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WINE LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

Table of Contents

Rock Star Winemakers............................................................4

4 Photo by Heather Young

Steve Anglim of Anglim Winery Josh Beckett of Chronic Cellars Shannon Gustafson of Rangeland Wines Austin Hope of Hope Family Wines Steve Peck of J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines Dorothy Schuler of Bodegas Paso Robles Alex Villicana of Villicana Winery & Vineyard

Paso Robles Wine Festival: A Storied History ........................20

30 Photo courtesy of Lisa Pretty

Castoro Cellars: Grape Juice .................................................22 Featured Artist: Adam Perun .................................................24

wine& dine .............................................................................26 Crab Orzo Salad & Tablas Creek Vineyard Thomas Hill Organics Eggplant Tower & Calcareous Vineyards Garlic Stuffed Pork Roast & Pear Valley Vivant Fine Cheese & Jada Wine selections

In the News: HR 1161 Legislation ..........................................37

42 Photo by Creig P. Sherburne

Central Coast Winery Architecture ........................................38 Feature: PasoPort ...................................................................42 A Taste of Downtown Paso Robles ........................................44 Rehabilitating the Farmers Alliance Building .........................48 Wine Event Calendar ..............................................................50 Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance Map................................51 North County Wineries, Vineyards & Tasting Rooms .............52 A Special Thank You to Juice Media .......................................59

59 Photo by Juice Media

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May 2011 | Page 1


DATE NIGHT

Lunch & Dinner

www.robertsrestaurantpaso.com

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1218 Pine Street Downtown Paso Robles (805) 226-5556

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A Word from the

EDITOR Welcome to the inaugural issue of Vino magazine produced by the Paso Robles Press and Atascadero News.

WINE LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

The Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance has partnered with the Paso Robles Press and the Atascadero News to publish VINO, a local magazine focused on Paso Robles Wine Country’s events, wineries, winemakers and the local community. This unique publication showcases how the wine industry impacts our local community, the people, businesses and organizations. VINO also portrays how our local wineries are weaved into the fabric of our community with many of the winemakers, owners, employees and industry businesses. Many of these people are integral to our friendship circles, church congregations, organizations, board members and club fellowships. Through these relationships, the Paso Robles wine community helps make our great city a better place to live, work and play.

I’m excited for our new publication. When I moved to California eight years ago from the Midwest, I knew wine to be white, red and pink. I didn’t know why I liked one red, but not the next. I knew that wines in a box or with a screw top were “bad,” though that’s not always the case today. It took several years and many, many tasting excursions throughout our wine region to realize how diverse wines, even those of the same varietal, are. Over the years I’ve also found my palate has changed. Syrahs and zinfandels once topped my list, and while they are still some of my favorites, petite sirah and cabernet sauvignon are now on top. Last summer I found myself opening up to whites as a cool summer treat, after overlooking whites and pinks because they weren’t red wine.

Atascadero News YOUR HOMETOWN PAPER SINCE 1916

*All editorial decisions are at the discretion of VINO staff. The Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance’s role is to assist the magazine in connecting with the wine community in support of the stories, articles, and features as determined by VINO.

Publisher:

Contributors:

Jason Cross jasonc@pasoroblespress.com

Andrew Bradford Renee Cole Aaron Crutchfield Josh Petray Lisa Pretty Creig P. Sherburne Janis Switzer Hayley Thomas

MAY 2011 Published by the Paso Robles Press & Atascadero News 805.237.6060 www.PasoRoblesPress.com

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Editor: Heather Young editor@atascaderonews.com

I’m always learning something new and discovering new varieties of grapes I hadn’t heard of before. It’s a long way from thinking there were only three varieties of wine — white, red and pink. We’re hoping you learn something new in this magazine and head out into Paso Robles Wine Country to sample a little bit of what this area has to offer. Heather Young Vino Editor May 2011 | Page 3


Rock Star WINEMAKERS

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hen we sip wine at dinner, it's not often that we think about the person, or people, behind the wine. Not only does the grape make the difference, but each winemaker makes different choices that affect the taste of the wine.

We chose seven local winemakers as this issue’s Rock Star Winemakers. We looked for winemakers that were interesting, well-known or produced well-known wine. What we found were seven fun and interesting individuals who weren’t shy and readily jumped into whatever we threw at them at the photo shoot we held earlier this spring. Their personalities came out as Dorothy Schuler taught the others to play croquet on the fly, ride bicycles from Best Bike Zone through the park, drop into Powell's for a quick sugar fix and end at Meritage for a sip of wine. The winemakers are truly rock stars and we enjoyed the time getting to know them. We hope you enjoy getting to know them in the pages of Vino as much as we did. –Heather Young, Editor

Photos by Heather Young

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Special thanks to Best Bike Zone for lending these wonderful bikes for our featured winemakers to ride during our photo shoot.

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Rock Star WINEMAKERS WINEMAKER

Steve Anglim Good fruit, great wine: Anglim keeps it sweet and simple Hayley Thomas VINO

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Photo by Heather Young

Anglim winemaker Steve Anglim hugs his daughter, Sofia, in Downtown City Park. Page 6 | May 2011

teve Anglim’s philosophy on wine is a lot like his parenting: Keep the fundamentals at heart while keeping a hands-off approach. “There’s a tendency, as a winemaker, to want to over-involve yourself, but if you have great fruit, you’re more like what a parent is to a child: You’re just there to make sure the wine turns out and grows into what it can be,” Anglim said. “I realized that the less I worried about [the wine], and the less I interfered with what it was going to be, the better it turned out.” Since his start as a Paso Robles winemaker in 2002, Anglim has learned a lot about what it takes to create a quality bottle of wine, including the importance of always sourcing the best fruit available. It’s become his personal mantra of sorts and the secret to consistent quality. “The longer I’m involved in [winemaking], the more I realize you really need to work with the growers and understand what happens, when it happens and why it happens,” he said. “[The fruit] has the most significant impact on the quality of the wine. We try to work with growers that are as passionate about growing grapes as we are about making wine.” Anglim grew up in Michigan and entered the automotive industry like his father and grandfather before him, eventually taking a job in California with Nissan. Wife Steffanie and daughter Stephanie, now 23, followed. Daughter Sofia was born seven years ago, rounding out what has now become a robust family business.

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“We always had a passion for wine, and knew we wanted to try it,” said Anglim. “I was young enough to think I could do it, and not so old that it would kill me trying.” The risk paid off. In the following years, Anglim gained a glowing reputation producing vineyard-designate Rhône varietals, blends and limited-release family favorites, including pinot noir and cabernet sauvignon. The winemaker has also racked up an immense list of accolades: His wines have taken home gold and silver medals at the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition, American Fine Wine Competition and stolen the spotlight at a slew of other top competitive venues and publications. A true family owned and operated business, Anglim’s tasting room is located in the historic Paso Robles train depot at 8th and Pine streets and manned by Steffanie. Sofia can also sometimes be spotted selling Girl Scout cookies at the location. Anglim said when he’s not making wine, he’s trying to sell the wine he’s made. It’s a true labor of love for a man that lives and breathes his work. “This is what we do. It’s our family business and it’s what keeps us busy,” Anglim said. During the Paso Robles Wine Festival weekend, a dozen or so family members hailing from near and far come out to lend a hand in the tasting room. Said Anglim with a chuckle, “It’s more of an extended-family business at that point.”

740 Pine Street Paso Robles 805-227-6813 www.anglimwinery.com

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Photos courtesy of Steve Anglim

A true family owned and operated business, Anglim's tasting room is located in the historic Paso Robles train depot at 8th and Pine streets and manned by wife Steffanie. Daughter Sofia can sometimes be spotted selling Girl Scout cookies at the location.

Steve and Steffanie Anglim pose for a photo. Steffanie is a welcoming presence at the winery's tasting room.

Steve Anglim rolls up his sleeves and tends to his wine, a true labor of love.

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Rock Star WINEMAKERS WINEMAKER

Josh Beckett Offering a different experience for wine tasters

Photo by Heather Young

Chronic Cellars winemaker Josh Beckett takes a whiff of one of his red wines before sampling it.

Heather Young VINO

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itting in his brightly colored tasting room, Josh Beckett, owner and winemaker of Chronic Cellars, talks about how he and his brother, Jake, came to start their winery. “We just want to do something different,” Beckett said. “We wanted to show everyone we could it on our own. It’s a fun brand. It’s a quality brand at the same time.” Beckett said although people think their winery is only for 21- to 31-year-olds, he said

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it’s not — it’s for everyone. “As edgy as we’ve gone, we’ve made sure quality is No. 1,” he said. “We try to make wines for different people.” Beckett grew up in the wine industry. His family owns and operates Peachy Canyon Winery in Templeton and Paso Robles. “I’m very fortunate to grow up here and in wine,” Beckett said. After he graduated from high school, Beckett left the area and attended college in San Diego, getting an English degree. He returned to the area in 2004. “I started scrubbing floors [at Peachy

Canyon],” Beckett said. “I didn’t want to do what my parents did. At all. I didn’t want to live in Paso again. Growing up I couldn’t get out of here soon enough.” Beckett didn’t plan on coming back to the area, but when his parents moved the tasting room to Highway 46, he said they asked him to come help out for two to three weeks. “I stayed for harvest,” Beckett said. “I haven’t looked back.” In 2004, he spent a California winter working harvest in Australia. Today, he works full time for Peachy Canyon and part time at Chronic.

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“It’s definitely challenging doing both,” Beckett said. While he and his brother, Jake, own and operate Chronic, Beckett continues to make wine for Peachy as well as doing sales for that winery. He said his favorite part of winemaking is the actual farmer, along with the physical work of making the wine. Beckett said he tries to take a minimalist approach to his winemaking as much as he can. “The vineyard speaks for itself,” he said. “If you can stick to the basics, there’s nothing that can beat good grapes and with good grapes you don’t have to do anything.” He said he enjoys blending the different grapes. “Some people have different palates and different ideas of what’s right,” Beckett said. “We’re doing some unorthodox, weird blends.

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We have all walks of life. All they want to do is enjoy wine.” To set themselves apart, and to have fun, Beckett said they try to do as many different things, such as alternate venues, such as Snowbomb in San Francisco. Right now, Beckett said, Chronic wines are only available on the Central Coast and San Diego. And he said one wine is carried at Costco. In addition to winemaking, Beckett, now a Morro Bay resident, spends his free time surfing.

2020 Nacimiento Lake Dr. Paso Robles 805-237-7848 www.chroniccellars.com

Photo by Heather Young

May 2011 | Page 9


Rock Star WINEMAKERS WINEMAKER

Shannon Gustafson Making Rangeland Wines in the vineyard

Photo by Juice Media

Rangeland winemaker Shannon Gustafson takes in the aroma of a wine at Meritage in Paso Robles.

Heather Young VINO

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hannon Gustafson, the winemaker for Rangeland Wines, knew she wanted to be an enologist — a winemaker — since she was 13 years old when she attended a women’s conference in Fresno. She doesn’t come from a family of winemakers, or even a family of wine drinkers, but after that conference at 13, she stayed with a family in France for three weeks when she was 16. At 17 she headed Page 10 | May 2011

off to California State University, Fresno and majored in food science and nutrition with an emphasis in winery production with minors in chemistry and French. She graduated in 2003 and started making wine. She spent time working at a winery in the Bordeaux region of France in 2001 and the Burgundy region in 2007. She has also worked in the wine industry in South Africa and Australia. She met Laird and Lisa Foshay, Rangeland owners, when she worked at Zoller Wine Styling making custom wine for customers.

“I really wanted to learn more about the vineyard,” Gustafson said and added that Laird was looking for a winemaker. She went fulltime with Rangeland in 2009. “One of the things I’ve learned is you make wine out in the vineyard,” Gustafson said. “We want to get the purest wine from the vineyard. We’re looking to make the purist expression of our vineyard.” Gustafson spends every day of harvest out in the vineyard for better quality control. “It’s fun. I like it,” Gustafson said. “I

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really wanted to get out in the vineyard. I really felt I needed to be out in the vineyard to see what’s going on.” The small winery produced 400 cases for its current vintage and Gustafson is not only the winemaker, but also the sales and marketing director and oversees the bottling, as well as a number of other areas. The winery staff includes Gustafson and the Foshays and she said she does a little bit of everything. Rangeland Wines’ flagship wine is the Limestone reserve cabernet. When asked what her favorite wine that she produces is, she said, “You can’t ask a winemaker what their favorite wine is. It is like asking them who their favorite kid is.” Besides making wine, Gustafson also enjoys photography with her Canon 5D

Mark II camera. On the property where Rangeland Wines is located, Gustafson has numerous opportunities to take out her camera with the variety of animals, such as bobcats, Golden eagles, deer, turkeys, bald eagles and red-tailed hawks that populate the area. “I’d much rather be working parttime seeing the sunlight than locked in the [winery] all day,” Gustafson said. “Not every winemaker is so lucky.”

