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*** FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE *** Contact: Nicola McIntosh Public Relations Officer for Idaho Zions Bank Tel: (208) 333-2748

Contact: Kelly Anderson Eastern Idaho Region President Zions Bank Tel: (208) 678-1054

EIGHT INDIVIDUALS RECEIVE ZIONS BANK HOMETOWN HERO AWARD AT IDAHO FALLS CHUKARS BASEBALL GAME ON AUG. 14 IDAHO FALLS; Aug. 14, 2013 — From the police officer whose swift and decisive action saved a young boy from choking to the trooper who works tirelessly to keep illegal drugs off our streets and out of our communities to the soldiers who leave their homes and families behind to defend our freedom, our first responders are real-life heroes. Zions Bank honored eight of these individuals with the Hometown Hero Award at the Idaho Falls Chukars baseball game on Aug. 14. The bank offered complimentary tickets to the game for all first responders and all active duty, guard and reserve military personnel and their families, and solicited nominations for the award from the community. “The heroic tasks performed by the first responders in our communities are all in a day’s work,” said Kelly Anderson, Eastern Idaho Region President for Zions Bank, who emceed the awards presentation. “We wanted to honor these outstanding men and women who do so much every day to keep our communities safe and secure.” The following individuals were recognized in a special ceremony prior to the baseball game for their heroic actions and received a commemorative bronze eagle statue: Staff Sergeant Sean Rash has served his country for more than 16 years in the Army and the National Guard, and was twice deployed to Iraq and once to Bosnia. He has received the Bronze Star Medal, the Army Commendation Medal and the Army Achievement Medal. He lives in Roberts and works as a recruiter for the Idaho Army National Guard.


ZIONS BANK Press Release – Page 2 Aug. 15, 2013

Sergeant Gary Hagen of the Rexburg Police Department was credited for his swift and decisive action in August 2012 that saved the life of an infant child who was choking and in distress. Today, Benjamin Ogbuehi is a healthy 2-year-old thanks to Sergeant Hagen’s quick response. A special team award was presented to Trooper Marcus Graham of the Idaho State Police, Deputy Jake Johnson and Deputy Mike Johnson of the Bingham County Sheriff’s Department and Sergeant Wes Wheatley and Corporal Andrew Adrignola of the Blackfoot Police Department. The teamwork by this group following a terrible motorcycle accident helped save a man’s life and prevented the accident scene from getting worse. Corporal Vance Cox of the Idaho State Police based in Idaho Falls has disrupted and dismantled numerous illegal drug trafficking organizations, including making a traffic stop that netted one of the largest drug seizures in Idaho history. He frequently speaks to youth groups about being good role models and making good decisions. Finally, Zions Bank created a special Community Service Award to recognize a retired member of the Idaho Falls Fire Department for his efforts to restore a 1930 ladder truck to its original glory. Retired Captain Brett Johnson received a donation from the bank to thank him for transforming the truck into a true gem for his community. Other highlights of the pre-game event included landing the Air Idaho Rescue helicopter on the baseball field, the Idaho Falls Fire Department Pipes and Drums as well as a Color Guard featuring members from the Idaho Falls Fire Department, the Bonneville County Sheriff’s Office and the Idaho State Police. The National Anthem was sung by 13-year-old Marissa Haacke of Idaho Falls. Zions Bank operates 26 full-service financial centers in Idaho and 102 financial centers throughout Utah. In addition to offering a wide range of traditional banking services, Zions Bank is also a leader in small business lending and has ranked as the No. 1 lender of U.S. Small Business Administration 7(a) loans in Idaho’s Boise District for the past 11 consecutive years. Founded in 1873, Zions Bank has been serving the communities of the Intermountain West for


ZIONS BANK Press Release – Page 3 Aug. 15, 2013

140 years. Additional information is available at www.zionsbank.com. #

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THUR SDAY, AU GUST 22, 2013 

COMMUNITY Hometown

Heroes

Zions Bank honors soldiers, first responders for exemplary service

Submitted by Zions Bank rom the police officer whose swift and decisive action saved a young boy from choking to the trooper who works tirelessly to keep illegal drugs off the streets and out of communities, to the soldiers who leave their homes and families behind to defend freedom, first responders are real-life heroes. Zions Bank honored eight of these individuals with the Hometown Hero Award at the Idaho Falls Chukars baseball game on Aug. 14. The bank offered complimentary tickets to the game for all first responders and all active duty, guard and reserve military personnel and their families, and solicited nominations for the award from the community. “The heroic tasks performed by the first responders in our communities are all in a day’s work,” said Kelly Anderson, Eastern Idaho region president for Zions Bank, who emceed the awards presentation. “We wanted to honor these outstanding men and women who do so much every day to keep our communities safe and secure.” The following individuals were recognized in a special ceremony prior to the baseball game for their heroic actions and received a commemorative

