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Northwest Minnesota Foundation ~ Developing Community Assets ~ Serving 12 Counties SPRING 2007

Number 43

Annual Dinner Celebrates Regional Accomplishments Awards Presented for Excellence, Philanthropy, and Enhancing Quality of Place On May 3, the Northwest Minnesota Foundation board and staff hosted the annual celebration dinner, held in Bemidji this year at the Beaux Arts Ballroom on the campus of Bemidji State University. Nearly 220 people attended the event. Eric Bergeson, NMF board chair, delivered the keynote message. The theme for this year’s celebration, “Re-Imagining the Future…and all that Jazz!” was the basis of remarks by Bergeson. He discussed how the foundation is in the process of strategic planning, involving the board and staff in goal setting for the next five years. He said, “As a part of our planning process, we have been interviewing leaders throughout the region. What we have found is that times have changed. Demographers are projecting that for the first time in nearly 100 years, our area is likely to experience a population increase. We are blessed with several thriving manufacturing businesses. Our regional centers have already perked up. In the rural areas, if land prices are any indication, more people than ever want to live here, or at least own a piece of land here. “Things are looking up,” Bergeson went on to say, “and that means that our work as a foundation is going to change. Instead of attempting to create growth, which is difficult, we will spend more time and effort managing

The George Maurer Trio

growth, which is a whole lot more fun.” He added, “After years of declining population, a decline which has taken an inevitable and unfortunate toll on our institutions, economy and morale, we are now reimagining the future…looking forward to an era of growth and building.” The ‘all that jazz’ element came in the form of the evening’s entertainment, provided by the George Maurer Trio, who played a mixture of jazz favorites and original material, to the delight of all. The highlight of the evening was the pleasure of honoring the work of partners through the presentation of awards.

Community Philanthropy Award For the second year, the Northwest Minnesota Foundation has given the Community Philanthropy Award, which was created to recognize a component or community fund that is helping to build and strengthen the culture of philanthropy in the region. Along with an original sculpture award for display, the fund’s endowment receives a $1,000 donation from Northwest Minnesota Foundation.

Director Kim Wilson, (right) presented the Community Philanthropy Award to Northwest Minnesota Women’s Fund Advisory Committee Members (left to right) Jeannine Windels, Gloria Kaste, Barbara Muesing, Karen Coe, Vicki Svedarsky, and Nancy Carroll

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Eric Bergeson, Board Chairman


A Message from the President John S. Ostrem

The Northwest Minnesota Foundation invests resources, creates opportunities and promotes philanthropy to make the region a better place to live and work. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Eric Bergeson Chair Fertile Anne Sand Vice Chair Bemidji Gary Purath Secretary Red Lake Falls

The foundation has recently passed an important milestone in our service to northwest Minnesota which, I think, should not go unnoticed. For the first time in our 21-year history, our grantmaking from donor-supported component funds exceeds our traditional, discretionary grantmaking.  After completing ten months of our current fiscal year, we have already made grants totaling $703,204 from our 172 endowed component funds and $452,224 in discretionary grants from project funds.   This is significant in that it affirms a decision made ten years ago by the foundation’s board of directors -- to begin serving the region as a community foundation.  Patti Swanson, board chairperson in 1996, shared the board’s vision in a Resource article. “In this role, [the foundation] gives people the opportunity to contribute and dedicate resources for charitable purposes in a variety of areas including economic development, education, health care, the environment, social welfare, cultural heritage, and many other areas,” Swanson said.  Donors generously responded to this concept and the services offered by the foundation.  Today we manage over $12,300,020 in component fund assets.  Of these, $11,007,499 is in permanent, endowed funds.  Grants from these funds are now having a very significant impact on individuals, families, organizations, and communities as can be seen in this issue of Resource.  I would like to thank the many donors who have made the foundation’s vision a reality, and for supporting our efforts to make northwest Minnesota a better place to live and work.  

