institution. Deadline: Varies by semester Saint Patrick's Parish Scholarships Value: $500 Available: Four Organization: St. Patrick's Parish Eligibility: Grade 12 Catholic students from St. Patrick's High School and Sir John Franklin High School who are attending a post-secondary institution within 15 months of graduation. Students must have made a contribution to the St. Patrick's Parish community in Yellowknife during their high school years including: attending Mass or other church celebrations, participation in ministry, church functions or celebrations, or assisted with the flea market. Students must write an essay on one of five predetermined topics. Deadline: June 18 Alice and Randy Daniels Music Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Scholarships may be awarded to individuals involved in studying music as a full time post-secondary student at an approved post-secondary institution. The study of music may be in performance, song writing, or music production. Deadline: May 15 Aurora College Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Applicants must be registered in a second or subsequent year of study at the Yellowknife/North Slave Aurora College campus and reside in Yellowknife for at least three years prior to application. Deadline: May 15 Chris Argue Memorial Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation

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Eligibility: Applicants must demonstrate leadership in the promotion of self-propelled wilderness travel in the NWT and have clear short and long term goals related to this field. Deadline: May 15 Con Employees Benevolent Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Open to high school graduates from Yellowknife who intend to pursue a trade or professional career in the mining industry or a related field, i.e. millwright, geo-technical engineer, environmental studies, geology or heavy equipment operation. Deadline: May 15 David J. Ramsden Memorial Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Applicants must be a resident of the NWT for at least two years, but five years is preferred, and entering their first or second year of university graduate studies. Deadline: May 15 David Sutherland Memorial Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Individuals must be members of a NWT crosscountry ski organization and a resident of the NWT for at least two years. Deadline: May 15 Diavik Community Scholarship Fund Value: $2,000 Available: Two Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: One scholarship is to assist individuals pursuing a career related to mining or resource development such as geological or geomatics engineering and/or mining related trades. A second scholarship is to assist an individual pursuing a career in mining support such as geology, environmental or earth science, communication, finance or procurement. Deadline: May 15 Doug Bothamley Memorial Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: This scholarship was designed to assist students who are attending university and have been active in softball, curling or golf as a player or a coach. Deadline: May 15 Elaine (Sweet) Whitford Scholarship Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation

Trudy Hause Photography

Mackenzie Marriott, left, was the recipient of the 2017-18 Lilly Borges-Oldham Language Scholarship through the Yellowknife Community Foundation. Fund representative Stuart Oldham stands at right. Eligibility: Open to individuals who have been a resident of the NWT for at least two years and are entering their second or subsequent year of post-secondary studies in social work or nursing at a recognized college or university. Deadline: May 15 Elliot Michael Brown Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Grants may be awarded to individuals who want to develop their entrepreneurial goals either through education or hands-on business start-up and have demonstrated resilience in the face of life's challenges. Deadline: May 15 Enough Talk, Hurry up and do it Already Arts Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Individuals must be Grade 12 students at Sir John Franklin High School who have been accepted into a post-secondary program for the performing arts, film, music or writing. Deadline: May 15 Continued on next page


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also be awarded to individuals or charitable organizations involved in outdoor skills and or survival training. Deadline: May 15

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Fine and Performing Arts Fund Scholarships Value: $2,000 Available: Two Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Supports NWT residents interested in pursuing education or training opportunities in the fine or performing arts. Individuals must have lived in the NWT for at least one year and been accepted in a recognized program with a minimum duration of 100 hours. Deadline: May 15 Friends of Fred Carmichael Scholarship Value: $4,000 Available: Varies Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Open to students enrolled in the Adult Learning and Basic Education program at an Aurora College Community Learning Centre in the Beaufort Delta or Sahtu. The criteria includes a strong academic effort and perseverance in the face of adversity. Deadline: May 15 Gary Robinson Memorial Fund Value: $10,000 Available: Varies

Helping Children Soar Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: This scholarship was established to assist residents of the Northwest Territories who have grown up in foster care to further their education. Deadline: May 15

wikicommons photo

Queen Elizabeth II scholarships from the Government of Nunavut offer $15,000 annually in total distributed between successful applicants. Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Provides financial support to those individuals or charitable organizations involved in search and rescue/recovery or emergency response activities. Grants can

