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Inside:

First Crush Birra

Rockstar Winemakers

Chef Santos

Making Wine at Home

Garagiste Festival

Villa Vino

Where the Wild Things Are

Red Claw

Award Winning Wines

Fall/Winter 2013


ENJOY THE AWARD WINNING WINES OF CHANGALA AND KALEIDOS IN ONE LOCATION. CHANGALA WINES ARE PAIRED WITH HERRMANN’S CHOCOLATES EVERY WEEKEND.

KALEIDOS WINES ARE PAIRED WITH CUPCAKES FROM LITTLE MISS CUPCAKE ON THE FIRST WEEKEND OF EVERY MONTH.

3770 WILLOW CREEK ROAD, PASO ROBLES (805) 226-9060 OPEN FOR TASTING FRIDAY - SUNDAY 11:00 - 5:00


NEWPORT FESTIVAL

The COAST YOU REMEMBER 1 - 800 - COAST 44 • discovernewport.com


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Rock Star Winemakers

Patti Bello.......................................................10

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Steve Lock......................................................12 Jason Bushong...............................................14 Michael Barreto.............................................16 Larry Roberts.................................................18 Neil Collins.....................................................20

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FEATURE: Award-winning Blush Wines..........22 ARCHITECTURE: Calcareous Vineyard............24 FEATURE: AVA Closer to Subdivision............28 FEATURE: Red Claw.........................................30

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FEATURE: Michael Gill Cellars........................28 Paso Robles Area Wine Tasting Map...............40

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FEATURE: Get Hands-On With First Crush......44 FOOD & WINE: Chef Santos at La Cosecha......48 FOOD & WINE: Fandango Olive Oil.................50 FOOD & WINE: Di Raimondo’s Cheese Shop...52 FEATURE: Garagiste Festival...........................54 FEATURE: Villa Vino at Poalillo Vineyards......58

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ART: Featured Artist Joe Thomas....................60 ART: Bodegas Paso Robles..............................62

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FEATURE: Harvest Wine Weekend..................66 FEATURE: Ashley McMahan............................68

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FEATURE: 15 Degrees C..................................70 BIRRA: BarrelHouse Brewing Co....................72 Calendar of Events..........................................74 Reference.................................................77

North County Wineries and Tasting Rooms

North County Olive Oil Tasting

Wine Country Tours, Transportation & Lodging


Photo taken at Cass Winery, Jeremy Burke/VINO Magazine

A Word from the

PUBLISHER First, I would like to thank you for reading this issue and the last issue. The new and improved VINO for the summer 2013 issue was the most popular by a long shot. I will give you an example. Previous issues of VINO, we would print 15,000 copies and it would last roughly three months. For this last issue, we printed the same 15,000 copies and they lasted one week. This is great news for all our advertisers and the readers.

VINO is published quarterly by the Paso Robles Press. All rights reserved, material may not be reprinted without written consent from the publisher. The Paso Robles Press made every effort to maintain the accuracy of information presented in the magazine, but assumes no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions.

Publisher:

Jeremy Burke publisher@pasoroblespress.com

Editorial:

For this issue, we took the design to another level. We have some fantastic illustrators on staff now and they incorporated original art throughout the magazine, including the ads for our great supporters of VINO.

Editor

Brian Williams news@pasoroblespress.com

In addition, we added a brand new sub-magazine into VINO. It is called BIRRA (Italian for Beer). Here we started with a story on a local brewery. The future for BIRRA is similar in fashion to VINO, we want to bring that beer information and education to you the reader. Why beer in a wine magazine you ask? Well there is a story behind it. Most of my ideas have stories behind them. Over the years, I have had the unique opportunity to talk with many winemakers and winery owners and I kept coming across a similar theme. They would always say, “It takes a lot of beer to make great wine.” This hit me in a dream and late one night I Googled what beer was in Italian and poof — BIRRA was born. Although, it was two weeks before deadline and I about gave my editor a heart attack.

Contributors

Laura Ness, Meagan Friberg, Hayley Thomas, Danny Foster, Natasha Dalton

Advertising: Sales

Brad Koyak, Carmen Burton, Sheri Potruch, Steve Fairchild

Art & Design: Mike Lyon

For the next edition, we look forward to enhancing our educational series for VINO and BIRRA. In both, VINO and BIRRA, tasting will be a big focus for us. VINO will touch on some quick information on how a few varietals look. For example, there will be illustrations on cabernet grapes, where we will give information on grape clusters and leaf type. This will give you quick information about how to identify the different varietal types. BIRRA will scratch the surface on hops and how they can impact the taste of beer and we will look at the different types of beers you can enjoy in the North County. Again, thank you for your valuable time, and I hope you enjoy this edition.

