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INSIDE NEWS

INSIDE OPINION

INSIDE CULTURE

INSIDE SPORTS

Students go Without

Expensive Eatery

Fall Music Preview

Basketball’s Back

As healthcare affects the United States, students continue to find ways to be insured

Why those who wish to eat on campus deserve better meal prices and options

A review on the most anticipated, upcoming albums that will be released before the end of the year

An analysis of the returning players and a look at what Coach Menzies is doing to prepare his team

New Mexico State University

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Vol. 123 No. 9 | nmsuroundup.com

Green sweeps NMSU campus There are

13

The average person uses

GREEN

80-100

buildings on campus

$619, 000

gallons of water a DAY.

10

There are water bottle refill stations around NMSU campus.

electricity bill in August 2012 by Anthony Albidrez Staff Writer The Office of Sustainability promotes energy and waste reduction across New Mexico State University and will spread the word about being “green” on Wednesday for the second annual Campus Sustainability Day. joni newcomer (sic), manager of Environmental Policy and Sustainability, lives a green lifestyle and shares her determination and knowledge throughout NMSU. “Sustainability is who we are, it is what we do because we are conscious and we care,” newcomer said. The Office of Sustainability targets campus environmental issues in order to resolve them, such as water waste reduction and energy reduction.

NMSU has 10 water-bottle filling stations throughout campus, which prevented 132,610 plastic bottles from entering the landfill since the installation during the summer of 2012. According to OoS in 2012, NMSU reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 2 percent and reduced energy consumption by 5.4 percent with actions such as getting NMSU certified as a bicycle friendly campus, converting to LED lights and recycling numerous objects. Forty percent of NMSU energy is created on campus at the central utility plant. The other 60 percent is purchased from El Paso Electric. According to OoS, the August

2012 electricity bill stood at about $619,000. The NMSU campus uses about 2 million gallons of water daily, and the NMSU golf course uses about 1 million gallons of drinkable water daily,. Low flow facets and showerheads have been installed in student housing to help reduce the amount of water usage. NMSU also has 13 green buildings on campus. On Oct. 16, OoS hosted a poster-making party, where students created posters made from reused resources and created original posters with facts regarding the environment. “It makes me happy to share the movement going around

sustainability,” said Sativa Cruz, president of the Environmental Science Student Organization. From 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. during Campus Sustainability Day, the posters will be hung on the trees outside the west-side of the Corbett Center Rotunda. At this location, OoS will inform students how they can make a difference by taking actions, such as shopping with reusable bags, using a reusable water bottle, taking the bus, walking or riding a bike to school, turning off electronics when not in use and reducing your waste by recycling. From noon to 1:30 p.m., there will be a webinar and discussion on climate adaptation in the Cor-

bett Center Senate Gallery. Leaders of campus sustainability will speak about green campus life, and afterword there will be a discussion of environmental topics and ways NMSU can evolve into a greener campus. From 6 p.m to 9 p.m., there will be a panel called “Climate Adaptation: Resilient Campuses and Communities,” where NMSU faculty will share ideas on the future of sustainability on campus. OoS strongly suggests being aware of the human impact on the planet for future generations and getting involved to spread the awareness.

Extra flex point funds aid university program by Rebecca Mendez Staff Writer Students who arrive to universities have a choice to buy meals at the dining hall and many purchase meal plans to defer these costs, but when the semester ends the money often times doesn’t return to the student’s pocket. According to a report by the Student Press Law Center, there are students who lose thousands of dollars every school year in unused dining meals dollars. However, what the leftover money is used for varies from university to university.

In the SPLC report, students at Washington State University collectively lost $43,000 in the 20092010 school year. WSU policy for unused funds is to carry the points over to the following semester as long as students remain in the residence hall system. Students at the University of Washington lost more than $90,000 in 2009-2010 school year. UW policy states unused money is forfeited at the end of an academic school year and becomes the property of the university. Sodexo Area Marketing Coordinator Katrina Miner said the

unused flex points are given back to New Mexico State University. “Sodexo does not get the unused money,” Miner said. “It goes back to the university, which is not uncommon in other universities.” Miner said for the meal plans that are purchased in fall for the academic year allow points to roll over to the spring. “The university doesn’t have a summer meal plan at the moment,” Miner said. “That is why we really start to notify students to use up their points in the spring.” Auxiliary Services Assistant Vice President Tammy Anthony said the unused money that is giv-

