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EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T Published by News Media Corporation. www.EquineEnthusiast.com EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T is a FREE quarterly publication. 12,000 copies are distributed throughout the state of Wyoming and the Nebraska Panhandle region. It is available at feed and retail stores, event centers, hotels and other equine-related businesses.

SUMMER 2013

PUBLISHER Jim Wood jimwood@EquineEnthusiast.com

FEATURES KINGFISHER BEND RANCH HOME TO BEAUTY, HORSE TRAINING ...... 6-7 HABITS OF COMPETENT RIDERS ................................................................ 9 BIG HORSE PROBLEMS OFTEN COME IN SMALL PACKAGES ............. 12-14 MEGHAN PROCTOR CROWNED WYOMING HIGH SCHOOL RODEO QUEEN ...................................................................................... 14-15 TIPS FOR BUYING A NEW OR USED HORSE TRAILER ......................... 18-19 TRAINING WITH REWARDS ....................................................................... 21 WHEATLAND WRANGLERS’ RODEO SET FOR AUGUST ........................... 22 GETTING HORSES RING READY................................................................. 24 SHOSHONE BACK COUNTRY HORSEMEN CELEBRATE 20 YEARS ...... 26-27 FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH ................................................................ 30-31 BORN WILD AND READY TO RIDE........................................................ 32-33 MOUNTED CITIZENS ENHANCE PATROLS ......................................... 34, 36 HORSE SLAUGHTER OPPONENTS SUE USDA OVER PERMITS ................. 42 BACKCOUNTRY BY HORSEBACK IS ONE OF AN OUTFITTERS’ GREAT ASSETS................................................................. 44-45 FLY AND MOSQUITO CONTROL ............................................................... 46 NIOBRARA COUNTY 4-HERS COMPETE AT STATE 4-H SHOWCASE SHOWDOWN .................................................................... 48-49 ‘THEY TAKE CARE OF YOU’ ........................................................................ 50 HORSES ON THE EJE: 1907-2013 .............................................. 52, 54, 56-57 30 U.S. REPS WANT TO REIGN IN BLM’S HORSE BUDGET ....................... 69

EDITORS Travis Pearson tpearson@EquineEnthusiast.com Matt Roberts editor@EquineEnthusiast.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Mike Jensen mjensen@EquineEnthusiast.com ADVERTISING OFFICES Cheyenne, WY 307-632-5666 Evanston, WY 307-789-6560 Kemmerer, WY 307-877-3347 Lusk, WY 307-334-2867 Lyman, WY 307-787-3229 Pinedale, WY 307-367-2123 Scottsbluff, NE 308-635-3110 Torrington, WY 307-532-2184 Wheatland, WY 307-322-2627

KINGFISHER BEND RANCH HOME TO BEAUTY, HORSE TRAINING PAGES 6-7

GENERAL INFORMATION Get the Word Out! EVENT CALENDAR Submit a short description of your club, business or organization’s event for our calendar. Be sure to include relevant dates, times, locations and contact information. E-mail your event to: mneher@EquineEnthusiast.com Advertise in the CLASSIFED MARKETPLACE! Line Class ads are at $15 Display Classied ads are $25 Call 307-532-2184 for information. rmort@EquineEnthusiast.com

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A trail ride for Kingfisher Bend Ranch guests is led by Joshua Sorensen. Photo/ Anjoli Mosier

READ MORE ABOUT THE JACKSON HOLE HORSE RESCUE ON PAGE 6 4

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BIG HORSE PROBLEMS OFTEN COME IN SMALL PACKAGES PAGES 12-14

WHEATLAND WRANGLERS’ RODEO SET FOR AUGUST PAGE 22

FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH PAGES 30-31

BORN WILD AND READY TO RIDE PAGES 32-33

COLUMNS TRAIL TALK: BLUE JAY TRAIL/COMMISSARY RIDGE ................................. 10 EQUINE BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS AND SUGGESTED REMEDIES ...... 58, 70 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE .................................................................. 62-66 EVENT CALENDAR ................................................................................. 68-69

FLY AND MOSQUITO CONTROL PAGE 46 COLUMN

NIOBRARA COUNTY 4-HERS COMPETE AT STATE 4-H SHOWCASE SHOWDOWN PAGES 48-49 Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

HORSES ON THE EJE: 1907-2013 PAGES 52, 54, 56-57

EQUINE NE BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS PRO AND SUGGESTED REMEDIES PAGES 58, 70 EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

KINGFISHER BEND RANCH HOME TO BEAUTY, HORSE TRAINING NESTLED IN THE UINTA MOUNTAINS, RANCH BOASTS WIDE ARRAY OF ACTIVITIES By Anjoli Mosier STAFF WRITER

I

n a peaceful valley with trees, mountains and roaming wildlife as a backdrop, lies a lovely working guest ranch. The Kingfi sher Bend Ranch is found nestled at the base of the Uinta Mountains in southwest Wyoming. A winding river and pond lend yet another touch of serenity to the surroundings, while providing water for the livestock and wildlife, and enjoyable activities for residents and guests. During their stay, guests have the opportunity to try a wide variety of outdoor activities, from pickle ball and volleyball to canoeing and horseback riding. Horseback rides are an included aspect of your stay on the ranch, as is the optional fly fishing, with equipment ready and waiting. While the ranch is geared toward having guests with two lovely small cabins overlooking the pond, and one main lodge geared toward larger parties, Kingfi sher Bend is a working ranch with a barn and a herd of Scottish Highland cattle. But one of the main aspects of the ranch – when there are no guests onsite – is training horses. And who better to train those horses than award-winning trainer Joshua Sorensen? Sorensen, along with his wife and helpmate Emilie, manages the ranch and loves every acre of it. Spending his entire life around horses, Sorensen grew up in the saddle and started showing horses at a young age. Fourteen years ago, Sorensen began breaking and training horses professionally. He trains horses for many different disciplines, and they go on to do many different things. Cow, show, barrel and trail are some of the occupations that horses Sorensen has trained have go on to do.

RANCH continued on page 7

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Photos/ Anjoli Mosier

A trail ride for ranch guests led by Sorensen.

The trail horses get a treat before being saddled up for a guest trail ride. Ranch Managers Joshua and Emilie Sorensen outside of the main house.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


RANCH continued from page 6 For the past 10 years, Sorensen has been showing working cow horses using the traditional Vaquero style of horsemanship. During his fi rst time showing in this category, he showed with a horse that was bred to be a race horse, instead of a cow horse. It won. “That proved to be interesting, to say

the least,” Sorensen said. “It was a great opportunity for me to learn.” Sorensen used techniques that were new to him in training that have proved to be invaluable to him, and to his horses. He and that race-bred horse went on to win more working cow horse competitions. The horse Sorensen is currently train-

ing and showing is Tangy, a son of Dual Ray. Tangy has won in the Hackamore class at competitions in Utah for the past two years, and Sorensen is excited to see his progression as a show animal. Not only does Sorensen break twoyear-old horses, he also retrains fiveyear-olds that have gotten off track. And he helps train their owners, too. “If we can help people to get to where they know their cues, it’s a little more understandable for the horse,” Sorensen said. “Once a a person can communicate with feel and their body, the horse will respond.”

More about the ranch can be found at www.kingfisherbend.com.

One of the lovely guest cabins overlooking the pond.

Photos/ Anjoli Mosier

The picturesque pond where guests can swim, canoe and fish.

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The interior of one of the guest cabins.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

HABITS OF COMPETENT RIDERS CERTAIN CHARACTERISTICS NECESSARY TO GET HORSE AND HUMAN UP TO SPEED By Ed Close STAFF WRITER

T

here are all sorts of levels in horse riding. Some people are born to fit a saddle, while others take years to learn the art of riding properly. Some never do get the knack of it. Competent riders have a set of habits, and although each rider may not show all of them, most good riders show some of them. Many spend so much time sitting in a saddle it becomes like a second home, and if those riders ride the same horses all the time, the horse and rider become as one unit through knowing one another so well either can anticipate the movements and habits of the other. The first positive habit of a competent rider is persistence. You can’t give up when you’re learning to ride

or when you’re trying to teach a new or young horse the way you do things. Take it slow and steady, and don’t give up. Then there’s patience. That need for patience isn’t just for the horse you just bought, but also for yourself. Riders make mistakes, just as horses do, and getting frustrated or throwing a tantrum over some mistake you or your horse made is counterproductive and reinforces the negative rather than the positive. Staying open minded is another crucial habit. There’s always something new to learn, and thinking you’ve learned it all and telling yourself this way or that way is always the best and only way simply isn’t true and doesn’t work. Circumstances change. The horse you rode last week may not be the horse you ride this week. The ter-

rain may be different, or the job you ride to do may change. Other riders should be a source of inspiration and new ideas rather than a nuisance. Listening to the horse is another of those habits. Just because the horse doesn’t speak in a language like we do, they do communicate quite well in a wide variety of ways. Horses on trail rides can suddenly spook, alerting the rider to unseen dangers. A horse being stubborn when that’s out of character for that particular animal may tell the rider there is a problem with equipment, or with the health of the animal that given day. True, horses can be just as lazy as some people, but most horses enjoy the daily rides once they know they’re going to happen, but perhaps the feed is a bit rich or off in some other way, and the horse isn’t feeling well. Maybe a hoof is bruised or

sore, even though there’s no outward evidence of an injury. Quitting for the day doesn’t sound like a positive habit, but it is. The tricky part here is learning and knowing when you or the horse has had enough for the time being. If your horse started the day fresh and stepping out briskly, and starts stumbling or tripping late in the day, maybe it’s time to head for the barn and a roll in that dust bed to scratch that itch. If the horse acts as though it wants to keep going but you’re feeling fatigued, maybe the same can be said of you, without the roll in the dirt – unless you enjoy such things. Pay attention to the horse’s energy level and, by all means, pay attention to your own. It’s a lot easier to get cross or rough with your horse if you’re too tired to be out there riding.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | TRAIL TALK

Photo/ Travis Pearson

TRAIL DETAILS Difficulty: Moderate Type: Anything from a 4-mile out-and-back to a 50-mile loop

The Wyoming Range offers stunning views, including those found along the Blue Jay Trail and Commissary Ridge, for those who take to the rugged trails.

BLUE JAY TRAIL/COMMISSARY RIDGE KEMMERER AREA TRAIL FEATURES ‘GORGEOUS’ COUNTRY

County: Lincoln

By Megan Meher STAFF WRITER

Trailhead: Blue Jay Directions: From Kemmerer, take U.S. 189 north to Pomeroy Basin Road. Trailheads are about 35 miles up the road. Elevation change: 1,5002,000 feet Facilities: Trailer parking Season: Late June through fall

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

W

yoming Game and Fish Department Game Warden Chris Baird is based in Kemmerer and knows the trails in the Kemmerer Ranger District like the back of his hand, and when asked for a nice day ride trail, he took his time deciding before landing on Blue Jay Creek and Bear Trap trails, both of which lead riders to the top of Commissary Ridge in the Wyoming Range northwest of Kemmerer, Wyo. The ride to the ridge is short and steep. Blue Jay takes riders to the top in 1.5 miles, whereas Bear Trap splits into a number of trails that cover the 2,000-

foot climb more gradually. Once on Commissary Ridge, the trail system opens up into a network of loops that could take days to cover if that was the objective. Smaller loops take riders to the top of the Fontenelle Creek drainage, which Baird called “gnarly,” “steep” and “totally worth seeing.” “It’s steep, gorgeous country,” Baird said. “Once you’re on top of the ridge, though, then it’s pretty smooth sailing.” The trails out of either Blue Jay or Bear Trap are lightly used, Baird said, noting the exception of hunting season. The area is known for some amazing wildlife, and that is one of its strongest attractions for hikers, riders and hunters. But these two trails are not has

heavily used as some other entry points onto Commissary Ridge, and Baird said riders can feel like much of that country belongs to them. The system out of the two trailheads is maintained by the U.S. Forest Service, and workers go in regularly to clear trails, but Baird suggested riders carry some sort of saw with them just in case. “There is a lot of timber in that area, and there can be branches down after a storm,” Baird said. “It can be nice to have a saw just in case.” The trail is fairly open at this time of the year, although this year, Baird said, there are still drifts on the north face of slopes. It remains open until late fall, when the snow falls again.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

BIG HORSE PROBLEMS OFTEN COME IN SMALL PACKAGES DEADLY EQUINE INFECTIOUS ANEMIA POPS UP IN WESTERN NEBRASKA for further EIA testing and research. The problem that horse owners face,

By Bud Patterson STAFFF WRITER

W

ith 12 confirmed cases of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in northwestern Nebraska earlier this month, it is prudent practice for horse owners to be familiar with the viral and bacterial diseases that can be transmitted to horses by biting insects. According to the Nebraska Department of Agriculture, because there is no treatment for EIA (which is always fatal), and it is easily transmitted to healthy horses within close proximity to those infected, 10 of the 12 horses in the Nebraska case were euthanized; the other two horses were transported to the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa,

PROBLEMS continued on page 13

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PROBLEMS

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continued from page 12 particularly during the spring and summer months, is that any insect that bites and draws blood is capable of making a horse very sick and, in some cases, will prove fatal. In the Rocky Mountain and High Plains areas of the United States, besides EIA, the most noteworthy diseases transmitted by biting insects include West Nile Virus (mosquitoes), Lyme disease (ticks) and Western Encephalitis (primarily mosquitoes), which is also known as sleeping sickness.

EIA According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), EIA is an infectious and potentially fatal viral disease that affects only horses, mules and donkeys. Humans and other animals are not affected by EIA. No vaccine or treatment exists for the disease. EIA is often transmitted through the bite of horseies and deeries, taking infected blood from sick horses and infecting horses within the range of the y. However, needles and other equipment contaminated with infected blood can also transmit the disease. Clinical signs of EIA include fever, weight loss, icterus (yellowing of body tissues), anemia, swelling in the limbs, and weakness. However, not all infected animals will show signs of illness, but can still infect other animals. The symptoms of EIA are similar to those of other horse ailments, and reliable diagnosis can only be done through a Coggins test (developed by Dr. Leroy Coggins in 1970) or other serologic test. However, the Coggins test is internationally recognized as the standard. All states require a negative Coggins test before a horse can enter the state. Many states will accept testing within the last 12 months, but some require a negative test within six months, so be aware of the laws and restrictions if you are planning on transporting your horse to another state, regardless of the reason. Since there is no cure for EIA, and it is most often fatal, good horse management is the tool horse owners have to reduce the possibility of infection. ■Use disposable needles and syringes when administering vaccines and medications, and don’t reuse needles on multiple horses.

■Sterilize dental tools and other instruments after every use. ■ Test horses for EIA at least annually. ■ Have horses tested prior to purchase. ■ Only attend events and shows that require a negative Coggins test of all horses on the premises. ■ Newly-purchased horses should be quarantined for 45 days and observed for any signs of illness. ■ All stable areas should be kept clean, dry and waste-free. ■ Implement good y control measures in stable areas.

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LYME DISEASE In the western half of the United States, Lyme disease is a bacteria carried by the western lack-legged tick. In the east, it is carried by the deer tick. The most common signs of Lyme disease is fever, lameness, not wanting to be handled or saddled, swollen lymph nodes, shifting weight back and forth, and a reluctance to move.

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Deer ticks can carry Lyme disease and other ailments that affect horses, people.

Diagnosis of Lyme disease is based on the horse’s exposure to ticks and blood work. Fortunately, Lyme disease can be treated effectively with Doxycycline or Tetracycline. However, treatment early is much better than later. Treatment in later stages of the disease will take longer, and leave the animal with joint problems.