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Submitted photos

A group of first responders from the Blackfoot area was honored with Zions Bank's Hometown Hero Award in a ceremony before the Idaho Falls Chukars baseball game on Aug. 14. The teamwork by this group following a terrible motorcycle accident helped save a man’s life and prevented the accident scene from getting worse. From left, Doug Flint of Zions Bank, Trooper Marcus Graham of the Idaho State Police, Cpl. Andrew Adrignola and Sgt. Wes Wheatley of the Blackfoot Police Department, Deputy Mike Johnson and Deputy Jake Johnson of the Bingham County Sheriff's Department, and Dirk Stanger of Zions Bank's Blackfoot Financial Center. bronze eagle statue: Staff Sgt. Sean Rash has served his country for more than 16 years in the Army and the National Guard, and was twice deployed to Iraq and once to Bosnia. He has received the Bronze

Cpl. Vance Cox of the Idaho State Police was recognized for his success in disrupting and dismantling numerous illegal drug trafficking organizations, including making a traffic stop that netted one of the largest drug seizures in Idaho history. Cameron Cook, assistant manager of Zions Bank’s Idaho Falls Downtown Financial Center, presented the award.

‘The Sapphires’ to be shown at ISU

T

information is he fall ON CAMPUS at www.pocatelsemester BOB DEVINE lofilmsociety. gets uncom/sapphires. der way this “The Great weekend at the Gatsby” will Bengal Theater be shown in the Pond Stunext Mondent Union, as day through the acclaimed Wednesday, hit, “The SapAug. 26 to 28, phires” will be at 8 p.m. Based on the bestshown on Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 24 and 25, at 5 selling novel, Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Muland 7 p.m. Based on a true ligan star in this adaptation story, this multiple award of the timeless classic about winning comedy/drama follows four Australian Ab- a young man’s journey to make something of himself original girls whose talent and manager leads them to in a difficult and sometimes unforgiving industrial age Vietnam, where they learn world. (Rated PG-13) Adabout love, friendship and war while entertaining bat- mission is $2 for the public, $1 for ISU staff, or free for tle weary soldiers. Rolling ISU students with Bengal Stone magazine calls the ID. movie, “a blast of joy and The futuristic movie, music that struts right into your heart.” (Rated PG-13) “Oblivion” will be shown on Admission is $2 for the pub- Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 3 and 4, at 8 p.m. Starlic, $1 for ISU staff, or free for ISU Students with Ben- ring Tom Cruise and See Devine, A11 gal ID. Trailer and more

Star Medal, the Army Commendation Medal and the Army Achievement Medal. He lives in Roberts and works as a recruiter for the Idaho Army National Guard. Sgt. Gary Hagen of the Rexburg

Staff Sgt. Sean Rash of the Idaho Army National Guard was recognized for more than 16 years of service to his country including two tours of duty in Iraq and one tour in Bosnia. He also threw out the ceremonial first pitch. Kelly Anderson, left, and Brian Garrett of Zions Bank helped present the award.

Police Department was credited for his swift and decisive action in August 2012 that saved the life of an infant child who was choking and in distress. Today, that child is a healthy 2-yearSee Heroes, A11

Sgt. Gary Hagen of the Rexburg Police Department received Zions Bank's Hometown Hero Award in recognition of his swift and decisive action that saved the life of an infant boy who was choking and unresponsive in 2012. Jason Benedict, manager of Zions Bank’s Rexburg Financial Center, presented the award.

LEARN THE SECRETS TO SELF-ESTEEM AT COUNSELING COURSE CHUBBUCK — The Secrets to Self-Esteem, a therapeutic group for girls, facilitated by Whitney Warr Allen, LPC, will be available for girls grades 6 through 8 and in grades 9 through 12 on Thursday evenings from 5:30 to 6:50 p.m. for sixth- to eighth-graders and 7 to 8:20 p.m. for ninth- to 12th-graders starting Sept. 5. The group will run weekly through Oct. 24. It will be held at Center Counseling, 4460 Central Way in Chubbuck. Groups cost $250, which includes all eight sessions. Register by Aug. 23 to receive a 10 percent discount. For more information, call 2371711 and ask for Whitney or e-mail whitneywarr.lpc@gmail.com.

ADOPT A KITTY AT SUNDAY HUMANE SOCIETY EVENT POCATELLO — Due to a large number of cats and kittens the Bannock Humane Society has in their adoption program, they will hold a special cat/kitten adoption day Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. at 850 Barton Road, Pocatello. The special adoption fee is $35, and that includes the spay/neuter, basic shots and a rabies shot.

