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COURIER THE

March 2014

Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Va.

Park View Science Fair Judging — Page 8

Healthy Eating, Culinary Skills New to BTRIP Story and photos Rebecca A. Perron

During the three weeks, patients NMCP Public Affairs engage in occupational, art and Naval Medical Center Portsmouth’s recreational therapy culinary specialists spent a few hours and meet with speMarch 21 reinforcing healthy eating cialists in anger and habits with service members attending time management, the Brain Trauma Recovery Intervention sleep and family relationships. Program. The nutrition BTRIP is a three-week outpatient program dedicated to the treatment of component is new service members with complex, com- and was developed bat-related traumatic brain injury and by Cmdr. Paul CS1 (SW/AW) Micah Lee adds spices to vinaigrette psychological health conditions. The Allen, the medical dressing as IT2 (SW) William Billingsley stirs. program gives patients the ability to center’s Nutrition Management This was the second time for Culinary Department head. Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Micah “The idea emanated out of address- Lee and CS1 (SW) Nicholas Harmes ing health promotion issues as a to work with the patients hands-on. To whole,” Allen said. “The BTRIP team keep the atmosphere light and casual, asked me to address the nutrition Lee and Harmes dressed as “Salt” and component specific to post-traumatic “Pepper.” During February’s training, brain injuries. I provide a lecture on they called themselves “Batman” and healthy eating before we do the cook- “Robin.” ing demo, which matches the core “We teach them some easy knife components I teach, such as eating skills,” Lee said. “We show them how to three meals a day, choosing a wide cut up fruits and vegetables, like melon variety of colors and textures, choos- and bell peppers. A lot of people don’t ing more nutrient-dense foods, eating know how to cut them, so they might clean and having fun at all of it.” not buy it, but we’ll teach them here.” The factors that go into planning “Working on knife skills can also the menu is health first, followed very improve hand-eye coordination,” said closely by taste. Harmes. “It’s a skill you can use to feed “Our culinary specialists have an your family, have some fun and eat CS1 (SW/AW) Micah Lee gives tips to enormous amount of talent and with healthier.” Marine Maj. Steven Miller as he cuts up my dietitian brain and their cookLee started the session by assembling raw chicken for the kabobs. ing skills, we came up with a tasty, the dessert – blackberry bread pudding, improve brain function and memory, healthy, easy-to-make meal,” Allen said. the only thing on the menu not very develop leisure activities and increase “It is about functional daily management healthy. Lee suggested they always start their problem-solving, coping and of life. Where would we be if we didn't eat?” stress-management skills. — See NUTRITION, Page 10 by


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The Courier | March 2014

Quick Scripts Drug Take-Back Day The Drug Enforcement Administration’s Drug Take-Back Day is set for April 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. NMCP will give the public its fifth opportunity in three years to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your pills for disposal to the outpatient pharmacy, window 4B at 620 John Paul Jones Cir., 23708 Portsmouth. (The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches.) The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

Real Talk No Rank Join us and experience the contagious enthusiasm of Women Inspiring Women. Most everyone has a story. Some speak of success; some speak of tragedy; some speak of guilt. Join us in conversation about the struggles, challenges, and

NMCP Ombudsman Team Pre-Deployment Brief The NMCP Ombudsman Team is here to help those attached to NMCP or its branch health clinics when you or a family member are preparing to deploy! The monthly pre-deployment brief is held the 3rd Tuesday of each month at 9:30 a.m. in the chapel. Email us to join our Ombudsman email tree and learn the latest news. NMCPombudsman@med.navy.mil or (757) 953-1973

rewards of being a successful woman, not just in the military, but in your life as you live it while you pursue your life’s passion. All women, without prejudice to rank, military or civilian, are invited and strongly encouraged to attend NMCP’s “Real Talk - No Rank.” April 28, Norfolk, Bldg. C9, classroom 2, noon to 2 p.m. May 16: NMCP, auditorium, noon to 2 p.m.

HM Ball T-Shirt Sale The 116th Hospital Corps Ball Committee is selling the 116th Hospital Corpsman Birthday T-shirts, long-sleeve shirts and hoodies. Colors available: Navy blue, Marine green, grey and hot pink. Prices: T-shirts – $15. Long-sleeve shirts – $25 (pre-order). Hoodies – $30 (pre-order only). Combo (all three) – $55.00 (pre-order).

Naval Medical Center Portsmouth is on Facebook and Twitter

www.facebook.com/ NMCPortsmouth

Those who wish to pre-order, contact HM3 Jamie Berg at 953-1570 or HM3 Mark Barranda 953-1560.

Holocaust Remembrance Day Join NMCP in observing Holocaust Remembrance Day with guest speaker Ret. Col. Edwards Shames – a Jewish army officer and one of the original members of the Band of Brothers. Shames was one of the first U.S. military officers to enter Dachau concentration camp and witness the horrors imposed on the prisoners by Nazi Germany. The remembrance is April 30, main chapel, Bldg. 3, 2nd deck at 11:45 a.m.

Oakleaf Club Open to New Members The Oakleaf Club of Tidewater is open to medical, dental, nurse, and Medical Service Corps — active and retired — officers and their spouses in Hampton Roads. The club is a charitable organization servicing those who benefit the Hampton Roads naval medical community. We are always happy to welcome new members.

http://twitter.com/NMCP1

For membership information, email tidewater.oakleaf@gmail.com

COURIER

The Courier is an authorized publication of Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, 620 John Paul Jones Circle, Portsmouth, VA 23708, and is published monthly by the Public Affairs Office.

THE

COMMANDER

Rear Adm. Elaine C. Wagner Capt. James L. Hancock

DEPUTY COMMANDER

The Courier provides an avenue to circulate all newsworthy information the NMC Portsmouth staff has to offer.

COMMAND MASTER CHIEF

Those who wish to submit an article or news

CMDCM (SW/AW/FMF) Michael James information for publishing should contact the PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER

Deborah R. Kallgren DEPUTY PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER

Rebecca A. Perron STAFF JOURNALISTS

MCC (SW/AW) Leslie Tomaino MC1 (SW/EXW/AW) Gary Johnson MC1 (SW/AW) Steven J. Weber

Public Affairs Office by calling 953-7986, by fax at 953-5118, or by emailing the PAO, Deborah Kallgren, at deborah.kallgren@med.navy.mil. Submissions should be in Word format, with photos submitted separately from the document and in jpeg, bitmap or tiff format. The Public Affairs Office is located in Bldg. 1, 3rd Deck, Rm. C308.