en back to NMSU is used to fund the food service program. “It’s to continue funding the meals plans for the next academic school year,” Anthony said. However, there are students who say it’s almost like a job to use up the points. Junior, criminal justice major Payton Preast said using the rest of his points was a lot of work. “I had to randomly go to Taos just to use them all up,” Preast said. “Even when I wasn’t hungry, I had to do it to get my money’s worth. At NMSU, Sodexo encourages students to use all of their flex

points. Meal plans are categorized based on how much time a student spends on campus; however, freshmen living on campus are required to have a meal plan. The Aggie Unlimited plan allows unlimited entrances to Taos plus $100 in Aggie Dining Dollars ($1,618 per semester). Aggie Choice plan has 230-230 entrances to Taos plus $325 in Aggie Dining Dollars ($1,575 per semester). The Aggie plan allows 64-74 entrances to Taos plus $325 Flex Points ($763 per semester). The Pistol plan allows $400 in Aggie Dining Dollars ($350 per semester)


October 22, 2013

2

Changes to healthcare continue to impact students by Anthony Albidrez Staff Writer Due to the high price of health insurance, a large amount of young Americans are forced to live without, but the introduction of the Affordable Care Act Oct. 1 may change that problem. Massive health benefits apply to uninsured young Americans, but understanding the ACA can be complicated. “The ACA is allowing you to look at all the insurance options and compare them with a student plan, state health insurance exchanges and your parent’s plan,” said Lori McKee, executive director at the New Mexico State University Health and Wellness Center. McKee said about 20 percent of NMSU students are uninsured. The campus Health Center of-

fers students an injury and sickness insurance plan underwritten by United Health Care Insurance Company for an annual fee of $1,231. This is additional money that is not taken out of student fees. The coverage includes preventive care services including annual physicals, gynecology exams, routine screenings and some immunizations. The coverage does not cover supplies and treatment for acne, dental treatment, elective abortion, hearing examinations, eye examinations, eyeglasses, contact lenses, sleep disorders, chronic pain disorders and addiction. McKee said the student health coverage offered by the Campus Health center is based on what

you need to get through school. According to younginvincible. org, 19 million young adults across the United States do not have basic healthcare. Under the regulation of the ACA, students will not be denied health coverage because of pre-existing conditions, and depending on the state, students may be eligible for free Medicaid coverage. By law, young adults can remain on their parent’s health insurance up to the age of 26 whether they are married, financially independent, attending school or no longer living with their parents. This policy has allowed about 3.1 million young adults to remain on their parent’s health plan, according to USA Today. Young people are more likely to

be healthy, but they do need accessible medical care for preventive treatment, regular check-ups and occasional health hiccups. Some cancers are diagnosed during young ages such as breast cancer and testicular cancer. Affordable health insurance would allow young people to schedule regular doctors visits and from there take further actions without the fear of debt or denied services. According to npr.org, “If you're a full-time student and you're not working, or if you're working just parttime, you probably don't earn enough to trigger the requirement to have health insurance.” Almost every U.S. citi-

zen is required have insurance by Jan. 1, 2014 or a penalty of $95 may be applied to the individual. “I’m worried about the price of healthcare, since me and my family don’t have health insurance,” said Aurora Rodriguez, NMSU junior. According to younginvincivles.org, 36 percent of 18 to 24-year-olds lack health coverage.

*Photo Illustration by Fernanda Teixeira

Submission Policy

The Round Up welcomes submissions for publication. Submissions can be dropped off, faxed or emailed. Submissions become propery of The Round Up and will not be returned. The Round Up reserves the right to edit articles and cannot gaurantee publication,

7 city blocks. 300+ vendors. All great reasons to love your LOCAL Farmers and Crafts Market of Las Cruces.

Advertising Policy

The Round Up welcomes paid advertisements for legal products and services. The Round Up does not accept ads deemed discriminatory by the editor. Any advertisement that might be confused with editorial content must be clearly labeled (paid advertisement.) Positions of ads cannot be guaranteed. The Round Up reserves the right to refuse publication of any advertisement.