Dean Johnson Treasurer Mahnomen Terri Anderson Ogema David Bergman Thief River Falls Mark Hewitt Park Rapids

Number of Endowment Funds 200

Roger Malm Hallock

180 160

Kim Wilson Fosston

140 120

Ann Beck Bagley

100 80

Robert Hager Greenbush

60 40 20 0 FY97

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FY98

FY99

FY00

FY01

FY02

FY03

FY04

FY05

FY06

FY07


Philanthropic Services

NMF Community Foundation Role Matures

Component Fund Growth Making a Difference in Northwest Minnesota Ten years ago the Northwest Minnesota Initiative Fund made a strategic, mission-driven change. It formally changed its name to the Northwest Minnesota Foundation (NMF) and became a regional community foundation in pursuit of a goal, integral to the mission statement, to “promote philanthropy.” NMF would continue to deliver priority programs that respond to regional issues through grants, training for leadership and nonprofit boards and managers, as well as for business development. Still, the astonishing growth of our community foundation mission could not have been predicted. The measure of success for NMF as a community foundation is not simply the total assets under management - $12 million - what the total represents tells the story. It represents commitment to retain the resources that are working to enhance our region, not leaving the area forever; the $12 million invested by NMF component funds will be used within the twelve counties year after year.

It also represents resources that work for the continued success of important non-profit programs and opportunities for the next generation of residents. NMF component fund grantmaking has been growing dramatically. Current assets will sustain annual grants of at least $500,000. These represent operations and special project funding for essential community non-profits. They represent educational grants to help our schools achieve a higher level of excellence in education and more than $100,000 in scholarships helping our young people have a brighter future. Scholarships have traditionally been a priority for donors interested in education and a wonderful resource for our student population. By establishing these scholarship programs, it is likely that our youth will also realize the many opportunities that exist and bring those new skills and knowledge back to our home towns. Endowment Fund Balance 12,000,000

10,000,000

8,000,000

6,000,000

4,000,000

2,000,000

0 FY97

It represents confidence to work together and to bring efficiency and effectiveness to the administration of many diverse programs. During a week in April, new endowment contributions totaling more than $225,000 were given to NMF component funds benefiting a humane society in Lake of the Woods County, a scholarship fund in Warroad, and education and mentoring programs in Park Rapids. More than $1.9 million has been contributed to NMF component funds so far in Fiscal Year 2007.

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FY98

FY99

FY00

FY01

FY02

FY03

FY04

FY05

FY06

FY07

One sign of this is noting where our scholarship recipients attend college. The top five institutions of higher education for NMF scholarship recipients are: The University of North Dakota, Bemidji State University, Minnesota State University – Moorhead, North Dakota State University and Northland Community and Technical College in Thief River Falls. All are located in or near our region. NMF’s role and expertise as a community foundation, the varied purposes of its component funds, and the active grantmaking of these funds all combine to truly make a difference in northwest Minnesota – this impact is helping northwest Minnesota become a better place to live and work.

NMF became a regional community foundation in pursuit of a goal, integral to the mission statement, to “promote philanthropy”.


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The fund receiving the award has shown substantial growth. The fund advisory committee is a cohesive group that meets regularly, promotes the fund and the culture of philanthropy in their community. They have worked hard to achieve the mission and goals of the fund.

“...We are now re-imagining the future... looking forward to an era of growth and building.” Eric Bergeson, NMF Board Chair

This year’s recipient is the Northwest Minnesota Women’s Fund. In February 1997, the Board of the Northwest Minnesota Foundation became one of the most visionary, progressive community foundations in the State by establishing a Women’s Fund. In its lifetime, over $270,000 has been raised and pledged to the endowment and project funds. Annually, grants are awarded to qualified programs and projects that benefit women and girls.

Board Vice-Chair Anne Sand with Excellence in Leadership recipient Robin Wold.

The Ruth Edevold Organizational Excellence Award was presented to Mahube Community Council. This award is given to an organization or agency whose staff or board members have attended a foundation sponsored training program, participated in the Nonprofit Excellence Program, or received a grant from the foundation and as a result, made changes to significantly improve the effectiveness of their organization or services to the people of the region.

Excellence Awards The Ruth Edevold Excellence in Leadership award was presented to Robin Wold. This award is given to individuals who have participated in the foundation’s Leadership Development Program and then returned to their job, their volunteer activities and their community actively using the skills they learned.