March 2014 | The Courier

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NMCP Celebrates 143rd Medical Corps Birthday by

Story and photos MCC (SW/AW) Leslie Tomaino NMCP Public Affairs

Naval Medical Center Portsmouth staff celebrated the 143rd birthday of the Navy Medical Corps with a cake-cutting ceremony March 7. Rear Adm. Elaine C. Wagner, NMCP commander, Capt. James Hancock, NMCP deputy commander, and HMCM (EXW/FMF/SW) Aaron VanDall, deputy command master chief, expressed their gratitude and admiration for the skilled service of the Medical Corps. In attendance were members of the Dental Corps, Nurse Corps, and Medical Service Corps who read birthday messages from their Chiefs of the individual corps. “The strength and diversity of our Corps is represented in so many waysfrom a Navy pediatrician taking care of the child of a Sailor deployed in harm’s way, a trauma surgeon stabilizing a fallen service member in Kandahar, a psychiatrist treating a Marine suffering the invisible wounds of war, a researcher making great strides in malaria vac-

Capt. James Hancock, NMCP deputy commander, delivers his remarks and reads the birthday message from the Surgeon General to those gathered to celebrate the 143rd birthday of the Medical Corps. cine development, an ophthalmologist providing eyesight-saving care to the citizens of several nations during a Pacific Partnership cruise of the Mercy, to a faculty member training the next generation of our Corps at the Uniformed Services University,” said Rear Adm. Raquel Bono, Chief of the Navy Medical Corps in her birthday remarks, read by Cmdr. Jared Antevil at the ceremony. Established March 3, 1871, the Medical Corps is composed of 4,300 active and reserve members, with 23 specialties and nearly 200 subspecialties. Following the remarks, the most junior and senior members of the Medical Corps at NMCP, Capt. Jose DeLaPena and Lt. Alice Blizman, cut the cake. “I felt very honored and thankful for the opportunity to be a part of such a ceremony honoring an organization so rich in history and so bigger than any

one person,” said Blizman of the honor of cutting the cake. “I’m extremely excited to get to the fleet this summer and fulfill my lifelong dream of helping people and serving alongside the Sailors and Marines providing care.” The Medical Corps has come a long way since its humble beginnings. It’s cared for service members through the Spanish-American War, two world wars, Korea, Vietnam, conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, all while adding to a legacy of superb care. The personnel that make up today’s corps build on a history of advancing medical research, education and training. “Our Medical Corps personnel are globally engaged,” said Vice Adm. Matthew L. Nathan, U.S. Navy surgeon general and chief, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, in his birthday remarks. “They provide the highest quality of care to those they serve, whether it’s on, above or below the sea, at home or overseas in faraway lands. They meet the mission – from kinetic warfare to humanitarian assistance, to research and development – anytime, anywhere.”

The cake is cut commemorating 143 years of the Navy Medical Corps by its NMCP’s most senior and junior Medical Corps members – Capt. Jose DeLaPena and Lt. Alice Blizman.


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The Courier | March 2014

No Snow Days for Cancer Story and photo by MCC(SW/AW) Leslie Tomaino NMCP Public Affairs

When weather forecasters predict snow in Hampton Roads, school-age children (and some grown-ups) delight at the thought of staying home for a snow day and breaking routine. However, at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, there’s a team of providers who never take a snow day because they and their patients know cancer doesn’t either. While there are many routine appointments that get postponed and rescheduled at the medical center, cancer treatments must proceed on schedule. “Our staff trains and anticipates a major event or adverse weather incident and has standard operating procedures in place,” said Lt. Cmdr. Aleah McHenry, nurse oncologist. “Rather than put our patients’ safety at risk, we know the best answer is to get the patients here ahead of the storm.” The latest storm in March set the plan in motion. With several inches of snow in the forecast, medical center staff were able to help an oncology patient and mother from North Carolina get needed treatment before the storm hit. Mom and daughter drove to Portsmouth the night before the snow began to fall. Getting the chemo

taken care of helped the family avoid slick roads and treacherous travel. NMCP has chemotherapy nursing support available 24/7, and there is Some of the members of the Nurse Oncology Group, which always a pediatric consists of the Ambulatory Infusion Center, Oncology oncologist avail- Clinic, Pediatric Clinic, Gynecology/Oncology and the able regardless of inpatient nursing staffs. weather conditions. This means even if the munications among the clinics and to be outpatient clinic is closed for routine visits, flexible during inclement weather. there is still a pediatric oncology doctor The clinics collaborate to ensure their who either braves the icy roads or stays staff trainings, policies, documentation, in-house to support the patients. procedures and patient information are all “During the first big snow, we had a doc standardized. This helps when care must be here in the clinic and covering oncology coordinated even during the worst weather. patients in the ward. During the second “Lt. Cmdr. McHenry has assembled a storm, we had a doc stay overnight,” said Nurse Oncology Group that consists of the Lt.Cmdr. (Dr.) Cole Bryan, a pediatric Ambulatory Infusion Center, Oncology oncologist at NMCP. “With the most Clinic, Pediatric Clinic, Gynecology/ recent snow with a two-hour delay, pedi- Oncology, and inpatient nursing staffs,” atrics hematology/oncology doctors were said Lt. Cmdr. Penelope Heiges, division still here at 6 a.m. in case we had patients officer for the AIC. “This creates a lot of come in.” communication and teamwork between All clinics proactively alert patients to the nurses especially, but also for the docthe potential for closures or delays to the tors who know the camaraderie that exists clinics, and prepare the schedule to offer between the different areas. It all comes appointments later in the day. The clinics back to providing outstanding patient care have all learned the importance of com- here at NMCP.”

NMCP’s ‘Health Care Heroes’ By Deborah R. Kallgren NMCP Public Affairs

Inside Business magazine recently named two of Naval Medical Center Portsmouth staff as a 2014 “Health Care Hero.” Dr. Sarah Bisch, a child and adolescent psychiatrist, and Capt. (Dr.) James Hancock, deputy commander, were among 25 individuals selected and honored in Hampton Roads following nominations from the public. This is the sixth year the awards have been presented. Bisch was honored in the Specialist – Psychiatry category. Hancock was honored in the Physician – Military Care category. Bisch is a board-certified child psychiatrist, spending about 80 percent of her time seeing patients. She sees 1,000 patients. While every patient is different, the common thread is being a

child growing up in the unique military environment. Bisch said, “Once a child has been identified as being in need, it is reassuring to parents that we are able to offer guidance, treatment or therapy. If we treat early, then we have a chance. Once they become adults it is much harder to do. “To see a child I have worked with get better is rewarding,” she said. Hancock was characteristically modest in learning about the award. “There are so many dedicated people here who do amazing things. I am constantly amazed at what they do.”


March 2014 | The Courier

Corpsman Ball Committee Holds 5K, ‘Pi’ Day Fundraiser on 3-14

Hospital Corps Ball Committee organized and ran its first of many intended annual Corpsman Ball 5K races on March 14 at NMCP. And, since the day of the run was March 14, otherwise known as 3.14 or “Pi” Day, the race ended with a pie-in-the face contest. In the days leading up to the event, medical center staff voted on who from their chain of command they wanted to see get pied, and the honor was given to the highest bidders. All money raised by the two events goes toward defraying the cost of the ball later this year.