About Us The Round Up is published during the academic year by the students for the university community. Corrections of the print edition will be made of www. nmsuroundup.com. Editorial content of the enwsoaoer is independent of advertising content. Opinions expressed in The Round Up are not necessarily those of the staff, New Mexico State University or the Associated Students of ASNMSU Box 3004, Dept. CC New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 Phone 575-646-6397 Fax 575-646-5557 All staff writers, Executive News Producers and editors can be reached at truprint@ nmsu.edu

EBT/WIC Accepted!


News

October 22, 2013

3

University celebrates homecoming by Anthony Albidrez

order to check in. This community service event gives students the chance to assemble and participate in the cleaning of the Aggie community. The first NMSU homecoming This week, New Mexico State Tasks of the event include painting, to attend this year’s Keep State Great — the a two- and picking up garbage around the University is celebrating 125 years was in 1926 and was onlycleaning volunteer-based clean up project around of establishment after opening the day celebration, but throughout NMSU campus. Other tasks also include campus. years the homecoming be- bird droppings. college in 1888. The beautification ofthe removing campus is hosted by came a weeklong event. NMSU had the been established “I participate in Keep State Great because Associated Students of New Mexico State The idea of Pistol Pete was crefor five years before the first footI like doing something beneficial for the University that will strike campus Saturday. ated in 1973 at a home football ball team was created. After the campus,” said junior Rebecca Levine. Check-in time is scheduled at 9 a.m. at game against Utah State. creation, the rivalry against UniStudents are encouraged to get involved the Corbett Outdoor Stage located outside in the community service. Last year’s Keep Some of the more recent versity of New Mexico began. Garcia Hall. State Great achieved the participation of 900 One tradition Sign-in of NMSU that homecoming traditions are the tables will be available at the meetvolunteers. began in 1920 was the painting of bonfire and a concert hosted ing location where groups can check in. the “A” on Tortugas“Student Mountain. It by the groups Associated organizations, of Students ofStudents are advised to be punctual to the check-in time, be courteous to fellow particiNMSU. started as an Aprilfriends Fool’sorjoke as individuals are encouraged to pants, refrain from explicit language, wear This year’s theme is “NMSU: students would go (register),” up the mounsaid Chelsea McCoy, director appropriate clothing for outdoor work, colThe Wild West” and was chosen tain to paint the “A.” To this day, of Community Outreach for ASNMSU. laborate with fellow volunteers and complete last semester by the Homecoming the “A” is still visible“This as sign of Agyear we are also reaching out high the task while having fun. Review Board, a committee of gie pride. school students who are interested in Another importantvolunteering.” tradition of students, faculty and staff. “It feels great organizing an event such homecoming is the singing of the volunteer “It is aninopportunity If participants a group, to as Keep State Great,” McCoy said. “It is awesome knowing that so many students are Aggie fight song. The the songentire first apcelebrate with theinuniversity that group must be present peared in The Round Up in 1921 prepared me for my career and while the United States was going show my school spirit,” said through prohibition and “a keg of Charlotte Tallman, senior alumni booze” was illegal. The lyrics of relations officer. Upcoming events include a the fight song have not changed since that time, and many NMSU movie night, bonfire, parade and alumni said they still know all the athletic events. Visit alum.nmsu. lyrics. edu for more information.

by Lillian Bowe and Staff Writer Amaya Worthem Staff Writers More than 800 participants are expected

3

october 15, 2013

news

excited and willing to give back to their campus. I love having the opportunity to plan such an event where students can show their appreciation for this university.”

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Forbes reports best and worst careers of 2013