Mahube Community Council is this year’s recipient. Mahube is a private, nonprofit community action agency serving Hubbard, Mahnomen and Becker Counties. Since 1965, Mahube has operated programs designed to assist low-income families in gaining the skills they need to succeed as individuals, parents, and community members such as Head Start, Early Head Start, Child Care Resource and Referral, Energy Assistance, Weatherization, and Supportive Housing services.

Wold attended the Leadership workshop in 1995, the Leadership 2 refresher session in 1999, and Valuing Diversity in 1998, along with completing the Individual Excellence Series of workshops and receiving her certificate in 2005. In addition, as executive director of Hope House, she attended the Organizational Excellence Workshop and requested an assessment that was conducted in September of 2005, then addressed a recommendation from the Organizational Assessment Report. Her organization serves as the community support program for people with serious and persistent mental illness. It has grown to provide more extensive services with Wold’s leadership. Hope House continues to work on prevention and crisis skills, including healthy lifestyle skills such as exercise, nutrition, and health education, which help to reduce or eliminate the need for hospitalization. Wold is a great example of someone who has truly taken her career and her organization to the next level through the development of leadership skills. She credits the training she received through the foundation for helping her become more focused and able to manage her stressful workload.

Director Dean Johnson presented the Organizational Excellence award to Leah Pigatti, executive director of Mahube.

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Leah Pigatti became the Executive Director of Mahube in 2000. Pigatti’s vision and leadership have brought much of the success that the organization has earned over the years, all the while keeping in mind Mahube’s mission – to work for the success of the people being served, by helping them gain the knowledge to work, live and govern themselves. For example, since Pigatti began directing the organization, active grants grew from $9.8 million to almost $17 million. Mahube has tripled the housing program and housing staff. She was instrumental in bringing $1.7 million to serve the long term homeless, not only in her own region, but in surrounding counties as well.

Director Mark Hewitt, St. Joseph’s Area Health Services CEO Ben Koppelman, and medical professionals Amy Morris and RaeAnn Mayer.

With financial support from NMF and others, a Community Dental Clinic located in Park Rapids provided a room for a Public Health Nurse to give information on dental health and other public health issues to patients and families receiving services through Medical Assistance or Minnesota Care. The concept of a hospitalsponsored, public health dental clinic was the first of its kind. There was none other like it in the state, according to Dr. Daniel Rose, the project’s innovator. The program incorporated the hospital, public health and a dental clinic, which is what made it so unique. Since being established, the program has been replicated in other communities and is serving as a model.

In addition, Pigatti developed a partnership with the Becker County HRA to bring a permanent housing project to a city in her region. Mahube has the only Child Passenger Resource Center in the State of Minnesota thanks to Leah’s support. It is also a leader in the area of providing support to grandparents who are raising their grandchildren. And this impressive list goes on. The foundation has been a partner with Mahube in numerous grant projects and programs, including Emergency Assistance, which provides heating fuel funding, Gaining the Edge-Next Steps program, Hubbard County Crisis Nursery, Park Rapids Living at Home, and the Crisis Care Program, among others.

Overall, this project has provided dental education to over 1,000 students, including preschool through high school, in community child care settings, to 650 Women, Infants and Children program participants, and 200 new mothers. Screening and education sessions were also held in Laporte.

Pigatti has surrounded herself with excellent staff that produces quality work. She firmly believes that no one agency can get the job done; it is only by partnering that success is achieved.

Quality of Place Awards As the foundation works on planning for the next five years, the strategy for programs and development will remain focused on Quality of Place. Following along these lines, last year the foundation created a new award, named the Quality of Place award. The purpose is to recognize the foundation’s partners, grantees, training participants, and loan clients who have helped to develop community assets. Through their work, they enhance the quality of places in the region. The recipients receive a specially designed plaque and select a nonprofit in our region to receive a $1,000 grant.

A foundation grant to the program was supplemented by grant funds from NMF’s Park Rapids Early Childhood Initiative, which is one of ten community coalitions working to make northwest Minnesota the best place to raise kids who are ready and able to learn.