Photos by MCC (SW/AW) Leslie Tomaino

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The Courier | March 2014

Patient Safety Fair Helps Navigate Care Safely Quality Management Directorate and Patient Safety Office marked National Patient Safety Awareness Week with a Patient Safety Awareness Fair on March 6 with interactive displays. The national week, this year March 2 – 8, is an annual education and awareness campaign for health care safety. The weeklong celebration creates awareness in the community and among hospital staff and patients about the need for patient safety and informs them of recent advancements in providing safe care. This year’s theme – Navigate Your Health…Safely – signifying a patient’s journey to the best diagnosis. During NMCP’s fair, there were about 40 exhibits lining the hallway of the Charette Health Care Center, covering topics from proper use of antibiotics and eye safety to Code Purple (OB-GYN emergency) and taking care of casts. Staff who had to best displays received awards from Rear Adm. Elaine C. Wagner, NMCP commander, during a March 13 award ceremony. HM1 Melecia Harrison, HM3 Willie Green and HN Megan Baker of Radiology won first place for “What’s Not Right?” The Patient Administration Department received second place for “PAD: Lost in Translation,” which addressed the importance of effective communications in patient safety. Kathy Jones and Cmdr. William Young of the main operating room received third place for “Wound Dressing.”

HN Henri Noordanus and HN Clarence Matthews, ENT Clinic, with their display, “High Level Disinfection of ENT Scopes.”

Cmdr. Nicki Tarant shows Anesthesiology Department’s presentation on their checklist procedures. The presentation, titled “Checklists Save Lives, Anesthesia Uses Checklists, and Anesthesia Saves Lives,” covers the many areas of their lists, crisis management and procedures.

Director for Nursing Services’s ensigns Steffany Mattson and Lynna Logue stand with their display “Tattoo Safety” and discuss the dangers of unsafe tattooing with a Sailor during NMCP’s Patient Safety Fair March 6.

Rosalyn Boyce, a registered nurse with the Multi-Service Wound Clinic stands with their display “Blood Clots: What’s Your Risk.”

HA Sean Liebler and registered nurse Colette Womack of the Internal Medicine Clinic with their display “Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work.”


March 2014 | The Courier

NMCP Celebrates Women’s History Month Story and photos by Rebecca A. Perron NMCP Public Affairs

Naval Medical Center Portsmouth celebrated Women’s History Month March 27 with a ceremony in the chapel that included the reading of the presidential proclamation by Mistress of Ceremonies Chief Hospital Corpsman (SW/AW) Latesha White, and a speech by Capt. Mary K. Nunley, senior nurse executive, followed by a cake cutting. This year’s theme, Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment, was highlighted by Nunley who spoke of the courageous women who broke down barriers while serving in the Navy and in Navy Medicine. She spoke of the Sacred Twenty, who were the Navy’s first nurses and trained at NMCP more than 100 years ago, as well as women who served their country more recently during wartime, some giving their lives on the battlefield. “Women were not officially allowed in the service until 1908, when Congress established the Navy Nurse Corps,” Nunley said. “The first 20 nurses, called the Sacred Twenty, broke barriers that got us to where all women could enter naval service on active duty. Nurses were the only women serving in the Navy until World War I, when the first enlisted women, known as yeomanettes, provided secretarial support.” Nunley spoke about the WAVES adding to the ranks during World War II, with more than 85,000 women serving as air traffic controllers, artists, bakers, couriers, cryptologists and hospital corpsmen at commands across the country and overseas. Nunley mentioned some of the women who inspire her, a list that includes Vice Adm. Michelle Howard who was recently confirmed to become Vice Chief of Naval Operations. “Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, who I had the pleasure of meeting at the Marine Corps Ball two years ago, recently became the highest ranking woman in the history of the Navy and the military,” Nunley said. “An amazing accomplishment!

During her speech, Capt. Mary K. Nunley highlights accomplishments of women within the Navy and Navy Medicine.

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Capt. Mary K. Nunley, senior nurse executive, and Cmdr. Maria Norbeck, Diversity Committee co-chair, cut the cake after the ceremony. Her Senate confirmation and promotion to Vice Chief of Naval Operations also makes her the first black woman to attain fourstar rank in Pentagon history.” Nunley recapped the soon-to-be VCNO’s career. “Howard knew when she was 12 that she wanted to attend the Naval Academy, even though women couldn’t apply,” Nunley said. “In 1978, when Howard entered the Academy, she was one of seven black women in a class of almost 1,400 midshipmen. She rose through the ranks and in 1993, when the Navy changed its policy allowing women to serve on combat vessels, Howard became the first female executive officer on an American warship, USS Tortuga. She was later named commanding officer of USS Rushmore, a 15,000-ton amphibious assault vessel with a crew of 400 sailors and more than 350 Marines. Howard became the first female captain of the Rushmore and the first black woman to command a Navy combat vessel.” Nunley talked about the role of women in combat, and how it has changed over the years. She recounted the loss of Lt. Florence Bacong Choe in Afghanistan in 2009. Choe had been a medical service corps officer assigned to Naval Medical Center San Diego when she was selected for the one-year deployment. “I was reminded this morning that this very day in 2009, we lost one of our own,” Nunley said. “Lt. Choe was 35 years old at the time and was killed by an Afghan Army soldier. A friend, Capt. Kim Lebel, Nurse Corps, was also shot, but her life was spared. She grieves today and every day, as do the family and friends of Florence. “We draw strength and inspiration from those who came before us, and those remarkable women among us today,” Nunley said. “They are part of our story, and a truly balanced and inclusive history recognizes how important women have always been in American society.” Nunley concluded her speech by saying, “The 2014 theme to me shows us how determination and tenacity – even in small groups of women – influenced society in the past few decades, and these women we have talked about today, among others, have written or will write important chapters in contemporary American history. I believe the Navy had always been a leader in women’s rights, and we will continue to be.”