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

PROBLEMS continued on page 14

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

MEGHAN PROCTOR CROWNED WYOMING HIGH SCHOOL RODEO QUEEN THE 16-YEAR-OLD IS DEDICATED TO RODEO PAGEANTS AND HORSEMANSHIP By Paul Collins STAFF WRITER

F

or many teenage girls, adolescent life revolves around cars, shopping malls, boys and dating. For Lusk, Wyo., teen Meghan Proctor, however, it is the competitive sport of rodeo that sits at the center of her universe. Proctor loves the rodeo so much that she refuses to relegate the activity to the realm of spectator sports. The 16-year-old has been throwing her cowgirl hat into the arena for many years now, actively participating in many different rodeo events. Her tenacity and dedication to the sport recently paid off when she was crowned

Wyoming High School Rodeo Queen. Both Meghan and her mother, Geri Proctor, were overjoyed when they learned of the honor. For Meghan, celebration of the achievement came during a time rest and recovery from illness. “I almost passed out when I learned that I had been crowned because I was very sick that day,” said Proctor. “Meghan said she wished she felt better so she could enjoy it more,” added Geri. Obtaining the crown was no easy task for Meghan. The 16-year-old had to compete against two other girls in a competition comprised of several different contests. Those contests included a personal interview, delivery of a speech, an impromptu

question-and-answer section, a written test and a dress modeling event. Throughout the competition, Meghan exhibited all the traits and characteristics that the panel of judges were looking for in a queen. “I think they liked my bubbly personality and my good horsemanship,” said Meghan. The coveted crown that now sits on Meghan’s head is only one of many accomplishments that the teen holds in the world of rodeo. Meghan has also been Niobrara County’s Junior Princess and Junior Queen. The young rodeo queen is quick to point out that she did not earn those achievements by herself. Meghan received assistance from her horse and four-legged friend, WD40. The rodeo

teen first acquired WD40 four years ago. According to Meghan, a strong bond between her and the fast and friendly steed formed the very moment they met. “She was my dad’s horse to begin with, so I didn’t get to get on her in the beginning,” said Meghan. “But when I got on her, we definitely clicked. She’s very smart. She has a personality. She is willing to do anything for me.” “They found chemistry instantly,” added Geri. Meghan first participated in the rodeo

In 2012, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming combined had 77 reported case of WVN in horses. Texas led the nation with 120 cases. Symptoms of WVN include loss of appetite, depression, fever, weakness or paralysis of hindquarters, muzzle twitching, ataxia (uncoordination), wandering, circling, inability to swallow, convulsions and coma. There is no specific treatment for WNV in horses and, according to USDA data, the fatality rate is 33 percent for horses with clinical signs of WNV. However, there are USDA-approved vaccines to prevent WNV, and have been very effective in preventing the disease. Even with the vaccines, however, it is good management to practice mosquito control around stables and barns. ■ House horses indoors when mosquitoes are the most active (dusk and dawn). ■ Avoid turning on lights inside stables during the evening. ■ Place lights on the perimeter of stables and corrals to attract mosquitoes away from horses. ■ Remove all birds and fowl from areas around the stable (birds are WNV carriers that

can pass the disease to mosquitoes). ■ Eliminate standing water on your property. ■ Use fly and mosquito repellants on horses frequently. ■ Use a pesticide fogger around stables in the evening to reduce mosquito populations.

and spinal cord become affected. Muscle weakness becomes apparent and there are behavioral changes and dementia. Notable symptoms include aggression, head pressing, wall leaning, compulsive circling and blindness. Other signs might include uncontrolled twitching of the eyeball and facial muscle paralysis. Eventually, a semi-comatose and convulsive state occurs, and death usually follows two or three days later. If the animal survives, residual nervous system problems will most likely remain. Mortality rates for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) are much higher, 90 percent, than for WEE, at 50 percent. There is no specific treatment for equines affected with EEE, which makes vaccination critical for prevention. As with WNV, horse owners should implement good horse management practices, especially with regard to biting insects. Summer is a great time to enjoy the outdoors with your equine companion. But without effective pest management and vaccinations, it can literally be a horse wreck. There is no truer adage with regard to horses than “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

QUEEN continued on page 15

PROBLEMS continued from page 13

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) WNV is the leading cause of arbovirus encephalitis in horses (and humans) in the United States, but may also cause meningitis. It is transmitted by many different mosquito species that vary geographically. According to APHIS, in 2012 there were 627 cases of WNV reported from 41 states, the highest number of cases reported since 2007, but still significantly lower than 2002 when over 15,000 cases were reported.

Courtesy

Mosquitoes can transmit West Nile Virus or Western Equine Encephalitis.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (WEE) WEE is an inflammation of the brain and spinal cord, and not only affects horses, but can also be deadly for humans. Like WNV, WEE is transmitted through the bite of mosquitoes that previously bit an infected bird. Also, as in WNV, horses and humans are considered “dead-end hosts,” and do not spread the disease. Symptoms of WEE are often not readily apparent. The first visible signs occur four to five days after infection and manifest as a fever, rapid heart rate, anorexia, depression and other neurological signs. As the illness progresses, the brain stem

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


QUEEN continued from page 14 at the tender age of 5. Since that time, she has developed into a formidable foe for other rodeo contestants in her age category. The rodeo queen claims breakaway roping as her best and favorite event. Meghan attributes her skill and success in the realm of rodeo to her upbringing in a family completely immersed in the sport. “It’s been in my family for years,” said Meghan. “It’s the lifestyle I grew up in.” While rodeo holds a special place in Meghan’s heart, the young rodeo queen also has plans to transcend the sport. A lover of animals, she has plans to attend Colorado State University, where she will study to become a veterinarian. Meghan vows never to abandon the sport entirely, however, and plans on passing on a rodeo legacy along to her children. “I may not always compete, but I’ll have my kids compete in the rodeo,” said Meghan.

Photo/ Paul Collins

Meghan Proctor stands with her horse, WD40, and all of her prizes from being named Wyoming High School State Rodeo Queen.

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Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

TIPS FOR BUYING A NEW OR USED HORSE TRAILER FLOORING, TIRES, DOORS AND WINDOWS JUST THE BEGINNING

Photos/ Vicki Hood

A bumper pull trailer is generally less expensive and certainly adequate for pulling two or fewer horses.

By Vicki Hood STAFF WRITER

W

hen it comes to most things equine, there’s plenty of debate and discussion in the “how to” department. And if you’re new to horse ownership, it can leave you with more questions than answers. But, despite the vast gray area there seems to be, there is one thing most owners can agree on – that expenses never seem to end. Often, people new to the arena seem to think that the horse will be their biggest investment overall, but anyone who’s been in the game long knows that couldn’t be further from the truth. While you may have a substantial investment in the purchase of the animal, the horse is just the beginning. Feed, tack, farrier and vet bills – the list seems endless. One of the bigger expenses the horse owner will deal with is the cost of a horse trailer. Although it may not be the first thing you purchase when you get your horse, sooner or later most owners discover they need a way to get their horse

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from place to place. Even if you’re just a weekend rider, a horse trailer is a near necessity to get involved in any riding beyond your own corral gates. When you purchase a horse trailer, there are some key factors you should consider. How much you can spend will certainly define your market, but there are other components that are equally important in the decision. How much you plan to use a trailer is important. If you’re only going to need it occasionally, then you don’t need to buy something brand new with a lot of amenities. But regardless of what you buy, it needs to be structurally sound, with operational lights and brakes. There are plenty of good used trailers that will serve the purpose. You’ll need to decide between a bumper pull or gooseneck connection. Each style has its own advantages and shortcomings so, again, your specific purposes need to be considered. If you’re hauling no more than two horses, a bumper pull can work for you, but for larger loads, you’ll be better off with a gooseneck. The gooseneck offers more stability and spreads the weight more evenly on the

chassis of the truck. Regardless of the style you choose, there are some areas that are critical to the integrity of the trailer. One crucial component is the fl ooring. The older the trailer, the more likely there could be extensive wear in the floor. Inspect the mats and then, if possible, lift them up to assess the condition of the base structure. Watch for rust or damage, because this could cost a fair sum of money down the line to fix, and could endanger your animals if unseen. Look over the inside walls, especially near the floor, for anything that could injure your horse’s legs or feet. Inspect the hitch and safety chains. Be sure the hitch operates correctly. Tires are another priority. Look for sidewall damage and tread wear. Check the hubs to be sure they are greased properly. Make sure all doors, windows and latches are working as they should. Horse owners often consider their own needs and likes when they choose a trailer, but it’s also important to think about your horse’s needs. Because a horse is a prey animal, they have a natural fear of enclosed, tight or dark places. You want your horse to have enough room to be able to move his head, neck and feet to some

degree, which will make him feel a little less confined. Ventilation is also important – be sure there is adequate airflow to keep horses cool in the summer heat. There are a number of ways to find a horse trailer, new or used. In addition to some of the big auction sites such as eBay, there are dozens of horse-related websites that have ads with trailers for sale. But a word of caution here, especially if you are dealing with a used trailer. Although there are plenty of legitimate offers online, be very wary of deals that look too good to be true. A very low price on a fairly new trailer is a big tip-off that something might not be right about the seller. Scammers use stock photos of trailers and put them in their ads as if they owned that trailer, which is not the case. If the seller seems unwilling to allow you to see the trailer, or wants to make “special arrangements” in the transfer of funds, this is a red flag as well. If it doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. Be patient – there are plenty of good, honest deals out there, and when you rush a decision, you

TIPS continued on page 19

A gooseneck trailer is preferred for hauling more than two horses due to increased stability as well as a more equal dispersion of the load on the vehicle chassis.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


TIPS continued from page 18 are much more vulnerable to a scammer. A horse trailer is one of the biggest expenses in horse ownership, so be sure you take the time to evaluate any you are considering for purchase. If you’re new to the

game, take someone with you that has experience, and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Safety is the top priority for you, your horse and all those with whom you’ll share the road.

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Grandstand Event Schedule: » TUESDAY

Pig Mud Wrestling » WEDNESDAY

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Park County’s Got Talent » FRIDAY

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Powell, Wyoming ~ www.parkcountyfair w .com 20

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SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

TRAINING WITH REWARDS REINFORCEMENT CAN GO A LONG WAY TOWARD EFFECTIVELY TRAINING A HORSE By Ed Close STAFF WRITER

T

here seem to be two schools of thought out there concerning the proper rewards for your horse. One school of thought centers on actions, while another centers on food snacks. Since many riders assume the horse can feel or sense the mood of the rider, it is also assumed if frustration during training sets in, it is a bad thing for the horse. Keeping your mood positive then will likewise affect the animal. It is also noted one should pet the horse when it does well, and not smack or slap the animal, which may misinterpret what you are trying to say by your actions. One reward for a job well done is to relax the reins and pet the horse, while

letting the animal wander around or munch on available grass. This technique helps the horse relax with the rider in the saddle, and helps create a trust and a bond. Sometimes the horse has a pretty g o o d idea what the rider wants, especially after several sessions of training. If your horse is at that point, accept the horse’s idea of what comes next, reinforcing the learning and giving the horse confidence

in its own abilities. If your horse has a favorite movement or exercise, use that toward the end of a good training session or workout. The horse will learn to look forward to doing that movement, and try to get the other lessons right in order to reach that exercise sooner. Beware of this one, though, as the horse can also get the idea that the other exercises d o n ’t really matter all that much and rush through them, making mistakes. Then there’s the idea that a food reward works well when training horses.

In some cases that may be true, but some things should be avoided. Some food snacks and show or event competitions simply don’t go well together. Some horse treats have color to them and, if the horse slobbers while eating the snack and the slobber turns pink or red, it may be mistaken for blood in the horse’s mouth, and that won’t impress the judges. Best to stick to things like cut up apples – preferably green to avoid any red slobber – or cut up carrots. Sugar cubes work well, but they can be as bad for your horse’s teeth as they are for yours. Fresh fruit is healthy and can be stuffed in a pocket if you keep it in a sandwich bag. I knew a horse once that loved slices of pear. Pears are good for them, and there’s no chance of a pink stain. Try pears with your horse and see what it thinks about them.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

WHEATLAND WRANGLERS’ RODEO SET FOR AUGUST THE 2013 EDITION PROMISES FUN, ENTERTAINMENT FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

Courtesy

Derrick Sisson of First State Bank is pictured with Lightnin’ at the Wheatland Wranglers’ Charity Ranch Rodeo last year. Sisson was the Wheatland Wranglers’ 2012 “Mystery Clown.” For the Enthusiast

I

t’s a 72-year-old tradition now that Rocky and Lida Christian brought from Texas to Wyoming. With tradition in mind, the Goshen Hole couple will again produce “Wheatland Wranglers’ Annual Charity Ranch-Rodeo” the last day of the Platte County Fair. Local cowboys and cowgirls are paying $250 per team to compete for $2,500 in prize money at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at Platte County Fairgrounds. The family tradition includes six or eight couples square dancing during rodeo performances. As an added twist, they’ll be on horseback! “No trotting, these young, local cowboys and cowgirls will be moving on,

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having a good time,” Lida Christian said. “They’ll wear colorful shirts, listening for cues from their caller,” she added. Just $5, and $3 for ages 12 and under, buys admission to the ranch-rodeo, planned to be action-packed and fastmoving. Advance tickets may be purchased starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at the fairgrounds ticket booth. The tradition also includes giving all rodeo and concession proits to a charitable fund. “Proits will again go to Platte County Memorial Nursing Home’s special facilities fund. We want to do something for the community while showing appreciation for the seniors,” Rocky Christian said. “Last year, 90 people participated; 40 were volunteers,” Lida added.

The Country Club Band of Cheyenne Live will again provide arena music. “The band is made up of the Bob Mathews family. He’s taught orchestra in Cheyenne public schools for 37 years, so the audience is in for professional entertainment. He’s played for square dances nearly all his life,” Lida said. Well-known announcer Bob Mosley of Chugwater will return to keep the audience informed and entertained. Also spicing up the rodeo will be “Mutton Bustin’” kids, coming out of a sheeptrailer next to the west arena fence. If they happen to not land on their feet, local 2013 Mystery Clown will help them up. “Most of Wheatland knows this person but won’t recognize him or her in make-

up and costume. We’ll announce his or her identity at the end of the show; we wouldn’t want anyone to go home wondering,” Rocky said with a smile. Zach Johnson of Torrington Livestock Market has secured sheep and riders. Tommy Hermann, of Wheatland, will use his working dogs to assist. Hay-bale singers, aka Wheatland Wrangler-Warblers, will sing out three toe-tappin’ songs. Kate Jackson of Chugwater will lead them before, during and after the rodeo. The Christians believe ranch-rodeo is a growing sport. “People enjoy seeing teamwork, skill and athleticism of contestants and their horses. Contestants will compete doing work done daily on local ranches, including riding broncs. The difference is they’ll be scored on the bronc and race the clock in four other events, trying to win prize money. You never know what’s going to happen!” the Christians said with a laugh. Rocky added that local father-son team Jack and Dean Finnerty will return as judges. And there’s no need to cook before coming to the rodeo. A great part of this family-tradition is providing delicious rodeo food at low prices. “We want families to be able to enjoy a meal away from home. We’ll have homemade chopped beef sandwiches and ‘Wrangler Nachos,’ beef, of course, and even cotton candy,” Lida said. “The Slater Women’s Club, with all their expertise, will manage the concession stand.” Rocky and Lida are expecting their maximum again of 10 local cowboy/ cowgirl teams to compete in the Aug. 3 rodeo. The winning team will advance to state inals in Douglas. “We’ll be there with bells on to watch that team,” Lida said. The deadline for rodeo entry forms and fees is July 27. Entry forms are available at Wheatland Country Store and Torrington Livestock Market. For more information, call (307) 331-4554 or (307) 331-4706.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

GETTING HORSES RING READY PROPER TRAINING BEFORE COMPETITION A KEY COMPONENT FOR CONFIDENT EQUINE By Kathy Carlson STAFF WRITER

W

hile showing horses can be thrilling, it can also be stressful. Taking steps to prepare a horse for a show not only helps ease the nerves for the rider, but also the equine partner. There are several tricks and tips to getting a horse ring ready, no matter what level of competition. It is never too early or late to start competing with horses. Ruth Shriver, a reining competitor, did not start showing horses until later in life. “I didn’t own a horse till I was 30, and had very few opportunities to ride before then,� Shriver said. “I’ve mostly enjoyed rides in the mountains and doing a few shows on occasion through the years, until I started reining when I turned 60.� Kristi Kainer, a cutting competitor,

grew up around horses and began competition much younger. However, no matter the age of the rider, the skill of the horse and the training hours logged pre-show are what counts. Proper training is required before entering a ring, no matter what the kind of competition. Kainer enlists help from a professional horse trainer to keep her horse on the top of its game. Shriver agrees practice is key to being composed in the ring. “You want your horse to be conďŹ dent at a competition, so practice to build that conďŹ dence, and relaxation, such as rides on the mesa or in the mountains is a good change mentally for them,â€? Shriver said. Meghann Durbrow, an eventing competitor, recommends doing interval training and running hills with a horse to get him into cardiovascular shape for longer competitions.

Once a horse and a rider are practiced up, make sure all tack is ďŹ tting perfectly. “You need to have good tack,â€? Kainer said. “A good bridle, a good saddle. Everything needs to ďŹ t them properly so it’s not painful and so they can work their best.â€? Do a trial run with tack and the show outfit that is planned on being worn. An outfit should be clean and comfortable, just as a horse’s tack should. Pack up all tack the night before, so all pieces of equipment are accounted for once at a show. Rushing in the morning or forgetting a piece of gear only adds to anxious nerves. Wash a horse the day before an event. This ensures the horse will be dry and oils will have returned to its coat, leaving it shiny. Give a horse a good brushing and apply oil to the coat, avoiding the saddle area to prevent slippage. Braid the horse’s

mane and paint hooves with oil the day of the event. Once at the ring, warm a horse up properly. This will get rid of both the rider’s and the horse’s jitters, and loosen them up to achieve optimal performance. Durbrow recommends doing bending exercises and ďŹ gure eights. If competing in a jumping event, have a horse do several small jumps before riding. Make sure a horse is moving in response to legs and hands before entering a ring. Once it is time to enter the show ring, don’t sweat small mistakes and continue to compete with a smile. Showing horses is fun, and working as a team with an equine is a rewarding experience. In the end, it’s all about being in partnership. “Spend time with your horse and develop a relationship with them,â€? Shriver said. “Horses are incredible therapy, at any age.â€?

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PRCA Rodeo July 26th & 27th 7:00 pm

Rubber Check Race

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August 7th

JB and the Moonshine Band Hwy 26 Summer Jam The Panhandles largest dance in the dirt.