by Rebecca Mendez Staff Writer College is the main prerequisite to get a job in America. During academic school years, 2020, students might acquire jobs in any adding store to make money or pursue 69,700 internships in their field of study. new jobs to America’s vision of successful the field. careers, however, is changing. Forbes named the most stressAccording to an article by ful job of 2013 enlisted military Forbes.com, career guidance personnel, and CareerCast website CareerCast.com recently ranked it as the third worst job evaluated 200 professions of a this year because “their lives are wide variety of industries, skill on the line, daily,” said Tony Lee, levels and salary ranges to decide publisher of CareerCast.com. the best and worst jobs of 2013. “They are away from home for CareerCast.com used a fourlong stretches of time and with core criteria measurement for the draw-down, many are being each job: pay, outlook, work pushed out of the military even environment and stress. Career- studies The Department ofmake Government Join us for an orientation to graduate though they want to it a offers a nationally-accredited Cast.com gatheredofdata from the in the Department Government at NMSUcareer,” Lee said. Masters in Public Census Bureau, United States Administration and an MA also said the(MPA) profession Thursday October 24, 2013, 5.00-6.00 pm Lee in Government. Each program is Bureau of Labor Statistics, trade designed provide a broad that has been to ranked among the Breland 358 foundation in the discipline of association studies and other worst jobs were news reporters. political science, while sources. encouraging students pursue According to Lee, this istodue to areas of particular interest. The website broke each catlow pay, high levels of stress from Whether you are looking for a egory into elements and gave each working undertodeadlines and the degree enhance your element points. In the final result, requirement professional or the to becareer on duty 24/7. opportunity to carry out a higher point total reported a less Thein-depth BLS predicts theonnumber research nationalof desirable job, and a lower score or international issues, the traditional printofnewspapers Department Government rewill reflected a more desirable one. help you achieve your porter jobs will decline 6 goals. percent Today.com rated software Contact: Dr. Neilhowever, Harvey, 646-3220; by 2020, thatnharvey@nmsu.edu does not engineer as one of the best jobs include media reporting. because it is a low-stress, highAssociate professor of journalpaying job that is diverse since it ism, Mary Lamonica, Ph.D., constantly works with developdisagrees with this report. ing technology. Positions are “I think that is a very shortexpected to increase by about 32 sided observation,” Lamonica percent by 2018, according to the said. “Journalism transitions with BLS. the times. Mon. 6pm - Tier 1Providing Yu-Gi-Ohthe news is U.S. News ranked pharmacy still important I wouldn’t be Tues. 6pm - Pokemonor & Kaijudo in the No. 3 slot because of the teaching it.” Wed. 6pm - Magic Gathering unique mix of medical knowlSome other careers listed Comics - Miniatures edge and people skills. Plus, Thurs. the 12pm under the “worst jobs” category requirement to run a pharmacy Fri. 6pm Friday Magic and dairy Apparel are actor, oilNight rig worker counter is always in demand.Sat. BLS 1pm Heroclix Tournaments farmer. Statues predicts a 25.4 percent employSun. Closed Collectibles ment growth for pharmacists by 1300 El Paseo Suite E1 Event Schedule

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october 22, 2013

Food unreasonably priced for students by Otto Nicli Staff Writer New Mexico State University isn’t known for having reasonable prices for food, which is irritating for students who are trying to save money. The most common choices for food are inside Corbett Center Student Union, even though the options are scarce and the prices are too high for the quality of food. At Chick-fil-A, the price for a full meal reaches up to $9, which is about $3 more than if one was to buy Chick-fil-A outside of NMSU. This could possibly be caused because of the cost of rent

for the restaurant to actually function in Corbett. The best option for food might be the convenience store outside of Corbett. Fountain drinks, cup noodles, hot pockets and other simple microwaveable foods are available. There aren’t many other options for students who don’t have flex points or a meal plan; all their options are overpriced and not very filling. So what is a hungry student to do when the options are slim? That’s the question many students ask themselves every day. Either they eat junk food, something they brought from home or don’t eat anything at all.

NMSU should take initiative to give students, who aren’t on a meal plan, more frugal and healthy food options. If NMSU worked out a plan with more franchises, or local businesses, to operate on campus without charging the students extra, then this problem would near a solution. That might be a difficult task to complete, but it is necessary for the growing concern of the hungry students of NMSU.

46

The Round Up Staff Alexandra Von Wolff Executive Director Jesca Cervantes Managing Editor Ashely DeMott Advertising Manager Michelle Tejeda Director of Finance Allison McCollister Director of Marketing

Executive News Producers Bethany Blundell Kevin Culver Andrea Rojas Designers Ana Ayon Garson Lamb David Loera Fernanda Teixeira

Groups should partake in homecoming by Jocelyn Apodaca Staff Writer The tradition of homecoming draws in hundreds of alumni each year who celebrate the week with a parade, dinners and football events, but hardly any students get involved. When it comes to homecoming involvement, it seems as though only the Greeks, the Aggie Pride band and our football team participate, but where are all the other sports teams, groups, clubs and organizations? The Greeks spend countless mandatory hours building their extravagant floats, preparing choreography, skits, costumes and an open house. All of this time and energy spent for a 10-minute drive down University Avenue for a chance at yearlong bragging rights, but homecoming would be more fun if the competition spread to more organizations. Our university is thriving with various clubs and groups. We have more than 12 catego-