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The Courier | March 2014

NMCP Staff Judge Elementary School Science Fair Story and photos by DC2 (SW) Samantha Forbes

eager to be one of the top winners. Each student will be judged two times by two Contributing Writer different judges.” Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Ann Naval Medical Center Portsmouth’s Marie Rippentrop, Diversity Committee finest take every opportunity to assist at president, was one of those judges, standPark View Elementary, NMCP’s adopt- ing alongside others to view a project that a-school. The latest big volunteer effort showed how flowers can absorb color. “It’s a great learning experience for – the school’s science fair. Members of the Diversity Committee and other hos- the kids,” Rippentrop said. “They get to pital staff helped judge more than 500 know what it feels like to present their ideas and hard work. They’ve taken a lot presentations on March 18. Over the past several school years, of initiative and creativity.” Rippentrot said quite a few of the projmedical center staff volunteers at the school at least once a week, helping in ects stood out to her. “I was impressed that a student used a many ways from working in the library to tutoring to sitting with students at lunch multi-meter and a pressure cooker,” she said. “I would have never through at that time. For the science fair, the day began with age to put those together. And another several second to sixth graders excited to used roses and carnations to show how present their projects when the judges a flower can absorb color. I had no idea arrived. Judges were asked to volunteer that was even possible. So, as you can see, for a minimum of two hours. Ten NMCP it has become a learning experience for us judges were present when the fair began as the judges, too.” Rippentrot also enjoyed the presentaand others rotated in and out throughout tion that proved the color blue in some the six-hour event. “We are at about 100 percent student Navy uniforms provides a calming and participation,” said LaKicia Sallee, a spe- secure presence for people. “I really like some of the projects that cial education teacher and member of the Park View Science Fair Committee. have props and integrate the viewer “This is my fifth year at Park View, and into the presentation,” said Hospital I have never seen this many children so Corpsman 2nd Class Christopher Brewer from Biomedical Repair. “The human battery presentation was pretty entertaining. That was probably my favorite.” The sneaker presentation was a favorite for retired Operations Specialist 2nd Class General Venable Jr., who volunteers because his sister-in-law is a teacher at Park View. “A young lady compared the durability of name brands versus generic brands,” Venable said. “But as a sports fan, what stood out was one A Park View student shows HM2 Erica Jones his student who did a presentapresentation about which paper “Towel Brand is tion on which sneakers would the Most Absorbent?”

Hospitalman Apprentice Shannon Short listens to the presentation, “Do White Candles Burn Faster Than Colored Candles?” make you jump higher. Just the way these kids explain their work is amazing.” Each project was judged in six categories, including knowledge and use of the Scientific Method, interest in the project, knowledge of the subject, organization and visual appeal of the scientific data, and written evidence of research, experimentation and analysis. All of the scores were put together to tally the top winners, which were announced at the PTA meeting that night. The winners received a certificate of achievement. “It means a lot to them,” Sallee said, “and once a student wins one year, they usually try to work harder the next year to become a repeat winner. Also, the volunteers were wonderful today. They want to jump right in and get involved with the students. The encouragement they gave the students today has been excellent.” “It’s rewarding to judge the fair, because we get to see how they are developing and we can show our support,” Brewer said. “The students have a lot of enthusiasm to share what they know, and it’s been a good time. Being able to help out the kids where they are with their education and helping to mold them to becoming enlightened individuals is meaningful.” — See SCIENCE, next page


March 2014 | The Courier

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Officers of the 1st Quarter Recognized Congratulations to the Officers of the Quarter for the 3rd Quarter! They were recognized March 25 by Rear Adm. Elaine Wagner, NMCP commander, who presented them with certificates and plaques. Front row, from left: Lt. j.g. Kendra Johnson, Junior Nurse Corps; Lt. Cmdr. Josephine Fajardo, Senior Medical Service Corps; Lt. Jennifer Shippy, Junior Medical Corps and Cmdr. John Van Slyke, Senior Medical Corps. Back row, from left: Lt. Cmdr. Frank Tratchel, Senior Nurse Corps; Lt. Cmdr. Rene Alova, Senior Dental Corps; and Lt. Daniel Fuhrmann, Junior Dental Corps.

Photo by MC1 (SW/AW) Steven Weber

SCIENCE — Continued from previous page Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Lashaunda Guy, a Diversity Committee member, agreed. “Volunteer opportunities and the things we do should never stop,” Guy said. “No matter what, we should always continue to be of service. Always staying involved in the community is important.” “It is very important for the military to work with the children in the community, especially as a role model,” Venable

NMCP staff joined others to judge more than 500 science fair presentations at Park View Elementary School.

added. “People need to see the military in a positive light. The Adopt-a-School Program allows Sailors to show what a positive influence they can have on the school and the community.” Those who are interested in volunteering still have time to make a difference this school year. Volunteers through the partnership must be active-duty or civil service staff and can set their own schedule within school hours. For more information, contact Rippentrop at 953-5336.

HM1 Ann Marie Rippentrop listens to a student present “What Causes a Tornado to Dissolve and Stop Its Destruction?”


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The Courier | March 2014

CS1 (SW/AW) Micah Lee as “Salt” and CS1 (SW) Nicholas Harmes as “Pepper” oversee the BTRIP group cutting up vegetables and practicing their knife skills after giving them a demonstration of proper techniques.

NUTRITION — Continued from page 1

with making the dessert since it often requires baking or setting in the refrigerator and can then be served right after the meal. They cut up fruit for the fruit salad, and then made vinaigrette dressing from scratch for the spinach salad. After placing both salads in the refrigerator, cutting up the vegetables was next: portabella mushrooms, green, orange and red bell peppers, cherry tomatoes, zucchini and squash. Lee and Harmes also showed them how to cut up raw chicken and steak, focusing on trimming fat and making the chunks consistent with the size of the cut-up vegetables. “We’re doing kabobs, because it’s getting to be grilling season, and some of them have kids, and it’s a great thing to do with your family,” Lee said. “Everyone can gather in the kitchen and chop up some vegetables and meat and grill it. It’s really easy.” Harmes then passed out wooden skewers that had spent the morning soaking in water, so as not to burn on the grill. “The BTRIP course is phenomenal,” said Staff Sgt. Nelson White, an aviation helicopter mechanic with the 128th Aviation Brigade at Joint Base-Eustis, as he placed pieces of vegetables on a skewer. “It actually has made me aware of different talents that I have. Every day is different, but this has probably been the most fun. They taught us that cooking is as imaginative as you want it to be. It’s great. So, in my eyes, BTRIP has brought out things in me that I thought I had lost.” As the group shared stories and relaxed as they cooked, Information Systems Technician 2nd Class (SW) William Billingsley, Naval Ocean Processing Facility, Dam Neck, compared the experience with a July 4th barbeque. “Cooking with people is always a great thing,” Billingsley said. “It’s like the 4th of July feeling, it always creates that family setting. You’ve always got something to look forward to and remember

Marine Maj. Steven Miller adds vanillaflavored dessert topping, whipped topping and fresh berries as he plates the desserts.

that you had a great time.” He said he was looking forward to eating the meal, and was grateful for the training. “I’m a single guy, so I don’t know how to cook that well, so this teaches me another way to incorporate vegetables, because that was something I was learning in the nutrition segment,” Billingsley said. “I didn’t know that many ways to get vegetables into my meal. Usually I’ll just buy a bag of salad and cook a piece of meat for dinner. But now I know other ways that I can work vegetables in, eat healthy and make it fun at the same time.” For Marine Maj. Steven Miller, the session meant learning that he can eat healthy without spending a lot of money. “I learned how to cook more economically, more healthy,” Miller said, stirring couscous cooking on the stove. “Since I’m going to be transitioning out of the military this year, this is good practice for me to realize I don’t have to spend a lot of money in order to be able to eat healthy.” Miller said his favorite part was preparing the food and finding out what foods are out there that are healthy, without going to a specialty grocery store. For “Salt” and “Pepper,” their favorite part was sharing their love of cooking with others. “We really get to show off our culinary skills when we train a small group like this,” Harmes said. “It’s different from making mass quantities for the galley. We made a setting for eight people, showing them how to dish up or plate each item, so they could see how to do this for their families.” “We love to cook the meals for the galley and for our patients, but what we really love is to do training like this,” Lee added, “because cooking is our passion.”