August 8th

Mud Bog & ATV Races Friday August 9th

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band the grounds act Play with gravity Aug 10th

Moto Cross Aug 9th & 10th

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SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

SHOSHONE BACK COUNTRY HORSEMEN CELEBRATE 20 YEARS RIDE, DINNER AND TRAIL MAINTENANCE ALL PART OF THE ANNIVERSARY By Gib Mathers STAFF WRITER

T

he Shoshone chapter of the Back Country Horsemen of America is celebrating 20 years in the area with a ride and dinner, and an ambitious schedule of trail maintenance this summer. Local Back Country Horsemen repair and clear existing trails in the Shoshone National Forest and across the Big Horn Basin. They have at

least 20 trails in the Beartooth Mountains, and the Wood and Shoshone river drainages on their to-do list for coming months. One of those projects will be repairing the corrals at Elk Fork trailhead, said Shoshone Chapter President Howard Sanders, of Powell, Wyo. “It will be a busy summer for us,” Sanders said. The Shoshone National Forest has about 1,000 miles of trails to maintain. Every year, forest personnel endeavor

to repair 500 to 600 miles of it. In the last three or four years, Back Country Horsemen have maintained 90 to 100 miles of those trails each season. That is a lot for volunteers, said Crosby Davidson, Shoshone National Forest wilderness forestry technician. “We’re incredibly appreciative of the Back Country Horsemen and the work they do,” said Davidson, who serves as the liaison for forest personnel and the group. The local Back Country Horse-

men chapter contracts with the Shoshone National Forest to repair trails, and receives $5,000 annually for for the work. Horsemen earmark that money for trailhead maintenance for public benefit. Over the last 10 years, the group has cleared more than 1,200 miles of trails in the Shoshone. Without the

SHOSHONE continued on page 27

Courtesy

The Shoshone chapter of the Back Country Horseman of America is celebrating 20 years. The volunteers work every season maintaining trails in the Shoshone National Forest or constructing trailhead facilities like this 2006 project on Cottonwood Creek in the Big Horn Mountains with Big Horn County and the Bureau of Land Management.

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SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


PONY EXPRESS RIDES AGAIN Marika Anderson patiently waits on her horse, Button, for the mailbag to arrive from Nebraska during the Pony Express re-ride that passed through Wyoming and Nebraska recently.

Photo/ Emily Siegel

SHOSHONE continued from page 26 Back Country Horsemen, many trails would be closed because the U.S. Forest Service does not have the resources to maintain them, Sanders said. Sanders cited a 2006 project in which the chapter partnered with the Bureau of Land Management and Big Horn County to construct trailhead facilities at the mouth of Cottonwood Creek on the west slope of the Big Horn Mountains. The Shoshone chapter also has hosted many training seminars on “leave no trace” principles for stock users, such as removing excess manure, preventing picketed horses from trampling meadows, or not tying horses to saplings. “Our trainers have worked with literally thousands of stock users over the years providing instruction on minimizing stock impacts on the land,” Sanders said. “No impact.” The Shoshone chapter has also been very active in the Shoshone’s planning process, advocating continued stock use on the forest. “You either stick up for trails or you lose them,” Sanders said. “We are not about to give up our trail riding rights

on public lands.” Horsemen provide a great service to both Shoshone and the outdoor community. “We can’t thank them enough,” Davidson said. The chapter also sponsors recreational trail rides. “It’s not just all work projects. We get out and have fun together and enjoy this magnificent place where we all live,” Sanders said. The horsemen’s organization has 185 chapters in 27 states, with nearly 13,000 members. The Shoshone chapter has about nine reliable riders, Sanders said. Last year, Back Country Horsemen of America donated more than 370,000 hours on public lands projects valued at more than $12.5 million. Over the years, they have completed more than $80 million in projects to public lands, far more than any other user group in the United States, Sanders asserted. Horsemen operate on principles of public service, education and trail advocacy.

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The all-new Hesston 2800 Series by Massey Ferguson®. Our new higher capacity Hesston 2800 Series automated round balers have evolved—completely. New features include our exclusive suspended axle system, large flotation tires, wider pick-up, lower mesh loading height and easier mesh feeding and routing. Our advanced Console I also provides realtime monitoring for superior bale production. So don’t settle for less. Get everything you need to streamline the job and maximize productivity. The Hesston 2800 Series. Definitely worth a second look. And maybe even a third. See your local dealer or visit masseyferguson.com.

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RARING TO RIDE Outfitters and guides across Wyoming keep stables of horses – similar to this group at the JC Ranch in Boulder – for recreational rides, pack trips, gear drops and myriad other services that require equine assistance.

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SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


Friday, August 16, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Wyoming Mustang Days Public All Wild Horse Show Classes for all riders and horses include: halter, lead line, team sorting, trail, youth boot race, “Western Cow Handling” All classes are open to the public and are free to enter. Entry forms are available at www.blm.gov/wy Awards presented to high point winners of junior and senior divisions

p.m. Saturday, August 17, 2 p.m. – 5 4:30 p.m. Trainer Showcase and Wild Horse Adoption Ten saddle-started wild horses showcased by trainers from the Mantle Wild Horse Training Facility and the Wyoming Honor Farm. 4:30 p.m: Showcased horses will be available for adoption, by oral bid.

August 12 -17, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Ten yearlings available for adoption at the BLM booth Thank you partners for supporting the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program!

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Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Wild Horse and Burro Program

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH GOOD DENTAL CARE MAKES A HEALTHIER, HAPPIER HORSE By Gib Mathers STAFF WRITER

H

e’s just like a human dental hygienist – but his patients have hooves. He is Greg Paris, an equine dental technician working for Ray Acker, DVM, just east of Powell, Wyo. Good dental care equals a healthier, happier horse, Paris said. As teeth wear, they lose their capacity to grind food, and grinding is essential to extract the nutrients from the food, Acker said. All the equine’s teeth must deliver pressure equally when the horse is eating, Paris said. But all that grinding is sort of a dou-

Greg Paris of Powell, Wyo., recently joined Big Horn Animal Care just east of Powell as an equine dental technician.

MOUTH continued on page 31

Photo/ Gib Mathers

ce Sin 23 19

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July 22 & 23. . .PACT & 4-H Fashion Revue July 26- Aug. 3

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Aug. 16-18 Senior Pro Rodeo

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SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


MOUTH continued from page 30

ble-edged sword. Food grinding produces the sharp points that scratch the tongue and gums, Paris said. Paris opens the mare’s mouth wide. Her teeth are indeed pointed. The points have scratched furrows in her gums and tongue. The tech must remove those points with his dental grinder. Bit points must be smooth where the bit rides against the tooth to allow for equal bit pressure, too. If the horse’s bit points are even, it won’t throw its head, Acker said. “Horses do get gum disease,” Paris said. Food must not penetrate the area between the teeth, or the equine will get gum disease. At age 3 or 4, a horse sheds its baby teeth. The permanent teeth push them out. However, sometimes baby teeth remain attached to the adult teeth. They are called caps. If the horse is not putting on weight, caps may be the culprits and will require removal, Acker said. The horse may be irritable, too, if it has caps, Paris said. Usually caps can be easily removed with the grinder. “Occasionally they need to be cut out,” Acker said. Prior to grinding, Acker gives the horse a sedative to keep it calm. A licensed veterinarian must administer the drug and be present to supervise the technician while they tend to the horse. If the tech discovers tumors, lesions or warts, a vet must take over care of the horse, Paris said. Although the scale is larger, Paris’ tool is no different than a dentist would use to smooth an errant human tooth.

He grinds for a few minutes and the teeth look smooth and uniform. Removing a horse’s tooth is a major procedure, and must be done by the vet, Acker said. When a horse is 5 years old, its teeth are fully grown. From then on, a horse must have dental care annually, Paris said. Paris grinds away. The horse is not enjoying the process, but it isn’t in pain either. Again, it seems to compare to the discomfort a human suffers under a dental hygienist. “We’re getting there, buddy,” Paris said to a gelding. Paris is also learning to become a vet tech to assist him, Acker said. Equine dental techs must practice under the supervision of a licensed vet, Acker said. Paris attended the Academy of Equine Dentistry in Glenns Ferry, Idaho. “Best in the world,” he said. “Greg is doing it right,” Acker said. “I’m glad to have him.” At Acker’s practice, hemograms can be completed in five minutes, which can make the difference between life and death. Chemistry can be completed in 30 minutes on large and small breed animals to check for maladies such as diabetes, liver or kidney failure, or a heart attack, Acker said. A company that produces de-worming horse feed said if the horse owner uses their product and meets other conditions, they will pay for colic surgery. “It is basically an insurance policy for colic surgery,” Acker said. He uses the above example to emphasize the importance of de-worming horses. He strongly recommends deworming every three months.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

BORN WILD AND READY TO RIDE FOURTH ANNUAL MUSTANG DAYS COMES TO DOUGLAS, WYO. By Emily Siegel STAFF WRITER

A

Courtesy/ BLM website

Horses at Mustang Days have been transformed from wild to trained in hopes of finding an adopted, forever home.

new crowd has come to the Wyoming State Fair in Douglas, Wyo., the past three years, as the Mustang Days event has allowed horse trainers to showcase the progress made with previously wild mustangs, leading to their potential adoption into a forever home. Wild Horse Specialist Scott Fluer, with the Bureau of Land Management, in Lander said this particular event is used to help get these horses adopted. He said the showcase of the mustangs during the state fair is imperative to keeping the population at a manageable number every year. “The only way we can control the population is through periodic gathers on the range, and we put those horses up for adoption,” he said.

Wyoming manages about 3,800 wild horses throughout the state, he said, adding that would equate to roughly 16 separate herds. After being gathered from the range by helicopter, the horses are sent to farms and ranches to receive training. “They train wild horses for people. And they showcase their training talents and their training styles at a training showcase.... We showcase 10 animals, saddle-started animals. Then we auction those off to the public, and that’s how we adopt those horses out,” Fluer said. Along with the untamed nature of the wild horse, some trainers say the first step when getting the horses at the ranch is gaining the trust of the animal. Fluer said time spent

BORN continued on page 33

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BORN continued from page 32

training a horse means nothing unless that animal trusts you, and the handlers respect the animal. “It depends on the horse and, of course, the trainer or person. Each one takes a different amount of time because you need to basically gain trust and respect with your horse. And, horses kind of set the pace,” he said. Steve Mantle has been a contract trainer for the BLM on the Honor Farm in Wheatland since 1998. He also said the initial step, once a wild horse enters the farm, is observation and gaining trust. “The first thing to overcome is getting that horse to trust me enough that I can get my hands on him and touch him. Prior to that, I’m just observing,” he said. Mantle said he likes to target the horses that are curious of him and want to learn. He said some of these wild horses, once they begin the training programs, become quick learners and are then eager to do more. He compared the wild colts to small children who hit a baseball for the first time and “float to first base,” adding that, once they complete a task, whether it be tracking a steer or stopping on point, their level of confidence grows. “All of a sudden, these colts’ confidence is up...if you can make these colts have that same sort of experience when they do something that you ask them to do, you’ll actually feel them try harder the next time,” he said. With every wild horse, training is different. Some may take less time to halter and saddle, while others need more exposure to domestication. Mantle said people who adopt these mustangs should continue to work with them, and can also find help through training programs. “You’ll be amazed that in maybe two or three sessions, you can actually track a steer in your arena without ever touching your reins on a wild colt,” he said. Although the life of a wild horse on the range can become difficult, Mantle said he firmly believes the mustangs enjoy their new life with more than just a rider on their back, but a companion. “I think the ones that we have and we see enjoy captivity because they no longer have to search for food or

water, and pick up and work at what we ask them to do,” he said happily. Fluer said he would be at the state fair all week long, where he will have a booth set up, and then he will be at the horse show and trainer’s showcase. Also, the United States Border Patrol from the Canadian border will attend the Mustang Days event this year. “All sorts of people use these horses. People use them for pleasure, for trail riding and on the ranch,” he said.

Trail riding, team sorting halter classes and western cow handling are some of the events that will take place at the Mustang Days event. “The whole event is tied around wild horses and the use of them...and all this will be done with wild horses,” he said. With the Wyoming State Fair is set to run in Douglas Aug. 12-17, Fluer is excited to expose the improvements the wild horses have made since being

worked with trainers. This is what sets the stage for adoptions, he said. “That’s our whole goal at the Wyoming State Fair, is to adopt horses out and to find them good homes,” Fluer said, adding, “We are showing the positive sides of the animal and the uniqueness of the mustang. And, they are sort of a novelty. Not everybody has one, not everybody wants one, but this is great opportunity to showcase them.”

Courtesy/ BLM website

Dawn Helms waits for her turn to compete with her horse BlackJack.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

MOUNTED CITIZENS ENHANCE PATROLS EQUINE PEACEKEEPERS INCREASE COMMUNITY FEEL, HELP WITH CROWD CONTROL By Matthew Manguso STAFF WRITER

I

n 1996, the Jackson, Wyo., Police Department had an idea – put regular, average citizens on top of horses to assist the department with crowd and traffic control during special events like rodeos and parades. The idea took off and, 17 years later, the JPD Citizen’s Mounted Unit is thriving, with dozens of volunteers and their horses enhancing community policing. The idea of mounting law enforcement or military personnel on equines is not a new idea. In the burgeoning years of the American Republic, the nation added a cavalry unit to its Army branch, but even before that, just about every country made use of the horse. Alexander the Great

crushed Persian forces with mounted soldiers, Attila the Hun plagued the Roman Empire with his horsemen using blitzkrieg-like attacks, and once the Spanish introduced the horse to the Americas, Native Americans could mount swifter and deadlier attacks against neighboring tribes, as well as the U.S. Army. Capt. Russ Ruschill of the JPD said there is a certain intimidation factor associated with a mounted patrol unit that makes malfeasants think twice about causing a ruckus. “There are some estimates out there that say one mounted police officer is worth five foot soldiers when it comes to the intimidation and crowd control techniques that we use,” Courtesy/ JPD CMU

PATROLS continued on page 36

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4 - Chuckwagon Days Barbecue, Events Center, following the 4th of July Parade, free to all, donations appreciated, Rodeo follows in the Buss Fear Outdoor Arena 7 - 351 Team Roping Enter @ 6PM rope @ 7PM call 307-231-1204 to Enter 12 - 13 IDRHA & CSRHA Horse Show - www.idrha.com or call Matt 208-680-8077 16 - Dressage Clinic with Sabina Kallas 11-4 PM. Reserve your spot today (space is limited) Call 307-3862092 or 307-749-8855. 17 - SBRC Barrel Jackpot, time only's 6 pm, race at 7 pm. Call 307-276-5424 to Enter

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November 10 - SBRC Barrel Jackpot, time only's 6 pm, race at 7 pm. Call 307-276-5424 to Enter enter.

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PATROLS continued from page 34

he explained. With a competent horse, a trained, prepared rider can easily outrun an assailant, get a bird’s eye view of a situation and even barricade individuals to prevent further commotion. But horses are equally intimidating and intriguing, and Ruschill said putting officers on horses sparks the public’s curiosity, prompting them to come over to the horse and its rider, ask questions and become friendlier with officers. “I’ve been a police officer for 11 years, and no one has ever asked to pet my police car,” Ruschill said with a laugh. “The very presence of a horse is an ice breaker for people to contact police and talk and chat with us.” Adding a CMU, Ruschill added, brought members of the community together based on a common interest of horses and keeping the town of Jackson safe. “The beautiful thing between the citizens and the police department is it enhances and enforces the community style of policing that our chiefs have adopted,” he said. “The biggest advantage is we build common interests with members of our community.” The horses used by the CMU range from Bureau of Land Management mustangs to British warmbloods to Hanoverians and everything in between. For a town rooted in the cowboy tradition, though, Ruschill said the most commonly used breed is the Quarter Horse, but the JPD has “seen every type of horse under the sun.” The men and women who volunteer for the CMU are just as varied as their steeds; hardworking folks, independently wealthy, retired individuals and beyond. Volunteers provide their own horses, and training consists of 40

hours, taking about a month. Ruschill said instruction is a type of scaffolding training, meaning riders and horses must have a good foundation of basic horsemanship skills before moving up to the more advanced levels like arrest techniques and crowd control maneuvers. “We start on the ground and after that we move onto riding while still using the ground schooling techniques,” Ruschill said. Once a volunteer is secure enough to ride, the training focuses on desensitizing the horse, which involves maneuvering the horses around balls, over tarps and bridges, and anything else to simulate a crowded environment that will keep the horse from spooking during an actual event. “In class, I refer to them as a passenger or rider,” Ruschill said. “A passenger lets the horse take control, and the rider understands his or her relationship with the horse and uses good techniques. It truly is a team, and has everything to do with the horse and the rider trusting one another.” Aside from being an effective crowd control tool and enhancing the relationship between the community and the police department, Ruschill said having a CMU preserves the Western legacy Jackson is known for. “The horses contribute to the West, and one of our original mission statements for the department was having Western heritage and community pride,” Ruschill said. “I believe having the horses and CMU downtown adds to the authentic culture and our Western heritage.” For more information on the JPD CMU, contact Ruschill at (307) 7331430 or rruschill@ci.jackson.wy.us. New volunteers are always welcome.