This year, St. Joseph’s Area Health Services received a Quality of Place Award. They are being recognized because of their work in developing and implementing a new dental education program for infants and children in Hubbard County.

The second Quality of Place award was presented to TEAM Industries. One of our region’s premier manufacturing firms, TEAM Industries, is an engineering led organization

By providing quality dentistry in a pleasant, professional atmosphere for Minnesota public program patients, the clinic is able to treat disease, eliminate pain, establish functions, educate and refer patients. The hope is that once exams and care are done, patients can be on a scheduled preventive and maintenance program.

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“No one agency can get the job done, it is only by partnering that success is achieved.” LEAH PIGATTI, Executive Director, Mahube Community Council


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responsible for total solutions in power-train product design applications. They pride themselves on being a one-stop outsourcing partner. TEAM provides power-train solutions to a variety of markets including All-Terrain Vehicles, Snowmobiles, Automotive, Golf/Utility, On/Off-road, Agricultural & Construction, and Turf & Garden care.

For TEAM Industries, this was the Ricke vision: to create opportunities for jobs in small communities using partners that already exist in the area.

TEAM Industries began as the dream of founders Don and Bea Ricke who, in 1967, established Motek Engineering and Manufacturing. Motek, now renamed TEAM Industries-Cambridge, was the first of six facilities located throughout Minnesota.

The foundation has been a partner and a resource for TEAM. Through the years, several loans have been made for facilities in Bagley and Park Rapids, including the initial construction of plants in a new location and for expansion of existing plants. Beyond that, TEAM has added to the quality of the places it has located by supporting education through special initiatives; training and education for job applicants and employees through Teamworks; by supporting Hospice and health care, such as funding a family Hospice room at the Bagley hospital; and early childhood, through support for the “WEE Care” Child Care Center. TEAM employees have helped to build the TEAM Foundation, which provides grants for these and other causes.

It was here that Don Ricke had ideas about starting his own machine shop, and two years later, he and Bea moved the family to Cambridge to start their own business. He TEAM is also a founding industry partner and two partners, whom he would buy out in with the foundation in establishing the Ingenuity 1970, ran the machine shop, while Bea ran the Frontier project, developed to attract and office and worked as educate the best and building maintenance. brightest engineering The emergence of talent in the region, new technology in branding Northwest manufacturing and Minnesota as THE the popular demand place for applied for snowmobiles put engineers. Included TEAM-Cambridge in Ingenuity Frontier in the forefront of is a program recreational markets. partnership dear The company to TEAM and the developed a mutually Rickes – Project beneficial relationship Lead The Way, a with Polaris, one of Director Ann Beck presented the Quality of Place pre-engineering award to TEAM Industries, represented by Jim the nation’s largest curriculum for Russ, Tom Hjort and Cassie Pickett manufacturers of middle and high snowmobiles, ATVs, school students. In motorcycles and personal watercraft. addition, TEAM was instrumental in founding the Highway 2 West Corridor Manufacturers With the success of TEAM-Cambridge, Association. Ricke set out to prove that people could have good jobs and live in rural areas. In 1984, he and his son, David (now CEO) built a second facility in Audubon, seven miles west of Detroit Lakes. And in 1987, TEAM Industries-Bagley was formed and began operations at Roy Lake. In 1991, a facility was built in Bagley.

This was the Ricke vision: to create opportunities for jobs in small communities using partners that already exist in the area. The result has been a dramatic economic boost in our region. Over 200 jobs have been created in Clearwater County alone. Statistics show that the annual average unemployment rate in the county dropped from 17.6% in 1991 to nearly half as much – 9.6% in 2006, which is directly attributable to TEAM’s presence. 6

The TEAM organization IS Quality of Place. It defines what a single company can do to enhance and improve communities in rural areas, and make them the best places to live and work. Since 1993, the foundation has been recognizing the contributions of individuals and organizations in northwest Minnesota. Fifty-nine awards have been given, with an unrestricted grant from the foundation to the nonprofit of the recipients’ choice. This represents $59,000 in grant making to our partners to develop assets in our communities and improve the quality of places throughout the region. (Continued on page 7)


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Circle of Vision Awards The Circle of Vision was established to recognize those people who see the possibilities of tomorrow by acting today; who believe in their communities, and, who say “yes” when asked to share of themselves and their resources. The award is presented in recognition of current gifts, planned gifts or will bequests of $100,000 or more made in direct support of the Northwest Minnesota Foundation or any of its component funds.