March 2014 | The Courier

Old-Fashioned Vanilla Bread Pudding with Blackberries Ingredients: 1 lb. loaf of bread, cut into 1 inch cubes. (We used hot dog buns that would expire soon) 2 cups fresh or frozen blackberries (we used fresh) 1 cup heavy cream 4 cups half & half (or whole milk) 8 eggs (we used 9 to make it extra fluffy) 2 1/2 cups sugar 1 Tb. vanilla extract 1 tsp. cinnamon 1/2 tsp. nutmeg 1/4 tsp. salt

Directions: We usually make your dessert first so it has time to cook and cool off. Place the bread cubes and blackberries in a 9” x 13” baking dish and toss to distribute the blackberries evenly. In a large bowl, whisk the remaining ingredients together into a frothy custard base. Pour the custard over the bread cubes. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. (You can omit this step if you’re in a rush but it helps for the bread to really soak up the custard) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Bake uncovered for 1 hour and 15 minutes, until golden and bubbly. The bread pudding should still be a little jiggly in the middle. Cool 20 minutes. (If the top starts to get too dark, place a piece of loose foil over it while baking.) Scoup onto plates or into bowls and add vanilla-flavored dessert topping, whipped topping and fresh berries. Fun Fact: Bread pudding was the answer to what to do with leftover bread, which probably came about soon after the invention of bread. Puddings of all types were very popular in England. Bread pudding most likely originated there in the late 1600s.

Spinach Salad Ingredients:

Spinach Whole or halved walnuts Craisins Balsamic Vinaigrette

Balsamic Vinaigrette

Ingredients: 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 2 teaspoons dark brown sugar, optional* (we did not use sugar) 1 tablespoon chopped garlic (we used garlic powder) 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3/4 cup olive oil Directions: Beat the vinegar in a bowl with the optional sugar, garlic, salt and pepper until sugar and salt dissolves. Then beat in the oil by droplets, whisking constantly. (Or place all the ingredients in a screw-top jar and shake to combine.) Taste and adjust the seasonings. If not using dressing right away, cover and refrigerate, whisking or shaking again before use. (We prepared the vinaigrette in the same bowl as the salad and marinated the about half of the craisins in it. If you’re not eating the salad right away, put the leaves on top so it doesn’t get soggy. Toss it up when you’re ready to serve.) *If using a good quality balsamic vinegar, you should not need the sugar. If using a lesser quality, you might want the sugar to round out the dressing.

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The Courier | March 2014

Israeli Couscous & Quinoa with Wilted Spinach and Sundried Tomatoes Ingredients: 1 package Rykoff Sexton Tri-Color Couscous & Quinoa or any store brand 1 cup sundried tomatoes, julienned 2 cups fresh baby spinach Salt and pepper to taste 2 cloves fresh chopped garlic

Couscous plated with kabobs and a green onion for garnish. Directions: Cook couscous and quinoa according to package directions. We used vegetable stock in place of the water to give it extra flavor. Add the tomatoes and garlic. Once everything is cooked, mix the spinach in and the heat will cook and wilt the spinach. Alternate recipe: Stir couscous into boiling water and return water to a boil. Cover and remove pot from heat. Let stand 5 minutes, then fluff with a fork. While the couscous is cooking, heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Stir in garlic, green onions and peppers; saute briefly. Stir in tomatoes, basil, cooked couscous, spinach, salt and pepper. Mix together and transfer to a 1 1/2 quart casserole dish. Splash some balsamic vinegar on top.

Kabob Secrets

Kabobs, or kebabs, are simply pieces of meat, vegetables, or fruit threaded on skewers, then broiled or grilled. There are many easy recipes that are wonderful for summer entertaining. These tips and tricks will help make the best kabobs: *Keep all ingredients about the same size so they cook evenly. *If you’re cooking foods with very different cooking times (like pork and cherry tomatoes), keep the same foods on one skewer. Cherry tomatoes, which cook in about 2 minutes, will overcook in the time it takes to cook pork, about 10 minutes. *Metal skewers are best for foods that take longer than 5 minutes to cook. *Bamboo skewers should be soaked in water for 30 minutes before adding the food so they don’t burn in the intense heat. *If you’re making shrimp kabobs, push the shrimp very close to one another so they’re stacked up. The shrimp will stay moist and tender even on the extreme grill temperatures. *Watch kabobs carefully on the grill, and turn them frequently. *Be sure the grill is clean, hot, and well oiled so the food will release. *Brush the kabobs with a marinade while they cook or brush them with olive oil and use any season of your liking. Discard any unused marinade at the end of cooking time. Cook the kabobs for 2 - 3 minutes after the last marinade application to kill any bacteria. For foods that can twirl on the grill, like shrimp, use two skewers, parallel to each other, to pierce the food.

Fruit Salad Ingredients: Strawberries Cantaloupe Blueberries Raspberries Pineapple

Directions: Wash thoroughly the strawberries, blueberries and raspberries. Place the blueberries and raspberries into a large bowl. Cut the tops off each strawberry, then turn upside-down and cut into fourths. Place cut strawberries into the bowl. With the pineapple on its side, cut off the top and bottom. Place upright and remove the core. Then cut down the edge to remove the skin, making sure to remove the brown spots, called eyes. Then slice into rings, chop into pieces and place into bowls. Place the cantaloupe in its side, cutting off the top and bottom. Cut in half, laying each half rind up. Slice downward through the rind into 6 - 8 wedges. Turn each wedge on its side, cutting off the rind and into pieces. Place cantaloupe into bowl stir well to mix fruit. Refrigerate until ready to eat.

Save the top of the pineapple for a festive centerpiece.