10425 Klau Mine Rd. Paso Robles 805-674-9232 www.adelaidasprings.com Photo by Heather Young

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Rock Star WINEMAKERS WINEMAKER

Austin Hope A Hope family tradition: 30 years and growing Hayley Thomas VINO

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obody in the Hope family could have guessed how far their namesake would take them — that it would one day encompass a celebrated string of wines known round the world. Hope Family Wines has steadily grown in Paso Robles for the past 30 years, producing Treana, Liberty School, Austin Hope, Candor and Westside Red Troublemaker. The farming family relocated from Bakersfield to Paso Robles in 1978 on the advice of an old family friend who suggested planting apples and grapes. “That’s just what we did,” winemaker Austin Hope, a third-generation farmer. The family quickly learned that apples were out, so grapes — by default — became their signature crop. “From there, it kind of evolved into what it is today,” Hope said. “We really had no idea.” At the time, wineries in Paso Robles were scarce and most growers supplied grapes to Northern California. All that would eventually change, and Hope’s father helped push the local wine industry forward as a founding member of what would become the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance and as an entrepreneur. After building a tasting room off Highway 46 West, the family dove headfirst into the world of wine. Still, it was a collaborative effort. “We hired a few winemakers and we had them make the wines for us. We really didn’t have much knowledge of the wine industry,” Hope said. Page 12 | May 2011

Photo courtesy of Juice Media

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But, a passion for wine began to brew in the young farmer. “I already knew the grape side of things because I had grown up in it and it was part of life, so when the wine side of things came around I got really excited,” he said. Hope soon landed a gig with the Napa-based Wagner family at Caymus Vineyards. “That’s really how it got going for me,” Hope said. “I got intrigued and bit by the wine side of [the industry], and saw fullscale production. I was fortunate not only to work the harvests for [Wagner], but he let me follow him around and see all aspects of the wine industry. From then on I thought, ‘This is really something I really want to do.’” The Hope family also began custom crushing for then Wagner-owned label Liberty School, which would in 1995 become part of Hope Family Wines and serve as the young winemaker’s first big break. With a three-person staff and the dream of making wine, “away we went,” Hope said. “Now we’re 40 people, five labels and known worldwide. I don’t think anybody had any idea where it was going to go today, so we all kind of sit back and look at it now and think about how lucky we are.” These days, Hope is sharing that appreciation with his two daughters, Ainsley and Avery. At just 5 and 7 years old, the girls may be showing an aptitude and passion for the family business. Hope recalled a day in the vineyard performing some routine leaf-pulling and shoot removal. “My older daughter was asking what we were doing, and I explained to them why we take the leaves,” said Hope. “It came back up a few weeks later and I said something about it, and my 7-year-old explained that ‘Oh yeah, they’re pulling leaves to get better tannins and more air circulation in there.’ I thought, ‘No way — you’re 7 years old and already getting it.’” Hope Family Wines has always been about family, and that includes employees and the entire Paso Robles Wine Region as a whole. Hope said he’s excited about Paso’s ascent. “I think the biggest excitement right now is that Paso Robles is not only on the map, but it’s on the international map and we’re starting to receive the respect that we have all worked for over the past 30 years,” he said. “It’s really our time to shine.”

Photos courtesy of Hope Family Wines

1585 Live Oak Road, Paso Robles 805-238-4112 www.hopefamilywines.com

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Winemaker Austin Hope spends a day with his daughters, Ainsley and Avery. At just 5 and 7 years old, the girls are already be showing an aptitude and passion for the family business. May 2011 | Page 13


Rock Star WINEMAKERS WINEMAKER

Steve Peck Creating a gateway to the flavors of Paso Robles

Photo by Heather Young

J. Lohr winemaker Steve Peck enjoys a glass of wine with VINO’s other Rock Star winemakers at Meritage.

Josh Petray VINO

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rom making a few barrels of wine a year in the Santa Cruz mountains to helping propel J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines to being named 2010 Winery of the Year by Wine Enthusiast magazine, J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines red winemaker Steve Peck said he will likely never lose excitement for red wines — or the Paso Robles area. Page 14 | May 2011

Peck said he feels lucky to be part of the Lohr family, from its yeast selections, barrel selections, high-tech sorting equipment and sustainable practices to its dedication to an uncompromising penchant for producing quality wines. “There is the shortcut way of doing things — and then there’s the J. Lohr way,” Peck said. “We’re really fortunate to be able to make decisions based on wine quality in an offensive way as op-

posed to making defensive decisions.” Producing his first vintage for the winery in 2007, Peck launched a new series of wines available only in tasting rooms and through wine clubs, a Rhône pedigree mixed bag of Mouvedre, syrah, a grenache rose and more. But most of all, Peck said his day-to-day job “is certainly about making sure that we continue to please a large customer base with our cabernet.”

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“I can’t deny that I have a lot of fun making these little, 200- and 300-case lots,” Peck said. Peck combines a gifted palate, a passion for viticulture and a comprehensive technical knowledge of winemaking practices, according to the Lohrs. So, why red? Peck admits that red wines “just sort of found me.” “The wineries that I’ve worked for, and at J. Lohr, are so dedicated to red wines,” Peck said, with better white wine results from the Arroyo Seco and Monterey County vineyards. Like many winemakers, Peck’s passion for winemaking started at an early age, 17, when he was making zinfandel in the Santa Cruz mountains with his uncle, a teacher in Watsonville. Six, eight, 10 barrels a year with a group of friends were where Peck’s humble roots in winemaking gained footing. In 2007, Peck took the helm with the full portfolio of J. Lohr red wines including J. Lohr Estates, the J. Lohr Vineyard Series and the J. Lohr Cuvée Series. Peck’s roots are in agriculture, and he has a penchant for sustainability. “I’ve really been involved my whole career, basically one step from the guy who takes the fruit from the field and responsible to getting it to the bottle,” Peck said. “I have always felt really aligned with the sustainability movement, and I’m particularly interested in having discussions on maintaining soil erosion.” In the last few years, J. Lohr joined the wave of wineries in the state participating in a pilot program to achieve certification through the California Wine Institute, for which the winery is committed to maintaining and building on, he added. Meanwhile, Peck said he is motivated and excited about the many young winemakers coming up behind him, raising the bar of all that Paso Robles wines have to offer.

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Photos by Heather Young

J. Lohr winemaker Steve Peck sits with his family in Meritage.

“I’m certainly not the oldest winemaker in town by any means, but I’m really excited and motivated by the young winemakers who are coming up behind me,” Peck said. “I’m kind of the baby boomer generation.” Peck said that he feels humbled by the recent honor. “We are a gateway to the flavors of Paso Robles,” Peck said. “We really feel delighted to be in that position.”

6169 Airport Road Paso Robles 805-239-8900 www.jlohr.com May 2011 | Page 15


Rock Star WINEMAKERS WINEMAKER

Dorothy Schuler Bodegas seeks to preserve Iberian wine traditions of the past

Photo by Heather Young

Dorothy Schuler, winemaker and co-owner of Bodegas Paso Robles, shows off some of her wine from her tasting room located on 13th Street.

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estled on a corner property along 13th Street, Bodegas Paso Robles presents a memorable, unique front and even more memorable tasting experience for those fortunate enough to venture into its tasting room. The cozy, small space, wood and marble finishings, comfortable leather couch and ambient light invite visitors to stay and relax with a glass of well-crafted wines, Page 16 | May 2011

created and often served by the co-owner and winemaker herself, Dorothy Schuler. Schuler, one of a small percentage of female winemakers in town and member of Women of the Vine Cellars, said that though she makes the wines and enjoys devoting much of her time and energy to perfecting the fruit-eliciting, alcohol-subduing process, it wasn’t her idea to start the business so much as her husband’s. She took over the reins after a change that left the couple with money invested in

an idea but the originators uninterested in supporting it. “It was sort of on a fluke,” Schuler said. “This was not planned. It was actually my husband’s project, and he and another friend of his who was a salesman in town started this.” Schuler originally agreed to take care of the bookkeeping, but after the salesman backed out and her husband, an engineer, accepted a job in England, he left her with the project and its accompanying responsibilities.

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“I said, ‘Honey, we’ve got all this money in this, what do you want me to do?’” Schuler remembered. “And he said, ‘Just run with it, it’s yours.’” Schuler seems to have taken the advice to heart, having grown the business to an impressive distribution of about 2,000 cases, after seeking the tutelage of a local expert on Spanish varietals early in the venture. She crafts wines in the same tradition as her European counterparts, focusing on the blending process and emphasizing the value of pairing her wines with food. Most of her wines contain a comparably low alcohol content, so that the full flavor and intricacies of the fruit will intrigue the palate. In addition, Bodegas wines contain the unique flavor of Spanish and Portuguese grapes — grapes that have created an small, elite following among California winemakers, despite California’s affable climate toward the varietals. “These grapes, nobody was using them very much any more,” she said. “Even in Spain, where they are from.” Schuler uses grapes such as the fullbodied and vibrant tempranillo, the highly peppery bastardo, and the floral, perfumy malvasia, as well as more traditional varietals like the steady cabernet sauvignon and garnacha blanca, commonly known by its French name: granache blanc. This year, Schuler plans to add deep, red alicante bouschet and white rodella to the mix. “I’ve got two whites now and I think I have seven or eight reds,” she said. “It’s not just a couple of bottles of wine. I blend almost everything, but not everything — but almost everything. And that is the Spanish and Portuguese tradition.” Schuler said that one of the most important aspect in winemaking, for her, is the process. As a prolific writer prior to her winemaking endeavor, she found that processes enriched her work. “Art is a process. I like things that are process-oriented,” she said. “I like that about wine-making. I like that I can get dirty when

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Photo courtesy of Dorothy Schuler

Dorothy Schuler, winemaker and coowner of Bodegas Paso Robles, absorbs the nose of one of her wines in the barrel room.

Photo by Heather Young

I make wine. Wine-making is not for people who have to have their fingernails perfect. I like mucking around in things, and artists do too. It’s a mucking-about process.” Schuler’s history speaks of her affinity for processes. She was associate editor of both Tri-Athlete magazine and Winning, Bicycle Racing Illustated in Brussels; she was on-staff at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and she worked for Tarcher Publishing before it was absorbed into Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, to name a few of

her occupations. Before that, she studied history and literature at the University of Buffalo. Schuler originally hails from one of the oldest families in Atlantic City, N. J. “I have a distributor in New Jersey, and we laugh all the time; I’m probably the first person in the family who made wine and paid taxes on it,” she said, referencing her family’s experience during Prohibition. She explained that she enjoys making Iberian grape-based wines because in doing so, she’s preserving some of the traditions of the past. “There’s a whole lot of us out there who really like that tradition,” Schuler said. “I’m one of them.”

729 13th Street, Paso Robles 805-237-3780 www.bodegaspasorobles.com May 2011 | Page 17


Rock Star WINEMAKERS WINEMAKER

Alex Villicana From winemaking to distilling

Photo by Juice Media

Villicana winemaker Alex Villicana stands with VINO’s other Rock Star winemakers in Meritage.

Josh Petray VINO

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hisk together a bold loyalty to Epicureanism and affinity for winemaking combined with his latest venture — crafting high-end distilled spirits — and Villicana Winery & Vineyard co-proprietor Alex Villicana has a recipe for success. Villicana, a Paso Robles/Los Angeles chef student-turned-winemaker, didn’t realize at first that when his plans of pursuing his passion for food would turn south when the culinary college never opened, he would be the owner and operator of one of Page 18 | May 2011

Paso Robles wine country’s up-andcoming small lot wineries. Not only that, the winemaker is now pursuing certification through the Tobacco and Trade Bureau on his westside Paso Robles ranch for what will stand as the Paso Robles American Viticultural Area’s only distillery, where he will turn his passion for making high-end wines to small lots of grape-based vodka and local, farmer-produced grain-based whiskey. Villicana eventually landed in the hands of winemaker extraordinaire Vic Roberts of Victor Hugo Winery in 1991, working the harvest.

His love for wine would never be the same. “I just fell in love with the whole process,” Villicana said. Making wine on his own didn’t come long thereafter. Later in 1993, Hoffman Mountain Ranch offered up three tons of grapes, “much more than the original hobby we started,” he said. The end result was 200 cases of Villicana cabernet sauvignon. “That was the start of it,” Villicana said of what would become a family owned and operated winery with a penchant for handcrafted wines.

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The finish: around 2,000 cases per year (as of 2011) with roughly 60 to 70 percent produced off the Villicanas’ prime westside 13-acre vineyard and the rest purchased from the Paso Robles area. At Villicana Winery & Vineyard, full focus fixates on small lots of roughly 200 to 300 cases annually with a gamut of varietals and blends. Villicana admits that he spends more time out in the vineyard to optimize its award-winning, limited production wines these days than he does in the kitchen or outdoors smoking Texas-style beef brisket. But his concordance with the culinary credo shines through in a winemaking style that produces wines described as “more food friendly.” “Layers, complexity and balance,” Vil-

licana said. “Not over the top. We really just try and highlight the varietal side of wines.” Villicana, who also acts as a spokesman for the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance alongside names like Steve Lohr, said he feels equally at home in Paso Robles, where he plans to continue to raise his family, coach his daughter’s basketball team and enjoy all that is “Authentic California” in Paso Robles. “For me, that’s what wine is really about: pairing good wines and sharing it with family and friends,” Villicana said. Besides family and friends, volunteering his time at the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance or serving as an ambassador for Paso wines, Villicana is at home on the backroads of bucolic Adelaida and other

westside getaways as an avid runner. Living in Paso Robles, Villicana said he is enamored with Paso’s spirit of experimentation, and it’s something he embraces as well. “We don’t always play by the rules,” he said. “If you look at some of the blends around here, they’re non-traditional. Here in Paso we think it’s fun to experiment — that’s the neat thing.”