$1 million mark in donations to the foundation or one of its components. To recognize this contribution, the Bill and Margaret are included as members of the Circle of Vision Leadership Society. Sadly, Margaret passed away at the age of 90 this past winter. Bill is in Warroad, surrounded by his large and loving family.

A scholarship fund has been established with a gift of $100,000 to honor the life of Dorrance H. Johnston. As a part of the Warroad Area Community Fund, it is the 14th scholarship or education-related fund that is supporting students in the Warroad area. This represents the 17th Circle of Vision award.

The Marvin’s recent gift to establish the Warroad Swim Program Fund supports programs, projects and activities associated with or supplementing the Warroad Public Schools swim program or the Warroad Outstanding Warriors Swim Club. Due to funding cuts to education, the swim program was in jeopardy. The Marvins felt it was imperative to fully fund the swim program to provide Warroad with instructors and coaches, along with the resources needed to help it thrive.

The original sculpture award representing this gift will be displayed in Warroad at the William S. Marvin Training and Visitor Center.

Dorrance H. Johnston, a 1926 graduate of Warroad High School, attended the University of Minnesota and earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering in 1931. He graduated in the midst of the Depression and was unable to obtain work in his field. 

The generosity that inspired these gifts is a tremendous contribution to the Quality of Place in the region. The foundation’s success is a result of philanthropic endeavors and its future progress will brighten the future for all of us.

Dorrance returned to Warroad and worked as a commercial fisherman and mink rancher. He used the knowledge he attained in engineering throughout his personal and professional life.

The past year was saddened by the loss of Arnold Lund, our first Circle of Vision Leadership Society recipient. Arnold was a long time partner and generously gave back to his Baudette community, especially in the area of business development and for the humane society.

The scholarship fund honors Dorrance’s life, his passion for engineering, and the desire to help other engineering students attain their goals.

Circle of Vision Leadership Society

NMF greatly appreciates each gift to the foundation and its family of funds. Giving at this level is truly transforming communities.

William S. and Margaret W. Marvin have become the second benefactors to reach the

Circle of Vision Recipients Anonymous Maggie Adams Roseau Hospital & Homes H.C. “Bill” Baer, Jr & Jessie Baer Courage North/ The Helleckson Family Francis Drivold Lyle H. Engelstad Robert F. & Marian Foley

Gaylord A. Gunderson Mark & Peggy Hewitt Sam & Peggy Johnson Leonard & Rosemond Kucera Arnold F. Lund, Sr. Eldor & Stella Omdahl Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians Elsie Semrau

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Employees of TEAM Industries/TEAM Foundation LuVerne Trogstad Ole & Ruth Tweet

Circle of Vision Leadership Society Arnold F. Lund, Sr. William S. & Margaret W. Marvin

The generosity that inspired these gifts is a tremendous contribution to the Quality of Place in the region.


Success of Bemidji Leads! Spurs New Center for Community Stewardship ...success is about real change and real action, and Bemidji Leads! has done just that.

What makes communities successful has changed dramatically over the past decade. Evidence shows that now more than ever before, successful communities can be built. It has become clear that assets leading to community success are, in fact, not inherited. The characteristic assets of a successful community can be created and developed. The Center for Community Stewardship in Bemidji was created to address this very issue. The Center for Community Stewardship helps to jump-start the success of a community by empowering its most powerful asset – its leaders. Case Study: Bemidji Leads! In 2003, Bemidji was a community without direction. There was little cooperation, and though it was growing, opportunities seemed to be slipping away. It was a community without a rudder. The Northwest Minnesota Foundation (NMF) responded by funding a grant project that helped to launch Bemidji Leads! The Joint Economic Development Commission (JEDC), in partnership with the Headwaters Regional Development Commission (HRDC), organized the project. The premise was that Bemidji was at a crossroads in its development as a regional center. The community needed to respond to growth pressures by doing more than just managing its current resources. The program, now expanded to become the Center for Community Stewardship, put out a call to action, challenging leaders to come together as stewards of Bemidji’s future. The leaders were encouraged, trained and inspired. With the guidance of the Center, these stewards helped the community agree upon a “shared destiny,” and developed an action plan of 17 destiny drivers to get there. Bemidji Leads! was born. The Center believes success is about real change and real action, and Bemidji Leads! has done just that. The results have been incredible: • After 15 years of struggle, Bemidji Leads! breathed new life into a regional event center effort, and today the community is moving forward to make the $50 million center a reality. 8