Cover Shot: Photo was taken at Cass Winery, Thank you for the use of your grounds and grapes. Photo by Jeremy Burke/VINO Magazine

Contact information

Cheers, Jeremy Burke Publisher 6 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

Robles Press

www.PasoRoblesPress.com 805-237-6060 829 10th Street, Suite B Paso Robles, CA 93446

VINO

Central Coast Edition


An Evening in the Garden Mission San Antonio Saturday, November 2, 2013 4pm - 8pm Please

join us for an enchanting evening in the garden. Your donation includes admission for one to the garden, live music, wine tasting featuring some of the central coast’s premium wineries, sumptuous hors d’oeuvres, and souvenir wine glass. Proceeds benefit the continuing restoration of the Padre’s Garden and Mission San Antonio. Purchase your tickets at one of the following King City establishments: The Garden House • Pacific Valley Bank or reserve tickets by calling the Mission Gift Shop 831.385.4478, ext. 10 (Tickets will be held at Will Call)

50 per person presale • $60 per person at the door For overnight accommodations at the Mission, please call Mission San Antonio 831-385-4478 extension 10 $


Winemakers For this issue — we give you six more Rock Star winemakers.

W

e strive to highlight different winemakers, with different wines and give you a glimpse into their lives; after all, winemakers are people too; they just get to spend their time, and often making their living, with wine. This issue’s Rock Star winemakers are Patti Bello of B and E Vineyard, Steve Lock of Ecluse Wines, Jason Bushong of Graveyard Vineyards, Michael Barreto of Le Vigne Winery, Larry Roberts of Penman Springs Vineyard and Neil Collins of Tablas Creek and Lone Madrone. After you read about our Rock Star winemakers, stop by and check our their wines and tasting rooms; you never know when you’ll get the chance to meet the winemaker in the tasting room.

8 Fall 2013

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Robles Press


VINOCentral Coast Edition

Fall 2013


Winemakers

Winemaker

Patti Bello Enjoys Making a ‘Really Friendly Wine’

Photos courtesy of B and E Vineyard

Patti Bello along with her husband Jerry have been growing grapes on Creston Road since 1992. Few women in the Paso Robles American Viticulture Area have been making wine as long and as well at Patti Bello of B and E Vineyard. B and E produces only red estate wines — cabernet sauvignon, merlot, syrah among other varietals and blends. 10 Fall 2013

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Central Coast Edition


B and E Vineyard Brian Williams VINO

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atti Bello is in a good place. She enjoys family, friends, raising cutting horses, her dogs and making wine. The order may change slightly from time to time but one thing is for sure. If she’s not having fun she is probably not going to do it for long. Bello is the winemaker and co-owner of B and E Vineyard on Creston Road and has been making wine since the 1990s but didn’t start selling it until 2002. “In the ‘90s, I started making some wine for myself,” she said with chuckle, “but not to sell. The first vintage we had for sale was a cabernet and since then we have gone on to make merlots and blends and a port. “It’s been pretty fun. There were a few bad years,” she said through a laugh, “that we lived through.” Bello is being very humble about her early winemaking days. Few women in the Paso Robles American Viticulture Area have been making wine as long and as well. B and E produces only red estate wines — cabernet sauvignon, merlot, syrah among other varietals and blends. Her first Red Rhythm, a Bordeaux blend, from 2004 received 94 points from Wine Enthusiast. The 2007 Red Rhythm got judges choice best of class and double gold in San Francisco and in Los Angeles. “I have no secrets. We grow high quality fruit here.” Bello said. “It’s very important to me that the fruit is at full maturity.” She and her husband, Jerry, started the vineyard back in 1989 when they planted 25 acres of cabernet sauvignon and added 25 acres of merlot in 1992. They planted another 8 acres of cabernet in 1995. Back then, they were just selling fruit. “There was just nobody out here,” Patti said. “But now it is almost solid grapes going back to town.” The couple, who met while attending Cal Poly in 1967, planted grapes because growing alfalfa became too costly. Patti is originally from Santa Ana. Her parents, the Elliotts, bought property in 1969 just down the road from where the vineyard is today. “We bought property down the road and started farming,” Patti said. “We had horses and cows and alfalfa. We farmed a lot of alfalfa. We owned quite a bit back then. We had a herd of 100 registered Red Brangus cows.” The Bellos purchased the property where the vineyard is back in the ‘80s and initially planted alfalfa. “We actually bought it with somebody else — we owned a quarter of it and they owned three quarters and then when they wanted to sell out we bought them out,” Patti said. Following the passing of her father, they began selling some of the property and started the vineyard. “It got too expensive to do alfalfa,” Patti said. “I was really happy when we stopped doing alfalfa. The grapes are much more enjoyable. The vineyard is just so beautiful.” Tobin James, who was buying some of their fruit for Tobin James Cellars, told Patti she should be making wine.