BRIEFS ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR EASTERN IDAHO STATE FAIR BLACKFOOT — The Eastern Idaho State Fair is only weeks away, and right now gate and carnival tickets are being offered at discount pricing if you purchase them on or before Aug. 30. This is the second year the EISF has offered advance gate tickets for all ages. Purchasing tickets before opening day will save you 50 cents on each adult and senior ticket and keep you from waiting in line for entry. Advance adult (12 and up) tickets are $5.50, advance senior (65 and up) tickets are $3.50, children’s (6-11) tickets are only $2 and children 5 and under are always free. Carnival wristbands and coupon books are also being sold at a discount this year. Carnival wristbands, which are good for unlimited carnival rides any single day of the fair, are only $25 if you purchase them in advance and return to their original price of

$30 once the fair opens. The EISF also offers a 20 percent advance discount on ride coupons, allowing you to purchase a book of 30 coupons for only $20. You can also take advantage of midweek savings by purchasing Pepsi wristbands that include gate admission along with unlimited carnival rides for just $25. Pepsi Wristband Days will be held Tuesday, Sept. 3; Wednesday, Sept. 4; and Thursday, Sept. 5. Pepsi wristbands can be purchased in advance, or outside each main gate of the fair on Sept. 3, 4, and 5. All carnival and gate tickets can be purchased at Vickers Western Stores in Idaho Falls and Pocatello, at the EISF ticket office in Blackfoot, or over the phone at 208-785-2480, ext. 7. The Eastern Idaho State Fair is a 16-county fair district that is in its 111th year of operations. More than 224,000 people visit the annual event, making it Eastern Idaho’s longest running and largest community event. The mission of the EISF is to provide wholesome, affordable family education and entertainment in a clean and safe agricultural environment. “It’s a Feeding Frenzy” showcases the EISF’s rich tradition of the best fair food in the Intermountain West. C M Y K


MorningNews

LOCAL

www.am-news.com

Saturday, August 17, 2013

3A

Zions Bank honors team of first responders as Hometown Heroes For the MORNING NEWS IDAHO FALLS — From the police officer whose swift and decisive action saved a young boy from choking to the trooper who works tirelessly to keep illegal drugs off our streets and out of our communities to the soldiers who leave their homes and families behind to defend our freedom, our first responders are reallife heroes. Zions Bank honored eight of these individuals with the Hometown Hero Award at the Idaho Falls Chukars baseball game on Aug. 14. The bank offered complimentary tickets to the game for all first responders and all active duty, guard and reserve military personnel and their families, and solicited nominations for the award from the community.  “The heroic tasks performed by the first responders in our communities are all in a day’s work,” said Kelly Anderson, Eastern Idaho Region President for Zions Bank, who emceed the awards presentation. “We wanted to honor these outstanding men and women who do so much every day to keep our communities safe and secure.”  The following individuals were recognized in a special ceremony prior to the baseball game for their heroic actions and

including making a traffic stop that netted one of the largest drug seizures in Idaho history. He frequently speaks to youth groups about being good role models and making good decisions. Finally, Zions Bank created a special Community Service Award to recognize a retired member of the Idaho Falls Fire Department for his efforts to restore a 1930 ladder truck to its original glory. Retired Captain Brett Johnson received a donation from the bank to thank him for transforming the truck into a true gem for his community.

Photo courtesy of Zions Bank A group of first responders from the Blackfoot area was honored with Zions Bank’s Hometown Hero Award in a ceremony before the Idaho Falls Chukars baseball game on Aug. 14. The teamwork by this group following a terrible motorcycle accident helped save a man’s life and prevented the accident scene from getting worse. From left, Doug Flint of Zions Bank, Trooper Marcus Graham of the Idaho State Police, Corporal Andrew Adrignola and Sergeant Wes Wheatley of the Blackfoot Police Department, Deputy Mike Johnson and Deputy Jake Johnson of the Bingham County Sheriff’s Department, and Dirk Stanger of Zions Bank’s Blackfoot Financial Center.

received a commemorative bronze eagle statue: Staff Sergeant Sean Rash has served his country for more than 16 years in the Army and the National Guard, and was twice deployed to Iraq and once to Bosnia. He has received the Bronze Star Medal, the Army Commendation Medal and the Army Achievement Medal. He

lives in Roberts and works as a recruiter for the Idaho Army National Guard. Sergeant Gary Hagen of the Rexburg Police Department was credited for his swift and decisive action in August 2012 that saved the life of an infant child who was choking and in distress. Today, Benjamin Ogbuehi is a healthy 2-year-old thanks

to Sergeant Hagen’s quick response. A special team award was presented to Trooper Marcus Graham of the Idaho State Police, Deputy Jake Johnson and Deputy Mike Johnson of the Bingham County Sheriff’s Department and Sergeant Wes Wheatley and Corporal Andrew Adrignola of the Blackfoot