Courtesy/ JPD CMU

Besides being an effective crowd control tool, mounted units also act as ice-breakers between the public and the police department.

Local Horseman & Facility Features | Event Coverage | Equine News Business Prole | Calendar of Events | Regular Editorial Columns | Classieds Equine Enthusiast is produced locally and distributed quarterly to feed/tack stores,event facilities, hotels, fairgrounds and other equine related businesses. It is also packaged with The Business Farmer, a weekly specialty publication that covers agricultural issues in eastern Wyoming and the Nebraska panhandle, and available at the Wyoming State Fair in Douglas, Cheyenne Frontier Days and numerous county fairs. (12,000 copies total, each issue) ™

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TIME TO PONY UP Presidents of the National Pony Express Association, (from left) Lyle Gromewold Les Bennington, Nick Schwab and James Swigart, stand together for a photo while in Henry, Neb. for the Pony Express re-ride that crossed over much of the country in June.

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Friday, August 30 • Main Street - 9th to Harrison closed to traffic 5:00 - 8:00 pm Kid’s activities - bingo - live turkey races - cowboy poetry - royalty and clowns - street dance starting at 8:00

Saturday, August 31, 2013 - Fairgrounds CANCER AWARENESS NIGHT - PLEASE WEAR PINK All Day - Arts and Crafts Booths - Food Booths - Bingo 12:00 Noon Live fish catch ages 3 years and up $4.00 entry fee 4:30 Gates open for rodeo 6:00 pm PRCA rodeo Mutton Bustin during the rodeo

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SADDLE UP The weather is right for recreational rides with Wyoming’s beautiful, albeit brief, summer months. Take due care in saddling horses and checking all the straps and buckles – and then get out and enjoy the ride.

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HORSE SLAUGHTER OPPONENTS SUE USDA OVER PERMITS CONGRESSIONAL FUNDING MAY HOLD KEY TO FUTURE OF AMERICAN HORSE OPERATIONS COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Animal protection groups are suing the U.S. Department of Agriculture to try to block the revival of domestic horse slaughter at commercial processing plants. The Humane Society of the United States, Front Range Equine Rescue of Larkspur, Colo., three other groups and ďŹ ve individuals ďŹ led a federal lawsuit Monday seeking an emergency injunction to overturn the USDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent permit approval for a horse meat plant in Roswell, N.M. Four of the named plaintiffs are Roswell residents; the ďŹ fth lives in Gallatin, Mo., where a Rains Natural Meats equine slaughterhouse could next receive federal approval. On Tuesday, the federal agency approved a horse slaughter plant in Si-

gourney, Iowa, and expects to endorse another request later this week. The Humane Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lawsuit named prospective processing plants in Gallatin and Rockville, Mo.; Woodbury, Tenn.; and Washington, Okla. Horse slaughterhouses last operated in the U.S. in 2007 before Congress banned the practice by eliminating funding for plant inspections. Federal lawmakers restored those cuts in 2011, but the USDA has been slow in granting permits, citing the need to re-establish an oversight program. In a written statement Tuesday, the agency said it was legally required to approve Responsible Transportationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plant in southeast Iowa. Congress could still cut funding for horse slaughterhouse inspections, ef-

fectively reinstating the ban. Both the House and Senate agriculture committees have endorsed such proposals, and the Obama administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed budget for the next ďŹ scal year also eliminates that funding. Another bill would ban U.S. horse slaughter facilities while prohibiting exports. While most Americans would blanche at the prospects of eating horse burgers or steaks, the processors plan to serve overseas markets. The 36-page petition to the U.S. District Court in San Francisco alleges the USDA did not prepare required environmental reviews for Valley Meat Co.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s horse meat plant in southeastern New Mexico or for any of the pending requests. It lawsuit cites negative environmental

consequences caused by horse slaughter, including air and water pollution. The lawsuit alleges that the animals can be fed drugs and medication not ďŹ t for human consumption because horses in the U.S. â&#x20AC;&#x153;are not raised in regulated industries conscious of public health and safety concerns, but rather in private homes, on racetracks and as working animals.â&#x20AC;? The three other groups challenging USDA and its Food Safety Inspection Service are each from California: the Marin Humane Society in Novato; Horses for Life Foundation; and Return to Freedom of Lompoc. The Humane Society and Front Range Equine Rescue had previously announced their intentions to challenge the USDA in court.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

BACKCOUNTRY BY HORSEBACK IS ONE OF AN OUTFITTERS’ GREAT ASSETS HORSES OFFER FUNCTIONALITY, COMFORT AND SENSE OF NATURALISM By Andrew Setterholm STAFF WRITER

I

n western Wyoming, recreation opportunities abound. For the state’s many outfitters and guides, especially in the state’s rough Northern Rocky Mountains terrain, taking

advantage of equine assistance for trips into the backcountry is a boon, and sometimes a necessity. Many outfitters in the region offer recreational horseback riding and most use packhorses for guided hunting and fishing trips in the expansive backcountry. For these guides, horses

offer functionality, comfort and a sense of naturalism that hiking by foot cannot. Terry Pollard, a guide and the proprietor of Bald Mountain Outfitters, said his clients enjoy experiencing the scenery of the Wind River Range from horseback for photography trips.

“When you ride a horse in the backcountry, the horse does the negotiating of the rocks and the logs, so you can enjoy the scenery,” Pollard said. “When you’re hiking and backpacking you have to have to watch your feet.” For others, the functionality of having a pack animal provides a more comfortable backcountry experience. Laura Childs, operator of Trophy Mountain Outfitters with her husband, Dustin, said her clients enjoy summer horseback trips because they can cover more ground than they could on foot, as well as carry more supplies. “You can go into the backcountry, and instead of having freeze dried food and worrying about how much weight you pack, you get a little leeway with the horses,” Childs said. “You can enjoy some luxuries you wouldn’t with a backpack – we feed our guests really well.” Packhorses are also an integral tool for some backcountry mountain climbers. Pollard and Bald Mountain Outfitters offer supply drops to several locations in the Wind River Range, including the popular Titcomb Basin. Pollard’s crew will ride into the basin and drop off the heavier equipment climbers will need, leaving them with plenty of energy to climb when they get to their supply drop. Come fall hunting season, horses become the backbone of outfitter operations. Outfitters set up hunting camps, get hunters to the camp and get out to hunting spots each day, all with the assistance of their trusty equines. “Those horses are absolutely necessary,” Childs said. “You’re talking long distances into the backcountry,

File

Trails throughout the Northern Rocky Mountains are riddled with rocks and debris, which backcountry horses are able to navigate as the rider enjoys his or her surroundings.

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BACKCOUNTRY continued on page 45

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


BACKCOUNTRY continued from page 44 and they’re packing everything – stuff you absolutely could not pack by hand. You could not cover the country if you didn’t have the horses.” Besides their size and endurance, hunting horses also provide the ability to get out to hunting locations before the sun comes up and quarry begins to move during prime hunting hours. “We leave in the dark before dawn, and they do the job navigating the trail and the downed timber in the dark. ...It’s amazing how they can put you on top of a mountain in the dark,” Childs said. Anglers can also benefit from a guided fishing trip by horseback, according to Pollard. “My guided trips are mostly geared toward fishermen,” Pollard explained. “The horses add a tremendous amount of latitude. You can cover significantly more country.” For fishers who are keen to catch Wyoming’s native species, Pollard’s pack trips offer the opportunity to get into the backcountry with access to different waters. “From one of our base camps, we can hit five or 10 different venues for different fish species, and see a lot of different country,” Pollard said. Aside from the enhanced recreation for fishing and hunting, some people simply enjoy their time in the mountains more from the saddle. Pat Maier, owner of Green River and Bridger-Teton Outfitters, said sometimes, connecting with a mount is the most enjoyable part of a trip in the backcountry. “It’s always nice to get out there and connect with the nature through a creature from God’s own earth. Sometimes that’s the best part – being with the animal and bonding with the animal,” Maier said. Outfitters typically look for animals with a mix of size and “rideability” for pack trips. Draft horse crosses and Quarter Horses are the most popular breeds for backcountry recreation, both for riding comfortably and being sure-footed on the rough terrain. After a long trip for hunting, fishing or just appreciating the scenery, most people come away with an appreciation for an equine partner, Childs said. “It’s one of those things that, by the end of a trip, they have a huge appreciation for their horse,” she said.

File

Horses in the backcountry help maneuver the rugged terrain found in western Wyoming and throughout the Rockies.

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

FLY AND MOSQUITO CONTROL KEEPING PESTS AT BAY IS OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE DURING HOT SUMMER MONTHS By Caitlin Tan STAFF WRITER

D

uring the summer months, flies and mosquitoes can be a serious distraction and annoyance for horses. There are a lot of different methods an equine owner can use to prevent insects from tormenting their horses, however.

VACCINATE It is first important to contact a veterinarian and have the horse vaccinated for West Nile Virus. This is a disease that can be transmitted through a mosquito bite. It can cause infections in the brain and the spinal cord that can lead to serious problems. After vaccinating horses for mosquitotransmitted diseases, there are many other preventative measures to take to protect horses from insects.

FLY SPRAY One of the most common methods is spraying the animals with fly spray. Many different brands of fly spray can be found in stores or online. There are also multiple recipes that can be made at home. Spray 1 The following is a recipe the U.S. Forest Service uses to prevent bugs on humans, horses and dogs. 1 cup water 1 cup Avon Skin So Soft bath oil 2 cups vinegar 1 tablespoon Eucalyptus oil Optional: A few tablespoons of 100 pure pure citronella oil Once you combine all of the ingredients, mix well and spray onto the horse. It is important to use 100 percent pure citronella oil because other types can be petroleum-based, which could be potentially harmful. Spray 2 This next recipe is simple and it can be made with just three ingredients. A 50/50 mixture of white vinegar and water

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Photo/Caitlin Tan

Fighting off bugs is a daily routine for horses during the summer months. 1 tablespoon of dishwashing soap Combine and mix all of the ingredients in a spray bottle. This recipe can be altered depending on the amount of insects. If the bugs are really bad, more white vinegar can be used. The dishwashing soap is included in the repellent because it helps the spray stay on the horse longer. Insecticide paste Another effective method is using insecticide paste. The paste is generally painted on several parts of the horse’s body. The insecticide is released slowly and will not attain full-body fly control for a couple of days. The application will last about one or two weeks. It is vital a horse owner follows the instructions on the product so as to not overuse it.

CLEAN UP

ing to protect them from mosquitoes.

Aside from fly spray and paste, there are various other ways to prevent insect problems. It is important to clean up the manure and trash near horses. These can be breeding grounds for flies. Along with this, it is crucial to eliminate as much standing water as possible, as it is also a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Some old timers say putting a few capfuls of canola oil in standing water will stop mosquitoes from reproducing.

ACCESSORIES

KEEP STABLED Dawn and dusk are the peak times for mosquito activity. If possible, keep horses in a stable at night and in the early morn-

During the daytime, flies are very productive. Therefore, fly sheets and fly masks should be used to shield equines. If a horse is in a stable, there are several ways to control insects. For example, setting up a fan and sticky traps can be useful to deter flies and mosquitoes. In addition, keeping the barn clean is imperative; maintaining dry stalls and removing any soiled bedding will help stop the breeding of insects. Insects are always an issue during the summer months. It is important to keep horses protected from the constant annoyances and potential diseases.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

NIOBRARA COUNTY 4-HERS COMPETE AT STATE 4-H SHOWCASE SHOWDOWN SOME MEMBERS WILL NEXT HEAD TO ATLANTA, GA. FOR 4-H CLUB CONGRESS By Tammie Jensen UNIVERSITY EXTENSION EDUCATOR

N

iobrara County, Wyo., had 10 4-H members participating in the State 4-H Showcase Showdown, held in Laramie June 24-25. Kylee Gaukel and Chelsea Baars were selected to represent Wyoming at the Na-

tional 4-H Club Congress in Atlanta, Ga., this November. This is one of the highest honors any 4-H member can receive, and is based on a member’s long-term record, community service and leadership skills. This is an outstanding accomplishment, which was well deserved by these girls. Bobbi York got the Niobrara County delegation off to a great start when she

was named reserve champion overall in the senior division of prepared presentations. She won a trip to the Denver 4-H Round-up for this outstanding accomplishment. The title of her presentation was “Hashing First World Problems.” Baars also won a trip to Denver for her presentation, which was deemed the most original with her “History of Lawn Mower Racing.” Taylor Gaukel placed ninth overall in the intermediate division with her presentation, “Thank You.” York was also recognized for placing fifth in the senior impromptu public speaking contest. The topic she drew to discuss was “Five Tools for the Future of Young People.” Baars also competed in this contest, and placed eighth with her topic, “Summer: A Good or Bad Time.”

Meghan Proctor, Taten Gaukel and Amber Jensen combined their talents to bring home the state champion produce judging title. This group scored 2,237 total points to outdistance second place Uinta County, which tallied 2,163 points. The group received a team trophy donated by the UW Plant Science Department, and a trip to the Denver 4-H Round-up in January. Proctor paced the home team with 749 points, making her the high individual overall in the contest. Meghan was also the high individual in identification and oral reasons. Gaukel gathered 746 points to be the

4-HERS continued on page 49

Courtesy photos

Horse Judging members, front row, from left: Kylie Stauch, Meghan Mosley and Taylor Gaukel; back row: Kaitlin Gaukel and Kylee Gaukel.

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Niobrara County Delegation to Showcase: back row from left: Taten Gaukel, Meghan Mosley, Kylee Gaukel, Amber Jensen, Meghan Proctor and Bobbi York; front row: Kaitlin Gaukel, Taylor Gaukel, Kylie Strauch and Chelsea Baars. SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


4-HERS continued from page 48 second high individual overall, and he was recognized for placing second in placings and fourth in identification. Amber had a final score of 742 points to capture third place honors. She was also honored for placing fourth in placings, fourth in oral reasons and sixth in identification. All three members received a plaque from RT Communications in Worland for their individual placings overall. In the state horse judging contest, Kylee Gaukel was the third high senior individual overall, with a score of 481. Kylee was also fourth in placings and fifth in oral reasons. Kaitlin Gaukel also had a good day, placing sixth overall in the senior division with 472 points. Kaitlin was also recognized for placing sixth in oral reasons and ninth in placings. The junior horse team of Taylor Gaukel, Kylie Staruch and Megan Mosley placed 13th. Taylor had 449 total points, Kylie 417 and Meghan earned 391. Taylor was also the 10th high intermediate individual in the question/ reasons division. All Niobrara 4-H horse judging members were coached by volunteer leader Kitson Boldon. In other competitive events, Amber Jen-

sen placed second in the senior division of the livestock judging contest. She had a final score of 384 points out of a possible 450 points. She was also the high individual in oral reason presentation. Kaitlin, Kylee and Taylor Gaukel all participated in a new workshop, “Project Runway.” In this workshop, members learned about putting together outfits, accessorizing and modeling. To showcase their newly-learned skills, there was a style show at the Monday night awards banquet. Taten Gaukel, Amber Jensen, Kylie Strauch, Bobbi York, Meghan Mosley, Chelsea Baars and Meghan Proctor participated in a variety of workshops, which included leadership and para cord braiding, and took tours of the University of Wyoming Athletics Department and Art Museum. Other events at the Showcase Showdown included cake decorating, table setting, dog skill-a-thon, livestock skill-a-thon, Hippology, robot wars and rocket launches. 4-H leaders chaperoning this event for Niobrara County included Kitson Boldon, Julie Gaukel, Toni Gaukel, Morgan Hanson, and Extension educators Denise Smith and Tammie Jensen.

Photo/ Andy Setterholm

A GOOD HORSE IS ALL Equine activities run the gamut of summer recreation, from short rides to day trips and extended camping, hiking and climbing opportunities.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

‘THEY TAKE CARE OF YOU’ JAKE CLARK’S MULE DAYS IN RALSTON DREW ADMIRERS OF THE TOUGH ANIMALS By Gib Mathers STAFF WRITER

Y

ou know there will be plenty of mules when the parade of animals and riders reach from practically one end of Ralston, Wyo., to the other during Jake Clark’s Mule Days on Saturday, June 15. Mule Days wrapped its five-day run June 16. The event was all about mules, mules and more mules in the tiny community. Numerous events tied to the animals took place, luring appreciative people and interested buyers. “It’s rodeo time in Ralston,” said announcer Joe Warner. Indeed. Payten Sorensen of Greybull, Wyo., rocketed out of the starting gate on a sleek mule. Her hat blew off as she urged her mount to the barrels. Mule and rider tilted as they circled the barrels. Then, for the final dash back to the starting gate, the mule seemed to spring back on its hind quarters to hightail it to the finish. Payten took second in youth barrel racing. At 82, Von Twitchell of Pine Bluffs, Wyo., may not be the oldest buckaroo around, but he proved a seasoned rider can succeed. Twitchell took first in both the open barrel race and open pole bending. Strapping locals prevailed in wild cow riding. Skyler Erickson of Ralston took first; Nate Winninger of Powell was second and Dustin Morigeau of Powell nailed third. The mules were auctioned the next day. “[The mules] take care of you,” said Judy Sorensen just before the sale. Sorensen and her husband Ron are from Albin, Wyo. Mules bond with their rider, they said. The Sorensens believe even their grandchildren are safe aboard mules. The kids play basketball and joust from atop mules, Judy said, and the animals are tough and hearty. “They’re a lot more durable than horses,” said Ron. Linda Bailey of the Wild Bunch Horse and Mule Company of Alexan-

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Photos/ Gib Mathers

‘I bought Ruthie,’ said Judy Sorensen of Albin, Wyo. Behind Judy are her husband, Ron, and Dusty Morigeau of Powell, Wyo.