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“He said we had really nice fruit and we should open up a tasting room and do a winery,” Bello said. “So with some help from Tobin, we started making some small blocks of wine for ourself and in 2002 made our first vintage for sale.” Patti handles the winemaking and marketing while Jerry works the vineyard. They still sell grapes and produce 2,500 cases of wine per year and have plans to grow to 5,000. The bottling is done at Robert Hall Winery. She is a member of the Paso Robles Cabernet and Bordeaux Collective. Patti has good working relationships with winemakers in the area, including Robert Hall’s Don Brady. “Don has been a huge inspiration and big help in the winemaking as far as the chemistry goes and the blends and everything like that,” Patti said. “I’ve talked to several winemakers, who have helped me from time to time. “I find that everybody in the area is really friendly. Nobody is out to scalp anybody,” she said. Patti takes great pride in not having to use additives. “I’ve been lucky to just put a good yeast in our fruit, and that’s it,” Patti said. “I’ve never had any issues with having to add anything to it. So for me, it is quite nice. And it’s a matter of holding that fruit in the barrels and keeping it clean, you know just general winemaking practices.” They de-stem everything, use open-top fermenters and punch down — three times a day. Once they press off, it goes into French oak barrels for anywhere from 20 to 30 months depending on the wine, Patti said. Patti is trying to create what she calls a “really friendly wine” that is fruit forward with a smooth beginning, middle and finish. “All of my wines are very fruit forward with a nice soft finish on them,” Bello said. “They are very approachable wines.” B and E Vineyard and its wine tasting saloon is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday at 10000 Creston Road. For more information, call 805-238-4815 or visit www.bevineyard.com.

B&E Vineyard 10000 Creston Road, Paso Robles, Ca. 93446 (805) 238-4815 www.bevineyard.com

Robles Press

11 Fall 2013


Winemakers

Winemaker

Steve Lock Uses a Minimalistic Approach to Making Wine

Brian Williams/VINO

2008 turned out to be a benchmark year for Écluse and its winemaker co-owner Steve Lock. The Écluse 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon from Lock Vineyard shared the 2011 Sweepstakes Award for the Best Red Wine from the San Francisco Chronicle with Thacher Winery’s Zinfandel. Brian Williams VINO

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teve Lock had a pretty good idea of how good his wine grapes were after that first harvest. In 1997, Steve and his wife Pam Lock bought what has become a prime piece of land just west of downtown Paso Robles on Kiler Canyon Road. They planted just under 30 total acres of cabernet sauvignon, syrah and zinfandel and Lock Vineyard had its first harvest in 2000. “We sold all of our Syrah to winemaker Stillman Brown, who in those days had the label Jory,” Steve said. “He liked the fruit so much from our vineyard that he gave us a vineyard designation, which was unusual to have the first harvest receive recognition of the vineyard.”

12 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

This was the Locks first attempt at farming. Both were highly successful in a variety of business start-ups in California and Washington over the years before making the trek from Whidbey Island, Wash. to Paso Robles. “At that point, we were primarily interested in growing, that was our major focus,” Steve said. Pam and Steve, who were originally from Southern California, spent 20 years in Washington and were ready to move back to California to be closer to family — Steve’s in the Central Valley and Pam’s in the San Fernando Valley. They’d caught the wine industry bug while helping a friend plant grapes in Paso Robles in the mid-1990s. Robert Nadeau of Nadeau Family Vintners found the piece of property on Kiler Canyon and turned the Locks on to it. “My wife and I have always enjoyed challenges in business,”