ries of organizations, not including the multitude of sports and academic teams. At the University of New Mexico, there is a campus decoration, which is a great idea to get all parts of campus involved. If NMSU started a campus-wide contest that extended to more than a door competition, the homecoming atmosphere would diversify. Currently, we judge the parade in two categories, one with an organization holding more than 30 members and one with less than 30 members. Texas Tech University has two separate categories as well, but separate the Greeks from other student organizations. Separating the Greeks keeps the competition amongst themselves and allows smaller clubs and organizations to have a fair chance of taking first place in one of the categories. If groups approached homecoming in the same fashion as community service, there would be a higher turnout and probably more funding to

back the week’s events. With some small changes to how we usually do things, homecoming can involve the entire campus and bring unity.

How do feel about Homecoming? ONLINE Read more at

nmsuroundup.com

Josue Marquez, Sophomore

Katy Pedone, Junior

Brandon Easterday, Junior

“What’s Homecoming?”

“Not that I don’t like it, just never really knew about it.”

“Never participated. I don’t hate it though.”

Anthony Quiterio, Junior “Think its chill, but I’m not in a Frat. I don’t really participate.”


october 22, 2013

5

HOROSCOPES AUTUMN WORD SEARCH

VIRGO Try for changes in everyday routines and in your career. Be open to a range of new ideas, some of which may knock you off your complacent perch.

LIBRA The intellect collapses tomorrow, to be taken over by fabulous instincts. There is nothing like Libran instinct - and the only thing stopping it is your refusal to believe in its existence.

SCORPIO The communication planet is in your sign, revving up your skills and exploring your genius. This planet goes into reverse tomorrow, but that doesn’t mean you cease to be brilliant.

CAPRICORN The latest surges of transformation are taking you places you never thought you’d go. Mostly the direction is inward, as you rethink your beliefs and goals.

AQUARIUS You haven’t the vaguest idea what you’re doing, or why. Which is perfectly fine because this week you have planetary permission to transmute into an airhead.

PISCES ACORN APPLE BIRD MIGRATION BLOWING LEAVES BLUSTERY DAY CANNING CHESTNUTS CHILLY

COLD CROPS EQUINOX FALL FARMING FEAST FROST HALLOWEEN

HARVEST HAYSTACK HICKORY NUTS LONGER NIGHTS NOVEMBER OCTOBER ORANGE LEAVES PIE

PUMPKIN RAKE RED LEAVES SCARECROW SCHOOL SEASON SEPTEMBER SHORTER DAYS

SQUASH SWEET POTATOES THANKSGIVING TURKEY WINDY YELLOW LEAVES

Your thoughts have turned inward and you need solitude. Your thoughts are powerful, so use this time to create good ones. Everything else is working as it should.

ARIES You’re looking at vague promises, old debts and ancient guilts. This could drive you nuts. So, pay the bills that must be paid, hide your wallet, examine your conscience for real issues, and tell everyone to take a hike.

TAURUS

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PROFESSOR ON REVIEW Fumi Arakawa, Ph.D., teaches a myriad of archaeology and anthropology courses. Originally from Nagoya, Japan, Arakawa moved to the United States when he was 19 years old. He received his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree from the University of Idaho and his doctorate from Washington State University. “I love to teach anthropology,” Arakawa said, “because I have come to believe that understanding other cultures and peoples is crucial and helps students to engage in more tolerant attitudes toward other ethnic or racial groups.” Arakawa has vast experience in archaeological fieldwork, specifically in the Pueblo cultures that are present in New Mexico and its surrounding areas. He has also led excavations in Idaho and Oregon and is currently the principal investigator of the Montezuma Canyon Project. “Teaching archaeology is fun because archaeology consists of fieldwork, data analysis, and interpretation of material remains and many students are interested in it because of this sense of discovery,” Arakawa said. Arakawa teaches introduction to anthropology, introduction to archaeology, archaeological method and theory, advanced American Southwest prehistory and archaeology and pueblo culture of the American Southwest (which includes a Field Trip to the Four-Corners’ Area).

Listen Up! We’re the Kids by Parade of Lights

In this new, light and upbeat song, Parade of Lights leaves the listener feeling as though the summer is eternal. The electro band is from Los Angels and is currently getting a lot of radio play on alternative radio stations.