Payten Sorensen of Greybull, Wyo., took second in youth barrel racing Saturday at Jake Clark’s Mule Days.

der, Ark., agreed. She rides a 22-year-old mule that is still going strong, while a 22-year-old horse she owns is slowing down.

“I like them just as much as I like my horse,” Bailey said. When she competes in rodeos, people poke fun at her mule until it

proves its worth. “I have mules that can compete as good as horses can,” Bailey said, looking a bit regal atop a mule she would ride into the auction barn. But the animals do live up to their reputation. “They can be stubborn,” said Dusty Morigeau of Powell, looking tall in the saddle on a handsome mule. Mules can be headstrong, but so can horses, mule lovers say. Stubbornness depends on the individual animal’s personality. The rider holds rein over a mount’s behavior. “It depends on who is riding them,” Morigeau said. Mules are a little slower than horses. “But, they’re smarter,” said Blake Wilf, of Romance, Ark., who brought mules to the sale. Meanwhile, back in the barn, auctioneer Lynn Weishaar keeps up the pace with his rapid-fire voice. The place smelled of fresh-sawn lumber, with a faint whiff of manure. It was packed with people. The mules were ridden into a small arena, their hoofbeats softened by the thick sawdust. Riders galloped their mounts around the ring. Others stood in the saddle or “sacked out” the mules, which is a way to show the animals will not spook easily. Kids, with people in the audience noting how cute they looked aboard the rough-hewn animals, rode into the arena showing off more mules. The mules fetched a good price. “Five thousand!” said Weishaar, voicing the final bid on one mule. Another went for $9,750. A girl wheeled around the arena, whirling a lariat. Mule and rider were rearing to cut cattle. “Rope on her [the mule],” Weishaar said. “Do everything.” Outside, riders on mule-back towered over fellow wranglers on the ground who were taking calls from out-of-town bidders. Judy Sorensen was tickled pink as she stroked a mule’s neck. “We bought Ruthie,” Sorensen said.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

HORSES ON THE EJE: 1907-2013 EQUINE PIVOTAL TO NEBRASKAN RANCH OPERATION By Shaun Evertson STAFF WRITER

H

orses were the backbone of the EJE Ranch from the very beginning. Of course, in 1907, when Evert Jay Evertson bought the heart of the future ranch from county sheriff Emil Forsling, horses were the backbone of every farm and ranch operation. In 1907, farming and ranching was impossible without horses. In 2013, like it or not, horses are mere accessories, or completely absent from the vast majority of farms and ranches. Evert Evertson raised cattle and grew crops in what might be called a diversified operation today. He purchased several sections of good native prairie, and another one or two sections of dryland farm ground south of Kimball (nee Antelopeville), Neb. The farm ground had been wrested from native prairie and farmed, with varying success, over the preceding 22 years. Although automobiles were on the scene in Kimball County, and some farmers were beginning to use tractors to till the land, most farming and transportation was horse powered. Evert had a stable of prized and powerful draft horses, and a remuda of tough cow ponies. I grew up listening to my grandfather, Wilbur, tell stories of life on that early ranch. From his stories, it was clear how important the horse was to farming, ranching and survival. I can’t, in fact, recall a single story of those days that didn’t prominently feature horses. In the 1960s and 1970s, when I first heard these stories, I tried hard but could never quite imagine what that early ranch life must have been like. It was a time long before rural electrification. I could kind of get that, because I’d experienced plenty of power outages during thunderstorms and blizzards. But the lights always came back on in my experience, and usually within hours, or at

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Courtesy

An infant Shaun Evertson sits in the saddle for the fi rst time on the EJE Ranch in early 1961. Shaun is held by Grandpa Wilbur.

the most within a few short days. Try as I might, I couldn’t (and still can’t) really imagine life with only candleand lantern-light after sundown. In my experience, we’ve always had electricity in the barns. Today, when I use the barn after dark, light and power are instantly available. For Evert, his family, and most farmers and ranchers, the long days usually began and ended in a darkened barn, harnessing, un-harnessing, and caring for horses. As Grandpa Wilbur related the story, the horses always came first. The draft horses were checked and harnessed before dawn, carefully

worked throughout the day, then unharnesses, checked, rubbed down, fed and watered after dark. The care and feeding of humans was a secondary concern. The draft horses were on a rotation, and didn’t toil in the traces every day. The humans, of course, weren’t on a rotation. They worked every day. The cow ponies were just as vital. There was simply no way to check, move and work cattle on a wide-open ranch without horses. The cow ponies

EJE continued on page 54

Mick Evertson riding the EJE range age 25 circa 1955/1965.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EJE continued from page 52

Courtesy

A saddled cow pony ready to hit the EJE range circa 1959.

Shaun Evertson with his future trusty mount Cadet circa 1966.

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had an easier life than the draft horses. They did little heavy pulling, and were used in rotation for daily range riding, so they spent the bulk of their time off the clock. They were used pretty hard during roundups and when trailing cattle to different pastures, but compared to the draft horses, their lot was pretty easy. The internal combustion engine brought a lot of change to the ranch. Had the Great Depression not occurred, farming on the EJE would likely have converted to tractor power by 1930. Cash was scarce during the Depression though, and the first tractor didn’t arrive on the ranch until 1936. That first tractor changed everything. Twenty draft horses disappeared almost overnight. All that remained were the harnesses, at one time incredibly valuable, now left to dry and curl on their pegs in the less-and-less important barn. Cow ponies remained, though their numbers dwindled. Pickup trucks and cars were now ubiquitous, but no one had invented a pickup that could navigate the prairie like a horse, or a pickup with cow sense. But that was changing, too. Pickups were more comfortable, could carry more and were in many ways more versatile. Fences and pasture plans were changed to suit the new vehicles. Horses were still vital, but ranchers began to adapt to less horse-centric practices. Horse num-

bers dwindled, and a lot of ropes and saddles joined the unused harnesses in the less-and-less-used barns. When my dad, Mick, began working on the ranch in the late 1940s, horses had begun to change from “absolutely necessary” to “nice to have.” Farmers who ran a few cows and small ranchers were learning to do without horses for the most part. The EJE retained a solid remuda and used it daily, but more because Evert, Wilbur and Mick wanted it that way than out of necessity. When I came along and began to take up my share of ranch work, the remuda of daily riders had become a small herd of pleasure horses which were used four or five times a year for working or moving cattle. We had an annual roundup and branding, and we trailed cattle to different pastures, and did these things from horseback. We still roped calves at branding, but I never joined the exalted ranks of the ropers. My place was always on the ground, “rasslin.” I learned to ride early and I loved it. I had few romantic notions about the life on horseback, however, because while I’d spent many idyllic days riding the range, I’d also spent more than enough miserable days on a horse. Riding the range is wonderful fun on a lovely day, but less so in the

EJE continued on page 56

Part of the ranch remuda at the hay feeder during an early-1970’s winter. SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EJE continued from page 54

hammering heat or driving rain or biting cold. The ranch continued to evolve away from horses and by the time I left for the Navy in 1979 there were only a dozen or so horses left on the ranch. They were still occasionally used to work cattle but only on special occasions. The EJE’s horses no longer paid their way in work, but in the pleasure we took in having them around. When I returned from the Navy, the numbers had dwindled further. In some ways it’s hard to believe, but to the best of my recollection, I’ve only done mounted cow-punching about a dozen times since 1992. The last time I “forked a bronc” was in 2005. Things have certainly changed on the EJE. In 1907, there was no farming or ranching without the horse. In 2013, the EJE supports a single horse, a 35-year-old mare named Sunny who is completely retired. When she’s gone, the constant equine presence on the ranch, unbroken since 1907, will come to an end.

Courtesy

EJE continued on page 57

Japanese foreign exchange student Kasuhiro Suzuki astride “Poke” on the EJE ranch circa 1976.

Various images of EJE horses circa 1955-1966.

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An unnamed foal and mare on the EJE Ranch circa 1960.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


EJE continued from page 56

I won’t mourn the passing of the horse from the ranch. Horse use on the ranch has been dwindling over my entire life. I love horses and I cherish the time I’ve spent with them, but we’ve moved on. The reality of life on the EJE, which is neither right nor wrong, simply no longer includes the horse. That may change. A younger generation may bring horses back to the ranch, and that would be nice indeed. Only time will tell.

If I mourn anything, it’s that the second-, third- and fourth-hand memories of the last century on the ranch are fading way. In a lot of ways those memories are like the abandoned harnesses and saddles that still rest in a nearly unused barn. They dry up and curl and gather dust and will someday be gone forever. But that’s life. Things change. New chapters will be written, new memories will be made.

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Courtesy

Mick Evertson (age 5) and Evert Jay Evertson, founder of the EJE Ranch, 1946.

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Please visit us on on facebook or the website: A horse-replacement rides grandkids around the farmstead of the EJE Ranch circa 2005.

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srxpress.com EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | COLUMN

EQUINE BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS AND SUGGESTED REMEDIES GOOD HABITS AND BEING OBSERVANT CAN PREVENT OR HEAD OFF A NUMBER OF ISSUES

Dr. Amy K. McLean EQUINE LECTURER AND EQUINE EXTENSION SPECIALIST, UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING

E

quine behavior is an evolving science. There’s been an increase in interest from researchers, especially from Europe and Australia, in how we train and manage equines in relation to their behavior. Many behavioral problems, such as cribbing (wind sucking), stall weaving or flank biting, are vices, or the more current term, stereotypies, that man has created based on observation. A stereotypy is an abnormal behavior that serves no function or purpose to an animal. Equines are designed to graze for long periods of time, such as 16-17 hours per day. Due to the increase in urban growth, specific restraints and jobs we expect horses to perform, however, we have begun to limit the amount of time a horse spends outside, including the amount of time they spend “grazing,” or consuming forage. Most horses are on a strict feeding schedule that revolves around help, management and people’s jobs; therefore, the

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animal that is used to grazing for a long period of time is now restricted to consuming one, or possibly two, large meals twice a day at very specific times. Feeding horses on a strict routine often increases anxiety and unwanted behaviors, like pawing or walking continuously in their stall. Then we reward the horses for such behavior by giving them food. Essentially, we have taught our horses if they paw, they will be fed. However, there is no simple answer for the change in how we keep horses. Most owners do not have access to enough land to enable continuous grazing. However, if they did, it is likely they would still keep their horses up at some point to observe them or to keep them in shape for competition. In many European stables, and even some racehorse farms, horses are fed three to four times throughout the day to try and decrease stereotypies such as cribbing, stall walking or even pawing for a meal. All diets are also weighed out so the horse is not being over or under fed, which can also lead to behavioral problems. Keep in mind not all horses display abnormal behavior, but those that do are generally derived the problems from having limited turn out, limited fiber sources and may have stressful or demanding workout regimes. Most of today’s performance horses at some point in their career will likely develop ulcers due to exercising at a trot or canter for most of their exercise regime. Gastric ulcers can be very painful for horses, and also create some of the unwanted behaviors such as cribbing, agitation and stall walking. Granted, proactive horsemen will allow horses to have turn-out time. Some horsemen will even supply an anxious or nervous horse with a companion animal to decrease anxiety, such as a goat or miniature donkey. This is seen quite often for horses that are on the road traveling and in new environments for most of the year. Other conditions that may lead to

abnormal behavior are related directly to the horse’s health. A good horseman will recognize abnormal behavior in a timely manner, such as a horse lying down constantly, looking at its fl anks, not eating its food, consuming little to no water, or a decrease in the horse’s performance. Decreased performance and abnormal behavior in performance horses is usually linked to the high incidence of gastric ulcers. Many horsemen will have their horses scoped for ulcers and treat them with a calcium bicarbonate product; assuming their horse already has ulcers. Many owners or trainers will allow horses to consume forages higher in calcium or will supply more hay to stabled horses, which has the benefit of making them less susceptible to developing gastric ulcers. Other factors that can contribute to ill behavior are related to equipment that horses are subjected to and how that equipment is used. Much research has gone into measuring pressure applied to a horse’s back in relation to how a rider sits on it, where weight is or isn’t being distributed, as well as how the saddle fits. A horse with a sore back may develop habits such as becoming “cold back,” meaning it may be hard to get on at first, and even raise its back and offer to buck. If horses are in enough pain, they may bite at the rider as they go to mount and or even throw them off when riding.

Courtesy photos/ Tom Balding Bits and Spurs

REMEDIES continued on page 70

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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All Breeds, All Disciplines! Local Horseman & Facility Features | Event Coverage | Equine News Business Pro¿le | Calendar of Events | Regular Editorial Columns | Classi¿eds DISTRIBUTION Equine Enthusiast is produced locally and distributed quarterly to feed/tack stores,event facilities, hotels, fairgrounds and other equine related businesses. It is also packaged with The Business Farmer, a weekly specialty publication that covers agricultural issues in eastern Wyoming and the Nebraska panhandle, and available at the Wyoming State Fair in Douglas, Cheyenne Frontier Days and numerous county fairs. (12,000 copies total, each issue) Equine Enthusiast is also available online at www.EquineEnthusiast.com and on Facebook: Facebook.com/equineenthusiastmagazine

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KINDNESS RANCH: A SAN SANCTUARY FOR RESEARCH ANIMALS

BRED TO RUN, RACE ACE AND BARREL

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ar out, on the edge of Sublette County, even out past the edge of the small town of Boulder, is a ranch that, come early next spring, will welcome four registered racing quarter or paint horses into the world. The small breeding outfit of 7 Lazy K Quarter Horses is, despite its size, home to children of some of the nation’s top moneymakers in the field of racing and barrel racing. The stud in residence is Dashing Move Fame, whose sire, Dash Ta Fame, was a barrel champion that produced millions of dollars in race earnings. Two of this spring’s foals will be Dashing’s, and owner, operator, breeder, trainer and all-around head honcho Heather Wells said she is already looking forward to meeting the young ones and gauging their potential. This has been Wells’ first year breeding Dashing, although she and her partner Bill Kelly have been breeding racing and barrel horses for eight years. Dashing’s previous offspring were too young to race the 2011 season, so no one will know how his progeny will perform until the 2012 season starts May 1. But Dashing’s bloodline is solid. His father, grandfather and great-grandfather, as well as his grandmother and great-grandmother, all have speed indexes over 100. A speed index of more than 80 earns a horse recognition for merit. Wells and Kelly are among the more than 100 performance breeders in Sublette and Sweetwater counties, and Wells said they are much smaller than many of the other breeders. “We do it for the fun of it,” she said. “We may make some supplemental income, and the horses we sell typically cover our expenses.” But it’s clear by the smile in her eyes it’s the love of it that keeps her going. It’s a lot of work monitoring mares to determine when they’re in heat, conducting the breeding and then monitoring mares to see if they’re in foal, not to mention raising foals from birth to when they are released into pasture. Kelly

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By Amber Ningen STAFF WRITER

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efore coming to the Kindness Ranch, RayAnne, a tall thoroughbred, was not adoptable. The mare had been used in research and had behavior problems and no manners. Today, she is able to run free through a pasture with other horses in rural southeast Wyoming. The once ill-mannered RayAnne now has good manners, thanks to the new culture that surrounds her. RayAnne’s story is just one of the Kindness Ranch’s success stories. Located near Hartville, the Kindness Ranch American Sanctuary For Research Animals is a 1,000-acre ranch that takes in all kinds of animals formerly used in research. Dr. David Groobman founded the sanctuary, which opened in the summer of 2007. Groobman dedicated 10 years of planning to the sanctuary. Ranch manager David Sleeper said Kindness Ranch staff members are not animal activists. “Our job is to provide the research laboratories a wonderful alternative to euthanasia,” he said. In order to do that, the Kindness Ranch fosters a working relationship with the researchers. While at the Kindness Ranch, animals

Courtesy photo

Dashing Move Fame is the stud for Heather Wells’ 7 Lazy K Quarter Horses outside of Boulder. works out of town much of the time, and many of these tasks are left to Wells. Mares are monitored with an ultrasound machine Wells has at the ranch. Images can tell her when mares are beginning their fertility cycle, to give Wells as much time as possible to administer the artifi cial insemination to impregnate them. The ultrasound can also tell when fertilization has occurred, even before there’s a heartbeat. The day-in, day-out work comes once the foals are born. “It’s a lot for one person to halterbreak, trim the hooves and pick up the feet of all the foals every day,” she said, explaining part of the routine to get the newborns accustomed to being around people. But when the foals aren’t being handled, they’re running around the paddocks, bucking and carrying on like the ability to walk was their own personal discovery, which, in a way, it was.