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Ecluse Wines Steve said. “We were both very much behind getting involved in this. It’s been a great ride. We have had a great time and we have made some great friends over the years.” Starting in 2000, Steve made wine from his fruit “primarily so I could showcase the fruit off our vineyard to other local winemakers.” So, for the next several years, other wineries produced award-winning wines with Lock Vineyard fruit — Matt Trevison of Linne Calodo, Chris Tietje, who in those days was with Four Vines, Mike Mooney of Chateau Margene, Roger Nicolas of RN Estate and Scott Hawley, who at that time was with Summerwood Winery, just to name a few. During that time, notable winemakers and longtime friends encouraged Steve to also sell the wine he was making. The Locks took a leap of faith one night during dinner with the “Godfather of Zin” — the late Art Norman and his wife Lei. Steve opened a bottle of Zinfandel, Syrah and Cabernet Sauvignon from their first harvest and asked Art for his opinion. “He said, ‘these are all really solid wines. There are no major flaws in these,’” Steve said. “He said, ‘you should enter these in the Mid-State Fair because they are really solid wines.’ So I did, and they all medaled.” That was officially the beginning of Écluse Wines and Steve adding the title of winemaker. Écluse is the French word for the locks on the canals of France, and since their last name is Lock, their label name was born. It was also the beginning of some heartbreak around the Paso Robles American Viticulture Area as some of the best fruit was being pulled from the market for the Écluse label. Over the next five years, the Locks began working toward building a winery with a tasting room. During this time, Steve worked closely with Hawley and started producing wine off-site. That willingness to help found in the wine industry here is something the Locks encountered when they first moved to Paso Robles and is something they still see today. “What makes it one of the strong areas is the friendliness of the people here — of the growers and the winemakers,” Steve said. “They were always really helpful. If you had a question on something there was no shortage of people that you could talk to. It’s nice on both the grower’s side and the winemaking side.” In 2008, the Locks had everything in place to bottle, sell and market their wine on-site. 2008 turned out to be a benchmark year for Écluse. The Écluse 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon from Lock Vineyard shared the 2011 Sweepstakes Award for the Best Red Wine from the San Francisco Chronicle with Thacher Winery’s Zinfandel. “It put our cabs on the map. It was great,” Steve said. “It was also gratifying in that it was the first wine that we made at our own winery. We had this building finished for the 2008 harvest so it was the first one that stayed on-site the whole time.” The 2009 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon received a 92 from Wine Enthusiast as well as a gold at the San Francisco Chronicle. “I think the key for us has been that we have had good fruit,” Steve said. “The goal for us, and it continues to be, has been a minimalistic approach through the process. So, when the wine comes in or the fruit comes in, we have spent probably nine months in the vineyard working the fruit to get it to where we want it, and then the key is to not mess it up once you get it in here.”

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Courtesy of Ecluse Wines

Ecluse Wines feature grapes grown by winemaker Steve Lock on Lock Vineyard.

Écluse produces 2,500 cases of rich, bold and velvety smooth estate red wines and sources grapes for its viognier and white Rhone blend. Lock Vineyard has also added plantings of petit verdot, tannat, petite sirah, malbec and mourvedre. The tasting room is staffed for tastings 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday and by appointment. For more information, call 238-4999.

Robles Press

Ecluse 1520 Kiler Canyon Rd. Paso Robles, CA 93446 (805) 238-4999 www.eclusewines.com 13 Fall 2013


Winemakers

Winemaker

Jason Bushong Road to Graveyard Vineyards Runs Through Humboldt and Cucamonga

Brian Williams/VINO

Winemaker Jason Bushong produces award-winning wines at Graveyard Vineyards. Brian Williams VINO

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ason Bushong’s road to Graveyard Vineyards didn’t involve stints in Napa or Bourdeaux. It began with a life-changing taste in Riverside, followed by stops in Humboldt County and Cucamonga. Bushong, just a senior in high school, was living in Riverside and had some buddies attending college. “They brought home some wine. It was a Sanford Chardonnay,” Bushong, 42, recalls. “So, we tried it and I was like ‘wow this is fantas14 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

tic.’ I just never really got into the beer thing in college. I was always into wine.” After high school, Bushong moved north and earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology from Humboldt State. During college, Bushong worked with Bob Hodgson at Fieldbrook Winery during harvest and learned about growing grapes and making wine in a cool, wet climate. Humboldt County is known for its pinot noir, chardonnay and cabernet franc. He worked for a couple of years with Daryl Mason at Vinatura Winery in Arcata while his wife attained her master’s degree. The couple then moved to Cucamonga, where Bushong landed his