2725 Adelaida Road Paso Robles 805-239-9456 www.villicanawinery.com

Get Off the Beaten Path – Experience the Difference! Specializing in Dry Farmed Zinfandel, Barbera, Barbera Port

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(805) 467-2138 May 2011 | Page 19


FEATURE FEATURE

Paso Robles Wine Festival: A storied history Since its launch in 1983, Paso’s marquee wine attraction continues to evolve Josh Petray VINO

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Photo by Hayley Thomas

Page 20 | May 2011

hroughout its history, the Paso Robles Wine Festival has continued to draw in epicurean enthusiasts from around the globe for a day of tasting in Downtown City Park and what’s evolved into a weekend-long series of events showcasing varietals as diverse as Spanish to Italian, Bordeaux to Rhône — not to mention zinfandel, the area’s heritage grape. Founded in 1983 by a tight-knit group of Paso Robles winegrape growers and winemakers, the original festival featured about 17 wineries in a portion of the park. Herman Schwartz grew cabernet, merlot and zinfandel on 500 acres of his 2,500acre vineyard near Whitley Gardens purchased in 1969 and sold in 2006. He was among the original founders. According to Schwartz, at the time the area “had some excellent small wineries” and “dedicated people.” “The wineries were terrific,” Schwartz said, “You can make the best black box in the world, but if you can’t sell the black boxes, you will go out of business.” That’s exactly what Paso Robles growers such as Schwartz didn’t want to happen, so they took action under the premise of launching an event to publicize and draw wine enthusiasts into Paso Robles, an opportunity to taste wines and visit with winemakers, he said. “I laid this on Tom Martin, and he agreed that it should be done,” Schwartz said. Schwartz and others’ interest was in part spurred by a trip to Healdsburg, near

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Photo by Hayley Thomas

Image courtesy of the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance

The Paso Robles Wine Festival, which has grown to become Paso’s marquee wine tasting attraction, was founded in 1983.

the Napa Valley, where a similar event was being put on. Paso Robles Wine Festival was created by a small group of growers and wineries, said Schwartz. At the time, “the ratio of growers to wineries was much in favor of the vineyards.” Organizers used four wine barrels to make tables for wineries to pour wines in about half of the park. The first event managed to attract media recognition from a Los Angeles Times writer and turned out to be a great success, he said, but it didn’t come without some jest. Schwartz said that one of the premier winemakers at the time jokingly remarked that “this is never going to work.” “I said, ‘we’ll see where the proof in the pudding is,’” he said. It wasn’t long thereafter that Schwartz said he was nearly lifted off the ground by a big guy, a winemaker, who said, “You son of a gun — you are right, I am wrong. This is a fabulous event.” The original participating tasting booths were Eberle, Martin Brothers, Ranchita Oaks, HMR, Ltd., Fairview Farm, Creston Manor, Tobias, Estrella, Mastan-

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Castoro owner Bimmer Udsen pours a selection of wine to tasters during the 2009 Paso Robles Wine Festival Grand Tasting in the City Park.

“You son of a gun — you are right, I am wrong. This is a fabulous event.” — Herman Schwartz tuono, Pesenti, Old Casteel, Caperone, Las Tablas, York Mountain, Watson, El Paso de Robles and Twin Hills. The original festival was organized under the auspices of the Paso Robles Chamber of Commerce and transitioned to Vintners and Growers Association, or what’s now the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance. “It had music, dancing, and it just turned out to be a winner,” said Schwartz of the event’s progress after 1983. “We just worked it — it was a constant effort on the parts of the leaders of the wine industry at that time, and it’s something to be proud of.” Every year, more wineries signed up to pour in the park, and the elements were expanded. Today, the event features more than 400 wines, an Artisan Alley for foodies and local chefs, among other enhancements, and the event has grown to occupy all of Downtown City Park. Perks

like large tents provide some relief from the sun, and allow winemakers to give seminars and represent Paso Robles wines. Viticulturist Neil Roberts was one of the many wineries to sign on for the event. Roberts said that from the time he participated, sales back at the winery benefited. “It’s a great place to try a lot of wines and a friendly atmosphere,” Roberts said. Despite moving to Marina del Rey, Schwartz said that he still has a place for Paso in his heart. In fact, the founder returned in 2010, as well as during the festival’s 25th anniversary. Schwartz said said it’s all about community. For more information about the 29th annual Paso Robles Wine Festival, its Friday, May 21 Grand Tasting event, as well as events throughout the Paso Robles American Viticultural Area, go to www.pasowine.com. May 2011 | Page 21


FEATURE

Local winery’s grape juice a definite departure from the usual Castoro Cellars’ juice uses wine grapes rather than Concords. The result is a smooth, mellow flavor. Aaron Crutchfield VINO

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t’s definitely not Welch’s.” Those were the first words to come from my wife’s mouth after sampling grape juice made from wine grapes by Castoro Cellars. We sampled a bottle in late March after chilling it overnight. I found the juice to be, as my wife said, quite a bit different from standard grape juice. The usual stuff has more of its bite early, while this juice has a more mellow flavor, with its grape bite more muted but also sustained longer. It makes for a nice, pleasant flavor that won’t sit in the fridge for lack of a drinker for long. Castoro Cellars owner Niels Udsen told me the juice has a nice, fruity quality to it. I do believe he’s right, although in all honesty, I don’t drink alcohol, so I have no opinion of

Page 22 | May 2011

what different descriptions mean for different flavors of wine. Much of the difference in flavor for this juice comes from the grapes. Standard grape juice is made from Concord grapes, while Castoro’s grape juice comes from a mixture of wine grapes grown in the North County: cabernet sauvignon, merlot, malbec and cabernet franc. “We take freshly pressed or crushed grapes that are in a tank,” Udsen said. “We take juice off of that tank and immediately chill it down, and we filter it right away so no wild yeast will take off. Then we sterile bottle it as soon as we can.” The juice is naturally sweet, with no added sugars. Because it is chilled and bottled before it can ferment, there is no alcohol. That works well for me, the non-drinker, and is also a plus for children or the designated driver. Castoro has been selling grape juice for the past 15 years or so. “We had it somewhere in some winery once, and our kids were younger and

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we thought, ‘This would be pretty cool if we could figure this out,’” Udsen said. Castoro isn’t the only winery in the world to make grape juice, but it’s not a particularly common thing, either. Udsen said it requires timing and the right equipment to make it. “We make a couple thousand cases or so,” he said. “But what we make is what we make. It’s not like where all the oranges are harvested and concentrated and they can keep making more. We have a window of two weeks to make it, and then that’s what we made for the year.” I got my bottle at the Castoro Cellars tasting room, which is located on Bethel Road just south of Highway 46 West. A bottle of grape juice there costs $4.95. The juice is also available locally at Nature’s Touch in Templeton, and a few places online sell it. Don’t expect to find it at the local grocery store. “It’s kind of hard for stores to figure out what to do with it,” Udsen said. “It looks like a wine bottle, but it’s not really wine. If you put it in the juice area, it will get lost with the Sobé and other things.”

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May 2011 | Page 23


FEATURE

Polish flair to 2011 PRWCA featured artist Adam Perun’s art being featured in 2011 PRWCA marketing materials

Josh Petray VINO

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gnacy Jan Paderewski’s Polish persuasion is uncorking in the Paso Robles art arena, as marketing gurus from the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance collaborated with Paderewski Festival organizers in 2011 to solicit artwork geared to better connect Paso to Poland. This year’s featured artist - whose artwork will appear on everything from Wine Festival catalogs to other PRWCA collateral — as selected by a panel of Polish judges in coordination with local organizers, is Polish artist Adam Perun. “It is another way to connect with Poland,” said Gracie Rey with the PRWCA. According to Paderewski Festival organizer Joel Peterson, as part of the Paderewski Festival exchange program last year, two dignitaries visited Paso Robles and launched discussion with business leaders to examine how to expand the exchange student program and develop a business relationship. The city of Paso Robles has signed a sister city agreement Tarnow, Poland. In addition, business leaders and local dignitaries have remained active in finding ways to enhance the relationship. “It was a collaborative effort between the Paderewski Festival and Wine Festival expanding not only the relationship of students going back-and-forth, but a business relationship expanding our horizons of what we can do and how we can make it work on a business level,” Peterson said. Past artists include French artist Erwin Dazelle in 2010 and Studios on the Park proprietor Anne Laddon in 2009. The PRWCA featured artist’s work is displayed in a variety of

Image courtesy of Adam Perun

Page 24 | May 2011

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Images courtesy of Adam Perun

materials for the alliance, including but not limited to the 2011 Paso Robles Wine Festival guide. MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST Perun was born in 1972 in Tarnow, Poland and is a graduate of Cracovian Universitis The Academy of Fine Arts and Papel Theological Academy, specializing in the field of visual communication and sacred art history. He is an artist, designer of applied graphic art and has authored visual profiles for more than 300 companies. He’s also a photographer and a member of The Association of Polish Art Photographers and a member of The Association of Polish Artists and Designers. He founded the Atelier “Symbol” in 1995, as well as a group of artists called Neosecession in 2008. He embraces an artwork that he calls NewStainedGlass. For more information on Perun’s work, go to www.adamperun.pl.

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May 2011 | Page 25


A perfect pairing Crab Orzo Salad with Tablas Creek’s Esprit De Beaucastel Blanc

Crab Orzo Salad Serves 4

Dressing Juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon Sriracha Hot Chili Sauce

Salad 2 cups of orzo cooked and chilled 1/2 red pepper finely diced 1/4 cup chopped spinach 2 large basil leaves finely chopped 4 large crab legs (canned crab may be substituted) butter lettuce 1 lemon Photo courtesy of Lisa Pretty

By Lisa Pretty CONTRIBUTOR

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hen the sun is shining and warm weather is once again back, I tend to go for lighter meals. I decided to make my Crab Orzo Salad and needed a white wine to enjoy with the meal. Tablas Creak has a number of white blends that I enjoy so I headed over to check out their new tasting room and taste the current lineup. The new tasting room was spectacular and I can say the same about all the wines I tasted. Page 26 | May 2011

My crab salad recipe is a little challenging to pair with wine since it has a high level of acidity due to the lemon dressing as well as a lot of heat from the Dijon mustard and hot sauce. On top of that the wine has to complement the rich crab meat. For me, I knew it would have to be a blend and I selected the 2007 Tablas Creek Esprit De Beaucastel Blanc. The wine has a high percentage of rousanne blended with grenache blanc and picpoul blanc. I was very pleased with the pairing and have to say it had the wow factor I was looking for.

In a small bowl whisk together dressing ingredients. Toss all salad ingredients in a large bowl. Pour dressing over top and toss again. Refrigerate the salad for at least one hour to allow the flavors to combine. When ready to serve place salad on a bed of butter lettuce with a lemon wedge on top.

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The French connection Tablas Creek offers Rhône-style wines Janis Switzer CONTRIBUTOR

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ablas Creek Vineyard is well-known for its vision when it came to the propagation of French grape varieties, the rise of Rhône popularity in the U.S., and the emergence of Paso Robles as a premier wine region. Yet when it came to the winery’s tasting room, you might say they had a bit of a blind spot. For when the owners first planned the winery in the mid 1990s, they didn’t intend on having a public tasting room. So when by 2002 growing customer interest demanded one, they converted a reception area and front offices of the winery to accommodate their ever-growing legion of fans. But it was never the size or layout they really needed. That has now changed in a most impressive way. Just last month Tablas Creek opened its new, expansive and welcoming tasting room in an 8,000-square-foot addition to their original winery facility. With large walls of glass showcasing the massive eight-foot-high foudres (French barrels), and six individual tasting bars, the space inside is designed to hold dozens of visitors while at the same time offering each an intimate tasting experience. Outside is a large multi-level patio area, with limestone walls, plenty of patio tables and views of the surrounding vineyards. “We were really trying to be conscious about communicating who we are and what we are all about just with the setting,” said Jason Haas, general manager of the winery. “We want people to know they are at a working winery.” The limestone and the vineyards are the cornerstone of the Tablas Creek story. Beginning in 1987, when prominent wine importer Robert Haas joined forces with the Perrin family of the famed Chateau de Beaucastel winery in the Chateauneuf-du-

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Pape region of France, the partners started looking for the ideal location to create a Chateauneuf-du-Pape style vineyard from scratch here in the U.S. The partners searched California from north to south, and ultimately discovered the westside of Paso Robles, where the shallow, rocky limestone soils are the same geologic origin as those at Beaucastel, and the climate is nearly identical. To replicate the quality and style of Beaucastel wine, the partners imported vines directly from the French estate, and after a three year USDA quarantine, they started growing and propagating those vines in 1993 at their own on-site nursery. New clones arrived at Tablas Creek each year between 1993 and 2000, eventually providing them with all 13 varieties of Rhône grapes grown in Chateauneuf-duPape. They named the vineyard for the small creek that runs through it, and their wines, appropriately, Esprit de Beaucastel (the spirit of Beaucastel). In addition to providing the vines for their own vineyard, Tablas Creek started selling the new Rhône varieties to other growers in Paso Robles, providing the spark that ignited the growth of Rhône wines in the region, and brought wineries such as Justin and L’Aventure to the attention of wine critics and wine buyers around the country. Today, roughly 75 percent of Paso Robles wineries produce a Rhône variety wine, and most sourced their vines from those original Tablas Creek cuttings. Tablas Creek no longer is in the nursery business, but the winery has continued its progressive leadership in the areas of solar power, organic farming, the production of quality wines, and the promotion of both Rhone varieties and the Paso Robles wine region. Named Paso Robles’ Wine Industry Person of the year in 2007, founder Robert