• There are new clusters of economic innovation in Bemidji spurred by Bemidji Leads! creating jobs for Bemidji in the knowledge economy. • With the Bemidji Leads!’ dream of becoming a regional center that looks like Itasca State Park, more than 10,000 trees were planted to reforest Bemidji last year, and 10,000 more will be planted every year for the next ten years. These are but a few examples of the tangible success stories for which this movement has been responsible. The results have been dramatic enough for Governor Tim Pawlenty to call Bemidji Leads! “spot on,” and Senator Norm Coleman has said Bemidji is a national model. Bemidji is not alone. Center for Community Stewardship staff also helped to initiate Progress Park Rapids, and begun work in other communities. NMF has been instrumental in helping to develop the process used by the Center by awarding Community Planning grants in the initial stages for both Bemidji Leads! and Progress Park Rapids, which is also beginning to see the same culture-changing results. Experience shows successful communities share two common traits: they’ve found a way to harness their community’s energy and passion, and they’ve come to realize that the only sure way to community success is for the entire community to work together. For more information about the Center for Community Stewardship, call (218) 444-4732 or go online at www.centerforcommunitystewardship. com.


Business Development Activities Microloans

Business Loans

Business counseling and loans are available to help entrepreneurs develop small business and self-employment opportunities. Six loans were recently made totaling $110,000:

Two loans were recently made from the Revolving Loan Fund totaling $250,000: Roseau County Ford, Inc., Roseau For new business start-up. Mid-Central Medical, St. Vincent For expansion of medical equipment manufacturing.

Housing

Loans were made from Fannie Mae funds to the Headwaters Housing Development Corporation and the Beltrami County HRA for the development of affordable housing totaling $600,000.

Rejuv Salon and Spa, Inc., Crookston Mobo Hobo Catering, Thief River Falls C&M Concessions, Warroad Michael J. McManus, Bemidji D&D Thomforde Garden Center, Crookston North Country Food & Fuel, Inc., Waskish

Technical Assistance

Seven businesses from Bemidji, Crookston and Bagley received $5,681 in outside consulting for management and technical assistance.

Save The Date The first Bemidji Pioneer Women’s Expo will be held Saturday, Sept. 8, 2007 at the John Glas Fieldhouse on the campus of Bemidji State University. The Northwest Minnesota Women’s Fund will participate as an event sponsor, host a seminar on the topic of Leadership and sponsor two booths for nonprofits that serve the needs of women in the area. This day-long event will include more than 100 vendor booths, food, entertainment, breakout sessions, door prizes and featured speakers. Advance tickets at $5 each are available at the Pioneer office, 1320 Neilson Ave. S.E., by calling (218) 333-9200 or on the Web at bemidjipioneer.com (click on Women’s Expo). Groups of 10 or more may purchase tickets at $4 each. Tickets at the door will be $7. Renee Rongen will present the keynote address at 11 a.m. Rongen is a nationally known speaker from Fertile, Minn. Her presentation will be entitled “Life’s Your Legacy ... LIVE IT!” 9


Grants Grants totaling $208,966 were awarded from February – April 2007 Caring Communities

STAR Teams Youth Leadership Training................................................ $1,050 $150 grants were made to the following STAR Teams for follow-up projects: Bagley, Bemidji, Red Lake, Schoolcraft and St. Philips

Children & Families

Lifetrack Resources ........................... $10,000 To provide support for families in Greater Minnesota whose children have hearing loss Minnesota Department of Human Services................................... $1,285 For training children’s mental health professionals and others working with young children