After 11 months and two weeks growing slowly in a mare, foals are born and able to walk within hours. It’s not the most graceful walk, as their legs unfold from nearly a year curled beneath them. But they figure out what it means to be a horse. Soon enough though, they’re walking and running – then racing. If Wells can’t fi nd buyers for her foals, she’ll keep them and race them when they’re a year old, with the hopes of selling them as finished racehorses. Unlike thoroughbreds, who race between 3/4 and 1 1/2 miles, quarter horses typically run between 300 and 400 yards, around one quarter of a mile – hence the name. Wells takes her horses to Idaho to ce, where there are fi five race, ve tracks. The ock Springs track recently opened, and Rock shee said she’s looking forward to doing me racing closer to home. But Idaho some n’t that bad, she said, when compared isn’t

to traveling to Oklahoma to race her paint horses. Quarter and paint horses belong to different associations, so their races are separate, although the races themselves are similar. When their racing career is over, Wells’ horses transition into running barrels, and this is where Dashing’s bloodline emerges to take center stage. Wells said in the barrelracing world, Dash Ta Fame is a household name, and often all the promotion needed to get Dashing’s name recognized. And with that should come demand for breeding opportunities. That’s all the more so, since Wells is keeping the stud fee at $650, when most performance stud fees exceed $1,000. g , though, g , when That mayy change, Dashing’s potential, as realized through his offspring, is recognized. If his foals do well next season, Wells and Kelly may not be doing this all just for fun anymore.

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– which include horses, dogs, cats, sheep and pigs – are rehabilitated in a homelike environment. Though Sleeper says he doesn’t consider himself a horse whisperer, he has a philosophy that has allowed him to form relationships with once untrusting animals. The more afraid an animal is, the more powerful and “permanent” is the response to his techniques. Although the philosophy is given in much better detail when Sleeper relays it to visitors at the Kindness Ranch, the bottom line is that animals mimic our behavior. If a human shows respect by using certain listening and intuiting techniques, coupled with an unwillingness to enter in to the animal’s “zone of intimacy” unless invited, the fearful animal becomes attracted like a magnet to this energetic safety exhibited by the human. The human basically focuses on evolving themselves to their higher form with no agenda and the animal amazingly is attracted and mimics that behavior. The fearful animal ends up being the instigator and choreographer of the deep bonding on an energetic level that emerges. Techniques then follow which encourage non-impulsive thinking behavior with the resulting boost in self esteem. Sleeper said that he can’t tell who is the

Members of the Kindness Ranch are welcome to stay in “yurts” while visiting. For more information on visiting the ranch, visit www.kindnessranch.org.

| FEATURE

Photos by Amber Ningen

Horses at the Kindness Ranch roam a pasture on a sunny October morning. The Kindness Ranch is made up of 1,000 acres. lead mare at the Kindness Ranch. “They all have manners, squabbles are rare and the pecking order seems to be non-existant,” he said. The former lead mare now has the most manners and perhaps the others are following her lead. In RayAnne’s case, the thoroughbred had been getting treats and sweet feed before coming to the Kindness Ranch and she was ill mannered towards people and equines. Sleeper’s idea is that having a relationship with an animal’s stomach leads to impulsive and addictive behavior with poor manners. Whereas relating the heart and mind encourages thinking and evolving and good manners. Sleeper said the 15 horses at the Kind-

ness Ranch now have their own culture that is based on manners and thinking. When a new horse arrives like RayAnne, instead of pecking order battle, the whole herd helps her to leave her impulsiveness behind and become a thinker with manners. “This sounds so strange and impossible until one sees it in action. It is a very rewarding for us folks to see animals that were subject to the trials of research end up living harmoniously with high selfesteem in a Wyoming paradise,” he said. The Kindness Ranch welcomes visitors. It offers well-appointed cabins for its members to stay in while visiting. For more information on the Kindness Ranch, visit kindnessranch.org.

Ranch Manager David Sleeper demonstrates his First Lite technique on Stormy.

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Published by News Media Corporation | FALL 2011

FALL 2011 | Published by News Media Corporation

21

FRONTIER DAYS FINALIST FOR ARENA VET NAMED PRCA AWARD DR. NORM SWAN SON KNOWS A THING OR TWO ABOU T BIG-TIME RODE

OS

STAFF REPORT

serving of this award, which makes he Profession the job of the al Rodeo Cowselection committee boys Associatio very difficult,” n is proud to said Doug Corey, announce the DVM, Pro Rodeo Hall of Famer sen out of a stellar five finalists choand chairman of the fi PRCA Animal for the 2011 “PRCA eld of nominees Welfare Committee Veterinaria n of “It is an honor the Year Award,” to be associated with presented by Purina. such The field includes group of veterinarya distinguish ed Dr. Norm Swanprofession son of Cheyenne, als that advocate for the welfare nated by Cheyennewho was nomirodeo livestock.” of Frontier Days Rodeo officials. The original field of 16 nominees The 2011 recipient was narrowed to these five will be announced in late distinguished veterinaria October and will ns: honored at the be ■ Dr. Joseph PRCA Contract Coli, Reno, Nev.; Personnel Banquet nominated by Wednesday, Nov. the Reno Rodeo in Las Vegas, 30, and Bob Feist and Wrangler National during the 53rd ■ Dr. Garth Lamb, Finals Rodeo SatLas Vegas, Nev.; urday, Dec. 3, nominated by 2011, at the Thomas Shawn Davis Mack Center in & ■ Dr. Norm Swanson, Las Vegas. Cheyenne; The award was nominated by created in 2010 Cheyenne Frontier recognize dedication to Days Rodeo to the health and welfare of ■ Dr. Jake Wells, rodeo livestock San Antonio, veterinaria ns across by Tex.; nominated the country. The by the San Antonio award is made Stock Show & possible by a partnerRodeo ship with Purina ■ Dr. Wes Mills to sponsor Wittman, Sonora, the award. Calif.; nominated by the Mother “Every nominee Lode Roundup is absolutely deRodeo and Tuolumne County Sheriff’s Posse

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Dr. Norm Swanson Published by News

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‘The Daddy of ‘em

by Cheyenne Frontier

All’ for 42 years.

Swanson has served as the arena son veterinaria n for has been an active the Cheyenne member Frontier Days of the contestants for 42 committee in years. In this capacity,consecutive Cheyenne for more than 40 years, he has coordinated with the general com- volunteering his time to ensure the mittee, the contestants contestants and hired personnel chairman, at PRCA judges and stock contrac- Cheyenne are taken care of during tors to oversee their stay. His the health and care the committee involvemen t with of all livestock has been on-site during the event. Cheyenne on providing immediate focused had nearly attention medical 1,700 competitor to animals if s this year and needed. the rodeo lasted “I have personally twelve days with witnessed Dr. nine sections of slack and nine Norm Swanson’s dedication to the performances. The sport of rodeo. He is extremely total number of livestock exceeded qualified for this award,” said 4,000. SwanPRCA stock contractor Harry Vold.

Days Rodeo

| FALL 2011

WILD

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

continued from page 46

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WILD HORSES: A SYMBOL OF THE AMERICAN WEST THE LARGEST NUMBER OF WYOMING’S WILD HORSES ARE IN THE SOUTHWEST By Virginia Giorgis STAFF WRITER

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yoming boasts the second largest wild horse herd in the nation, second only to Nevada. Wild horses are symbols of the West – they are untamed spirits and have free range on a wide-open landscape. Today’s wild horses are descendants of horses brought to the United States by the Spanish, as well as horses subsequently turned out by ranchers or led away by the wild horse herds. As of February, there were 5,333 wild horses in Wyoming, according to June Wendlandt, Wyoming’s BLM wild horse and burro program lead. Currently, the number of wild horses is around 2,000 head over the projected management level, which is set at between 2,490 and 3,725 horses.

The wild horses are regulated under the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971. The act sets guidelines for maintaining the wild horses and their forage. “We have healthy horses in Wyoming, and we want to keep it that way,” Wendlandt said. Wild horses differ from domestic horses, as they have naturally bred for survival in the wild countryside. They are more compact and have thicker, sturdier legs to carry them over the open ranges. Wendlandt said a large part of management requirements for wild horses is determined by the vegetation and forage on BLM land. She explained the BLM is a multiple-use agency, so the land they manage is divided into multiple purposes, such as wildlife, wild horses, livestock and recreation. BLM analyzes the “amount and type of forage and divides it into pieces of the pie.”

Courtesy of BLM

BLM Wyoming Herd Management Areas (HMAs) for 2011.

Wild horses are found in Wyoming on the western half of the state from as far north as the Cody area to the state’s southern border. Wendlandt said wild horses in Wyoming are managed in 16 management areas, with the largest number of wild horses in the southwest. Wild horses can be seen from I-80 as motorists drive across the western portion of the state. There are Courtesy photos of BLM also a number of wild horses in the Some of the scenes of the horses living in the wild make for worthRed Desert area. while touring.

FINDING WILD HORSES Courtesy of BLM

Pilot Butte Wild Horse Scenic Tour.

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The two easiest places to view wild horses are in the Pryor Mountains outside Lovell and in southwest Wyoming, near Rock Springs. A loop tour has even been developed near Rock Springs, known as

the Pilot Butte Wild Horse Scenic Loop Tour. The area is easily accessible and is on the top of Pilot Butte, which lies on the east side of Rock Springs. The 24-mile self-guided tour can begin

WILD continued on page 47 FALL 2011 | Published by News Media Corporation

in either Green River or Rock Springs. Travelers should plan on about 1 1/2 hours to complete the tour, most of which is on gravel roads. “It is a good tour to take,” Wendlandt said, “and most likely the wild horses will be there.” Another sizable herd is in the Adobe Town area, south of I-80 near Rock Springs. The Pryor Mountain Wild Mustang Center features a museum. Visitors can learn about the horses there, as well as the current location of the herd before driving out to locate it. Another benefit is often the sighting of other wildlife in the area. Wild horse management tools include a count of the herds, maintaining the forage, roundups and adoptions, and managing the reproduction of the herds, Wendlandt said. Other management tools for the wild horses include “gathering and removing excess horses, treating the mares with PZP – a form of birth control which prevents the mares from breeding for two years – and adjusting the ratio of the released horses so more males are released than females. That helps maintain a slower growth rate of the herd so the time between round ups can be lengthened, Wendlandt said. Another option that has been considered has been spaying mares and neutering studs. This option has been sidelined until it can be determined what its impact would be on geldings being released back into the herds.

ADOPTING WILD HORSES

Roundups are conducted periodically if the wild horse numbers are deemed too large. The gathered horses are then put up for adoption. To adopt, applications must be submitted by interested parties that contain many specific, including what type of trailer will be used to pick up a horse, and what type of pen will be employed. Requirements include maintaining a fence six feet or higher, a 20by-20 foot enclosure constructed of substantial pipe or wood and connected to a shelter of at least 12by-12 feet. Such specifications are required because most of the ad-

Published by News Media Corporation | FALL 2011

opted horses are “untouched,” or have had little training, though some of the adopted horses may be halter or saddle broken. In Wyoming, the process runs through the spring and summer, though in other states the adoption process is handled year-round. The corrals in southwest Wyoming were closed Sept. 30. There were 128 horses adopted in Wyoming this year, Wendlandt said. The aim is to have 2,000 to 3,000 wild horses adopted nationwide; these numbers were not met this year. Wendlandt blamed the lower adoption rate on the weak economy. “It is hard for people to think about feeding a horse,” Wendlandt suggested, “when they are thinking about feeding their family.” Wild horses have been adopted by a wide variety of individuals. Some are retirees who want to trail ride, others are younger p e o p l e who need a good working horse for their ranch. Others just wa n t to pleasure ride. W i l d horses, Wendlandt said, are “very versatile and

can do almost anything.” She added a wild horse was “the best horse I ever had. She would wait for me to get home from school. I could catch her with no halter, no lead line, and ride her to the house” after Wendlantdt got off the bus from school.

MUSTANG DAYS

A prime wild horse-related event in Wyoming is Mustang Days. The event is held in conjunction with the Mustang Heritage Foundation, a non-profit group. The event was most recently held at the Wyoming State Fair Aug. 16-20, and included competitors as young as 5 years old showing their wild horses. Competitions consisted of mustang owners competing in things like halter, trail courses, western pleasure and freestyle, which can include a theatrical bent. Cheyenne resident Kathi Wilson’s performance with her wild horse was “so cool,” Wendlandt said. Wilson “laid her horse down on the ground. It was done to music, and then she got on and road bareback.” Another important part of Mustang Days is the competition between wild horse trainers. Members of the Honor Farm at Riverton work with some of the wild horses before they are adopted. Also, three members of the Mantle Wild Horse Training Facility competed against one another. The horses have been trained anywhere from 20 days to a year. Jeff Martin of the Honor Farm earned the belt buckle for being the best trainer. The adoption rate was 20 out of 20 – 18 horses and two burros – at the Mustang Days. Wendlandt credited this to the fun and excitement of the event, which made others want to participate next year.

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Tons of trucks in stock.at Cowboy Dodge in Cheyenne. Work trucks, trucks with towing power to get you and your horses to your next show, rodeo, or competition. CowboyDodge.com, 307-634-5887.

Trucks & Trailers Laramie Ford 3609 Grand Ave Laramie, WY 82070 307-745-7315

Phone Number:

Platte Valley Riders Open riding and gymkhanas http://plattevalleyriders.com

EQUIPMENT

Big Sky Ford Ford, Lincoln Dealership No Reasonable Offer Will Be Refused. 1209 East M Street Torrington, Wyoming 307-532-2114 or 888-532-2114

BILLING & CONTACT INFORMATION

ENTERTAINMENT

AUTOMOTIVE

Reganis Auto Center Great deals on a New or Used vehicles. Full-service Service Department 2006 E Overland, Scottsbluff, NE 69361 (308) 632-8200

TClassified LINE Ad

We offer Featherlite Trailers Ask us about our special truck & trailer combo pricing

C & K Equipment, Inc Authorized Bobcat Dealer 1851 Commercial Avenue Sheridan, WY 307-674-6405

FACILITIES SUBLETTE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS affordable pricing for equine, rodeo, meeting, and banquet events! 307-749-3546 (Jay. Brower@sublettewyo.com) SUBLETTE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS Stirrup some fun at the the Sublette County Fair, July 19th21st, for more information call 307-276-5373 or email: manager@sublettcountyfair.com

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Place your ad by calling Rob Mortimore 307-532-2184

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CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE The Park County Fair in Powell, Wyoming - Join in the fun July 23-27. Grand Stand Vents - Carnival - Livestock Shows - Tasty Fair Food - Free Entertainment - Fair Exhibits. www.parkcountyfair.com Goshen County Fair Grounds 4-H & Goshen County Celebrate 100 Years. Fair: July 25th- August 4th

Sandberg Implement Inc. Serving Western Nebraska, Eastern Wyoming and Northern Colorado for over 50 years. Offering the quality products, service and support for all your farm, ranch, commercial or residential equipment needs. 160085 Highway 71 Gering, Ne 69341 (308) 436-2179

FARM SUPPLY

FARM EQUIPMENT REPAIR SERVICE

HorizonWest Inc. Full-line Case IH and New Holland dealership Our Service departments are staffed with factory trained technicians. Scottsbluff, NE, (888) 322-7344 Sidney, NE, (888) 227-3440 Torrington, WY, (888) 922-7344

Floydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Truck Center 60 Plus Years in business Truck & Trailer Alignment, Repair, Parts and Service RV Service, Repair, and Towing Full Service Body Shop Sidney, NE, (308) 254-5956 Scottsbluff, NE, (800) 658-4052 Cheyenne, WY, (866)600-3911

Heilburnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Powersports and Trailer Sales Large selection of trailers and ATVs. Repairs to all makes and models of trailers. Trailers for your livestock, ATV, hobby and work needs. Dump trailers, ďŹ&#x201A;atbeds, enclosed and

Scottsbluff County Fair Grounds Fair: August 1st-10th

cargo made by Aluma Trailers, Midsota, H & H Trailers and Travalong Trailers. We offer ďŹ nancing and take trades. Call for all your trailer needs. Located in the Heilbrun Complex, 230340 Highland Drive, Scottsbluff, NE, 308-632-4040.

Wheatland County Store Farm, Ranch & Clothing 301 16th Street Wheatland, WY 82201 Tel: 307-322-3922 www.wheatlandcountrystore.com Big R Stores Almost Anything, Big Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Got It! Three convenient locations in Powell, Riverton and their newest location in Jackson Hole! Lintonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big R and Big R Ranch and Home offer Ag Supplies, Clothing, Sporting Goods, Tools & Hardware,

Automotive Supplies, Camping Supplies, Lawn & Garden Supplies... Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like ten stores under one roof! Stop by in see us in Powell, Riverton or Jackson or visit us online at www.lintonsbigr.com. White Horse Country Store Old Fashioned Country Store with Saddles new and used. Western Gifts, Jewelry, Home Decor and more. 180 HWY 20 South, Thermopolis, Wy 1-877-864-3048 Century Lumber Farm and Ranch supplies featuring stock tanks, fence posts and much more. 1418 East K, Torrington WY 307-532-2614 1-800-532-4138 www.centurylumbercenter.com

FARRIER SERVICES

HORSES FOR SALE

Farrier Services Experienced Horse Shoeing. Local, Reliable, Affordable. Shoeing all classes of horses in Northern Wyoming. Call Clint at 307-254-4410

Big, Gentle Tennessee Walking Horse. Lots of trail miles. Kids horse, Momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hunting horse. Easy to load, mount, ride, and shoe. 12 years old. 307-754-4930. Please leave contact info if no answer.