The mood improves as you focus on fun and creativity. The black depressions are gone, replaced by a conviction that you can sail through anything. And so you can.

GEMINI

Chocolate by the 1975

You need help with your finances as it is not one of your skills. Unless, of course, you decide to ignore the problem and hope, as usual, that it will go away by itself.

Trojans by Atlas Genius

Just because no one can figure out how your mind works doesn’t mean it’s not working. This is the time to pay attention to that inner voice.

The English and indie band has been together since 2002, but are slowly transferring to the American radio. The song is short but simple and is a good listen if you want to take a night drive.

If you don’t know this band already, they deserve a listen. They formed in 2009 but are topping the charts and currently touring in the area. “Trojans” is a calm song with elements of upbeat indie rock.

Let It Go by The Neighbourhood

Lyrically, The Neighbourhood is advancing music farther than most. The song is somewhat at a slow pace but is great to relax or have in the background.

CANCER

LEO There is no prince waiting to carry you off on his horse. Nor is Aphrodite poised to teach you the secrets of eternal love. So calm down. Fantasy is the source of creativity.

SAGITTARIUS You’re looking fabulous and are pleased with yourself. Sure, there are niggling doubts in the dark corners but, for now, sunshine is all you can see. Timeslive.co.za/entertainment/horoscopes/


6

october 22, 2013

Ending the year on a good note Upcoming must-listen albums by Otto Nicli Staff Writer

review

Although 2013 is nearly over, some of the best albums are still to come. Bands such as Arcade Fire, Los Campesinos!, Sky Ferreira and M.I.A. will release their highly anticipated albums in the coming months. M.I.A.’s new album “Matangi” will finally release Nov. 5, nine months after the release of “Bad Girls,” the album’s single. This album is one of the most anticipated albums of 2013 by crit-

ics, and for a good time it was believed by many in the music industry that it wouldn’t be released any time soon. Thankfully, M.I.A. decided to take matters into her own hands. She tweeted she would leak the album if her record label didn’t announce a release date soon, which prompted her label Interscope to respond almost instantly with the upcoming date. Sky Ferreira’s debut album “Night Time, My Time” will be released Oct. 29. This album follows Ferreira’s two previous EPs, which are reminis-

cent of the ’80s, and will potentially live up to the expectation Ferreira has become accustomed to. British indie-pop band Los Campesinos! returns on the Oct. 29 with their fifth album “No Blues.” The follow up to 2011’s “Hello Sadness,” “No Blues” seems like a change of pace for the band, this time being hopefully more optimistic than their previous album. Arcade Fire, the indie rock band, will release their anticipated album, “Reflektor,” Oct. 29. The Arcade Fire will return three years after their third album; “The Suburbs” won the Emmy for Album of the Year. The title track and first single, the seven-minute masterpiece

“Reflektor,” has already put everyone into a whirlwind reminiscent of 1970s roller rinks. “Reflektor” is a golden example of how perfectly the Arcade Fire can reinvent themselves from album to album, always yielding an incredibly original sound. The title track and the songs from the Roman Coppola directed short film “Here Comes The Nighttime”

shows Arcade Fire in top form, their return will be welcomed brilliantly.

Leave your keys at home and leave the driving to us! Ride the Crimson Coach all around town on Friday and Saturday nights. Hop on at any one of our convenient stop locations and let your night begin! The Coach goes to Casa B, The Grove, Dublins, De La Vegas, Buffalo Wild Wings, The Game, and on Campus at Garcia Hall and runs from 9 pm until the night ends (usually around 3 am). You can get ON the Coach at any of the seven stops, but you can get OFF the Coach ANYWHERE along the route! Just tell the driver and they will do their best to get you to the closest safe location to your destination. Maps, rules and regulations can be found on the ASNMSU website: asnmsu.nmsu.edu