Jenny Gamble-Fournier Memorial Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Students must be graduating from Sir. John Franklin High School and pursuing a post-secondary education with an emphasis on the arts. Deadline: May 15 John Tumchewics Memorial Fund Value: $4,000 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Assists individuals with helicopter flight training, upgrading by endorsements or ratings and the purchase of safety equipment. Aircraft maintenance engineers working toward a helicopter endorsement may also apply. Scholarship funds may also be used for other individuals seeking training in the aviation field. Jonas Konge Memorial Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Open to individuals who have lived in the NWT for at least five years and are entering their second or subsequent year of post-secondary studies in medicine or nursing with plans to return to the North after graduation. Deadline: May 15 Legislative Assembly of the NWT Fund Value: $2,500 Available: Two Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Applicants must have resided in the NWT for at least 10 years and be entering their first or subsequent years of studies in a recognized post-secondary program in political science or a related field. Deadline: May 15 Lilly Borges Oldham Second Language Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: For those studying second languages and/or cultures at a post-secondary institution. To be eligible, individual applicants must be registering in a recognized post-secondary program of study in a second language or culture. They must also be a Grade 12 or adult student and a resident of Yellowknife for their Grade 11 and Grade 12 years. Deadline: May 15 Luke Charpentier Memorial Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Assists post-secondary or trades students from the city of Yellowknife with their studies. As a grant it is intended to assist organizations from the city of Yellowknife with projects that will benefit the community. Deadline: May 15 Mary Beth Miller Memorial Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: One

Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Supports individuals or organizations who are interested in pursuing/developing sport excellence in cross-country skiing, biathlon, mountain biking, speed skating, canoeing or kayaking. Deadline: May 15 Pat McMahon Memorial Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Priority in the awarding of grants from this fund will be given to females demonstrating community leadership in Yellowknife municipal affairs and civic pride. Grants may also be awarded to females involved in demonstrating uniqueness in promoting Yellowknife or one who is pursuing studies in tourism, public administration and/or political science. Randy McBride Hockey Project Fund Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Supports NWT youth pursuing advanced levels of hockey not available in the NWT. Deadline: May 15 Wally12Million Value: $3,000 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: Individuals must be a resident of the NWT and entering their second or subsequent year of studies in fine arts or music at a recognized institution. Deadline: May 15

NUNAVUT

Post-Secondary Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: Multiple Organization: Nunavut Tunngavik Foundation/Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. Eligibility: Must be Inuit post-secondary students enrolled under the Nunavut Agreement Deadline: Consult Nunavut Tunngavik Laura Ulluriaq Gauthier Scholarship Value: $5,000 Available: One Organization: Qulliq Energy Corporation Eligibility: Applicants must be students from Nunavut, but are not required to be Nunavut Inuit. Students must be enrolled in either a recognized, accredited technical, college or university program for the September 2018 semester. Mature students are encouraged to apply. Deadline: June 30 Jose Amaujaq Kusugak Memorial Scholarships Value: $5,000 Available: Two Organization: Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated Eligibility: Open to post-secondary students in the fields of education, Inuit language or the advancement of Inuit rights. Deadline: July 9 Interpreter Translator Student Award Value: $1,000 Available: Two Organization: Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated Eligibility: Based on academic merit among first and second year students in Nunavut Arctic College's interpreter translator diploma program. Deadline: End of the school year Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. Nursing Scholarship Value: $500 Available: One Organization: Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. Eligibility: Based on merit among students in Nunavut Arctic College's nursing program. Deadline: End of the school year Continued on next page


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Sport and Recreation Scholarships Value: Up to $5,000 each Available: Multiple Organization: Government of Nunavut Eligibility: Open to post-secondary students pursuing education/kinesiology, sports administration, sports sciences or recreation at a recognized college or university. Deadline: Contact the Government of Nunavut

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John Amagoalik Scholarship Value: $5,000 Available: One Organization: Qikiqtani Inuit Association Eligibility: QIA will prioritize applications from post-secondary students enrolled under the Nunavut Agreement who are entering a field that promotes Inuit language and culture.

Queen Elizabeth II scholarships Value: Up to $15,000 annually in total distributed between successful applicants Available: Varies Organization: Government of Nunavut Eligibility: The scholarships are presented yearly to the top Nunavut students in the Nunavut Arctic College nursing program. Deadline: Contact the Government of Nunavut

QIA Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: 80 Organization: Qikiqtani Inuit Association Eligibility: The QIA Scholarship was launched in 2017-18 for students in all 13 Qikiqtani communities. Applicants must have a valid Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. card, be enrolled under the Nunavut Agreement in the Qikiqtani region and be enrolled in post-secondary education.