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Central Coast Edition


Graveyard Vineyards first job as a winemaker at the historic Galleano Winery in 1997, to be closer to family. “At one time, Cucamonga was the largest wine region in the state,” Bushong said. “It was a good time for me.” The Cucamonga Valley AVA, unlike Humboldt County, has sandy alluvial soils and summer temperatures that often top 100 degrees. Cucamonga is known for its red wines that are generally rich and jammy with a strong earthy component. He worked at Galleano for three years and also did extension course work in viticulture at UC Davis, where he received “more technical training, actually quite a bit of it,” he says. “While I was working at Galleano, I met a consultant who was coming up here (Paso Robles) to build a winery and he asked me to come along and help,” Bushong says. Fast-forward five years to 2005 and Bushong is a full-time winemaker and doing some consulting, while his wife teaches at Pleasant Valley Elementary School east of Paso Robles. The same school that Graveyard owners Rob and Paula Campbell-Taylor’s son attended. The Campbell-Taylors were looking for someone to get their fledgling Pleasant Valley winery off the ground and Bushong obliged. “The Campbell-Taylors are just great people and they have a great energy about them,” Bushong says. “They had the original vineyard that was established with cabernet (sauvignon) and syrah. “I was excited to work with them, more than anything, because I really liked them. I like working with people and watching it grow and develop.” As Graveyard Vineyards progressed so too did Bushong’s role, going from consultant to winemaker. Early on, they produced an estate cabernet sauvignon and an estate syrah and purchased petite sirah grapes for a blend that led to the Tombstone line. They also bottled chardonnay and sauvignon blanc with purchased grapes. They have since planted zinfandel and some petite sirah bringing the total acres planted to 15. When the fruit allows, Graveyard produces estate reserves. They had a reserve cabernet sauvignon in 2008 and did not have it in 2009 but came back with one in 2010. The 2011 syrah was good enough to be Graveyard’s first estate reserve syrah. “It either presents itself or it’s just not there,” Bushong says. “We pick all of the estate grapes usually in two picks so sometimes we will leave a certain section of the vineyard out longer in the hopes that it will become a reserve product.” Having worked in several different AVAs, Bushong has learned to take what the soil gives you in order to produce “balanced wines, elegant wines.” “In this area, it’s a balance between physiological maturity and brix maturity in this warm climate here,” Bushong says. “Things get very, very ripe before they have a lot of flavor.” In 2011, the Paso Tombstone Red, a blend of cabernet sauvignon, syrah and petite sirah, and Deliverance, a chocolate-infused dessert wine, both received highly coveted four-star designations from the ultra-competitive Orange County wine competition. Only 34 of the more than 2,500 judged wines received four stars and Graveyard was the only winery to have more than one wine in this elite class.

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Visitors to Graveyard Vineyard’s tasting room are met with this playful landscape feature.

These were just one of many awards the winery has received over the years. “I attribute it to lots of things, it’s not just myself, it’s a team,” Bushong says. “We have a had a lot of success and it is nice to be recognized.” For Bushong, making wine is a “unique trinity of art, agriculture and science.” “You have the art side of it which is how you produce the wine, the barrels you use and how long you age it, blending. And obviously you have the agricultural side which is the grapes and how they are planted, how they are pruned, how they are treated through the year, when to harvest. And then you have the science element — the fermentation, the yeast and acids and ph and all of that. I enjoy that you get to do all of that — three major elements in life all in one thing.” Graveyard Vineyards is part of the Pleasant Valley Wine Trail. It produces between 2,500 and 3,000 cases per year. Its tasting room is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Monday at 6990 Estrella Road. For more information, call 805-467-2043 or visit online at www.graveyardvineyards.com.

Graveyard Vineyards 6990 Estrella Rd San Miguel, CA 93451 (805) 467-2043 www.graveyardvineyards.com

Robles Press

15 Fall 2013


Winemakers

Winemaker

Michael Barreto Letting the Vineyard Speak for Itself

Brian Williams/VINO

Le Vigne winemaker Michael Barreto developed the wine program at the winery. It focuses on vineyard designated wines. Brian Williams VINO

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ichael Barreto’s goal as winemaker of Le Vigne Winery is to simply “let the vineyard speak for itself.” This philosophy is carried through in the wine program he developed for the winery since coming on board as assistant winemaker in 2003. This year, Barreto, 43, replaced Jac Jacobs as winemaker, making for a nearly seamless transition for owners Sylvia and Walter Fillippini, who acquired the winery in 2001. “I’ve been working behind the scenes on the marketing and development of the Le Vigne program since I got here,” Barreto said. “It was kind of my idea that when the ownership was looking for a direction or focus for the winery, I suggested we focus on vineyard designated wines, small production so that you could really give the consumer a sense of where the grapes are coming from. They are more of a terroir-based wines.”