March 2014 | The Courier

My NMCRS Story

In August 2005, Chief Hospital Corpsman Lisa Ceron, then a new second class, was stationed in Iwakuni, Japan. She was a single parent to a three-year-old daughter, and that would be enough for most young Sailors to handle. Then doctors diagnosed Ceron with a cerebral aneurysm. The news sent her into a tailspin emotionally, since her parents had died from ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brain (cerebral) aneurysm is a bulging, weak area in the wall of an artery that supplies blood to the brain. In most cases, a brain aneurysm causes no symptoms and goes unnoticed. In rare cases, the brain aneurysm ruptures, releasing blood into the skull and causing a stroke. When a brain aneurysm ruptures, the result is called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Depending on the severity of the hemorrhage, brain damage or death may result. Thinking of her parents, Ceron feared the worst, and, with a young child, she didn’t want that same fate. The doctors said she would require a craniotomy and aneurysm clipping so it would not rupture and cause her to die. Ceron would have to travel to Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii for the surgery, but the command was unable to fund her daughter’s travel expenses. Like many young Sailors, Ceron did not have the money saved to pay for her daughter’s expenses, let alone the expense of flying family in to care for her daughter in her absence. Ceron’s command referred her to Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, who paid for her daughter’s ticket from Japan to Hawaii and back. “Some people are under the impression that their money is not being used for the services NMCRS advertises. I’m living proof that they are. Without their support, I honestly don’t know what I would have done,” said Ceron. NMCRS provides a variety of services such as financial assistance with food, rent or mortgage, utilities, home repairs, establishing a new residence, including security and utility deposits, car repairs and insurance deductibles, medical expenses, military pay shortage or delayed entitlements, funeral expenses, and emergency travel expenses. The NMCRS fund drive goes through the month of March and donations made in Hampton Roads help Sailors and Marines in this geographic area. To donate, contact your command’s coordinator. In August 2005, Chief Hospital Corpsman Lisa Ceron, then a new second class, was stationed in Iwakuni, Japan. She was a single parent to a three-year-old daughter, and that would be enough for most young Sailors to handle. Then doctors diagnosed Ceron with a cerebral aneurysm. The news sent her into a tailspin emo-

tionally, since her parents had died from ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brain (cerebral) aneurysm is a bulging, weak area in the wall of an artery that supplies blood to the brain. In most cases, a brain aneurysm causes no symptoms and goes unnoticed. In rare cases, the brain aneurysm ruptures, releasing blood into the skull and causing a stroke. When a brain aneurysm ruptures, the result is called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Depending on the severity of the hemorrhage, brain damage or death may result. Thinking of her parents, Ceron feared the worst, and, with a young child, she didn’t want that same fate. The doctors said she would require a craniotomy and aneurysm clipping so it would not rupture and cause her to die. Ceron would have to travel to Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii for the surgery, but the command was unable to fund her daughter’s travel expenses. Like many young Sailors, Ceron did not have the money saved to pay for her daughter’s expenses, let alone the expense of flying family in to care for her daughter in her absence. Ceron’s command referred her to Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, who paid for her daughter’s ticket from Japan to Hawaii and back. “Some people are under the impression that their money is not being used for the services NMCRS advertises. I’m living proof that they are. Without their support, I honestly don’t know what I would have done,” said Ceron. NMCRS provides a variety of services such as financial assistance with food, rent or mortgage, utilities, home repairs, establishing a new residence, including security and utility deposits, car repairs and insurance deductibles, medical expenses, military pay shortage or delayed entitlements, funeral expenses, and emergency travel expenses. The NMCRS fund drive goes through the month of March and donations made in Hampton Roads help Sailors and Marines in this geographic area. To donate, contact your command’s coordinator. In August 2005, Chief Hospital Corpsman Lisa Ceron, then a new second class, was stationed in Iwakuni, Japan. She was a single parent to a three-year-old daughter, and — See CERON, next page

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The Courier | March 2014

CERON — Continued from previous page

that would be enough for most young Sailors to handle. Then doctors diagnosed Ceron with a cerebral aneurysm. The news sent her into a tailspin emotionally, since her parents had died from ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brain (cerebral) aneurysm is a bulging, weak area in the wall of an artery that supplies blood to the brain. In most cases, a brain aneurysm causes no symptoms and goes unnoticed. In rare cases, the brain aneurysm ruptures, releasing blood into the skull and causing a stroke. When a brain aneurysm ruptures, the result is called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Depending on the severity of the hemorrhage, brain damage or death may result. Thinking of her parents, Ceron feared the worst, and, with a young child, she didn’t want that same fate. The doctors said she would require a craniotomy and aneurysm clipping so it would not rupture and cause her to die. Ceron would have to travel to Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii for the surgery, but the command was unable to fund her daughter’s travel expenses. Like many young Sailors, Ceron

did not have the money saved to pay for her daughter’s expenses, let alone the expense of flying family in to care for her daughter in her absence. Ceron’s command referred her to Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, who paid for her daughter’s ticket from Japan to Hawaii and back. “Some people are under the impression that their money is not being used for the services NMCRS advertises. I’m living proof that they are. Without their support, I honestly don’t know what I would have done,” said Ceron. NMCRS provides a variety of services such as financial assistance with food, rent or mortgage, utilities, home repairs, establishing a new residence, including security and utility deposits, car repairs and insurance deductibles, medical expenses, military pay shortage or delayed entitlements, funeral expenses, and emergency travel expenses. The NMCRS fund drive goes through the month of March and donations made in Hampton Roads help Sailors and Marines in this geographic area. To donate, contact your command’s coordinator.

NMCRS: A Helping Hand for Sailors and Marines Story and photos by MCC (SW/AW) Leslie Tomaino NMCP Public Affairs

The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society 2014 Fund Drive had been extended to April 11 in Hampton Roads. There’s still time to donate! For 110 years, NMCRS has been there for Sailors, Marines, and their families. In today’s economy, many civilian and military families alike are struggling to make do with less and stretch resources. Single Sailors and Marines struggle with the same issues and that’s why now NMCRS services are needed more than ever. The Society offers many services to include Quick Assist Loans and financial counseling which can benefit many first-term Sailors. It is often these Sailors who may be inexperienced with money management or just need a helping hand when they find themselves in unplanned situations. Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Sonia Strickland was one such Sailor who back in 2001 as a young E-2 was living out in town. Like so many Sailors, the freedom and independence of renting vice staying on the ship came with many responsibilities and commitments she hadn’t counted or planned for. “I couldn’t pay my utilities and buy food after paying my rent, car note and insurance. I had heard of (NMCRS), but my pride was getting the best of me. I felt ashamed and scared that I would be out in the street and in trouble with my command,” said Strickland.