Dr. Christine Egan Memorial Scholarship Value: Varies ($12,525 total distributed between successful applicants in 2017-18) Available: Two to four Organization: University of Manitoba Eligibility: Open to Nunavut beneficiaries who have completed one year of a baccalaureate nursing degree and are enrolled full time for a second, third or fourth year in nursing. Deadline: Contact the University of Manitoba

Aviation Scholarship Value: Up to $7,500 Available: Four Organization: Department of Economic Development and Transportation Eligibility: Open to full-time residents of Nunavut (two-year minimum residency) pursuing full-time aviation-related studies: airline or airport operations or management, aircraft maintenance and pilot training. Technical Professions Studies Scholarship Value: First year: $2,500; second year: $3,000; third year: $4,000; fourth year: $5,000 Available: Multiple Organization: Department of Community and Government Services (CGS) Eligibility: For students in the field of engineering, informatics, community planning, business studies, college programs of firefighting, training, prevention and land administration. Deadline: Contact CGS Qikiqtaaluk Corporation Scholarship Value: TBA Available: TBA Organization: Qikiqtaaluk Corporation and group of companies Eligibility: Open to Nunavut Land Claim beneficiaries who are permanent residents of the Qikiqtani region and studying management, environmental sciences or project management at a recognized institution. Deadline: Contact the Qikiqtaaluk Corporation Jim Noble Nunavut Wildlife Management Board Scholarship Value: $5,000 each Available: 2 Organization: Nunavut Wildlife Management Board Eligibility: Applicants must be seeking a degree, diploma or certificate in wildlife or wildlife management. Deadline: Contact the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board

NNSL file photo

Al Woodhouse Bursary Value: $3,000 Available: Varies Organization: Nunavut Arctic College with assistance from the Nunavut Research Institute and the Iqaluit Rotary Club Eligibility: Applicants must have lived in Nunavut for at least two years, be enrolled in full-time post-secondary studies, and intend to pursue a career in Nunavut. Deadline: September

Kaine Towtongie sits at the controls of an aircraft during a tour of planes in Rankin Inlet in August. The Northern Aviation Scholarship has eight $5,000 scholarships available for candidates from NWT and Nunavut interested in an Nunavut Implementation Training Committee Nunavut aviation industry career. Beneficiaries Scholarships Fred R. Elias Graduation Award Value: $1,500 to $5,000 Available: Multiple Organization: Kitikmeot Inuit Association Eligibility: Targeted at students who have successfully completed business and management studies or related disciplines. Deadline: Contact the Kitikmeot Inuit Association Nunasi Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: up to 11 Organization: Nunasi Corporation in partnership with Nuna Logistics, NCC Investment Group Ltd., Polar Vision, Larga Kitikmeot Eligibility: Applicants must be beneficiaries of the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement and enrolled in full-time studies at an accredited education institution. Deadline: Contact Nunasi Corporation

Value: up to $2,400 Available: Three Organization: Nunavut Implementation Training Committee Eligibility: Applicants must be enrolled as a beneficiary in the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement, enrolled or accepted by a recognized full-time accredited university or college program of at least two years duration and have maintained an overall average higher than 65 per cent in the previous year of study – Continued on next page


Degrees of Success

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a 75 per cent average must maintained while receiving the scholarship. Deadline: Aug. 1 and Dec. 1 Technical Professional Studies Scholarships Value: Up to $5,000 Available: Varies Organization: Government of Nunavut Eligibility: Open to students studying engineering, informatics, community planning, business studies, firefighting, training, prevention and land administration. Priority is given to beneficiaries of the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement. Deadline: Contact the Government of Nunavut Financial Assistance for Nunavut Students Scholarships Value: Up to $1,500 Available: Numerous Organization: Government of Nunavut Eligibility: Open to students attending designated postsecondary institutions and academic programs. Deadline: March 1, July 15 and Nov. 15

Jack Cram Memorial Prize Value: $2,500 Available: One for Nunavut Organization: Awarded by the Faculty of Education's Committee on Student Affairs Eligibility: The prize will be available to part-time and fulltime students engaging in further study (after a certificate program) in the Nunavut Teacher Education Program.

NWT AND NUNAVUT

Bob Spence Memorial Scholarship Value: $2,000 Available: One Organization: Northwest Territories and Nunavut Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists (NAPEG) Education Foundation Eligibility: Applicants must be a NWT or Nunavut student studying engineering or geoscience at the undergraduate level in a recognized university. Deadline: Sept. 30 Northern Futures Scholarship Value: $4,000 Available: Six