GUARD, continued from 1A provide support to the Beaver Creek Fire in central Idaho. The mission assignment enables the National Guard to provide check-

point security personnel who will assist with road closures in the area. Blaine County requested the assistance due to current evacuations, and the

potential for those evacuation areas to expand. The Idaho Emergency Operations Center, housed at the Idaho Bureau of Homeland

Obituaries Osmond Jed Merrill, 92 Osmond Jed Merrill, known as “OJ” or “Jed” to his friends, passed peacefully at home on Aug. 12, 2013. Jed was born to Ralph Douglas and Lucile Stoddard Merrill on a beautiful sunny day June 3, 1921. He was named by his grandfather, William I. Stoddard. Jed was born in Richmond, Cache County, Utah. The family also lived in Clifton, Blue Creek area of Utah before moving to Moreland. Jed was the fifth son in the family of 13 children. As a young boy, Jed was awarded the “Life Scout” designation to attend the National Boy Scout Jamboree in Washington, D.C., in the 1930s. He was an accomplished athlete, lettering in baseball and basketball, and was the district champion in Horseshoes. He graduated from Moreland High School as class and student body president. Jed married Maria Monserrat in 1946 and moved to Vanport College in Portland, Ore., to attend college after service in the US Army’s 126th Field Artillery Battalion. Later, Jed settled in Eugene, Ore,, where he developed skills as a building contractor, landlord, and teacher at Lane Community College. Jed remained active as a young adult; bowling in a league, singing in Eugene Gleeman, and coming home to Moreland with his family. Whether creating a landscape design, managing and repairing

Funeral services will take place at 1 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 23, 2013, at McHenry Funeral Home, 206 NW Fifth St., Corvallis, Ore. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Lane Community College Foundation “In Memory of Osmond Jed Merrill,” 4000 E. 30th Ave., Eugene, Ore. 97405 or on-line at www.lanecc/edu/foundation apartments, or broadening a mind with a challenging question, Jed kept busy. He raised four children: Victoria Channer of Siletz, Ore.; Debra Jones of South Beach, Ore.; O. Jay Merrill of Bend, Ore.; and Michel (Cindy) Merrill of Bend, Ore. He has five granddaughters Michelle Channer, Ivy Jones, Deena Bahr-Merrill, Natalie Merrill and Eva Merrill. He had settled in the peaceful Alsea Valley gardening with his wife Alvanita Stouder Merrill. He was preceded in death by his wife, Mary, and brothers, Douglas of Salt Lake City; Owen of Salt Lake City; Windsor of Ogden, Utah; Quill from Anchorage, Alaska; Israel of Blackfoot, and one sister, Dona Lue Harris of Moreland. He is survived by brothers Clifford of Moreland; Richard of Thomas; Lloyd of Moreland; Parry of Thomas; Calvin of Claremont, Calif.; and his sister, Pauline Hill of Blackfoot.

Vera Ida FalkLycan-Prisock, 99 Vera Ida Falk-LycanPrisock passed away peacefully in her sleep after a short illness. She died two weeks shy of her 100th birthday. She was born Aug. 29, 1913, in Charlson, N.D., and died Aug. 14, 2013, in Aurora, Ore. She is survived by her two sons, Barry Lycan (Christian) of Aurora, Ore., and Richard Prisock (Paula) of Iowa Park, Texas, four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Vera was preceded in death by her parents, Henry and Ida Falk, two husbands, John R. Lycan and Joe T. Prisock, sisters Fern May Falk Faulds, Della Ethel Falk Turner, Hazel Purdy, Florence Purdy, Bert Purdy and Lester Purdy. She was buried beside her husband, Joe Prisock, at Grove City Cemetery in Blackfoot.

Security, remains activated and continues to monitor the situation, process requests for assistance, and issue mission assignments to support the ongoing fire suppression efforts. The activation and the missions are made possible through the Governor’s disaster declaration, which was issued Aug. 12. “With the Beaver Creek Fire moving toward structures, we are putting all available resources toward the effort,” said BHS director Col. Brad Richy.  “The Idaho National Guard has unique capabilities that will be instrumental in providing for the public’s safety and we thank them for their support.”