Ride the Crimson Coach

Ride the Crimson Coach

Visit nmsu roundup .com

Ride the Crimson Coach

Ride the Crimson Coach


October october 22, 15, 2013

culture

7

How one NMSU student became a state-wide story by Lillian Bowe Staff Writer Matt Zajac, 26, became a double amputee after serving his country in the Army, and in May 2007 decided he wanted to earn a degree in mechanical engineering. The subject may be intimidating to some, but Zajac said he loves it and there are always “puzzles to solve” in his major. While visiting Las Cruces during Thanksgiving, Zajac decided

to tour New Mexico State University and look at the engineering department. “I was really impressed by the engineering department, so I came to NMSU,” Zajac said. Zajac was no stranger to Las Cruces as his grandmother, Marjorie Seedorf, 87, lives in town. A few months ago, after the passing of his father, Zajac became the sole provider for his grandmother. “I don’t know what would have

happened if had gone to school in another state,” he said. Zajac is currently a sophomore and is only taking one class while he takes care of his grandmother. That was also his reason for missing out of the $2,000 prize during the Sept. 28 Aggie football game against San Diego State University. Zajac heard he missed out on the prize from his girlfriend’s coworker who was at the game. “I was not upset that I did not

get the money, and I did not think it was a big deal at all,” Zajac said. “The rules were that you had to be at the game, and I wasn’t there.” The news of Zajac missing out on the prize money caught the media’s attention. Mark Chavez, founder of a University of New Mexico fan website thelobolair. com, started a campaign to raise money for Zajac. The website collected about $2,000 for Zajac quickly. But Za-

jac said he did nothing to deserve it and holds no resentment to NMSU students for not raising the money themselves. Zajac decided to take half of the money and donate it to the Fisher House Foundation, which houses family members of wounded veterans during the veteran’s time at the hospital. Zajac is currently awaiting a charitable donation from the Veterans United Foundation.

Survivor raises funds for cancer scholarship

evenings to do some work in the green house and other things,” Photo Courtesy by Fruitvale Station Film Kilcrease said. “It was still important, and is now, to be in school and come out cancer free.” On October 10, 2011, Kilcrease finished chemotherapy treatment. “I’m very happy, “Kilcrease by Jesca Cervantes & Bethanysaid. Blundell “ Three months cancer free Managing Editor & News Editor and going strong.” Kilcrease said he wanted to start the scholarship for several reasons. Commentary “I saw that there were many Although “Fruitvale Station” re- ofmental, the town and later into a James Kilcrease named his dog physical and grew financial ceived acclaimed awards nationwide subject of interest Kimocritically after enduring his therapy burdens for just about anyonebefrom film was cause thethrough numerous videos formany cancer.festivals, courtesythe photo whoof goes cancer andwitdenied the opportunity to pre- nesses leaked to the Internet. treatments,” Kilcrease said. by Rebecca Mendez miere on big screens everywhere The case also caught the attenscholarship is specifiStaffdealing Writer with the ongoing tion The despite of another California resically for graduate students and racial issue in America. dent and African is meant to offsetAmerican, costs suchRyan as New Mexicoaudience-gripping State University Coogler, who was attending the The intense, books or supplies. It is also meant graduate student James Kilcrease, story of African American Oscar University of Southern to encourage graduate California students 27, started the Aggie CancerSta- at the time. Grant portrayed in “Fruitvale with cancer to continue with their Survivor he tion” tells aScholarship story of a after California Coogler then received rights to education. completed chemotherapy in man who was shot and killed on Grant’s to make the “It’sstory a wayinoforder recognizing October 2011.by a Bay Area Re- film. He consulted news sources, a train platform these students who have cancer the endpolice of summer gionalAtTransit officer.2011, court recordsit,” andKilcrease loved ones or survived said.for Kilcrease went for a On the night of Newcheckup Year’s Eve details of are thatpeople night, who which in“There areheproud appointment where he cluded in the film. in doctor’s 2009, Grant along with friends that you have survived and this out that he mother, was diagnosed andfound his daughter’s rode Because Coogler’s is a way ofofgiving back aresearch, little bit with testicular cancer. the train back home after ring- many of in thethese story’s details accuof light difficult circum“It was an interesting journey,” ing in the new year in the city. In rately depict Grant’s including stances. We want tolife, bring back a Kilcrease said. “I found a small transit, Grant found himself in an thesmile fact tothat mother thathis person’s faceencourwith a lump, and I made an appointaltercation with another rider. aged the group to take the train scholarship.” ment with my urologist, Mark Police were immediately called that night her birthday and that So far,onthe process of raisBieri. He checked, conducted to the scene, and the train stopped heing promised histhe daughter a tripisto funds for scholarship some tests, called me the next on its route. In an attempt to re- Chuck E. Cheese the next —a underway and $5,000 hasday been morning and told me that I would frain from a confrontation, Grant promise was never raised. that In order for thefulfilled. scholarbe going into surgery the next exited the train but encounWhile film,funds Coogler ship to making becomethe active, must day.” tered several police officers, who sought make a political statereach to $10,000. Kilcrease’s life changed within “Once we reach our goal of stopped to question him. ment. 36 hours. $10,000 we will be Within minutes of refuting acIn a PBSthen interview, he able saidtohe He recovered from surgery five distribute out someGrant’s scholarships cusations that they were involved wanted to display relaweeks later and soon began his to cancerwith survivors,” Kilcrease in three the situation, Grant and his tionships family and friends months of chemotherapy. said. “It’s an endowed, universal friends were toldhospital to remain He was in the for sitting about to portray him as a typical man. scholarship, when to we have against wall. Tension Coogler also so wanted address eight the andstation’s half hours a day five the money, it will be paid out in escalated while officers became the ongoing issue of racism days a week for treatment and evforever.” impatient the rowdy tran- America to show that many Afriery oncewith in a while on Saturdays Kilcrease is encouraging others sit for riders and Grant’s group a white blood cell booster of can Americans are killed because to give a giftacts of $1, $10, $50 and friends. of “senseless of violence.” shot. up to help the scholarship grow. Moment’s later, Officer JoThe phenomenal acting mixed “Those were the worst because “Every little bit helps,” hannes Mehserle pulled out body his with dramatic cinematography it made every muscle in my Kilcrease said. “My family and I gun, heknow laterI had claimed thatwhich I didn’t hurt,”he shows a realistic picture of an give from the money that we can thought wassaid. his “However, Taser, andI shot Kilcrease had American issue that is often left put together Grant. unsettled, giveninto thatthis in fund.” today’s soa great oncologist, Constance Kilcrease will graduate in Grant hospi- ciety cases like Grant and Trayvon Wash,was whorushed got metothethe treatment December with his doctorate tal Iwhere heand was very laterquickly.” pronounced Martin are often overlooked. needed in the Department of Plant and dead.When Kilcrease was in cheEnvironmental Sciences. The event riled up still the active citizen’s motherapy, he was in To donate, pick up a brochure school full time. He took online at the NMSU Foundation office classes to maintain his status in to mail in your donations. school. “I had my dad drive me from the hospital to school in the