Organization: Northwestel Eligibility: Applicants must reside within Nortwestel's operating area and be enrolled in a degree or diploma program in the fields of engineering, commerce or business, computer science or electrical communications. Deadline: Contact Northwestel Mel Brown Memorial Scholarship Value: $2,000 Available: One Organization: Northwest Territories and Nunavut Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists (NAPEG) Education Foundation Eligibility: Applicants must be a NWT or Nunavut student studying engineering or geosciences at the undergraduate level in a recognized university. Deadline: Sept. 30 Northern Aviation Scholarship Value: $5,000 Available: Eight Organization: GNWT Department of Transportation, GN Department of Economic Development and Transportation, Discovery Air, Keewatin Air and North-Wright Airways Eligibility: Applicants must be full-time residents of the NWT and Nunavut pursuing full-time aviation-related studies such as airline or airport operations or management, aircraft maintenance or pilot training. Deadline: Contact the NWT Department of Transportation Kenn Borek Memorial Scholarship Value: $4,000 Available: One Organization: Kenn Borek Air Ltd. Eligibility: Applicants must be Canadian citizens and reside in the NWT, Nunavut, the Yukon, British Columbia or Alberta, be between 18 and 30 years of age, pursuing pilot or aircraft maintenance training at an aviation program at an accredited post-secondary institution. Deadline: March 31 Northern Aviation Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Yellowknife Community Foundation Eligibility: This fund was established to support individuals from the NWT or Nunavut pursuing a post-secondary education in the aviation industry. Deadline: May 15 Arctic Co-operatives Award Value: $2,500 Available: One Organization: Association of Canadian Universities of Northern Studies Eligibility: Applicants must be pursuing studies focused on the understanding and development of Arctic co-operatives in Nunavut, the NWT or Northern Manitoba. Deadline: Jan. 31 Caribou Research and Management Award Value: $1,500 to $5,000 Available: One Organization: Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies Eligibility: Applicants must be pursuing masters or doctorate studies – either traditional knowledge or scientific – which contribute to the understanding of barren-ground caribou and their habitat. Deadline: Jan. 30 Northern Resident Award Value: $5,000 Available: Eight Organization: Association of Canadian Universities of Northern Studies Eligibility: Applicants must have resided in Nunavut, NWT, the Yukon or the Provincial North for at least eight years and be enrolled in full-time post-secondary education at the undergraduate level involving a Northern community partner who will directly benefit from the project work. Deadline: Jan. 30 POLAR Northern Resident Scholarship Value: $10,000 Available: Four Organization: Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies Eligibility: Applicants must have resided in Nunavut, the NWT, the Yukon or the provincial North for at least eight years and be enrolled in full-time post-secondary education at the undergraduate level whose program makes a contribution to the North. Deadline: Jan. 31 Post-Secondary Student Support Program Value: Up to $35,000 per full-time student per year Available: Numerous Continued on next page


Degrees of Success

Monday, March 5, 2018 19

photo courtesy of Agnico Eagle Mines Ltd.

Caribou bedded down by core boxes at the Meliadine gold mine site outside Rankin Inlet. The Caribou Research and Management Award offers scholarships of $1,500 to $5,000 to one applicant pursuing masters or doctorate studies – either traditional knowledge or scientific – which contribute to the understanding of barren-ground caribou and their habitat. Continued from previous page

Organization: Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada Eligibility: For treaty/status First Nation and Inuit postsecondary students who have resided in Canada for 12 consecutive months before the date of their application, but who reside outside their territory and are no longer eligible to be funded by their territory. Deadline: Contact local band office or the Inuit designated organization. Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut Scholarships Value: $1,500 Available: Two Organization: Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut Eligibility: Available to post-secondary students pursuing further education in the chartered accountant profession. Applicants must submit a letter detailing reasons why they should be awarded the scholarship, extra-curricular activities, future goals, and intention to pursue a CA designation. Applicants must be a resident of the NWT or Nunavut. One scholarship will be awarded to a student of aboriginal descent. Deadline: Oct. 31

Ekati Plus Post-Secondary Scholarship Value: $2,500 Available: Two Organization: Dominion Diamonds Eligibility: Northern residents accepted or enrolled in fulltime post-secondary education. Deadline: Sept. 30 Gil Purcell Memorial Journalism Scholarship Value: $4,000 Available: One Organization: The Canadian Press Eligibility: Awarded to an aboriginal Canadian who is enrolled in a Canadian university or community college in a journalism program or actively involved in a news organization associated with the institution. Applicants are encouraged to submit samples of their journalism activity. Deadline: Nov. 1 Captain Nichola K S Goddard Memorial Graduate Scholarship Value: $5,000 Available: One Organization: University of Calgary Eligibility: Open to students registered in a full-time graduate program. Candidates must be citizens of Papua New

Guinea or Afghanistan or members of Canada's First Nations, Inuit or Metis people. Deadline: Feb. 1 Canadian Northern Studies Trust Awards Program Value: up to $10,000 Available: One Organization: Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies Eligibility: Intended to advance knowledge of Canada's North and enhance educational opportunities for Northern residents. To qualify you must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, enrolled in full time post-secondary education and have an aspect of northern or circumpolar fieldwork included as part of your research. Deadline: Jan. 31 Dominion Diamonds IBA scholarships Value: Confidential Available: Varies Organization: Dominion Diamonds Eligibility: Students in communities that are part of Dominion Diamonds' impact benefits agreements are encouraged to contact their IBA representative for details. Deadline: Varies


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Degrees of Success

Degrees of Success 2018  
Degrees of Success 2018