Police Department. The teamwork by this group following a terrible motorcycle accident helped save a man’s life and prevented the accident scene from getting worse. Corporal Vance Cox of the Idaho State Police based in Idaho Falls has disrupted and dismantled numerous illegal drug trafficking organizations,

Model railroaders to meet today

For the MORNING NEWS POCATELLO — The Pocatello Model Railroad and Historical Society will hold an open house from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today in UPRR brick building 59 south of the UPRR depot and just north of the Benton Overpass. Everyone is welcome and admission is free.

785-1320

ServiceS

Jerald “Bo” Bowman

Funeral Service: 11:00 a.m. Saturday, August 17, 2013 at Hawker Funeral Home Viewing: One hour prior to services at the funeral home

Carol Lee Smout Graveside Service: 11:00 a.m. Saturday, August 17, 2013 at Springfield Cemetery

Shirley Lucille Dyer Jones Hansen Funeral Service: 2:00 p.m. Saturday, August 17, 2013 at Hawker Funeral Home Viewing: One hour prior to services at the funeral home

a special

for more info visit hawkerfuneralhome.com

Thank You ...to all my wonderful family & friends who made my

90th Birthday Party a Roaring Success!

I Love You All ~ Itha Fullmer

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called to serve: 9 young men head out on or return from their missions C3

THEWEST

FRIday, august 16, 2013

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Managing Editor Rob Thornberry — phone: 542-6795, email: rthornberry@postregister.com

Section of John Adams to close n The section from St. Clair to Lincoln will be closed from 9 a.m. to noon today and Saturday. B y SAMUEL HOWARD showard@postregister.com

Monte LaOrange / mlaorange@postregister.com

Christopher Leichtweis discusses his vision for North Wind on Tuesday after becoming the new president and chief strategic officer. Founder Sylvia Medina retired in March.

Expanding a vision North Wind’s new president sees opportunity elsewhere n Christopher Leichtweis wants to spread the company eastward and to Canada.

Christopher Leichtweis’ entrepreneurial interests began at age 5, when he recycled newspapers and soda bottles.

B y ALEX STUCKEY astuckey@postregister.com

Football memorabilia lines the shelves and university diplomas from back east are mounted on the wall. The view from North Wind’s corner office overlooking the Snake River is the same, but the vision of the person behind the new cherry desk is different. The calm but focused demeanor of company founder Sylvia Medina has vacated, replaced by the energetic, in-your-face attitude of Christopher Leichtweis — the new president and chief strategic officer for North Wind. North Wind is an environmental, engineering and construction services company built from the ground up by Medina beginning in 1997. It works with the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense on waste management, natural resource services and alternative energy, among other things. Medina — who retired in March after selling the company to Cook Inlet Region Inc. (Ciri) in late 2009 — may be gone, but her core values and vision for the company will remain. She left the company with more than 300 employees in 20 locations across the country. Leichtweis plans to take that vision and expand it even farther across the country and into Canada. “North Wind — perspective-wise — is a Western (and) Alaskan firm,” Leichtweis said. “I want to move east (and) continue to widen the bandwidth of the company.” He’s uniquely qualified to do so. Beginning in 1991, he grew the Safe-

Monte LaOrange mlaorange@post register.com

ty and Ecology Corp., based in Knoxville, Tenn., from a basement business to 630 employees. Leichtweis’ time in Tennessee, including earning his MBA at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, led to his affinity for the UT football team, hence some of the memorabilia. The company specializes in removal and remediation of hazardous nuclear materials for federal agencies such as the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense. It provides services across the nation, Europe and the Caribbean, according to its website. The similarities between he and Medina, Leichtweis said, are almost scary. “(They) saw an experienced guy that loves to win and loves to create value for companies,” he said. “I came here to continue on with (Medina’s) dream.” Greg Razo, North Wind CEO, said Leichtweis rose to the top of the president recruits because of those similarities. “He had both the experience of a transition of a small business to a large business

and the entrepreneurial spirit a small business requires,” Razo said. “That put him above and beyond.” Razo also is Ciri’s vice president of government contracting. Leichtweis said his motivation for money fostered his entrepreneurial spirit because he came from nothing. At age 5, he collected newspapers and soda bottles for recycling. Later, he shoveled snow for some extra cash. He even had a house painting business. He always wanted to start his own business but never imagined he’d be where he is now. In fact, he wanted to be an electrical engineer. That dream died after falling short on three interviews for a job at Hewlett-Packard after college. Thirty years later, Leichtweis has big shoes to fill at North Wind. He said he’s ready for it, though. “I’m just going to be myself,” he said. “I’ve got good recognition in the industry and I’m going to continue to do what I do.”