Photo courtesy of Janis Switzer

Jason Haas, general manager of Tablas Creek Vineyard Haas has retired from his daily role in the business, but at the age of 83 is still often found at the winery’s offices. His youngest son Jason, 37, is general manager, and runs the day-to day business of the winery with head winemaker Neil Collins. With about 30 other employees, the team will produce about 25,000 cases of wine this year — the most ever. In fact, the biggest challenge in the last few years has been making enough wine to satisfy demand. “In the general scheme of problems, it’s one of the good ones to have,” Jason said, “but it’s still a problem.” The new tasting room probably won't help them with that problem. It has already proven to be a popular success with wine club members and wine enthusiasts. It opened just before Zinfandel Festival weekend and even four inches of rain didn't deter almost 500 visitors from making it to their remote location on Adelaida Road over the three-day event. May 2011 | Page 27


Thomas Hill Organics From Our Farm to Your Table

Photo courtesy of Thomas Hill Organics

Submitted article

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homas Hill Organics is a quaint bistro in downtown Paso Robles dedicated to serving the freshest local produce together with all natural and organic meats. Owners Joe and Debbie Thomas created the bistro to showcase their freshly harvested organic fruit and produce from their original passion, Thomas Hill Farms. The Thomases have more than 900 fruit and nut trees on their 10-acre farm ranging from apples and pears to figs, almonds and pomegranates. They specialize in hearty greens such as black kale, mustard greens and arugula. They have a passion for heirloom vegetables like tomatoes and melons. However, due to weather restraints they can’t grow everything on their farm, so they depend on other local farms to complete the seasonal cycle at their restaurant. “We go to three farmer’s markets every week to ensure our produce is fresh and sourced as locally as possible,” said Debbie. “We buy from other farms that share our same belief: No harmful chemicals.” They buy salad mix from Windrose Farms, oyster mushrooms from Oakhill Mushrooms, strawberries from Bautista Farms and microgreens from Bloom Microgreens. All are right here on the Central Coast. Page 28 | May 2011

The bistro sources most of its meats locally as well. Its chicken comes from B&B Chicken in Templeton and rabbit from Rabbit Foot Farms in Paso Robles. The bistro sources beef and pork from PC Cattle of San Luis Obispo and purchase bread from two sources in Paso Robles. Two Little Birds Bakery supplies its rosemary flatbread, and the bistro uses Ciro’s Pane Rustico bread for its cheese plates. This, with a little olive oil from Olea Farms makes for a delectable treat. The Thomases also believe in supporting the local wineries. Their wine list has between 50 to 60 local wines on a revolving basis, and they have a close relationship with many of the wineries in Paso Robles. They run a community supported agriculture program out of Cass Winery, which has been purchasing produce for three years. The bistro makes lunches at Calcareous Vineyard. The bistro supports and markets smaller boutique wineries such as Alta Colina and Vines on the Marycrest and more established wineries such as Tablas Creek, who grow their grapes organically. Thomas Hill’s menu changes weekly based on what is grown on the farm or sourced locally. The menu offers mouthwatering dishes created by Chef Julie Simon. Among some of the items you may find on the lunch menu: Vietnamese barbecue pork belly sandwich with marinated vegetables; roasted red and golden beet salad

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Photo courtesy of Thomas Hill Organics

Photo courtesy of Thomas Hill Organics

with Cara Cara and blood oranges, strawberries, kumquats, sesame brittle, mint, balsamic reduction and Olea Farm arbequina olive oil; THO garden burger, smoked shiitake mushrooms, wakame, sprouts, haas avocado, shaved carrots, roasted garlic aioli and Ffield greens. Dinner entrées may include: pan-seared mano de leon Scallops, lemon pappardelle pasta, pea tendrils, shiitake mushrooomsfine herbs, crème fraiche, parmigiano Rreggiano and tobiko; grilled flat iron steak with roasted cauliflower puree, grilled radicchio with whole grain mustard vinaigrette and Italian salsa verde. You can also enjoy thin crust pizza made in their wood-burning oven. The Thomases are dedicated to quality food brought together with the support of many local businesses and that is why Thomas Hill Organics is among Paso Robles’ finest dining destinations. Thomas Hill Organic Bistro 805-226-5888 • www.thomashillorganics.com

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May 2011 | Page 29


Eggplant Tower with Calcareous wine paired with Calcareous Vineyard syrah

Photo courtesy of Lisa Pretty

By Lisa Pretty CONTRIBUTOR

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hen you have a dish with lots of bold flavors, especially spice, you need a bold wine that will hold up and complement the flavors without getting over powered by the dish. My eggplant towers recipe has layers of flavors with plenty of herbs, pepper and lamb. To me the dish screams out for syrah and I found it to be awesome with the 2006 Calcareous syrah. The syrah grape originated in the Rhône region of France. In Northern Rhône, Page 30 | May 2011

it is typically the main grape used in wine production while in Southern Rhône it is often found in blends. Australians produce a very fruit-forward wine from the grape and there it is known as shiraz. American producers may use either name but it is indeed the same grape. In Paso Robles there are some incredible syrah produced on both the east and the west side. The wines tend to be dark, have loads of berry flavors, a fleshy fruit on the palate and a little pepper or tobacco on the finish. I think Karen MacNeil’s description of syrah in the Wine Bible is perfect to characterize a Paso syrah: “Syrah re-

minds me of the kind of guy who wears cowboy boots with a tuxedo. Rustic, manly, and yet elegant — that’s syrah.” The 2006 Calcareous Syrah is made from grapes from two Westside vineyards: the Calcareous Estate Vineyard and Kiler Canyon Vineyard. The wine had stunning color, with dark, silky forest fruits flavors complemented by a touch of oak, soft vanilla and white pepper on the finish. The tasting room is open daily and is just a few miles west of down town Paso Robles. The 2006 syrah is $34 per bottle; however, it is currently on special for just $20.

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Eggplant Towers Salt eggplant slices and let them sit for 30 minutes to remove any bitterness. Coat the bottom of a medium sized sauce pan with olive oil, heat oil and add garlic, sauté until garlic begins to brown, add mushroom and continue to sauté until mushrooms begin to release their juice, then add oregano, cayenne pepper, thyme and salt, stir for one to two minutes to coat mushrooms and allow them to absorb flavors. Add red wine and tomatoes reserving ½ cup of tomato juice for lamb mixture. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to simmer. Allow sauce to simmer and reduce naturally while you prepare the other elements of the towers — stir occasionally. Rinse the salt from the eggplant, pat dry then lightly coat both sides of the eggplant slices and the red pepper with olive oil and a little salt. Place eggplant and peppers on baking sheets (covered with foil for easier clean-up) and roast in oven preheated to 400 degrees. Peppers should be skin side up. Turn eggplant slices after 10 minutes of roasting and roast for approximately five more minutes then remove from oven (take care not to over cook eggplant — they should still be somewhat firm). When pepper skins turn black remove from oven and place in a plastic bag and allow to steam so the skins can be easily removed. Once the peppers have cooled, remove skins. Reduce oven heat to 350 degrees.

Photos courtesy of Lisa Pretty

2 medium eggplants, sliced into rounds approximately ½ inch thick 2 large red bell peppers, cut into quarters Olive oil 2 cloves of garlic, smashed, peeled and chopped 3 cups of baby bella mushrooms, sliced 1 tablespoons oregano 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon thyme 3 cups of stewed tomatoes (canned diced tomatoes work fine) 1 cup of dry red wine

In a large frying pan, heat approximately one tablespoon of olive oil and sauté the chopped onion until it becomes translucent. Add ground lamb and stir until meat just begins to brown then add rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper. Continue to stir and add the reserved tomato juice. Simmer the lamb with herbs and juice for five to 10 minutes then stir in tomato paste and allow to simmer for an additional 10 minutes. Lightly grease a large baking dish then place eggplant slices along the bottom of the dish — leave room between slices as you want stand alone towers. Spoon lamb mixture onto each eggplant slice approximately ½ inch thick. Place another slice of eggplant on top of the lamb mixture, spoon mushroom sauce over eggplant approximately ½ inch thick, place another eggplant slice on top, place roasted pepper on top and drizzle a little of the mushroom sauce over top — then sprinkle cheese on top of each tower. Bake in oven preheated to 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

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1 lb ground lamb 1 medium onion, peeled and coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons of tomato paste 1 tablespoons rosemary 1 teaspoon thyme 1 cup grated Pecorino Romano Salt and Pepper to taste

May 2011 | Page 31


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Page 32 | May 2011

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Garlic Stuffed Pork Roast paired with Pear Valley’s “Our Daily Red”

Garlic Stuffed Pork Roast 4-5 pound pork roast (loin or tenderloin) 5 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced 1/2 cup dry white wine 1/4 cup olive oil 1/2 cup apple juice 1 tablespoon dried rosemary 1/2 tablespoon dried thyme Salt and pepper to taste

Photos courtesy of Lisa Pretty

By Lisa Pretty CONTRIBUTOR

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ork, often referred to as the “other white meat,” is flavorful, reasonably priced and healthy. Pork tenderloin is the leanest cut of pork and has less fat than skinless chicken breast and fewer calories. Loaded with protein, zinc, iron and B-vitamins, this tasty cut of meat is an excellent choice for people wanting a healthy meal. The price and ease of cooking are additional benefits to a pork roast. Whether grilled or baked, even a novice cook can produce a tender, juicy roast with very little effort. Pork is considered cooked when it reaches an internal temperature of 170 degrees and since it is such a juicy meat it is best to let the meat rest prior to slicing — as a result the roast should be removed from the heat at 160 degrees since it will continue to increase in temperature as it rests. Although pork can be tasty when seasoned with just a little salt and pepper, it does absorb flavors well and is often marinated or rubbed prior to cooking. I personally like the flavor of roasted garlic with pork, so here is my very easy recipe that can be served as

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part of a simple supper or to impress a group when entertaining. Wine Pairing Several wines will pair well with a pork roast; from a refreshing riesling to a bold syrah. Given the roasted garlic element in this recipe I decided to go with a red wine with a nice fruit backing. Since one of the perks of a pork roast is the price I also wanted to pair this recipe with a good value wine. One of my new discoveries is Pear Valley’s “Our Daily Red.” Our Daily Red is an estate blend of 45% merlot, 40% cabernet sauvignon, 10% cabernet franc and 5% petit verdot. The wine has an aromatic nose of dried cherries and raspberries with flavors of berries, smoke, coffee and a hint of chocolate. Priced at just $18 per bottle this wine will have you saying “Give us this day Our Daily Red.” Pear Valley is located at 4900 Union Road in Paso Robles and the tasting room is open daily 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. “Our Daily Red” was recently released and can be purchased in the tasting room or online at www.pearvalley.com.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Using a sharp knife make small incisions all around the roast. Insert garlic slices into incisions and then place pork in roasting pan. Pour wine, apple juice and olive oil over the roast so that the bottom of the pan is covered in liquid (approximately a half- to oneinch deep). Rub the rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper on the roast and then place pan in pre-heated oven. Baste roast with liquid after one half-hour of roasting and again 15 minutes later. Remove roast from oven when a meat thermometer indicates an internal temperature of 160 degrees (approximately 1 to 1.5 hours). Let roast rest for 10 minutes before carving.

May 2011 | Page 33


Vivant Fine Cheese …and Jada wine selections By Lisa Pretty CONTRIBUTOR

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ne of the classic pairings of all time with wine is cheese. However, there are so many different types of cheese and so many different styles of wine that it really does take some effort to find the perfect pairing. A strong cheese can definitely overpower a wine just as a bold wine can overpower a delicate cheese. When a pairing is good, the wine will taste better with the cheese than standing alone. Living in the Paso Robles area, we are very lucky to have Vivant Fine Cheese. The cheese shop is located on Pine Street next door to Hotel Cheval. The selection of cheeses change often and at any given time they will have over 150 cheeses in their tasting room. The business is owned and operated by Danika Reed, who graduated

VIVANT FINE CHEESE

CURRENT JADA PAIRING LIST 2009 XCV (Viognier, Rousanne, Grenache Blanc) with Mezzo Secco cheese from California 2008 Jersey Girl Estate Syrah with Iberico cheese from Spain 2008 Mirror (Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Petit Verdot, Merlot) with Mimolette cheese from France 2008 Jack of Hearts (Cabernet Suavignon, Petit Verdot, Merlot) with Piave cheese from Italy Photo courtesy of Lisa Pretty

Page 34 | May 2011

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Photos courtesy of Lisa Pretty

with a dairy science degree from Cal Poly. After working in the dairy industry for a few years, she decided to launch the gourmet cheese business in Paso Robles. Almost 70% of her sales are to wineries and approximately 40% of her walk-in customers

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are looking for cheese to have with wine. Although her background was not in wine she spent time to learn what pairings work well and is more than happy to expertly help customers select the perfect cheese to go with a particular wine or a selection that

will work with a wide range of wines for a party. A great place to enjoy a wine and cheese experience is at Jada Vineyard & Winery. The tasting room located on Vineyard Drive offers visitors a wine and gourmet cheese pairing. The entire staff at Jada work with Danika to select the cheese that will work best with each of the wines included in the tasting. Since wines change as they age, the cheese selection is continually updated to ensure that the best pairing is offered. The tasting room staff at Jada will guide you through the process recommending you taste first the wine, then the cheese and then once again taste the wine. It really is a fun experience to see what a difference the cheese can make to how the wine tastes. Often cheese is thought of as a party food, with a platter offered as guests mingle and sip on a glass of wine either at a causal party or prior to dinner. I personally enjoy exploring cheese and wine so much that I prefer to have a cheese course with dinner. A selection of three cheeses with different texture, intensity, sweetness and acidity with a flight of three different wines is a culinary delight and a great way to spark conversation with friends at the table. Be adventurous and try cheese from different regions with your favorite Central Coast wines. May 2011 | Page 35


WINE LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE A local magazine geared toward the culture, community and lifestyle of Paso Robles Wine Country. VINO is distributed in the Paso Robles Press and Atascadero News three times per year. Additional copies are available at local businesses, wineries, hotel and in the Park during the Paso Robles Wine Festival. Additionally, the full magazine will also be posted online at www.PasoRoblesPress.com and www.AtascaderoNews.com.