Component Funds Backstrom Family Charitable Fund ..........$300 To Campus Childcare Center for a donation in memory of John Seitz

Northwoods Coalition for Battered Women..................................... $24,900

Bagley Early Childhood Initiative Fund...................................... $1,757 Bagley Community Education/ECFE for Healthy Children, Healthy Communities

For children’s program services

Red Lake Nation Chemical Health Programs..................................... `$1,000

For David Parnell presentation

Bagley Education Endowment and Project Fund...................................$1,200 Bagley General Scholarship Fund (2)

Early Childhood Initiative Minnesota Department of Human Services...................................$1,285 For training children’s mental health professionals and others working with young children

Bemidji Area Arts Endowment & Project Fund.................................... $2,750 Bemidji State University Department of Music for the 2007 J.S. Bach harpsichord concert; to Bemidji State University Department of Visual Arts for Jeff Oestreich workshop, lecture, exhibit; to Bemidji Symphony Orchestra for Russian Works Concert

Healthy Lakes & Rivers Partnership Program Beltrami Soil & Water Conservation District................................................ $4,000 For LAWA voluntary septic system inspection project

Bemidji Community Theater Fund........ $2,250 To Bemidji Community Theater for “Kiss Me, Kate” Musical

Hubbard County Soil and Water District.......................................$4,000 For Potato Lake shoreland restoration and vegetation mapping

Everett Wilimek Endowment.................... $500 for Violin Studies To Headwaters School of Music & Arts for Violin Lessons and Suzuki Camp

Natural Resources

Promotion & Preservation

Frederick Marshall Fund......................... $1,350 To Headwaters School of Music & Arts

Giziibii RC & D......................................$25,000

To create an awareness among private woodland owners about land management

for Upgrade Communication Equipment North Star Arts Fund............................ $1,850 Headwaters School of Music & Arts for 2007 REM Arts Classes

Independent School District #390....................................... $9,000 To assemble and coordinate a volunteer group of students to assist in water quality testing

Bemidji Area Early Childhood Initiative Fund.................................... $19,935 For coalition programs and activities benefiting children ages 0-6 in the Bemidji area

Training

Individual Effectiveness

Bemidji Lumberjack Foundation Fund All School Reunion Fund To Bemidji Area School Dist, #31 for All School Reunion grants.......................................$5,072 Buck Robbins Scholarship Fund................ $150 General Scholarship Fund (4)................ $2,250 Beltrami Electric Scholarships, Deerwood Bank Scholarship, Paul Bunyan Telephone Scholarship

Peacemaker Resources...................... $1,350 For conflict resolution and mediation training

Organizational Effectiveness Lakeland Public Television........................... $925

for Combining Board Members and Staff Members for Integrated Strategic Planning Lakeland Public Television.................... $1,450 For Local Programming: Is Lakeland Public Television Meeting the Needs of its Viewers?

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Grants

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Heidi Bitzer McClure Memorial Scholarship................................................$1,000 K.E. “Red” Wilson Athletic Fund (2)...........$1,500 First National Bank Bonspiel Fund................ $500 To Bemidji Area School Dist. #31 for physical therapy services and youth baseball support Security Bank USA Lumberjack Scramble Fund........................................ $10,000 To Bemidji Area School Dist. #31 for physical therapy services and youth baseball support John F. Breen Scholarship Fund (2).....................................................$2,000 Ray F. Breen Scholarship (3)......................$3,000 Blackduck Area Community Fund Academic and .. Character Scholarship Fund.......................... $500 Charles “Nick” Peterson Memorial Scholarship Fund.......................................... $100 Clearwater County Humane Society . .................... Endowment Fund.......................................$1,000 To Humane Society for general operating support

Mississippi Headwaters Area Dental Health Center Fund..................................... $750 To Northwest Minnesota Foundation for directors and officers liability policy Ole and Ruth Tweet Family Fund...................... $500

For the Challenger Mosaic Poetry Project

Park Rapids Area Community Fund

Clearwater Health Care Fund CHS Hospice Family Room Project Fund......................................... $15,000 For the Hospice Family Room at Clearwater County Memorial Hospital CHS Hospice Fund................................. $3,600 For a office and medical equipment Crookston Early Childhood Initiative Fund................................................ $1,809