Strong head, stronger heart 7 plead guilty to drug charges I POST REGISTER

Seven eastern Idaho defendants pleaded guilty to methamphetamine distribution charges this week in United States District Court in Pocatello. The defendants were charged in two separate indictments, U.S. Attorney Wendy J. Olson announced in a Thursday news release. Juan Carlos Garcia, 35, of Idaho Falls, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of actual methamphetamine Monday. Co-defendant Benito Vasquez Joya, 58, of Rigby, pleaded guilty to possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of actual methamphetamine. Fausto Enrique Urias, 32, and Erica Rodriguez, 33, both of Idaho Falls, pleadn In a separate case, two Idaho Falls residents entered guilty pleas Wednesday drugs, Continued on Page C5

INSIDE Today’s West

t began like any other Monday for 62-year-old Good Samaritan Lynda Naylor. After a long afternoon spent at Tautphaus Park on Aug. 5, Naylor stepped off the shuttle bus in front of the nursing home. But she quickly noticed something was wrong: The bus was slowly rolling away — the brakes weren’t working. “All I was visualizing was the people inside rolling Naylor down into the driveway and crashing,” she said. “All I could think about was saving them.” The bus driver — who was busy helping seated passengers — seemed unaware of the downward-rolling bus, Naylor said. So she decided to take action. “I was close enough to the door

Bingham Co. News....... C2 Called to Serve.............. C3 Commodities................ C2

Reporter Samuel Howard can be reached at 542-6746.

Griz hurts 2 in I. Park n Both victims are BLM contract technicians, who were not seriously injured. B y SAMUEL HOWARD showard@postregister.com

Two Bureau of Land Management contract technicians were bitten by a grizzly bear in Island Park on Thursday. inside The contractors — n Grizzly hurts both male — were in the 2 Yellowstone southern part of Shot- hikers / C5 gun Valley around noon when a bear charged them, according to a news release from the BLM and Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The bear bit one technician on the n No areas have yet been closed bear, Continued on Page C5

State trooper receives award n Cpl. Vance Cox was given the Hometown Hero award Wednesday.

K I R ST E N JOHNSON

BRIGHT SPOTS

B y RUTH BROWN rbrown@postregister.com

that I thought I could stop it,” Naylor said. “I thought if I got on the bus, I could run and stomp on the brakes.” Standing only 4-foot-9, Naylor lunged forward to jump aboard as the bus was moving. But the bus — quickly gaining momentum — was moving too fast. Instead, as it n Naylor ended up with several broken bones and days in hospital heart, Continued on Page C5

Crime Log..................... C4 Obituaries..................... C2 Religion News......... C3, C4

The portion of John Adams Parkway from St. Clair Road to Lincoln Drive will be closed to traffic today and Saturday. Crews are seal coating the roadway around the Idaho Canal, according to a city news release. The street will be closed from 9 a.m. to noon today and again Saturday. The road will reopen to traffic at noon today and again Saturday at noon when construction wraps up, City Engineer Kent Fugal said. Eastbound and westbound traffic should use First Street as a detour. The seal coating will extend the life span of the road’s surface, Fugal said. “What we are doing on John Adams Parkway is we (are completing) the seal coat and we are doing what we refer to as a fog seal,” Fugal said. “It is basically an oil layer on top to turn it black again and to seal chips into place, so they are less likely to come off.” Other city streets will undergo similar work during the next few days. The city also will put a fog seal on 17th Street/Pancheri Drive from Holmes Avenue to the Snake River on Sunday, but Fugal said he expects only one lane will be closed at a time.

It was the driver’s nervous behavior that turned Idaho State Police Cpl. Vance Cox’s average traffic stop into one of the largest drug busts in state history. Cox received a Zions Bank Hometown Hero award at Wednesday’s Chukars game for his efforts in the drug bust. Cox was flown by helicopter onto Melaleuca Field after the Idaho Falls Fire Department Pipes and Drums band and the color guard performed at the event. Cox stopped the U-Haul truck that was carrying 52 pounds of methamphetamine and 27 pounds of cocaine March 9. The drugs had a street value of $1 million to $1.2 million, according to police reports. n Rexburg officer also honored for saving choking child trooper, Continued on Page C5

Today’s obituaries, Page C2 n R. Shayne Forsgren n Shirley Hansen

In Saturday’s Paper n Building Permits

n Business Calendar


Friday, August 16, 2013

Post Register C5

the west

Rexburg mother’s Panel tackles public defense issue charge is dismissed n Lawmakers have been

bear

From Page C1 thigh and backside and then bit the second technician on his hands. Although both men were knocked down by the bear, the second technician deployed bear spray as the grizzly fled, according to the news release. Idaho Department of Fish and Game regional conservation educator Gregg Losinski said the technicians were assessing habitats on BLM-administered land when the incident occurred. “They were doing their jobs when the bear charged them,” he said. “We’re calling it a surprise incident.” Fremont County EMS and a sheriff’s deputy responded to the incident at about 1:20 p.m., Lt. Bart