Run in all three VINO magazines and receive 15% OFF Advertising Information

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Quarter Page Ad $300

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Publication/ October 7 Distribution in Paso Robles Press & Atascadero News, plus additional 5000 copies. Also posted online!

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May 4 in Paso Robles Press & Atascadero News, plus additional 5000 copies. Also posted online!

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FEATURE

Legislation to restrict interstate wine shipping reintroduced Last year’s HR 5034 is this year’s HR 1161 Aaron Crutchfield VINO

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hat was introduced last year in Congress as HR 5034 has been reintroduced this year as HR 1161, but by any other name, wine industry insiders call it a threat to direct distribution for small wineries. “If this thing were to get through and see full support and a full vote to be ratified, it would severely hinder, if not cripple, a lot of our small wineries’ ability to sell wine to consumers out of state, because that sale requires them to be able to ship that wine direct,” said Christopher Taranto, marketing director for the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance. “Essentially what this bill does is it threatens that ability to sell your wine and almost hinders you to have to work through the three-tier system.” The three tiers are producers, distributors/wholesalers and retailers. The wholesale tier of the alcohol industry has generally backed the bill, called the Community Alcohol Regulatory Effectiveness Act of 2011, or “CARE” Act. Last year’s bill didn’t make it out of committee but did get more than 150 cosponsors. The bill would allow states to write laws to restrict which wineries can ship into the state. Currently, local wineries can directly ship their wine to 32 states. “We are pleased that Rep. [Jason] Chaffetz (R-Utah) and the original cosponsors chose to make the first word in the legislation’s title ‘community,’” National Beer Wholesalers Association president Craig Purser said in a state-

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ment. “This makes it clear that decisions regarding alcohol regulation should continue to be made at the state and local levels. This bipartisan legislation clarifies congressional intent in reaffirming the states’ authority to make their own alcohol-related decisions.” The Brewers Association, WineAmerica, Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, Wine Institute, Beer Institute and the National Associ-

came law, it would make it much harder for brewers, vintners, distillers and importers to get their products to market.” Locally, Taranto said the bill, if passed, could make things tougher on some of the smaller wineries in the Paso Robles appellation. “I don’t know if they’ll necessarily close,” he said. “They’ll just have to get really creative on how they’re going to be able to sell wine.”

“If this thing were to get through and see full support and a full vote to be ratified, it would severely hinder if not cripple a lot of our small wineries’ ability to sell wine to consumers out of state …” — Christopher Taranto

ation of Beverage Importers, associations representing virtually all alcohol beverages sold in the 50 states, have officially come out in opposition of the new bill. “We strongly oppose H.R. 1161, which, like its predecessor in the last Congress, is unnecessary,” the groups said in a statement. “Its provisions would harm consumers and the marketplace, limit consumer choice, and allow states to enact protectionist and anti-competitive laws. If this bill be-

That said, Taranto said he thinks local wineries could get through it if the bill does pass. “A great majority of them, even some of the larger guys, sell a good majority of the wine they produce out the cellar door,” he said. “So I don’t think it’s doom and gloom in the sense of, ‘Oh, no, if 1161 goes through, now all of a sudden we’re going to lose a bunch of wineries.’ I don’t believe that to be the case. But it does cripple commerce.” May 2011 | Page 37


FEATURE

Central Coast wineries have style all their own And to each, a style all its own

Photos by Andrew Bradford

An example of stunning modern architecture at Denner.

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ot many activities can pander to one’s cravings for elegance and refinement quite as well as wine tasting. To suddenly find yourself immersed in a world of delicate stemware, dark, polished woods, and pourers whose charm and knowledge is as smooth and savory as the zinfandel which you may find yourself tasting, is a vivid and notable experience. The charm of wineries has long been a social attraction within the Central Coast, Page 38 | May 2011

since the introduction of the first one in 1882 — York Mountain. With the allure of fine drink and enhancing atmosphere, wineries have progressed both in their crafts and in their ability to appeal to guests, creating settings which compliment both the wine and the drinker. While, of course, there have been several other defining points in California’s

wine world, one major event that placed us on the map was the Paris Tasting of 1976, and the celebrated chardonnay produced by Chateau Montelena which proved to the world that California was quite capable of creating outstanding wines. Since that time, there has been a veritable cavalcade of wine makers rushing in to take part in the hopes that they too may produce drinks, the likes of which will secure their names in the annals of wine history. The agreeable weather of the Central Coast has allowed for a wide range of grape

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varietals to be grown, and just as impressive amount of wineries, with more than 200 now calling the region their home. Ranging from small backyard hobbyists to massive-scale producers, each winery has its own unique charm and style, designed to appeal to different demographics and create an environment through specific architecture which is distinctly their own. In the early days of winery architecture, form most certainly followed function, with wineries creating their looks more for the betterment of their crafts, and not so much for the pleasure of their patrons. Most had cellars which were designed to ward off flaws and spoilage that could be dastardly to their wines, and were by no means designed to be the flashy and chic

cathedrals we often see today. But as the increase in wine tourism grew, so did the need to stand out to be recognized. This in turn allowed winery owners to consider different building designs which would help them to create the desired atmosphere, and the result was a wonderful assortment of designs and layouts which are marvelous to behold.

The imposing stone walls and beautiful construction of Niner Wine Estates.

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It has become a battle for architectural brilliance and the Central Coast is certainly in the fight. While an Italian element is often conjured when thinking of winery architecture — and with wines earliest recordings coming from Greek and Italian regions, this is certainly unsee STYLE continued on page 41

Photos by Andrew Bradford

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welcome to the

     Friday, May 20 Barrel Tastings - Come and be tantalized by “Twilightâ€?, our newest port-style wine infused with just the right touch of chocolate. Looking for a Fab Cab? Don’t miss barrel tastings of our 2009 Vintner’s Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon! Barrel Tastings and specialty cheese pairings - $5/pp; Complimentary/Stargazers. Saturday, May 21 We don’t want to miss a day at the park and neither should you! We invite you to stop by our table for tastings of our award-winning wines and receive a discount coupon worth 10% off on all RiverStar Tasting Room merchandise good for Sunday 5/22/2011. Sunday, May 22 A Tri-Tip BBQ, a Central Coast favorite and ours, will be served up with Betty’s World Famous Chili, Salad, Bread and Delicious Homemade Brownies. Dance it off later to the live sounds of local favorite “Human Nationâ€? on our scenic patio overlooking 75 beautiful acres. $25/pp; $15/Stargazers – price includes a glass of RiverStar Wine. Wine Festival Hours: 11am-5pm WINE CASE SPECIALS 2010 Sauvignon Blanc $85/case • 2009 Zinfandel $99/case ONLINE WINE CASE SPECIALS $65 4-Pack Blend Special (Entice, Sunset Red, Affinity, Allure) BUY ONLINE, receive FREE SHIPPING (online only, during May 20–22, 2011)

805.467.0086 7450 Estrella Road, San Miguel (Go to the End of Airport Road)

www.riverstarvineyards.com Page 40 | May 2011

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Photo by Andrew Bradford

A view of the wine barrels at Rotta. derstandable — it is by no means the only type seen in the local area. Niner Wine Estates in Paso Robles, for example, not only strays away from Italian influence, but is about as modern as wineries go with rock walls that tower over visitors like sentinels trapped in stone sleep, and deep brooding colors which seem to say about the winery: “Oh yes, we know what we’re doing here.” Another splendid example is Denner Wine Estates, which hosts one of the most unique building designs in the area. A great, sweeping half dome makes up a good portion of the grounds, with a beautiful assortment of botanical life and relaxing areas comprising much of the rest. Not all local architecture is walls and roofs, however. Often times the grounds themselves are designed to create thrilling spectacles for their lucky viewers. Such is the case with Sculpterra, located in Paso Robles. It hosts winding paths which harbor stunning works of art which are scattered throughout the property — the most impressive of which is a 15-foot-long, 20,000-pound puma carved of solid granite. It is the largest art piece carved from this type of granite in the world. By simply touring the area with little

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Photo by Andrew Bradford

Tuscan style architecture at Pear Valley.

Photo by Andrew Bradford

Rustic settings at Epoch, formerly York Mountain. more than a passing interest and an only marginal disregard for gas usage, you can experience winery settings which range from stately villas which bring to mind a construct in sunny Tuscany such as Pear Valley, to a homey and comfortable resi-

dence such as Tobin James, all within just a few hours — allowing you to partake in the Central Coast bounty, and still be able to retire to the comforting and personalized designs of your own home in time for dinner. Now isn’t that just splendid? May 2011 | Page 41


FEATURE

In a storm, not any port will do Pick a delicious one; one with a cool label

Photo by Creig P. Sherburne

Owner and winemaker Steve Glossner shows off his favorite of PasoPort’s wines, “Violeta.”

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n a county known for its wine, local port is a bit of a novelty. But PasoPort, a North County winery, has made port its bread and butter. “We do port first, table wine second,” owner Lola Glossner said. Just as only sparkling wine made in France can be called Champagne, only port produced in the Demarcated Region of the Douro, Portugal can be called ports. What Glossner makes is a “port-style wine,” but a port by any other name would taste just as sweet. Port is traditionally an after-dinner drink, a dessert wine. “People tend to think sweet wine isn’t sophisticated,” Glossner said, “but I think the opposite is true. It’s more accessible, but Page 42 | May 2011

ports are just as subtle and nuanced as table wines.” There are two major distinctions of port: tawny and ruby. Ruby ports are typically aged five to seven years and have fruit flavors. They are usually aged in stainless steel or concrete containers, and are smoother and less tannic. Ruby ports are inexpensive to make, and most readily available. Tawny ports age no less than seven years, usually in oak barrels. The oak barrels expose the port to a limited amount of oxygen, which makes the end product taste more intense. The wooden barrels also impart a nutty flavor. In port, sugars do two things: they make the end product sweet and ferment into alcohol. If too much sugar ferments into alcohol, the wine will be too dry.

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The main difference between table wine and port, Glossner said, is port requires more work up front to balance the sugars. But, she added, once it’s stable, port simply sits and waits for five years. Next month, PasoPort will be bottling its 2008 vintages. Glossner pointed out that post-prohibition, sweet wines were enormously popular. The sugars in sweet wines made them far more stable than their table wine counterparts. “People come to Paso Robles and say ‘I’m just going to focus on making the best wine possible,’” owner Steve Glossner said. “But making great wine is only part of it, a small part. Making good wine is easy compared to selling it.” It was a blend of this need and that era which inspired PasoPort’s labels. Prohibition was the golden age of the pinup girl, Lola said, and nearly all PasoPort’s labels feature a different gorgeously hand drawn pinup girl, which has done nothing to slow down sales. “We wanted something iconic like the Morton Salt girl, but more fun,” Lola said. Steve is Lola’s husband and “partner in crime.” He’s been making wine with other wineries in Paso for over a decade, producing a very wide range of products. But, according to PasoPort’s website, www.pasoportwines.com, making port gives Steve a creative outlet without the inevitable comparison to other wines he’s had a part in producing. Indeed, PasoPort’s wines defy being compared to almost anything else on the Central Coast. The sweet, fortified dessert wines are all as unique as the pinups that grace the bottles. Their flagship, Violeta — the label pinup wears a violet dress — is made with the same type of grapes grown in many Portugal’s ports, and is very

similar in style and flavor to those ports. Because port takes so long to age, Steve said it’s simply impossible to respond quickly and bring new products to market. New port wines have to be planned some five years in advance. Still, they do have at least one seasonal port, Noel, and the label pinup is the very best Mrs. Claus you’re ever likely to meet. “The wine we make is great,” Steve said. “And we love sharing it,” Lola added. Share and enjoy PasoPort’s offerings in its tasting room at 5940 Union Road, Paso Robles, at the Steiebeck Vineyards and Winery.

Photo by Creig P. Sherburne

PasoPort has five wines in two major styles. Each wine features a different vintage-styled, hand-drawn pinup girl as a mascot.

Photo by Creig P. Sherburne

PasoPort owners Steve and Lola Glossner said they love making port and love the port they make. Lola said she wishes she could get everybody to try it, not just for business, but because it’s that good.