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october 22, 2013

8

Basketball season returns with high hopes by Grace Gutierrez Staff Writer After winning the Western Athletic Conference championship the past two years, the New Mexico State Men’s Basketball team is expected to win the “three-peat” this year. During the Crimson vs. White Scrimmage Oct. 19, fans got to see the Aggies in action, as head coach Marvin Menzies substituted many different team combinations with 10 returning players and a variety of new recruits. Among the returning players is guard Daniel Mullings, the All WAC pre-season player of the year, who led the Aggies in points and was second in assists last year. Alongside Mullings for the third consecutive season are teammates K.C. Ross-Miller and Terrell deRouen — both guards are quick up and down the court. Also returning is Kevin Aronis who led the Aggies in three-pointers last year averaging 31 points. Making an appearance in every game last year, Aronis is a threat to opponents. “We are going to be moving the ball and be aggressive on

offense, if they are not running I will put someone in who will,” Menzies said. Center Sim Bhullar was named to the All-WAC preseason first team and the Lou Henson Preseason All-America Team. Bhullar set a single-season record with 85 blocks for NM State last season and helped the team set a team single-season record of 193 blocks. As the tallest current player in college basketball and the NBA, he sets a high standard for the rest of the Aggies. Forward Renaldo Dixon and center Tshilidzi Nephawe, both 6’10,” are returning as the eldest players on the team. After sustaining a hand injury last year, Nephawe is expected to step back into his role as a strong center by putting points on the board and getting the ball back into Aggie hands. Forwards Aaron Kubinski, Barry Remi and Matej Bouvec have also worked together for years now, giving them an upperhand. While Remi is looking to be a three-time WAC champion, all of the forwards have at least one under their belt. New to the team is 7’3” Tanveer Bhullar, who came to New

Mexico State to play with his brother and a familiar team, but Menzies has not decided whether or not Tanveer will play this season. Although the team is strong

and well-established, Menzies noted the team still has a lot of work to do to clench the threepeat. “From a fan’s perspective it was very entertaining, but from

a coach’s perspective we still have work to do,” Menzies said. “In all honesty, I thought the guys played really hard and they showed their athleticism.”

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