Quayle said. Quayle said EMTs checked the victims and decided not to transport them to a hospital. Later, however, the technicians checked in at Madison Memorial Hospital in Rexburg. A Fish and Game biologist met with the victims at the hospital to try to collect samples of the bear’s DNA, according to the news release. The two contract technicians were hired locally, Losinski said. He wouldn’t disclose their names. By 5 p.m., the BLM had not closed any areas as a result of the attack. On July 29, a grizzly bear bit Brett Panting, a wildlife technician for the Wildlife Conservation Society. The incident involving Panting happened about 10 air miles south of where Thursday’s encounter took place.

heart

From Page C1 rolled by, the lift ramp that was lowered out the door smacked Naylor hard in the head. “I remember bleeding from my head,” she said. “I remember someone said, ‘Call an ambulance.’ After that, I don’t remember anything.” The impact caught the attention of the bus driver, who quickly ran to the front of the bus and hit the brakes. Naylor ended up with at least six broken ribs, eight stitches in her head and a punctured lung. Yet she considers herself lucky. “Nothing was broken in my head, so that means I must have a hard head,” she said. “You could say I got a lift out of that

drugs

From Page C1 ed guilty Tuesday to conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of actual methamphetamine. Misty Chapman, 29, also of Idaho Falls, pleaded guilty to distribution of methamphetamine. Garcia, Joya, Urias, Chapman and Rodriguez are scheduled for sentencing Oct. 23 before Chief U.S. District Judge B. Lynn­ Winmill at the federal courthouse in Pocatello. In a separate case, Josue Rodriguez-Sanchez, 25, and Julian Vega-Valdez, 25, both of Idaho Falls, entered guilty pleas Wednesday. Rodriguez-Sanchez pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of actual methamphetamine. Vega-Valdez pleaded guilty to distribution of 5 grams or more of actual methamphetamine. They are scheduled for sentencing Nov. 18 in Pocatello. Co-defendant Fernando Garcia, 31, of Logan, Utah, is expected to enter a guilty plea Aug. 29. According to plea agreements filed in the case, between November 2009 and October 2012, Urias and Garcia conspired to possess and distribute methamphetamine to other individuals in the Idaho Falls area, the news release said. Urias and Garcia previously were convicted of fel-

tasked with bringing the state’s public defense system up to standards set by the constitution. BOISE (AP) — A committee of Idaho lawmakers has begun the complicated task of trying to bring the state’s public defense system in line with constitutional requirements. Members of the Public Defense Interim Committee met in Boise on Thursday to hear from state and national experts who warned that Idaho’s system is so inadequate that it’s likely unconstitutional, and as a result, it’s only a matter of time until a lawsuit forces the state to make major changes. “Idaho must aggressively improve the system it has today,” Idaho Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Burdick said. “This will take tremendous political courage.”

Bear attacks 2 YNP hikers YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — The National Park Service says two people were treated for injuries after an encounter with a grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park. A group of four people was a few miles down a trail southwest of Canyon Village when they saw a young grizzly bear approaching at about 11:30 Thursday morning. A sow grizzly then appeared at close range and charged the group. Two of the hikers discharged bear spray and the sow and cub left. One person was treated at the scene, and a second was taken to a hospital with bite and claw wounds.

one.” Karen Moore, 61, a close friend of Naylor, said the woman’s altruistic behavior is nothing out of the ordinary. “She’ll put her life in front of anyone else’s,” Moore said. “You won’t find many people who will do something like that.” Naylor, who was released from the hospital Aug. 15, is still recovering. But she wouldn’t hesitate to do the exact same thing again. “I would maybe back up the next time, but I wouldn’t hesitate to try and get on the bus again,” she said. “I don’t like to see people hurt, maimed or killed. Time makes you forget about your pain. But my love for the human race is very strong.” To nominate someone for the Bright Spots column, email news@postregister.com. Please include your name and phone number.

ony possession of a controlled substance in Bonneville County on Nov. 9, 2004, and June 7, 2005, respectively, the news release said. Co-conspirator Marco Antonio Echeverria, 25, of Idaho Falls, is scheduled to enter a guilty plea to related drug charges Aug. 29. Conspiracy and possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of actual methamphetamine carries a minimum term of 10 years in prison, a fine of up to $10 million and at least five years of supervised release. Since Urias and Garcia previously were convict-

ed of felony drug offenses, they face mandatory minimum terms of 20 years, fines of up to $20 million and at least 10 years of supervised release, the news release said. Possession with intent to distribute 5 grams or more of actual methamphetamine carries a minimum five-year prison term, a fine of up to $5 million and at least four years of supervised release. Distribution of an undetermined amount of methamphetamine is punishable by up to 20 years in prison, a fine of up to $1 million and at least three years of supervised release.