When a Sailor or Marine like Strickland feels they need money fast, they can qualify for emergency financial assistance through an interest-free loan to be used for basic living expenses, temporary needs, and family emergencies. There’s no application fee and no appointment needed. Sailors and Marines can get up to $500 in a matter of minutes and get back to their life and responsibilities. “The process was very easy, I brought in my bank statements and financial documents, and they sat down with me to do a personalized financial budget,” said Strickland. “They wrote me a check for a no interest loan worth a month of groceries, paid a month’s utilities, and created a repayment plan that worked for me.” When Sailors and Marines seek out financial assistance and counseling through NMCRS, they can expect great things as well. Caseworkers will listen to understand the service members financial situation, as well as help them understand their bills and unexpected expenses, if they need it. The caseworker will help them create a plan for financial success, making sure their budget helps them figure out how to spend their money and not run out. They’ll also get money-saving resources and tips to help stretch your dollars. “After they assisted me, I felt a sense of great support. They provided me with not only temporary financial support but tools to manage my money wisely and ways to get out of debt,” — See STRICKLAND, next page


March 2014 | The Courier

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Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month The Gastroenterology Clinic helped staff and patients prevent colon cancer by marking Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month with an awareness booth on March 26. Hospitalman Egor Fomin spoke with beneficiaries about the important of colon cancer screening at the appropriate age, as well as education about common upper and lower GI diseases. During the day, he passed out dozens of cereal bars as a reminder to eat whole grains, as well as pamphlets and books about GI health and colonoscopy.

Photos by Rebecca A. Perron

Cynthia Foster, Internal Medicine Clinic staff, looks at material about fighting colon cancer.

A patient stops and looks at a model that explains GI ulcers.

STRICKLAND — Continued from previous page

said Strickland. “I did feel overwhelmed because I knew I had a lot of work ahead of me to get my finances right at the same time they were there to support me if I needed it.” NMCRS provides completely confidential services and funds to help with a wide range of financial needs. Eligible personnel include active duty or retired Sailors and Marines, eligible family members with a military ID card, surviving spouses, and reservists on active duty of 30 days or more. Common situations include: food, rent/mortgage, utilities, essential home repairs, establishing a new residence, including security and utility deposits, car expenses, such as repairs and insurance deductibles,

Debbie Thompson, Ophthalmology Clinic, speaks with HN Egor Fomin about medical conditions that can cause polyps and require additional colon cancer screenings. medical expenses, military pay shortage/delayed entitlements, and funeral expenses. “I needed help and back then the economy was not like it is today so you can only imagine how many Sailors and their families are having a hard time trying to keep food in the fridge, heat and lights on,” said Strickland. “Without these donations to NMCRS, we are turning our backs on our Sailors and Marines by not keeping these services available. And if we are in a place to give back, why not give back to your Navy family?” To learn more about the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society and how you can give a helping hand to the Navy-Marine Corps family visit, www.nmcrs.org.


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The Courier | March 2014

Vikki Garner Health Care Quality Awards Presented Naval Medical Center Portsmouth awarded the 2013 Vikki Garner Health Care Award for Excellence in Quality Improvement during a ceremony on March 13, presenting the award to the STEMI Alert Committee for the Chest Pain Center improvement project. During the ceremony, Rear Adm. Elaine C. Wagner presented the trophy and Letters of Appreciation to Cmdr. Michael Juliano, Cmdr. Daniel D’Aurora, Lt. Cmdr. Tara McGinnis and Lt. Cmdr. Neil Williams. A STEMI is a kind of heart attack detected by an electrocardiogram, or EKG. To be designated a “Chest Pain Center,” a hospital must be able to perform an EKG, present it to the physician and have it read within 10 minutes of the patient’s arrival. Patients must then be seen, treated, sent to the catheterization lab and receive an intervention (balloon, stent, etc.) within 90 minutes of arrival from the Emergency Room. The Vikki Garner award is presented each year to the individual or team who identifies an opportunity for quality improvement within NMCP or one of its clinics, and then Photo by DC2 (SW) Samantha Forbes implements a long-lasting solution that significantly improves Rear Adm. Elaine Wagner, NMCP commander, awards Letters the quality of care and safety for patients. The award was of Appreciation to members of the STEMI Alert Committee created in memory of Garner, who died in 2007 after servon March 13. They won the 2013 Vikki Garner Award, which ing as NMCP’s associate director of Health Care Quality recognized the team for their efforts with the Emergency Improvement and who is remembered for her contributions Department’s Chest Pain improvement project. to the culture of excellence at the medical center. Lt. Cmdr. Krystal Bauman, Donna Sandifer and Lt. Wagner also presented LOAs to two finalists who competed for the award. Director of Nursing Services’ Lt. j.g. Matthew Britt Cmdr. Tara McGinnis, also of DNS, were recognized for and Hospitalman Justin Street for their work with the “proper use “nurse-driven foley catheter management protocol,” directly and documentation of behavioral and non-behavioral restraints,” contributing to the reduction of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. which increased compliance from 67 to 92 percent.

Civilian of the Quarter Awards Congratulations to the Civilians of the Quarter for the 4th Quarter of 2013! They received recognition during a ceremony March 25, where NMCP deputy commander, Capt. James L. Hancock, presented them with certificates and plaques. From left: Eunice McNair, Category II Clinical, Barbara Swan, Category II, Administrative; and Eldon Hayes, Category I, Clinical. Not pictured: Jacqueline Davis, Category I, Administrative. Photo by MC1 (SW/AW) Steven Weber


March 2014 | The Courier

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Civilian in the Spotlight Melinda Zimmerman Hometown: Antrim, N.H. Years of service civilian: 7 years, almost 4 years at NMCP, (5 years active duty as an HM3) Job: Deputy command publication officer, procurement officer, travel coordinator What do you like most about your job? I enjoy being deputy publication officer: facilitating publication approval and assisting authors with that process. I coordinate procurement for research protocols. It’s exciting to assist researchers and staff in the beginning stages of their research. I enjoy making micro purchases and managing contracts to get the protocols up and running.

Photo by MC1 (SW/EXW/AW) Gary Johnson

What do you do in your off-duty time/hobbies? In my off-duty time, I am a team manager for my son’s U11 Rush Competitive Travel Soccer Team and I play on an adult indoor soccer team. We are die hard soccer fans in our house so we enjoy playing and watching soccer. We also enjoy the outdoors so if we are not involved with soccer we are usually biking, kayaking or participating in running events.

Favorite movie: Movies from the Fast and the Furious franchise Favorite food: French fries Anything else interesting about yourself that you would like to tell us? I was a finalist for Military Newspapers Spouse of the Year in 2012, and Still Serving in 2013, which honors veterans involved in their community. I am the proud mother of three boys and have a military spouse who just returned from his seventh deployment. My oldest is in the Air Force as a Tactical Air Control Party specialist. I’m a member of the Autism Society in support of my youngest and a strong supporter of the Red Sox Home Base program that supports and assists military members suffering from PTSD. Why is he/she nominated as Civilian in the Spotlight? “Melinda sets the example for other to follow at work, at home and in her community,” June Brockman, publication officer. “She very successfully coordinates multiple responsibilities at CID and always has a ‘can-do’ positive attitude in the face of sometimes impossible deadlines. She is a major asset to CID and NMCP research while filling the role of a military spouse with three children, one of whom has special needs. We are proud of Melinda and are very fortunate to have her as part of our team. We are glad to have the opportunity to recognize her for her many accomplishments.”