Heartland Homes Endowment and Project Fund................................... $3,182

To Heartland Homes, Inc for Heartland Homes Community Program Kitchen Project Park Rapids Early Childhood Initiative Fund................................... $1,704 To Mahube Community Council for Gym Connections

Red Lake Falls Education Endowment and Project Fund Kris Fontaine Memorial Scholarship Fund (3)......................... $1,500 Kyle A. Myhre Memorial Fund (2)....... $1,000 Lester Norris Dale, MD Scholarship Fund.................................. $400

Roseau Area Community Fund Marian Foley Memorial Fund (2)........$2,000 Marvin LaRue Memorial Fund...............$500

To the Crookston School Dist #593 for early childhood screening

Fosston Education Foundation Endowment and Project Fund........................................... $1,160

To the Fosston Community Library Arts Association for author visit and the school district for conference

Warren-Alvarado-Oslo Education Foundation Endowment and Project Fund Lyle H Engelstad Scholarship Fund..............................$1,000

Headwaters Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Fund................................................ $398 For support of Churches United, House of Hospitality, and Battered Women’s Shelter

Warroad Area Community Fund Edward and Agnes Brandli Scholarship Fund (2)............................ $400 Jennifer Grove Memorial Scholarship Fund..................................$500 Justin Knebel Memorial Fund...............$250 Katie Jo Olafson Memorial Scholarship Fund..................................$300 NAPA Ride to Reading Fund (2) ........$6,305 To Warroad School District for AR compatible books and assorted assessments Warroad Early Childhood Initiative Fund.................................$10,000 To Warroad School District for #690 for the Strengthening Preschoolers Through Collaboration Warroad Education Endowment and Project Fund.................................. $500 Presidential Freedom Scholarship Warroad Farmer’s Union Oil Company Scholarship Fund.................................. $500

Lake of the Woods Early Childhood Initiative Fund.......................................... $2,000 To Lake of the Woods School District for parent education

Laporte Education Endowment and Project Fund............................................. $1,000 Scholarships (2) Laporte-Benedict VFW Scholarship Fund......................................$250 Tonia Johannsen Memorial Fund (2).......$1,000 Leonard J. Kucera Memorial Scholarship Fund (2)........................................................ $1,000 Luther Younggren Memorial Scholarship Fund . ....................................... $1,500 Mahnomen Education Endowment and Project Fund.......................................... $2,750

Scholarships (5)

Milton Hockel Natural Resources Scholarship Fund..................................... $500

General Ike Isaacson and Major Bruce Isaacson Scholarship Fund....................... $250 Leslie Hanson Scholarship Fund............... $500

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NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. Postage PAID Bemidji, MN 56601 Permit No. 36

4225 Technology Drive NW Bemidji, MN 56601 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Upcoming Events Organizational Excellence

Organizational Excellence I 9:00-4:00 ~ July 20, 2007 Beltrami Electric Community Room, Bemidji

STAR Advisor Training

Non-Coercive Discipline: Building Personal Responsibility Through Self-Discipline 8:30 – 5:00 ~ June 28 and 29 Holiday Inn, Bemidji

Leadership Development Update:

NMF has initiated a process to improve its longstanding adult leadership program and make it even more responsive to the needs of the region. For the past 18 years, NMF has offered Leadership I to northwest Minnesota residents. Five years ago, Leadership II was included to help alumni to further develop leadership skills. Since establishing guidelines and criteria and gathering feedback, the new program is moving forward in the design process. The pilot will be delivered late October 2007 by invitation. The program is scheduled to be launched in Spring 2008 after reviewing the pilot and making any necessary adjustments. Please watch this space for further developments.

~ Northwest Minnesota Foundation ~ www.nwmf.org ~ CONTACT US: 218-759-2057 ~ 800-659-7859 ~ FAX 218-759-2328 ~ nwmf@nwmf.org

http://www.nwmf.org/images/CF.spring07  

http://www.nwmf.org/images/CF.spring07.pdf

http://www.nwmf.org/images/CF.spring07  

http://www.nwmf.org/images/CF.spring07.pdf