HORSE BOARDING

Rawhide Valley Quarter Horses Garrett & Kristie Smith Lusk, WY Home 307-334-2337 Cell 307-340-1751

Horse Boarding and Leasing Horseshoe 7 Ranch 307-630-5645 horseshoe7ranch.com We offer full care or overnight stays riding lessons, horse rental

HORSE TRAINING Chris Ellsworth Horsemanship Clinics 307-575-6674 www.chearthorses.com

Tell them you saw it in the Equine Enthusiast

Weber Sales & Service The Auction Barn layneweberauctions@yahoo.com

307.836.2225 600 W. Whalen Street, Box 703 Guernsey, WY 82214

Weber Sales & Service

For All Your Auction Needs

R ELIABLE E QUIPMENT R ENTAL Trusses & Pole Barn Kits Call us for all your equipment needs. OPEN 7-5 M-F, Sat. 7-1

1851 Oak Street Wheatland, WY

(307) 322-5900 After Hours Call: (307) 241-0195

Claudia A. Teeters Business Development P.O. Box 878 69 South Wyoming Ave. Guernsey, WY 82214 p: 307|836.2163 f: 307|836.2102 claudia.teeters@mccauleyconstructors.com

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t 180 Hwy 20 South, Thermopolis, WY 82443 email: whcs@rtconnect.net

Full Line Of:

Kevin Sanders

r5BDLr8PSLXFBS r$PXCPZ#PPUT r$MPUIJOH If Not Corraled in Ten Days Return to r+FXFMSZ Probst Western and www.probstwesternstore.com

Outdoor Clothing Co

(SFZCVMM"WFOVF (SFZCVMM 8ZPNJOHr&TUBCMJTIFE

ADVERTISE IN THE CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE!

EQUIPMENT â&#x20AC;˘ TACK â&#x20AC;˘ HORSES FOR SALE/LEASE TRAILERS/ TRACTORS/ TRUCKS RENTAL PROPERTIES â&#x20AC;˘ BOARDING FACILITIES

LINE ADS FOR ONLY $15 DISPLAY ADS FOR ONLY $25 EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CALL 307-532-2184 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Serving Southeastern Wyoming and the Nebraska Panhandle. 307.532.2800 (Home) 307.575.3460 (Cell)

Do you want a flat broke horse? Offering training services for all classes and ages of horses and mules, with an emphasis on building a trusting and trustworthy equine partner.

Flat Broke Performance Horses Sarah Barton, Trainer, Upton, WY (307)290-0027 or flat_broke_horses@hotmail.com

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE HOTEL/MOTEL

1548 S. Main Torrington, WY 82240 307-532-7118

America’s Best Value Inn

www.bestvaluetorrington.com

Tel: 307-358-2122 www.conversehospital.com

MISCELLANEOUS

YARN EXPRESS

Sheridan College 3059 Coffeen Avenue Sheridan, WY 82801 800.913.9139 Sheridan.edu

Eastern Wyoming College 3200 West C Street Torrington, WY 82240 1-866-327-8996 ewc.wy.edu

We specialize in eco-friendly &s pecialty yarns.

Benedict’s Market Nature Intended Produce 950 North Highway 414 Mountain View, WY 307.782.3581

Memorial Hospital of Converse County Advanced Medicine Hometown Care 111 South 5th Street Douglas, WY 82633

100 N. 2nd St., Douglas, WY

307-358-3660

GET THE WORD OUT!

Blair Newman, Larame L. Pope 152 N Durbin St Ste 404 Casper, WY 82601

REALTY

307-754-9400 | fax 307-754-9406 Powell 469 S. Mt. View St. Suite 1 Powell, Wyoming 82435 Greybull 400 North 6th St., Suite 1 Greybull, Wyoming 82426

H. Loloff LAND MAN Eric Broker/Owner/Ranch Manager/Loan Originator | Licensed: WY/MT cell 307-899-0258 TEAM

307-786-4434

Ranch, Residential, Vacant Land and Commercial Listings Arlene Sweat, Broker, 679-3303 Marilyn Hollis, Assoc. Broker, 679-1114 Toni Rinker, Sales Assoc., 780-6503

se H o u Horse

eric@runninghorserealty.com

Wyoming West Realty

Trader

Terry Kimbrel

Marci Barker,

Realtor®®

of

Owner/Broker

Windmill Realty

Jody Garver, Assoc. Broker

Your horse property connection in Torrington WY.

Assoc. Broker

Cell 307-575-5669

Coffee Cup Fuel Stop Open 24/365 Easy in and out for Big Rigs Moorcroft, WY 307-756-3493

SADDLES AND TACK Balding Bits and Spurs Hand Crafted Bits and Spurs Made in America www.tombalding.com 307-672-8459 Moss Saddles, Boots & Tack Most Major Brands of Tack Plus a Whole Lot More 4648 W Yellowstone Hwy Casper, WY 307-472-1872

W estern S kys Daily Specials Children’s Menu Mon-Sat: 5:30 am - 8 pm Sun: 6 am - 8 pm Summer: Open till 9 pm

Family Diner

Breakfast & Dinner Served Anytime

86 16th Street Wheatland, WY 307-322-9302

OPE6N5 24/3

Phone: 307.836.2222 Fax: 307.836.2226 wyomingwestrealty@wyoming.com

40 S. Wyoming/P.O. Box 490, Guernsey, Wyoming 82214 www.wyomingwestrealty.com

Eldon Garver,

Website: www.buywyo.com

Brannan’s Homes LTD Deliver in 4 states: NE, WY, CO, SD 1520 East Overland Scottsbluff, NE 69361 308-632-3422 fax: 308-632-3019

RESTAURANT

runninghorserealty.com

Serving Mountain View, Lyman, Fort Bridger & Robertson, WY

Riding Lessons Have just completed the Western Dressage Association of America ™ Train-the-Trainers Certification program. Offering single and group lessons, clinics and schooling shows. Improve your riding skills, hands, seat and balance. For more info call: 307-780-4750

www.NewmanRealty.Net 215 20th Ave Torrington, WY 82240 Business: (307) 532-7131 • Cell: (307) 532-1592 Email: land@newmanrealty.net

larame.pope@nmfn.com www.nmfn.com/laramepop

Wyoming West Realty “Your Real Estate Professionals” 40 S. Wyoming Guernsey WY 82214 307-836-2222 www.wyomingrealty.com

WLS, GRI, ALC

Newman Realty

307.473.7070 office 307.267.3013 cellular 207.473.8006 fax

RIDING LESSONS

JAY FEAR REAL ESTATE Serving Sublette County, Wyoming. 307-367-2494 www. jayfearrealestate.com

Broker/Owner

Financial Representative

REAL ESTATE

Easy In And Out For Big Rigs Hot Stuff Pizza • Deli Depot Moorcroft, WY

307 756-3493

Local Horseman & Facility Features | Event Coverage | Equine News Business Pro¿le | Calendar of Events | Regular Editorial Columns | Classi¿eds

All Breeds, All Disciplines! 64

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Equine Enthusiast is produced locally and distributed quarterly to feed/tack stores,event facilities, hotels, fairgrounds and other equine related businesses. It is also packaged with The Business Farmer, a weekly specialty publication that covers agricultural issues in eastern Wyoming and the Nebraska panhandle, and available at the Wyoming State Fair in Douglas, Cheyenne Frontier Days and numerous county fairs. (12,000 copies total, each issue) Equine Enthusiast is also available online at www.EquineEnthusiast.com and on Facebook: Facebook.com/ equineenthusiastmagazine Looking to expand your coverage even more? Ask about our Equine Enthusiast publications in Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and California.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE City Shoe & Saddle Shop “YOUR ONE STOP WORK AND WESTERN SHOP” Boot Repair, Western Wear Horse Tack Jewelry, Buckles & Knives, Boots & Shoes 104 N 2nd Street Douglas WY 82633 Sheridan Leather 2047 Coffeen Avenue, Sheridan, WY (307) 674-6679 www.sheridanleather.com Kings Saddlery Ropes & Museum King Ropes 184 N. Main Sheridan, WY 82801 1-800-446-8919 1-307-672-2702 Fax 1-307-672-5235 GET RESULTS! Advertise in the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CLASSIFIEDS! Line ad classifieds for only $15! Display ad classifieds with color photos for only $25! Call 307-532-2184 and ask for Jeanie at jwright@EquineEnthusiast.com to get more information or to place your ad TODAY! Wild Man Riggins Custom Built Chaps Larry Sandvick Kaycee, Wyoming Shop 307-738-2608 Cell 307-696-2882 Probst Western Full line of: Tack, workwear, cowboy boots, clothing and jewelry. Visit Probst Western and Outdoor Clothing Co in Greybull, Wyoming. Visit us online at www.probstwesternstore.com

Frannie Tack Quality Tack at a Great Price. Full Service Repair Shop. Custom saddles and gear. More than 100 saddles in stock! The Frannie Tack Shop - 58 Lane 2 1/2 in Frannie, Wy 307-8662344 or 800-552-8836

STEEL BUILDINGS Morton Buildings, Inc. High-quality, post-frame or “timber-frame” structures. 190810 Highway 26 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 (308) 635-2414

TRAVEL Take Your Horse on Vacation Private summer cattle ranch. 40 miles from Cheyenne, near Tie Siding. 1890’s cabin is modernized and supplied, just bring your food, bedding and oats. 4 bedrooms can accommodate up to 8. Miles to ride with National Forest access. Call/text 970-481-2790 or email ldrangusranch@aol.com

P.O. Box 881 Buffalo, WY 82834

Repairs, tack, leather products, cowboy gear and unique gifts!

Bryan Pickeral (307)217-0451

A Better Understanding is Coming...

Cow Working Clinic with Chris Ellsworth September 7 & 8 Torrington, WY For More Info:

307-575-6674 chearthorses@yahoo.com www.chearthorses.com

Work Western & Outdoor Apparel Shoes, Boots, Gift Items Western Jewelry, Knives Shoe Repair

Jim & Nancy Young (307) 358-2734 104 N. 2nd Street Douglas, WY 82633

CITY SHOE & SADDLE SHOP

ADVERTISE IN THE CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE!

EQUIPMENT • TACK • HORSES FOR SALE/LEASE TRAILERS/ TRACTORS/ TRUCKS RENTAL PROPERTIES • BOARDING FACILITIES

LINE ADS FOR ONLY $15 DISPLAY ADS FOR ONLY $25 EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CALL 307-532-2184 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TRUCKING SERVICES SR Express/ Trucking Hauling Hay and Cattle Garrett Smith Lusk, Wy 307-334-3333 cell 307-340-1751 GET THE WORD OUT! Join the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST EVENT CALENDAR! Email your equine-related event to Megan at: mrawlins@EquineEnthusiast.com

October!

307-532-2184 Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE We welcome our readers to submit editorial on achievements, milestones, local equestrian stories and organizations! Do you know a local horse person who deserves to be Equine Enthusiast’s featured local horseman/woman of the year? Please feel free to contact us with any comments or suggestions to help EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T best suit YOUR needs!

UTILITIES/SERVICES Ferrellgas better prices and best service, call today for no fees/one price propane. 307-276-3944 For all your Farm and Ranch needs call the professionals at Burns Insurance Agency. 307634-5757 Trendsetters: High speed, low cost satellite internet. Local providers for: HughesNet, DISH NETWORK and DIRECTV trendst77@yahoo.com for more info

VETERINARY SERVICES Casper Animal Medical Center Veterinary Services 4700 S. Valley Road Casper, WY 82604 307-237-8387 Western Skies Veterinary Services, LLC Dr. Jared Sare, large animal exclusive, full-line of livestock supplies and vaccine. 307-367-3185 Pinedale, Wy Harnish Veterinary Services “Quality Veterinary Services For Large & Small Animals” Laser Surgery Boarding 172 W Frontage Rd Wheatland WY 82201 Tel: 307-322-3751

Laramie Peak Veterinary Associates Steve Lucas, D.V.M. John Koger,D.V.M. Brenda Unrein, D.V.M. Large & Small Animal Practice Hills Prescription Diets & Pet Food Grooming & Boarding Available 28 West Frontage Road Wheatland, WY 82201 Tel: 307-322-3640 Goshen Veterinary Clinic Inc. Veterinary Services 4548 US Hwy 26/85 Torrington, WY 307-532-4195 Animal Clinic of Pinedale, Equine and Small Animals-Medicine, Surgery, Equine Reproduction, Acupuncture, Hospitalization, and Boarding. 307-367-4752 Equine Dental Services offered at Big Horn Animal Care Center in Powell, WY. Call Equine Dental Technician Greg Paris to schedule an appointment. 307754-4192 GET RESULTS! Advertise in the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CLASSIFIEDS! Line ad classifieds for only $15! Display ad classifieds with color photos for only $25! Call 307-532-2184 and ask for Jeanie at jwright@ EquineEnthusiast.com to get more information or to place your ad TODAY!

Quality veterinary services available for large & small animals Harnish Veterinary Services 172 West Frontage Road Wheatland, WY 82201 Office 307-322-3751 Cekk 307-241-0011

Travis Pearson

307-532-2184

tpearson@EquineEnthusiast.com 66

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Dr. Daniel Harnish, DVM

ADVERTISE IN THE CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE!

EQUIPMENT • TACK • HORSES FOR SALE/LEASE TRAILERS/ TRACTORS/ TRUCKS RENTAL PROPERTIES • BOARDING FACILITIES

LINE ADS FOR ONLY $15 DISPLAY ADS FOR ONLY $25 EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CALL 307-532-2184 FOR MORE INFORMATION

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EVENT CALENDAR JULY

■ National High School Finals Rodeo, July 14-21, Sweetwater Events Complex, Rock Springs.

■ Dubois National Day of the Cowboy Celebration, July 27, Main Street, Dubois.

■ Campbell County Cowgirls/ Cowboys, Thursdays 6:30-10 p.m., Cam-Plex Wrangler Arena, Gillette.

Details available at www. sweetwaterevents.com

For more information, contact (307) 455-2700.

■ Sublette County Barrel Racing Club Barrel Jackpot, July 17, Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. Time only 6 p.m., race at 7 p.m.

■ Central Wyoming Performance Horse Club open horse show, July 27, State Fairgrounds, Douglas.

For more information, contact Paula O’Connell at (307) 687-0566. ■ Teton County Fairgrounds rodeos, July 12-13, 17, 20 and 31, Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 733-5289. ■ Lloyd Brower Memorial Slide National Reining Horse Association horse show, July 12-13, Sublette County Fairgrounds Arena, Big Piney.

For more information and to enter, contact Jessie at (307) 260-5266. ■ Sublette County Fair, July 22-28, trick riders, horse shows and rodeos. Pre-fair events July 19-21, Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. For more information, check the online schedule at www. sublettecountyfair.com ■ Teton County Fair, July 19-28, Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson.

For more information, contact Shannon Lakner at (307) 251-6795. ■ National Day of the American Cowboy, July 28, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Cody. For more information, contact (307) 578-4014. ■ Campbell County Fair, July 29Aug. 2, Cam-Plex all arenas, Gillette. For schedule, see www. campbellcountyfair.com or contact Bobbi Jo Heald at (307) 687-0200.

For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 749-3546.

For an event schedule, see www.tetoncountyfair.com

AUGUST

■ Levi Little Rodeo, July 14, Cam-Plex, Gillette.

■ Red Desert Roundup Rodeo, July 25-27, Sweetwater Events Complex, Rock Springs.

For more information, contact Quentin Reynolds at (307) 682-0912.

For more information, contact the Red Desert Roundup Committee at (307) 389-1643.

■ Campbell County Cowgirls/ Cowboys, Thursdays 6:30-10 p.m., Cam-Plex Wrangler Arena, Gillette.

All Breeds, All Disciplines! 68

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

For more information, contact Paula O’Connell at (307) 687-0566.

Equine Enthusiast is also available online at www.EquineEnthusiast. com and on Facebook: Facebook.com/ equineenthusiastmagazine

■ Bar S Bar Rodeo series, Thursdays, Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. ■ Sublette County Barrel Racing Club Barrel Jackpot, Wednesdays 6 p.m., Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. For more information and to enter, contact Jessie at (307) 260-5266. ■ Jesus Little Levi Rodeo, Aug. 16-17, Cam-Plex, Gillette. For more information, contact (307) 682-0552. ■ Central Wyoming Performance Horse Club open horse show, Aug. 18, State Fairgrounds, Douglas. For more information, contact Shannon Lakner at (307) 251-6795. ■ Sheridan Elks Youth Rodeo, Aug. 24-25, Victoria Street, Sheridan. For more information, contact (307) 674-7297. ■ Ed Wright Barrel Clinic, Aug. 30 to Sept. 1, Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. For more information, contact (307) 276-5373.