Sailor in the Spotlight HM2 Jordan Wagner Hometown: Columbus, Ohio Years of naval service: 8 years, two at NMCP Job: DPE executive assistant What do you like most about your job? The opportunities I have daily to grow as a leader and be involved in the mission at a command level. Also, the people in Team DPE always make it happen and are awesome to work with. What do you do in your off-duty time/hobbies? Have fun with my kids; play with the dog; beatbox. Favorite movie: New Jack City Favorite food: Coffee

Photo by MCC (SW/AW) Leslie Tomaino

Why is he/she nominated as Sailor in the Spotlight? “HM2 Wagner’s infectious energy and positive attitude are a great contribution to DPE and the fellow Sailors he works with daily,” Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Robert Joseph, assistant directorate leading petty officer. “He not only provides excellent customer service, but also goes the extra mile when it comes to exam worksheets, frocking letters and other essential tasks to mission readiness here at NMCP.”


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The Courier | March 2014

Senior Sailor of the Quarter As leading petty officer of the Medical-Surgical Department, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class (SW) Russell J. Wagenman provided unparalleled professional leadership to 75 enlisted Sailors while delivering patient care to more than 1,500 patients. He effectively managed daily activities and orientation of junior personnel, ensuring tasks were completed quickly and shift transitions went smoothly. Wagenman continued to show leadership through coordination and facilitation of more than 60 departments and directorate physical fitness sessions, preparing more than 300 staff for the Fall 2013 Physical Fitness Cycle.

Photos by Rebecca A. Perron

Sailor of the Quarter As the leading petty officer for Resuscitative Medicine and Tactical Combat Casualty Care Program manager, Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (FMF) Terron A. Lasalle guided and mentored three Sailors in the certification of 746 students in eight Resuscitative Medicine Training Programs, increasing the instructor cadre by 13 for the TCCC, Advanced Cardiac and Pediatric Life Support courses. Additionally, he supervised 24 instructors and coordinated two providers and one instructor course, which led to the qualification of 54 staff in the principles of high quality trauma care. He contributed 384 man-hours of training to 96 students in Basic Life Support and Heart Saver techniques with a certification rate of 100 percent at a command cost avoidance of $149,000 in enrollment and travel fees.

Junior Sailor of the Quarter Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (FMF) Harold Kyle Q. Aglit led 186 newly reported petty officer first class and below Sailors to complete 5,467 hours of computer-based military training. He facilitated two petty officer leadership courses for 25 Sailors, ensuring all had a firm understanding of the expectations of a petty officer third class. As the owner of the command petty officer first class and below email distribution list, he ensured enlisted Sailors received access to information about topics in and out of the command and maintained 100 percent accuracy of the list. His support as a basic life support instructor led to the recertification of 60 staff members.


March 2014 | The Courier

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Blue Jacket of the Quarter As the program administrator for two mission-essential training programs, Hospitalman Kelsie A. Alexander expertly managed and led 65 instructors which resulted in the certification of 81 medical providers throughout the command and associated branch health clinics and contributed to a cost avoidance of $23,500. Additionally, as a basic life support instructor, her efforts resulted in the training of 144 students in Basic Life Support and Heart Saver skills, resulting in a 100 percent certification rate directly supporting the readiness and professional development pillar.

March Awards MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL

Capt. Rees Lee Cmdr. Kathleen Hinz Cmdr. Shannon Johnson Cmdr. Lanny Littlejohn Cmdr. Arvin Trippensee Lt. Cmdr. Travis Polk HMCM (SW/AW) Anna Sanzone

NAVY & MARINE CORPS COMMENDATION MEDAL

Cmdr. Daniel Daurora Cmdr. Jose Henao Cmdr. Michael Juliano Cmdr. Arvin Trippensee Lt. Cmdr. Matt Beery

Lt. Cmdr. Shayne Morris Lt. Duane Rowe HMC (SW/AW) Marvin Celestino HMC (SW/AW) Richard Laxa HM1 (SW) Farrah Fleury

NAVY & MARINE CORPS ACHIEVEMENT MEDAL

Lt. Cmdr. Tara McGinnis Lt Jason Leidel Lt Stephanie Long Lt. j.g. Matthew Britt Lt. j.g. Kendra Johnson Lt. j.g. Ashley Sanders Ensign Glenn Campbell HM1 Koleea Flagg

April Is Sexual Assault Awareness Month • Heighten Your Awareness

• Support Victims

• Participate

April 3 – Walk a Lap in Their Shoes, Gym, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. April 11 – Sexual Assault Awareness Month 5K Run/Walk, Gym, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Look for other activities throughout the month

HM1 (FMF) Robert Nester HM1 Tiffany Perkins HM2 Arturo Alarcon GM2 Christopher Bellora LS2 (SW/AW) Bryan Christy HM2 Jesse Delgado Jr. HM2 (FMF) Joseph Hardebeck HM2 Keaundra Thomas HM2 Jeffrey White HM3 (SCW) Jacob Fisher HM3 Angelica Garcia HM3 Jennifer Knight HM3 Carolyn May HM3 Asia Robinson HN Tobias Marve


Shipmate of the Month

Photo by MCC (SW/AW) Leslie Tomaino.

HN HM3 Brandon Neal, DQM HN Addison Xiong, DMH HM2 Sebastian Kayser, DPC HN Nicole Harthausen, DSS HM3 Jessica Atwood, DPHS

HN Kayla Currithers, DCSS HN Sean Hebert, DNS HN Amber Nash, DMS YN3 Jeanette Dyrek, DFA HM3 Ky Amos, DPE

Mentor of the Month As Emergency Department’s leading petty officer, HM1 Adrian Cassanova advises the leading chief petty officer and department head on all enlisted matters that support mission accomplishment. He ensures that evaluations and midterm counselings are completed on time

as well as submits subordinate awards up the chain of command. He is also responsible for providing oversight to junior officers and enlisted Sailors to ensure they provide quality emergent health care to more than72,000 beneficiaries. “I believe we should treat every Sailor the way would want to be treated,” said Cassanova, who has been at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth since July 2010. “The Mentorship Program challenges all staff and leadership to positively impact the careers of those they lead and others who need guidance.” Cassanova directly mentors six Sailors.

Photo by MC1 (SW/EXW/AW) Gary Johnson

“Mentors are directly responsible for the growth and development of their protégé. The look on a Sailor’s face after accomplishing something in which you contributed is what made me want to be a mentor.” The advice Cassanova gives other mentors is to understand that we won’t always have the answers, and sometimes we aren’t the particular fit for that Sailor. But to be a good mentor, Cassanova says you have to stay engaged and you have to be a good communicator. Would you like to become a mentor or find a mentor? Check out the Mentor Program on the Intranet to find valuable information about mentoring at NMCP. Go to the directory website map and look under “M” to learn more and join the Mentor Program today. Everyone is welcome.


March 2014 Courier