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FEATURE

A taste of downtown Paso Robles From gourmet foods to hard-to-find estate wines, Paso Robles’ more than 20 downtown tasting rooms offer plenty of variety for the wine enthusiast

Photo by Hayley Thomas

Locals and tourists mingle at Meritage Wine Lounge over glasses of wine.

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n wine tasting rooms throughout downtown Paso Robles, rolling hills and sunflecked vineyards are replaced by the rhythm of street traffic and buzz of local merchants. Although the feel of these hushed havens are two parts city to one part country, the right fusion of atmosphere, food and fun have given downtown wine aficionados a taste of something new. Whether sitting street-side or perched at a table with friends, wine tasters can now more than ever experience their own pick of local vineyards, all within a brisk stroll through Paso Robles’ dynamic downtown district. “We have a charming downtown that Page 44 | May 2011

people tend to gravitate toward,” said Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance Executive Director Stacie Jacob. “The downtown is usually part of [a wine taster’s] starting point in touring Paso wine country. It’s a nice complement to boutique shopping and restaurants to have tasting rooms downtown.” Walking down Park Street at dusk, it’s easy to find old friends unwinding and connecting through the windows of candle-lit tasting rooms. It’s also easy to watch the world move by at a slower, dreamier Central Coast pace with a glass of aromatic cabernet sauvignon in hand. Some wine aficionados may argue that — at their very best — wine tasting rooms are the antithesis of the traditional rowdy

barroom, and Meritage Wine Lounge fits that bill without exception. Casual yet sophisticated, the atmosphere detracts nothing from the lounge’s main focus: educated wine tasting. The lounge, which offers an array of different tasting stations, is a realm of relaxation, artfully combining low lighting and plush seating to create a tranquil wine tasting atmosphere. In addition, each tasting station is manned by the winery’s vintner, which means that visitors can ask wine-related questions to their hearts’ content. According to Jacob, there were about 12 different tasting rooms in downtown Paso Robles before Meritage opened shop at 810 11th St. in November 2009. Now,

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WINERIES/WINE BARS in Downtown Paso Robles thanks to the business’ ever-growing selection, there are more than 20. Justin Kahler, owner and winemaker of JK Wine Company, said things are definitely heating up at Meritage, which recently filled its last winery slot. “What I like with downtown wineries, and Meritage especially, is that you can walk in here and taste wine from 10 different wineries — from Monterey to Paso Robles — and you are able to become exposed to many different varietals, different appellations, different wines, then order food and enjoy the food-and-wine type thing,” Kahler said. In regard to downtown commerce, this means wine tasters are enticed to flock to the lounge in order to try wines such as Roxo Port Cellars, Brochelle Vineyards and others that can only be found in downtown Paso Robles. Kahler said being downtown is a huge asset to the business, and it will become an even greater asset once summer community activities such as the Olive Festival, Wine Festival and Concerts in the Park kick off as spring and summer unfold. As for other tasting rooms popping up, Kahler said taste is everything. “I think [more wine tasting rooms] are good, as long as it’s tastefully done and they are dispersed throughout the town well, which they are now,” he said. “You have wineries that are around the town square, but then you can get over around 13th Street by Artisan and there’s tasting rooms there, so I think [with] the logistics of restraints to tasting rooms to wine bars to retail shops and cheese shops, everything is spatially located,” Kahler said. “I think [the city] has done a really great job with downtown, and the Paso Robles Downtown Main Street Association has really done well with having a good concept, a very cohesive concept.” Vinoteca Wine Bar is a hotspot amongst Paso’s booming downtown wine tasting scene, often well-populated by tasters at the bar or chatting with one another across candle-lit tables. Owner Rob Sharp said the layout of downtown Paso Robles has created a per-

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Albeno Munari Vineyard & Winery 725 12th Street • 239-9176 — Anglim Winery 740 Pine Street • 227-6813 — Arroyo Robles 739 12th Street • 461-0675 — Asuncion Ridge 729 13th Street • 237-3780 — Bear Cave Cellars 840 13th Street, Suite G • 238-4329 — Bodegas Paso Robles 729 13th Street • 237-3780 — Christian Lazo Wines 840 13th Street • 226-8820

Photo by Hayley Thomas

Patrons sip wines at Vinoteca Wine Bar, one of a handful of tasting rooms situated in downtown Paso Robles.

fect storm for boosting tourism after local wineries took a collective financial hit. “The way Paso is laid out, with the hotels and the really outstanding restaurants downtown, it’s all within walking distance,” Sharp said. “[Tasters] go out and taste wine during the day, and then they come in, clean up and they go out and go to the restaurants and wine bars in the evening, so it works for everybody.” Sharp said that Paso’s location in relation to San Francisco and Los Angeles has also been a big plus for downtown. “We are finding that the downturn in the economy has helped us a lot because the people from Orange County, San Diego and Los Angeles are not wanting to drive up to Napa. The value in hotels, restaurants and wine here is tremendously more than what you get up there,” he said. “We talk to a lot of people here that, instead of getting in a plane and flying to San Francisco, they will see DOWNTOWN continued on page 47

Clayhouse Vineyards & Wines 849 13th Street • 238-7055 — D’Anbino Cellars 710 Pine Street • 227-6800 — Graveyard Vineyards 1032 Pine Street • 400-0096 — Herman Story Wines 1227 Paso Robles Street • 714-9966 — Kiamie Wine Cellars 1111 Riverside Ave., Ste 102 • 226-8333 — Meritage Wine Tasting Lounge Featured Wineries inside: Brochelle, Cerro Prieto CrossLynn Estate/TKL, JK Wine Co Line Shack, Michaud, Roxo Port 810 11th Street • 238-9456 — Orchid Hill 1140 Pine Street • 237-7525 — Ortman Family Wines 1317 Park Street • 237-9009 — Parrish Family Vineyard 1120 Park Street • 286-4028 — Paso Wine Centre 1240 Park Street • 239-9156 — Pianetta Winery 829 13th Street • 226-4005 — Vihuela 840 11th Street • 835-4304 — Vinoteca Wine Bar 835 12th Street • 227-7154 — Zoller Wine Styling 525A Pine Street • 226-9707

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drive the four hours or six hours away and stay in Paso Robles.” The wine bar offers tapas, desserts and a full calendar of events. Sharp said the community has embraced it under the new ownership. “The wine bar features ‘Wednesday Night Winemakers,’ and this place has become a gathering spot for winemakers in Paso Robles. They come in here and taste each other’s stuff, and we all know each other,” said Sharp, adding that winemakers often give each other advice and try out each other’s wines and pairings. According to Sharp, downtown wine tasting rooms are simultaneously in competition but also working together to bring more business to downtown. Sharp and his wife experienced this phenomenon firsthand when they moved to the area several years ago. “Five wineries came to us out of the blue and asked if we needed a tractor, bins or help with labor or if we needed help planting or whatever it might be, and we didn’t even know these people,” Sharp said. “It’s a great, close community of winemakers. We all taste each other’s stuff. We all ask each other for advice. We use each other’s barrels occasionally and we all help each other out.” V2 Bistro, born out of a collaboration between Vihuela Winery and Vivant Fine Cheese in late 2009, is one downtown haunt where good wine and great conversation flow in abundance. The cozy tasting room, which features outdoor seating, live music and an Italian-inspired menu, is located at 840 11th St. in the heart of downtown Paso. Tasting room employee Jessie Bierlich spends her time pairing local wines with the perfect flavorful cheeses for discerning customers from San Francisco to San Diego and beyond. She said the steady influx of downtown tasting rooms has contributed to feeding V2 Bistro’s unique business, which she said is comparable to tasting wine “inside of a cheese shop.” For gourmet food seekers, the pungent, heady aroma of exotic cheeses may be just as intoxicating as the Rhône-style wines. “[The tasting rooms] have brought a

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Photo by Hayley Thomas

Paso residents Merilee and Dale Wilhelm enjoy a few glasses of wine at V2 Bistro, which offers 150 different types of cheese and a vast selection of wines.

lot more tourists and visitors in, especially during the winter months,” Bierlich said after pouring a splash of wine for a table of two. “It was surprisingly busy last month, when a lot of people had predicted that February and January would be slow after the holidays, but we were actually really busy.” At a nearby table, San Jose resident Tina Mercer enjoyed a cheese and wine pairing with a friend. The tourist said she was tipped off by a fellow Northern California resident who explored Paso’s downtown a weekend prior. A first-timer in the area, Mercer gushed over her wine tasting experience thus far. “We went to about four different wineries, and we really enjoyed tasting the wines, and everyone was really friendly,” she said. Although Mercer said V2 Bistro was the first downtown tasting room the pair hit since touring the wineries, it wouldn’t be the last. Next, the friends said they’d snoop around downtown, catch a bite to eat, and end the night at nearby Meritage.

Merilee and Dale Wilhelm, who nibbled cheeses and sipped wine at a nearby table, are well-acquainted with Paso’s downtown tasting rooms, although they weren’t always. The couple relocated from San Luis Obispo to Paso Robles and it’s been a winelover’s paradise for the two ever since. Before the move, the couple said they hadn’t explored Paso’s downtown, opting instead to attend winemaker’s dinners or visit various wineries. However, once the wine lovers transitioned to Paso Robles, they said they were floored by the quality and selection of wine available just under their noses. Now, the couple is on a mission to spread the word about Paso’s outstanding downtown shopping, restaurants and wine. “I didn’t know how sophisticated the area was. We came up here [to live] and now I feel like I’m on vacation,” Marilee said. “I’m in love with Paso.” For more information on Paso Robles downtown wineries, go to http://www.pasodowntownwineries.com

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FEATURE

Closer look: Rehabilitating Paso Robles’ Farmers Alliance building Derby Wine Estates to continue legacy of ag production

Image courtesy of Derby Wine Estates

This shows an artist’s rendering of the new Farmer’s Alliance Building in Paso Robles. Derby Wine Estates plans to rehabilitate the building, maintaining the historical use of agricultural production. The project recently gained the approval of the city’s Planning Commission.

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he adaptive reuse of one of Paso Robles’ historic buildings for an agricultural commodity is now coming to fruition. Derby Wine Estates’ Ray Derby said he was more than excited, he was “ecstatic” after a proposal to rehabilitate the the historic Farmers Alliance building and make way for a new agricultural production operation received the unanimous approval from the city’s Planning Commission in March. The building lies on a roughly 1.8-acre site and was formerly known as the Almond Growers Association Building. It will be transformed into a state-of-the-art wine production facility for Derby Estates. Derby had originally proposed building an expanded facility on its eastside location off Highway 46 East but encountered difficulties through the county planning process, spending two-and-ahalf years and a quarter-million dollars. Derby said he was very pleased with the experience of planning and developing a project Page 48 | May 2011

through the coordinated efforts of Paso Robles city staff, who were receptive to the project from the beginning. “The city folks are really very easy to work with and have done a really great job,” Derby said, also crediting San Luis Obispo-based architect Craig Smith and Jamie Kirk of Kirk Consulting for providing exemplary services. “I just can’t say enough to how the city has responded to this project. The planning department has been thorough and more than willing to work with us.” It’s not the first time someone has proposed a project for the site. In 2006, Smart and Final submitted an application requesting demolition to make way for a new store, but that proposal was eventually rejected. According to Derby, construction drawings for the planned development are currently being drawn up. Escrow closed in October 2010. The concrete building will maintain its historic integrity. Changes visible to the public would include a Derby Wine Estates name on the tower. In addition “the property will be cleaned up,”

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Derby said. Landscaping amenities are planned. Parking in the front of the facility would also be improved. “In terms of the concrete building itself, there is very little change,” Derby said. The project team is also planning on flying an American flag on top of the tower as an homage to a tradition believed to be part of the building’s history. Historical pictures of the Farmers Alliance will adorn the building’s interior. Color-wise, the team is hoping to restore the building’s “warm, red tint.” The building has been painted a multitude of times. The project team was working with Sherwin-Williams with their computerized color matching system for a color match as of press time. The project consists of restoring the exterior of the original building facade. Windows would be repaired to original condition; historic lettering “Paso Robles Almond Growers Association Building” on the parapet would be restored; an existing diamond frame would be retained; existing roll-up doors would be retained and utilized; and a loading dock along the front of the building would be re-used. The old office in the building will house the tasting room, which will be open to the public. Americans with Disabilities Actcompliant bathrooms would be installed. The tasting room will be the focal point for the public, he added, complete with a “tasting garden” type area to the north of the building. An existing concrete slab would be replaced and new drainage installed. Paso Robles was arguably considered by many to at one point in history be considered the “Almond Capital of the World.” With the burgeoning Paso Robles wine industry in today’s modern era, ag production at the facility falls in tune. A phased approach to the project is being undertaken to get construction under way soon. The projected opening date is in two years. Derby, who passed the Almond Growers building hundreds if not thousands of times over the years, gave Pete Clark a call, did his due diligence and formulated an offer. A year or so went by, and with that time Derby continued to look around to see if there were any other sites that would make sense, but there was nothing else that would meet its requirements. “I took a liking to the building,” said Derby, “Convinced that we could have our winery and rehabilitate the building and make it a pride to the community and fix an eyesore at the same time, so as far as I’m concerned, it’s a win-win situation.”