SUMMER

2 0 12

FREE

■ Barrel Racing Clinic, Aug. 31- Sept. 1, Cam-Plex, Gillette.

10-day dedicat ion to history

WYOMING/NEB RASKA PANHANDLE EDITI ON

For more information, contact Carey Mackey at (307) 680-4105.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

30 U.S. REPS WANT TO REIGN IN BLM’S HORSE BUDGET CRITICS CLAIM HORSE REMOVAL NOT EASING ECOLOGICAL DAMAGE RENO, Nev. (AP) – Thirty U.S. representatives urged new U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell on Thursday to make a priority out of reforming the government’s wild horse management program and its spiraling budget that they say has created an “untenable situation” for both the mustangs and taxpayers. Arizona Rep. Raul Grijalva, the ranking Democrat on the House Natural Resources subcommittee on public lands and environmental regulation, wrote the letter appealing to Jewell “as a conservationist and outdoor enthusiast” to help bring “long overdue” changes at the U.S. Bureau of Land Management charged with protecting the horses. “Given the importance of wild horses to the American people and

considering the ever-tightening budget situation, we believe that this is a problem that demands your urgent attention,” he wrote. Florida Rep. C.W. Young, a senior member of the House Appropriations Committee, was the lone Republican to sign the letter. The majority of the co-signers were from states in the East and South, but several joined from states that are home to some of the estimated 37,000 free-roaming wild horses and burros on federal land in the West, including Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., Rep. Jared Polis, D-Colo., five representatives from California and three from Oregon. Grijalva said they’re asking for renewed attention to the program after an independent scientific review of

horse roundups. The review, which was released last month, recommended that the government invest in widespread fertility control of the mustangs and let nature cull any excess herds instead of spending millions to house them in overflowing holding pens. The 14-member panel assembled by the National Science Academy’s National Research Council and Management concluded BLM’s removal of nearly 100,000 horses from the Western range over the past decade is probably having the opposite effect of its intention to ease ecological damage and reduce overpopulated herds. By stepping in prematurely when food and water supplies remain adequate, BLM is producing artificial conditions that ultimately serve to

perpetuate population growth, the committee stated. BLM spokesman Tom Gorey referred inquiries Thursday to Jewell’s office where a spokeswoman said press secretary Jessica Kershaw was not immediately available to comment. Grijalva said BLM’s wild horse budget has doubled since 2009 as the agency “escalated its unsustainable roundup-remove-and-stockpile approach to wild horse management.” Last year, BLM spent 60 percent of its wild horse budget on holding facilities alone, more than $40 million. “In fact, the U.S. government today maintains more wild horses in captivity than remain in the wild,” Grijalva said. “This is an untenable situation, both for America’s wild horses and for American taxpayers.”

EVENT CALENDAR SEPTEMBER ■ Bar S Bar Rodeo series, Thursdays, Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. ■ American Cowboy Team Roping Association Fall Roping, Sept. 6-8, Cam-Plex, Gillette. For more information, contact Vicki Benedict at (307) 751-3966.

■ Wyoming Cutting Horse Association Cow Cutting, Sept. 10-17, Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. For more information, contact (307) 276-5373. ■ Fizz Bomb Futurity barrel race, Sept. 13-15, Cam-Plex, Gillette. For more information, contact Carey Mackey at (307) 680-4105.

■ Thar’s ranch sorting, Sept. 21-22, Cam-Plex, Gillette. For more information, contact Stacey Thar at (307) 685-0149.

OCTOBER ■ NACA National Correinte Convention, Oct. 2-5, Cam-Plex, Gillette. For more information, contact (307) 682-0552.

■ Central Wyoming Performance Horse Club ranch horse show, Sept. 7, State Fairgrounds, Douglas.

■ National Barrel Horse Association District 4 Finals Barrel Race, Sept. 14-15, Sweetwater Events Complex, Rock Springs.

■ Northwest Barrel Racing Association Finals, Oct. 10-13, Cam-Plex, Gillette.

For more information, contact Shannon Lakner at (307) 251-6795.

For more information, contact Konra Williams at (307) 537-5836.

For more information, contact Robyn Miller at (605) 209-0503.

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

■ Wyoming Reined Cowhorse Association Snaffle Bit Futurity, Oct. 18-20, Cam-Plex, Gillette. For more information, contact Cheri Carter at (307) 682-9530.

GET YOUR EVENT IN THE EQUINE ENTHUSIAST™

EVENT CALENDAR GET THE WORD OUT! Submit a short description of your club, business or organization’s event for our calendar. Be sure to include relevant dates, times, locations and contact information. E-mail your event to: tpearson@EquineEnthusiast.com

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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REMEDIES

ADVERTISERS

continued from page 58

I N D E X ADVERTISER

PAGE #

4 Rivers Equipment.............................. 25 Americas Best Value ............................ 38

Animal Clinic of Pinedale.................... 51 Balding Bits & Spurs ........................... 23

Benedict’s Market ................................ 39 Big Horn Animal Care ......................... 32 Big Horn Coop ..................................... 30 Big Sky Ford .......................................... 3

Bighorn Blacksmithing ........................ 63

Blue Ribbon Realty .............................. 64 Bob King Days..................................... 19 Brannan Homes.................................... 15

Bridger Valley Electric ......................... 28

Bureau of Land Manag ........................ 29 Burns Insurance Agency ...................... 13

C Heart Saddle ..................................... 65 C&K Equipment .................................. 27 Casper Animal Clinic ............................. 7

Cathy Hasselbacher .............................. 62 Century Lumber Center ......................... 9

City Shoe and Saddle Shop .................. 65 Cleary Buildings .................................. 11 Coffee Cup Fuel Stop........................... 64

Covolo Auto-Farm Sales and Service .. 19 Cowboy Dodge .................................... 43 Cowboy Motors ................................... 16 Cowboy Motors ................................... 17

East to West Construction .................... 28 Eastern Wyoming College ................... 31

Equine Enthusiast................................. 60 Equine Enthusiast................................. 61 Evanston Cowboy Days ...................... 33

Farrell Gas............................................ 12 Flat Broke Perf. Horse ......................... 63

Floyd’s Truck Center............................ 53 Frannie Tack ......................................... 42 Goshen Co. Fair Grounds .................... 71 Goshen Veterinary Clinic ..................... 42

Greiner Motors ....................................... 2 Harnish Veterinary Services ................. 66 Heilbrun’s Powersports ........................ 55

Henderson Meat ................................... 51

HorizonWest Inc. ................................. 21 Jay Fear Real Estate ............................... 7

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Kevin Sanders Horseshoeing ............... 63 Kings Saddlery ..................................... 15

Larame Pope ........................................ 64

Laramie County Community College .. 47 Laramie Ford........................................ 37

Laramie Peak Veterinary Associates .... 40

Lida Christian/ Ranch Rodeo ............... 49 Linton’s ................................................ 41

MCCauley Constructors....................... 63

Memorial Hospital of Converse Co. .... 72 MJB Animal Clinic .............................. 31 Morton Buildings. ................................ 38

Moss Saddles Boots & Tack ................ 13

Newman Realty.................................... 64

Courtesy photos/ Tom Balding Bits and Spurs

Park County Fair .................................. 20

Platte Co. Fair Board............................ 30 Picks Saddle Shop ................................ 65

Platte Valley Riders .............................. 51

Probst Western Wear ............................ 63 Rawhide Valley Quarter ....................... 19

Real Estate Arena ................................. 67 Reganis................................................. 32

Reliable Equipment Rental .................. 63 Running Horse Realty .......................... 64 Sandberg’s ............................................ 57

Sublette Co. Fairgrounds...................... 35 Sublette Co. Fairgrounds...................... 40 Scottsbluff Co. Fair .............................. 24

Sheridan College .................................. 34 SR Express/ Trucking .......................... 57

Sweetwater Events ................................. 8 Terry Kimbrel....................................... 64 Trendsetters .......................................... 49

Weber Sales & Service......................... 28 Weber Sales & Service......................... 63 Western Skies Vet................................. 34 Western Skys Family Diner ................. 64 Wheatland Country Store .................... 51 White Horse ......................................... 63

Wildman Riggins ................................. 65 Wolf Pinedale Dodge ........................... 59 Wyoming Quarter Horse Sale .............. 24

Wyoming West Realty.......................... 64 Yarn Express ........................................ 64

A more stoic horse will still continue to perform under pain, but eventually its performance may decrease and even develop abnormalities within its gaits to overcome pain. Another area where a horse may experience pain from equipment being improperly used is from the bit and bridle. Problems that can arise from improper use of a bridle and bit include the headstall and bit don’t properly fit, the curb strap/chain is adjusted too tight, or the bit is too large or small for the horse’s mouth. When such problems arise with the headstall not properly fitting, a horse may be more reluctant to let one bridle him and toss his head way in the air. He may also refuse to open his mouth. In severe cases, the horse may even rear up and, if he learns to rear to avoid being bridled, or when bridled, and it causes the person to get off, then the horse has learned to rear up to escape the situation. Other behavioral problems with bridling a horse may be due to a den-

tal condition such as a young horse that needs to have the caps removed from its teeth; or, the horse may have teeth called wolf teeth. Horses that have wolf teeth, which lie in the bars of the horse’s mouth where the bit should comfortably sit, would cause a horse to rear and resist pressure being placed on its mouth. A horse may also exhibit abnormal or resistant behavior when being ridden due to an inexperienced rider giving mixed cues, or never releasing pressure being applied with their hands and or legs. Equine behavior is essential to proper training, riding and care of your horse. Part of being a responsible horseman is being able to recognize the signs of a horse displaying abnormal behavior. Behavioral problems can be as serious as life-threatening colic to something as simple as needing to loosen the curb strap by one notch. Listen to what your horse is telling you, and try to respond. Most equine behavioral problems can be solved by adequate turn out, supplying enough forage several times per day, using equipment that fits your horse and knowing how to use the equipment. This article is sponsored by Tom Balding Bits and Spurs http://www. tombalding.com. All photos are provided by Tom Balding Bits and Spurs and are intended for the sole use in this article.

SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


THURSDAY, JULY 25 9:00 am

Supreme Cow Program Vet Check, Weigh-in and Interviews

FRIDAY, JULY 26 5:00 & 7:00 pm CIRCUS (Pavilion Parking Lot) SATURDAY, JULY 27 GOSHEN COUNTY TEAM ROPING- Outdoor Arena Enter @ 8:00 am***Rope @ 9:00 am

GOSHEN COUNTY BARREL RACE- Pavilion Enter @ TBA***Exhibitions start TBA

SONrise Church Service (RC) 4-H Dog Agility (P)

MONDAY, JULY 29

8:00 am – noon 4-H Exhibit Interview Judging (4-H Bldg) 8:00 am – noon Ag Hall Exhibit Check-In (Ag Hall)

(NON PERISHABLE ITEMS ONLY )

1:00 pm 5:00 pm

Noon – 9:00 pm 4-H Building & Ag Hall Open 7:00 am Chamber of Commerce Ranch Breakfast (RC) 7:00 am FIRST milk-out for Dairy Goat Milking Competition

10:00 am 10:00 am Noon 12:30 pm 12:45 pm

1:00 pm 1:30 pm 2:00 pm 5:00 pm 7:00 pm

Breeding Sheep & Breeding Swine Shows (Grass)

YOUTH RODEO SERIES & FINALS (P)

NO ANIMALS ALLOWED IN BARNS BEFORE 6:00 AM WEDNESDAY (EXCLUDING HORSES & BREEDING)

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31

3:00 – 9:00 pm 4-H Building Open 7:00 – 11:00 am Open Class Entries (Ag Hall) Floriculture & Horticulture 7:30 – 8:00 am Carcass Swine Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 8:00 – 10:00 am Market Swine Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 9:00 am 4-H/FFA Rodeo Events followed by 4-H/FFA Barrels & Poles (P) 10:00 – noon Market Lamb Weigh-In (Swine Barn) NOON-4:00 pm AG HALL CLOSED FOR JUDGING 1:00 – 2:00 pm Market Goat Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 2:00 pm 1st/2nd Yr Lamb Project Conferences (RC) 2:00 – 4:00 pm Market Beef Weigh-In (Swine Barn) Heifers followed by Steers

BAKE SALE (AG HALL)

4:30 pm Market Heifer Preg Check (Swine Barn) 5:00 – 8:00 pm Ag Hall Open for vendor set up 5:00 pm Arrival deadline for all other livestock 5:00 pm 4-H/FFA Team Sort (P) 5:30 pm Mandatory Livestock Exhibitor Meeting (Grass) 6:00 pm Goat Costume & Agility Contest (TBA)

PINNACLE BANK MUTTON BUSTIN’ & TEAM SORT (P) $5

Sort Entries CLOSE @ 6pm* Calcutta will follow Mutton Bustin’

7:00 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm

Rally (RC) followed by Dog Costume Contest

Supreme Cow Contest (Grass) Goshen County Bred/Fed Beef Show (Grass) Swine Show- Market & Showmanship (Grass)

SECOND milk-out for Dairy Goat Milking Competition

FORD FRIDAY, AUGUST 2

7:30 -8:00 am Carcass Lamb Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 8:00 – 8:30 am Carcass Beef Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 7:00 am Horse Performance Classes (P) 9:00 am – 3:00 pm Trail Class (Outdoor Arena) Breeding Meat Goat, Breeding Sheep Showmanship, 4:00 pm

7:00 pm

5TH ANNUAL RANCH RODEO * $8

Noon – Midnight***BEER GARDEN Featuring THE DRIVIN’ DYNAMICS

TUESDAY, JULY 30

4:00 pm

Carcass Contest (Kelly Pack) 4-H Cloverbud Show (Grass Arena) 4-H Pocket Pet Show (Grass Arena) 4-H/FFA Static Exhibit Auction (FS)

7:00 pm Torrington Lions Club partner to present: GORDY PRATT IN CONCERT (P) $5

Fabric and Fashion Judging (RC) Horse Showmanship & Halter (P)

6:00 pm

GOSHEN COUNTY FAIR PARADE

1:00 pm 4-H Dog Show -Obedience, Showmanship, Conformation,

SUNDAY, JULY 28 10:00 am 2:00 pm

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1 HAPPY 100TH BIRTHDAY GOSHEN COUNTY

Release of all Horses 4-H Style Review (RC) Pre milk-out for Dairy Goat Milking Competition 4:00 pm – Midnight***BEER GARDEN Featuring HEARTLAND PRODUCTIONS

1913 Model “T”

2013 F150

9:00 am – 9:00 pm 4-H Building & Ag Hall Open 8:00 am Sheep Show-Showmanship, Market, 1st/2nd Yr Lamb Project (Grass) 8:30 am Rabbit/Poultry Show- Rabbits followed by Poultry Classes & Costume Contest (Rabbit Barn) 2:00 pm Goshen County Bred/Fed Lamb Show (Grass) 2:00-5:00 pm OPEN STAGE TALENT-All Ages Welcome (FS) 3:00 pm Market Goat Show-Showmanship, Market, Goshen County Bred/Fed Market Goat Show (TBA) 5:00 pm Goshen County Sheep Producers BBQ & Platte Valley Bank Ice Cream Social (TBA) 5:00 pm Sheep Lead Contest (Grass) 5:30 pm Dairy Cattle Show (Grass) 6:00 pm 4-H Cat Show (RC) 6:00 pm Market Beef Show (Grass) 7:00 pm WIENER DOG RACES (Grass following Beef Show)

8:00 pm

FORD TOUGH BULL RIDING (P) $8

4:00 pm – Midnight***BEER GARDEN Featuring THE DRIVIN’ DYNAMICS

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3

9:00 am – 9:00 pm 4-H Building & Ag Hall Open 8:00 am Dairy Goat Show-Showmanship, Dairy Goats (TBA) 9:00 am Breeding Beef Show & Showmanship (Grass)

10:00 am Ranch Horse Competition (Outdoor Arena) 11:30 am WY State Fair Exhibitors Meeting (FS) 3:00 pm JR LIVESTOCK SALE (FS) Followed by Livestock Sale Buyer Dinner (RC) 6:30 pm 4-H/FFA Round Robin Showmanship Contest Presentation of Herdsmanship & Special Awards (Grass) Over The Hill Showmanship Contest Immediately following Round Robin & Special Awards

7:00 pm GREEN VALLEY HOMESTEADERS (RC) 7:30pm GOSHEN COUNTY & WYOMING 4-H 100th BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION 8:00 pm SUPERCROSS * $8 4:00 pm – Midnight***BEER GARDEN Featuring THE DRIVIN’ DYNAMICS

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4

6:00-10:00 am ALL EXHIBITS RELEASED 10:00 am

VISIT EAT STREET Enjoy the sound of HEARTLAND PRODUCTIONS Wed-Sat in the Frontier Shelter

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2013

SONrise Church Service (RC)

Paid for in part by Goshen County Tourism Promotions Joint Powers Board

CRABTREE AMUSEMENTS Wednesday, Friday & Saturday Midafternoon til Midnight Thursday* Noon to Midnight Every Night is Bracelet Night

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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SUMMER 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation

Wyo-Braska Summer 2013  

Equine Magazine for Wyoming/Nebraska Summer 2013

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