Alex McDougall / amcdougall@postregister.com

Idaho State Police Cpl. Vance Cox, left, arrived on Melaleuca Field on Wednesday evening before the Chukars game via helicopter to be honored for one of the biggest drug busts in state history.

trooper From Page C1

“It’s refreshing to think that some of those drugs that I took off the road didn’t get into schools or the families that are addicted to them,” Cox said. Cox, 39, said the police shift that made Idaho history started like any other. He spent most of the shift in the office writing reports and was scheduled to get off at 3 a.m. When 2 a.m. rolled around, he finished his last report and thought he had time to try to find one more drunken driver. He got in his car and quickly saw the U-Haul truck swerve across a line and he pulled them over. Cox said the driver was clearly nervous, and after a drug-sniffing K9 was called, she couldn’t take

her eyes off the dog. In 2007, Cox also found nearly 11 pounds of marijuana in a traffic stop. Other lesser but still memorable traffic stops included when Cox found 25 pounds of marijuana and 4 pounds of cocaine. Zions Bank created the Hometown Hero award to recognize the outstanding efforts of local first responders and military personnel. Cox, who has been an ISP trooper since 2000, said he loves his job. “I enjoy (ISP) because there’s so much diversity and every day is different,” Cox said. “One day you’re changing somebody’s tire or helping someone who is disabled, and the next minute you’re stopping an organization that’s selling drugs.”

Rexburg officer honored

Sgt. Gary Hagen of the Rexburg Police Department also was honored with a Hometown Hero award prior to the game. The Rexburg Standard Journal reported that Hagen was recognized for saving the life of 11-monthold Benjamin Ogbuehi, who was choking and not breathing in a November incident. The Standard Journal reported that when Benjamin’s panicked parents “left their apartment and bolted to the hospital, Hagen knew that the baby only had moments to live and pulled the car over.” Hagen performed the Heimlich maneuver and after three attempts, the airway was cleared and the child started to breathe.

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A misdemeanor charge filed against a Rexburg mother who left her infant daughter in a car was dismissed Wednesday. Rexburg Assistant City Attorney Aaron Davis said the injury to child charge against Anya M. K. Frandsen, 32, was dropped because the circumstances of the case did not rise to the level of the charge. The Department of Health and Welfare determined there was no negligence, Davis said. The child was not injured or left alone for a long peri-

od of time, he said, and because the incident happened at 9:30 p.m., the outside temperature was not overly hot. Police said the child was in the car for less than 15 minutes and the temperature was about 74 degrees. “It was an error in judgment, but criminal prosecution was inappropriate,” Davis said. Frandsen’s charge came June 26 when a passerby reported seeing her 1-yearold daughter strapped into a car seat with the vehicle’s windows rolled up. Frandsen was shopping at the time.

Public Defender Sara Thomas. But because there are no guidelines limiting caseloads, and because many of those contracts are flat-fee contracts, there’s a built-in incentive to spend as little time on each case as possible, she said. In some cases, public defenders have to ask county commissioners or a judge for permission before they may hire investigators or expert witnesses, and generally counties don’t provide them with computers or subscriptions to electronic case law databases, putting the public defenders — and their impoverished clients — at a distinct disadvantage against better-funded prosecutors. John Gross with the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers told lawmakers they needed to be prepared to spend money to fix the system. “The reality is it kind of falls to all of you, for better or worse, to bring the system kicking and screaming into the modern era,” Gross said.

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B y RUTH BROWN rbrown@postregister.com

The state’s legal community has been on notice for years. In 2010, a report from the National Legal Aid and Defender Association found that Idaho isn’t adequately satisfying its Sixth Amendment obligations for defendants. That prompted the Idaho Criminal Justice Commission to study the issue, and the commission asked lawmakers earlier this year to take up the matter. The interim committee is expected to present its recommendations and any proposed bills to the full Legislature next year. Among the problems noted by David Carroll, an expert with the 6th Amendment Center in Boston, is the way Idaho pays for public defenders, the lack of training requirements for those attorneys, and the lack of independence they are afforded. Those challenges make it difficult, or sometimes impossible, to meet national justice standards. Many Idaho counties contract with private attorneys to serve as public defenders, said Idaho State Appellate

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