Images courtesy of Derby Wine Estates

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Calendar of Events UPCOMING

MAY 2011

JUNE 2011

AUGUST 2011

Day in the Shade

Paso Robles’ Winemakers Cookoff

The annual Day in the Shade will take place in Templeton Park on Saturday, May 7 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and will include wine tasting and art such as painting, sculpture, jewelry, photography, ceramics and more. There will also be live music and entertainment. The morning portion will be held in conjunction with Templeton Farmers’ Market. For more information, call 712-0601 or go to www.templetonchamber.com.

Paso Robles’ Winemakers Cookoff will be held on Saturday, Aug. 6 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Paso Robles Country County, 800 Clubhouse Drive. The fundraiser is sponsored by Paso Robles Rotary Club. Tickets are $75 per person and includes more than 30 winemaker-chefs. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 264-6979, e-mail info@winemakerscookoff.com or go to www.winemakerscookoff.com.

Atascadero Art & Wine Tour The next Atascadero Art & Wine Tour will be held on Friday, May 13 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. The Atascadero Art & Wine Tour will include local wineries pouring at many of the participating galleries and businesses. The tour is free and open to the public. For more information, go to www.atascaderomainstreet.org or call 4620177.

Photo by Hayley Thomas

Pinot and Paella Festival The eighth annual Pinot and Paella Festival will be held in Templeton Community Park on Sunday, June 5 from 2 to 5 p.m. The event will feature Paso Robles’ pinot noir from 12 local pinot noir producers and paella by 16 chefs. All proceeds will go to the local youth performing arts organizations. Tickets are $65 per person and include a burgundy-style wineglass, 20 different pinot noir tastes, 20 paella tastes and live music by Incendio. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 2392565 or go to www.pinotandpaella.com.

SEPTEMBER 2011 Atascadero Art & Wine Tour The next Atascadero Art & Wine Tour will be held on Friday, Sept. 9 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. The Atascadero Art & Wine Tour will include local wineries pouring at many of the participating galleries and businesses. The tour is free and open to the public. For more information, go to www.atascadero mainstreet.org or call 462-0177.

A Taste of Downtown - Paso Robles

File photo Photo by Heather Young

Paso Robles Wine Festival The annual Paso Robles Wine Festival will be held in Paso Robles’ Downtown City Park from 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 21. Events will take place Friday through Sunday at local wineries. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 239-8463 or go to www.pasowine.com.

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Atascadero Lakeside Wine Festival The annual Atascadero Lakeside Wine Festival will take place on Saturday, June 25 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Atascadero Lake Park. The event will include local wine, food and artists, as well as live music. Attendees can witness plein air artists in action. Tickets are $40 in advance or $45 the day of the event. For more information, call 466-2044 or go to www.atascaderowinefestival.org.

Paso Robles’ annual walk around downtown, A Taste of Downtown, will take place on Saturday, Sept. 17 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. More than 35 restaurants, wineries, sweet shops and coffee house will participate in the event. Admission is $25 per person. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 238-4103 or go to www.pasorobles downtown.org

Sunset: Savor the Central Coast The second annual Sunset: Savor the Central Coast will take place from Sept. 29 through Oct. 2 around the county. The main event will take place at the Santa Margarita Ranch on Saturday, Oct. 1 and Sunday, Oct. 2. For more information, go to www.savor centralcoast.com.

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NORTH COUNTY

Wineries, Vineyards & Tasting Rooms

15 degrees C Wine Shop & Bar — 1121 Rossi Rd. Suite A Templeton • (805) 434-1554 • www.15degreescwines.com Adelaida Cellars — 5805 Adelaida Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-8980 • www.adelaida.com Albeno Munari Vineyard & Winery — 725 12th Street Paso Robles • (805) 239-9176 • www.munariwinery.com AJB Vineyards — 3280 Township Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-9432 • www.ajbvineyards.com Alta Colina Vineyard & Winery — 2725 Adelaida Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 227-4191 • www.altacolinawine.com AmByth Estate — 510 Sequoia Lane Templeton • (805) 305-7355 • www.ambythestate.com Ancient Peaks Winery — 18798 El Camino Real Atascadero • (805) 365-7045 • www.ancientpeaks.com Anglim Winery — 740 Pine St. Paso Robles • (805) 227-6813 • www.anglimwinery.com Arroyo Robles Winery — 739 12th St. Paso Robles • (805) 226-5454 • www.arroyorobles.com Asuncion Ridge — 729 13th St. Paso Robles • (805) 461-0675 • www.asuncionridge.com August Ridge Vineyards — 8790 Hwy 41 Creston • (805) 239-2455 • www.augustridge.com Austin Hope/Treana Tasting Cellar — 1585 Live Oak Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-4112 • www.austinhope.com B&E Vineyard — 10000 Creston Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-4815 • www.bevineyard.com Barrel 27 Wine Company — 2323 Tuley Ct. #110 Paso Robles • (805) 237-1245 • www.barrel27.com Barreto Cellars — 5115 Buena Vista Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 474-8276 • www.barretocellars.com Bear Cave Cellars — 840 13th St., Suite G, Paso Robles • (805) 238-4329 • www.bearcavecellars.com Bella Luna Winery — 1850 Templeton Rd. Templeton • (805) 434-5477 • www.bellalunawine.com Berardo Vineyards and Winery — 3280 Township Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-9432 • www.berardovineyardsandwinery.com Bianchi Winery — 3380 Branch Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-9922 • www.bianchiwine.com Bodegas Paso Robles — 729 13th St. Paso Robles • (805) 237-3780 • www.bodegaspasorobles.com Booker Vineyard — 2640 Anderson Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-7367 • www.bookerwines.com Brian Benson Cellars — 2985 Anderson Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 296-9463 • www.brianbensoncellars.com Brochelle Vineyards — 810 11th Street (at Meritage) Paso Robles • (805) 238-9456 • www.brochelle.com Calcareous Vineyard — 3430 Peachy Canyon Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-0289 • www.calcareous.com Caliza Winery — 2570 Anderson Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-1480 • www.calizawinery.com Candor — 1585 Live Oak Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-4112 • www.hopefamilywines.com Caparone Winery — 2280 San Marcos Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 467-3827 or (805) 610-5308 • www.caparone.com Carina Cellars — 3525 Adelaida Rd. Paso Robles • (415) 309-2046 • www.carinacellars.com Carmody McKnight Estate Wines — 11240 Chimney Rock Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-9392 • www.carmodymcknight.com Page 52 | May 2011

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Cass Winery & Vineyard — 7350 Linne Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-1730 • www.casswines.com Castoro Cellars — 1315 N. Bethel Rd. Templeton • (805) 238-0725 • www.castorocellars.com Cerro Prieto Vineyards & Cellars — 810 11th Street (at Meritage) Paso Robles • (805) 674-0826 • www.cerroprietovineyard.com Changala Winery — 3770 Willow Creek Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-9060 • www.changalawinery.com Chateau Margene — 4385 La Panza Rd. Creston • (805) 238-2321 • www.chateaumargene.com Christian Lazo Wines — 840 13th St. #B, Paso Robles • (805) 226-8820 • www.christianlazowines.com Chronic Cellars — 2020 Nacimiento Lake Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 237-7848 • www.chroniccellars.com Chumeia Vineyards — 8331 Hwy 46 Paso Robles • (805) 226-0102 • www.chumeiavineyards.com Cinquain Cellars — 6404 Independence Ranch Pl San Miguel • (805) 400-5978 • www.cinquaincellars.com Clautiere Vineyard — 1340 Penman Springs Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-3789 • www.clautiere.com Clavo Cellars — 315 Main St. Templeton • (805) 226-0174 • www.clavocellars.com Clayhouse Wines — 849 13th St. Paso Robles • (805) 238-7055 • www.clayhousewines.com Croad Vineyards — 3700 Vinedo Robles Ln. Paso Robles • (805) 226-9899 • www.croadvineyards.com Cypher Winery — 3750 Hwy 46 West Templeton • (805) 237-0055 • www.cypherwinery.com D'Anbino Vineyards & Cellars — 710 Pine St. Paso Robles • (805) 227-6800 • www.danbino.com Dark Star Cellars — 2985 Anderson Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-2389 • www.darkstarcellars.com Daou Vineyards — 2777 Hidden Mountain Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-5460 • www.daouvineyards.com Denner Vineyards — 5414 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 239-4287 • www.dennervineyards.com Derby Wine Estates — 5620 Hwy 46 East, Paso Robles • (805) 238-6300 • www.derbywineestates.com Diamond Jem Vineyard — 7290 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 237-1424 Doce Robles Winery — 2023 12 Oaks Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 227-4766 • www.docerobleswinery.com Donati Family Vineyard — 2720 Oak View Rd. Templeton • (805) 238-0676 • www.donatifamilyvineyard.com Donatoni Winery — 3225 Township Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-0620 • www.donatoniwineryandvineyards.com Dover Canyon Winery — 4520 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 237-0101 • www.dovercanyon.com Dubost — 9988 Chimney Rock Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-8463 • www.dubostwine.com Dunning Vineyards Estate Winery — 1953 Niderer Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-4763 • www.dunningvineyards.com Eagle Castle Winery — 3090 Anderson Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 227-1428 • www.eaglecastlewinery.com Eberle Winery — 3810 W Hwy. 46 Paso Robles • (805) 238-9607 • www.eberlewinery.com Ecluse Wines — 1520 Kiler Canyon Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-4998 • www.eclusewines.com

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May 2011 | Page 53


NORTH COUNTY

Wineries, Vineyards & Tasting Rooms

Edward Sellers Vineyards & Wines — 1401 Highway 46 West Paso Robles • (805) 239-8915 • www.edwardsellers.com EOS Estate Winery — 2300 Airport Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 591-8050 • www.eosvintage.com Epoch Estate Wines — 7505 York Mountain Rd. Templeton • (805) 237-7575 • www.epochwines.com Eros Cellars — 14490 San Miguel Rd. Atascadero • (805) 466-0779 • www.frolickingfrogwine.com Falcon Nest Vineyard and Winery — 5185 Union Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-0227 • https://falconnestwinery.com First Crush Winemaking Experience — 2995 Pleasant Rd. San Miguel • (805) 434-2772 • www.firstcrushwinemaking.com Four Vines Winery — 3750 Hwy 46 West Templeton • (805) 237-0055 • www.fourvines.com Fratelli Perata Winery — 1595 Arbor Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-2809 • www.fratelliperata.com Frolicking Frog Winery — 14490 San Miguel Rd Atascadero • (805) 466-0779 • www.frolickingfrogwine.com FS Cellars — 1337 Vendels Circle Paso Robles • (805) 431-8146 • www.fscellars.com Gelfand Vineyards — 5530 Dresser Ranch Pl Paso Robles • (805) 239-5808 • www.gelfandvineyards.com Graveyard Vineyards — 1032 Pine Street Paso Robles • (805) 400-0096 • www.graveyardvineyards.com Greg Norman California Estates — 7000 Hwy 46 East Paso Robles • (805) 226-7000 • www.gregnormanestateswine.com Gremark Vineyards — 5325 Rancho La Loma Linda Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 237-0154 • www.gremarkwine.com Grey Wolf Cellars — 2174 W Hwy. 46 Paso Robles • (805) 237-0771 • www.greywolfcellars.com Halter Ranch Vineyard — 8910 Adelaida Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-9455 • www.halterranch.com Hansen Vineyard — 5575 El Pomar Dr. Templeton • (805) 239-8412 • www.hansenvineyards.com HammerSky Vineyards — 7725 Vineyards Dr, Paso Robles • (805) 949-7813 • www.hammersky.com Haven Wine Bistro — 6155 El Camino Real, Atascadero • (805) 468-4880 • www.havenwinebar.net Hearthstone Vineyard & Winery — 5070 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 238-2544 • www.hearthstonevineyard.com Hice Cellars — 821 Pine St. Paso Robles • (805) 610-1470 • www.hicecellars.com Hidden Oak Winery — 4671 S. El Pomar Templeton • (805) 237-9315 • www.hiddenoakwinery.com Hug Cellars — 2323 Tuley Ct., Ste. 120d Paso Robles • (805) 226-8022 • www.hugcellars.com Hunt Cellars — 2875 Oakdale Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-1600 • www.huntcellars.com J. Dusi Wines — 635 North Main Street, Templeton • (805) 451-7944 • www.jdusiwines.com J. Lohr Vineyards and Wines — 6169 Airport Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-8900 • www.jlohr.com J. Paul Rosilez Winery — 4889 Dry Creek Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-0550 • www.jpaulwinery.com Jack Creek Cellars — 5265 Jack Creek Rd. Templeton CA • (805) 226-8283 • www.jackcreekcellars.com Jada Vineyard — 5620 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 226-4200 • www.jadavineyard.com Page 54 | May 2011

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JK Wine Company — 810 11th St. Paso Robles • (805) 226-7514 • www.jkwinecompany.com J&J Cellars — 2850 Ranchita Canyon Rd. San Miguel • (805) 467-2891 • www.jjcellars.com Justin Vineyards & Winery — 11680 Chimney Rock Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-6932 • www.justinwine.com Kenneth Volk Vineyards — 3101 HWY 46 West Paso Robles • (805) 237-7896 • www.volkwines.com Kiamie Wine Cellars — 1111 Riverside Ave. Paso Robles • (805) 226-8333 • www.kiamiewines.com Kukkula — 45 S. Main St. Templeton • (805) 434-5475 • www.kukkulawine.com L'Aventure — 2815 Live Oak Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 227-1588 • www.aventurewine.com La Filice Winery — 910 Grapevine Way Templeton • (805) 434-0648 • www.lafilice.com Laraneta Winery — 2602 Templeton Rd. Templeton • (805) 434-5090 • www.laraneta.com Le Cuvier — 9750 Adelaida Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-5706 • www.lcwine.com Le Vigne Winery at Sylvester Vineyards — 5115 Buena Vista Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 227-4000 • www.sylvesterwinery.com Liberty School — 1585 Live Oak Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-4112 • www.hopefamilywines.com Linne Calodo — 3030 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 227-0797 • www.linnecalodo.com Locatelli Vineyards & Winery — 8585 Cross Canyons Rd. San Miguel • (805) 467-0067 • www.locatelliwinery.com Loma Linda Vineyards — 5155 Rancho La Loma Linda Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 227-7172 • www.lomalindavineyards.com Lone Madrone — 2485 Hwy 46 West Paso Robles • (805) 238-0845 • www.lonemadrone.com Madison Cellars — 4540 Hwy 41 Paso Robles • (805) 237-7544 • www.madisoncellars.com Maloy O'Neill Vineyards — 5725 Union Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-6430 • www.maloyoneill.com McClean Vineyards — 4491 El Pomar Dr. Templeton • (805) 237-2441 • www.mccleanvineyard.com Meridian Vineyards — 7000 Hwy 46 Paso Robles • (805) 226-7133 • www.meridianvineyards.com Meritage Wine Tasting Lounge — 810 11th Street Paso Robles • (805) 238-9456 • www.meritagelounge.com Michaud Vineyard — 810 11th Street Paso Robles • (805) 238-9456 • www.michaudvineyard.com Midnight Cellars Winery & Vineyard — 2925 Anderson Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-8904 • www.midnightcellars.com Minassian-Young Vineyards — 4045 Peachy Canyon Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-7571 • www.minassianyoung.com Mitchella Vineyard & Winery — 2525 Mitchell Ranch Way Paso Robles • (805) 239-8555 • www.mitchella.com Mondo Cellars Winery — 3260 Nacimiento Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 226-2925 • www.mondocellars.com Nadeau Family Vintners — 3860 Peachy Canyon Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-3574 • www.nadeaufamilyvintners.com Nichols Winery & Cellars — 5115 Buena Vista Rd. Paso Robles • (310) 305-0397 • www.nicholswinery.com Niner Wine Estates — 2400 Hwy 46 West Paso Robles • (805) 239-2233 • www.ninerwine.com

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May 2011 | Page 55


NORTH COUNTY

Wineries, Vineyards & Tasting Rooms

Norman Vineyards — 7450 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 237-0138 • www.normanvineyards.com Opolo Vineyards — 7110 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 238-9593 • www.opolo.com Orchid Hill Vineyard — 1140 Pine St. Paso Robles • (805) 237-7525 • www.orchidhillwine.com Ortman Family Vineyards — 1317 Park St. Paso Robles • (805) 237-9009 • www.ortmanwines.com Oso Libre — 7383 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 238-3378 • www.osolibre.com Parkfield Vineyards — 70502 Vineyard Canyon Rd. San Miguel • (805) 463-2316 • www.parkfieldvineyards.com Parrish Family Vineyard — 1120 Park Street Paso Robles • (805) 286-4028 • www.parrishfamilyvineyard.com PasoPort Wine Company — 5940 Union Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-2229 • www.pasoportwine.com Paso Wine Centre — 1240 Park St. Paso Robles • (805) 239-9156 • www.pasowines.com Peachy Canyon Winery — 1480 N. Bethel Rd. Templeton • (805) 239-1918 • www.peachycanyon.com Pear Valley Vineyards — 4900 Union Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-2861 • www.pearvalley.com Penman Springs Vineyard — 1985 Penman Springs Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-7959 • www.penmansprings.com Per Cazo Cellars — 16996 Peachy Canyon Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 610-6703 • www.percazocellars.com Pianetta Winery — 1829 13th St. Paso Robles • (805) 226-4005 • www.pianettawinery.com Pipestone Vineyards — 12040 Niderer Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 227-6385 • www.pipestonevineyards.com Poalillo Vineyards — 17970 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 238-0621 • www.poalillovineyards.com Pomar Junction Vineyard & Winery — 5036 S. El Pomar Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-9940 • www.pomarjunction.com Pozo Valley Wine — 122202 El Camino Real Dr Santa Margarita • (805) 438-3375 • www.pozovalley.com Pretty Smith Vineyards & Winery — 113350 River Rd. San Miguel • (805) 467-3104 • www.pasowine.com Proulx — 15424 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 706-0425 • www.proulxwines.com Rabbit Ridge Winery — 11172 San Marcos Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 467-3331 • www.rabbitridgewinery.com Ranchita Canyon Vineyard — 13439 Ranchita Canyon Rd. San Miguel • (805) 467-9448 • www.ranchitacanyonvineyard.com Rangeland Wines — 110425 Klau Mine Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 674-9232 • www.adelaidasprings.com Red Soles Winery — 13230 Oakdale Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-9898 • www.redsoleswinery.com Redline Wines — 16305 Buena Vista Dr. Paso Robles CA • (805) 434-WINE Rio Seco Vineyard & Winery — 14295 Union Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-8884 • www.riosecowine.com RiverStar Vineyards — 17450 Estrella Rd. San Miguel • (805) 467-0086 • www.riverstarvineyards.com RN Estate Vineyard — 17986 N. River Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 610-9802 • www.rnestate.com Robert Hall Winery — 3443 Mill Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-1616 • www.roberthallwinery.com Page 56 | May 2011

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Rockin’ R Winery — 8500 Union Rd. #C Paso Robles • (805) 835-8529 • www.rockinrwinery.com Rocky Creek Cellar — 8687 Apple Rd. Hwy 46 West Templeton • (805) 238-1919 • www.rockycreekcellars.com Ronan Cellars — 6305 Buena Vista Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 238-0833 Rotta Winery — 250 Winery Rd. Templeton • (805) 237-0510 • www.rottawinery.com Roxo Port Cellars — 810 11th Street Paso Robles (in Meritage) • (805) 464-0922 • www.roxocellars.com San Antonio Winery — 2610 Buena Vista Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 226-2600 • www.sanantoniowinery.com San Marcos Creek Vineyard — 7750 Hwy 101 Paso Robles • (866) PASO-WINE • www.sanmarcoscreek.com Sarzotti Winery — 180 Bella Ranch Rd. Templeton • (805) 226-2022 • www.sarzottiwinery.com Sculpterra Winery and Sculpture Garden — 5015 Linne Rd. Paso Robles • (888) 302-8881 • www.sculpterra.com Sextant Wines — 3502 Dry Creek Rd Ste 9-11 Paso Robles • (866) 833-WINE • www.sextantwines.com Shale Oak Winery — 3235 Oakdale Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-4800 • www.shaleoakwinery.com Sharp's Hill Vineyards — Ambush Trail Pl Paso Robles • (805) 237-2005 • www.sharpehill.com Silver Horse Winery — 2995 Pleasant Rd. San Miguel • (805) 467-WINE • www.silverhorse.com Skyhawk Lane — 6305 Buena Vista Dr. Paso Robles • (213) 200-4661 • www.skyhawklane.com Stacked Stone Cellars — 1525 Peachy Canyon Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-7872 • www.stackedstone.com STANGER Vineyards — 5255 Highway 41 Paso Robles • (805) 238-4777 • www.stangervineyards.com Starr Ranch Vineyards & Winery — 9320 Chimney Rock Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 227-0144 • www.starr-ranch.com Steinbeck Vineyards & Winery — 5940 Union Road Paso Robles • (805) 238-1854 • www.steinbeckwines.com Stephen's Cellar & Vineyard — 2485 Hwy 46 Paso Robles • (805) 238-2412 • www.stephenscellar.com Still Waters Vineyards — 2750 Old Grove Ln. Paso Robles • (805) 237-923 • www.stillwatersvineyards.com Summerwood Winery — 2175 Arbor Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 227-1365 • www.summerwoodwine.com Tablas Creek Vineyard — 9339 Adelaida Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-1231 • www.tablascreek.com Tackitt Family Vineyards — 6640 Von Dollen Rd. San Miguel • (805) 467-9490 • www.tackittfamilyvineyards.com Tarrica Wine Cellars — 111 Clark Rd. Shandon • (805) 237-8693 • www.tarricawinecellars.com Tassajara Cellars (at Silver Horse) — 2995 Pleasant Rd. San Miguel • (805) 239-8511 • www.tassajaracellars.com Terry Hoage Vineyards — 870 Arbor Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-2083 • www.terryhoagevineyards.com Thacher Winery — 8355 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 237-0087 • www.thacherwinery.com TKL Wines/CrossLynn Estate (at Meritage) — 810 11th Street Paso Robles • (805) 434-9838 • www.crosslynnestate.com Thunderbolt Winery — 2740 Hidden Mountain Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-9907 • www.thunderboltjunction.com

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May 2011 | Page 57


NORTH COUNTY

Wineries, Vineyards & Tasting Rooms

Tobin James Cellars — 8950 Union Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-2204 • www.tobinjames.com Tolo Cellars — 9750 Adelaida Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 226-2282 • www.tolocellars.com Treana and Hope Family Wines — 1585 Live Oak Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-4112 • www.hopefamilywines.com Turley Wine Cellars — 2900 Vineyard Dr. Templeton • (805) 434-1030 • www.turleywinecellars.com Twilight Cellars — 2740 Hidden Mountain Rd Paso Robles • (805) 226-9907 • www.twilightcellars.com Venteux Vineyards — 1795 Las Tablas Rd. Templeton • (805) 369-0127 • www.venteuxvineyards.com Veris Cellars (Home of Jan Kris & Ben Hogan Wines) — 1266 N. Bethel Rd. Templeton • (805) 434-0319 • www.veriscellars.com Via Vega Winery — 2378 Adobe Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 423-2190 • www.viavega.com Victor Hugo Winery — 2850 El Pomar Dr. Templeton • (805) 434-1128 • www.victorhugowinery.com Vihuela Winery — 840 11th St. Paso Robles • (805) 835-4604 • www.vihuelawinery.com Villa Creek Cellars — 5995 Peachy Canyon Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 238-7145 • www.villacreek.com Villa Creek Winery & Restaurant — 1144 Pine St. Paso Robles • (805) 238-3000 • www.villacreek.com Villa San-Juliette Winery — 6385 Cross Canyon Rd. San Miguel • (805) 550-0522 • www.villasanjuliette.com Villicana Winery — 2725 Adelaida Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-9456 • www.villicanawinery.com Vin D'Elle Cellars — 5115 Buena Vista Dr. Paso Roble • (805) 550-8741 • www.vindelle.com VinAlegre Vineyards — 7755 Airport Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 674-0616 • www.vinalegre.com Vina Robles Winery — 3700 Mill Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 227-4812 • www.vinarobles.com Vines on the Marycrest — 5076 Mustard Creek Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 237-0378 • www.vinesonthemarycrest.com Vinoteca Wine Bar — 835 12th St. Paso Robles • (805) 227-7154 • www.vinotecawinebar.com Vista Creek Cellars — 729 13th St. Paso Robles • (805) 610-1740 • www.vistacreekcellars.com Vista Del Rey Vineyards — 7340 Drake Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 467-2138 • www.vdrvineyards.com WCP Cellars — 1335 Vendels Circle Paso Robles • (805) 239-1568 • www.wcpwines.com Westberg Cellars — 3180 Willow Creek Rd Paso Robles • (805) 238-9321 • www.westbergwine.com Whalebone Vineyard — 8325 Vineyard Dr. Paso Robles • (805) 239-9020 • www.whalebonevineyard.com Wild Coyote Estate Winery — 3775 Adelaida Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 610-1311 • www.wildcoyote.biz Windward Vineyard — 1380 Live Oak Rd. Paso Robles • (805) 239-2565 • www.windwardvineyard.com Zenaida Cellars — 1550 Hwy 46 Paso Robles • (805) 227-0382 • www.zenaidacellars.com ZinAlley — 3730 W Hwy. 46 Templeton • (805) 238-0959 • www.zinalley.com Zoller Wine Styling — 525 Pine St. Paso Robles • (805) 226-9707 • www.zollerwinestyling.com Page 58 | May 2011

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Special thanks to Juice Media for their help and contribution of beautiful photographs and videos.

All photos by Juice Media


Creston Road Horse Ranch & Vineyard Across the road from the beautiful Windfall Farms Horse Ranch. 85 Total acres, 55 acres producing vines with very good net income. This property is an excellent location for a winery and tasting room. The existing home and horse facilities need some TLC, or remove them and build yourself a first-class winery. Don’t overlook this property. It has a lot to offer – great water & soils, location and huge potential. $1,750,000.

The knowledge to guide you and the service you deserve…

KIM WOOD

www.PasoRoblesLandCompany.com

(805) 674-2404 Broker

Page 60 | May 2011

JOE KUHNLE (805) 550-8584

Ranches, Land and Vineyards

Broker Associate

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Profile for WatsNews LLC

VINO - WIne Lifestyle Magazine  

VINO is a local magazine focused on Paso Robles Wine County events, wineries, winemakers and the local wine community.

VINO - WIne Lifestyle Magazine  

VINO is a local magazine focused on Paso Robles Wine County events, wineries, winemakers and the local wine community.

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