16 Fall 2013

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Le Vigne began making wine with grapes from its estate on 5115 Buena Vista Drive in 1989. A state of the art winery was built in 1995 at the location. It was planted predominately to cabernet sauvignon —51 acres — and chardonnay but since has grown to include the following varietals: cabernet franc, corvina, grenache, malbec, merlot, petite sirah, petit verdot, sangiovese, syrah, sauvignon blanc, tannat, viognier and zinfandel. They also manage vineyards in the Templeton Gap and San Miguel. “That is the beauty of the Le Vigne program. The best wines practically make themselves,” Barreto said. “You are watching them making sure nothing happens to them but when the fruit comes in you can tell this is going to make phenomenal wine. You know out in the vineyard the blocks and where your premium fruit is going to come from and it kind of confirms it the day it shows up and as it progresses.” Le Vigne’s wine program prominently incorporates the names of the Fillippini children — Kiara and Domenico. The estate is named for their son Domenico and the winery’s secondary label is

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Le Vigne Winery named after their daughter Kiara. The Kiara label is more focused on Paso Robles as an appellation — these are “wines that are more a conveyance of the variety and varietal correctness and just a good Paso Robles wine.” Le Vigne is used on its estate and reserve wines. Only the reserve — if good enough — receive the vineyard designation. “They are only bottled in years when they express themselves as being truly worthy of vineyard designation,” Barreto said. “So, with multiple blocks of cab, in theory, you could have one year when you have two or three cabernet sauvignons. So, we could have Le Vigne Domenico Cabernet Sauvignon or we could have Le Vigne Di Aquelo Cabernet Sauvignon just depending on where the vineyard source was from. And the same thing with petite sirah, merlot and zinfandel.” In addition to the Le Vigne varietals, Barreto produces Le Vigne blends — Brian Williams/VINO Nikiara, Cuore Vella de Vigna (heart of the Le Vigne winemaker Michael Barreto is also passing along his knowledge to others through orgavineyard in Italian) and Ame de la Vigne nized tastings with other professionals in the wine industry. (soul of the vineyard). Nikiara is a meritage or Bourdeaux obtain an entry-level position,” Barreto said. “We decided July 1 to blend. Cuore Vella de Vigna is a cabernet-based wine but it is blended move from Visalia and July 13 I started work the next day in San to be stylistically reminiscent of a super Tuscan wine. Miguel. And have been happy ever since.” “If you compared it to our varietal cabernet sauvignon, it’s going He made the most of his time at Courtside. to be more rustic, more earthy, not Paso Robles style, more European “It was a large custom crush facility. It gave me a great opportustyle,” Barreto said. “It would have more underlying herbal notes nity to see fruit sources, different companies, and different styles. I versus fruity notes.” could not have gotten a better hands-on learning experience. My first Ame de la Vigne pays homage to Paso Robles and its ability to day at work I was topping Robert Mondavi barrels. I remember thinkproduce solid Rhone varietals, typically it is a blend of syrah, grenache ing, ‘hey I’m in the wine industry.’” and petite sirah, Barreto said. Barreto continues to take classes and attend workshops and is also Barreto embraces Le Vigne’s nod to the Old World. passing along the knowledge to others through organized tastings with “My style is kind of more European I think in a sense,” Barreto other professionals in the wine industry. said. “I want them to age but also be approachable. I don’t want them “The teaching, I love that because it reaffirms the knowledge in to be off-putting young. They have style depth and complexity but that my own mind,” he said. “You will never learn everything. It is constant complexity shows from the vineyard and not from over processing of education.” the wine.” Le Vigne Winery is located at 5115 Buena Vista Drive in Paso Barreto, who was born and raised on a dairy farm in Hanford, is Robles. The tasting room is open daily — 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday a relative newcomer to the wine industry having started at Courtside through Thursday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday. For more Cellars in San Miguel back in 2001. He graduated from California information, call 805-227-4000 or visit www.levignewinery.com. State University, Fresno with a degree in agriculture business in 1993 and moved into the accounting side of the fresh produce industry. But something was missing. Barreto recalls being drawn back to the farm and being bit by the winemaking bug. He went back to Fresno 5115 Buena Vista Dr. in 1997 to study enology and winery management. He also took a Paso Robles, CA 93446 variety of winemaking classes offered through the University of California, Davis extension program. (805) 227-4000 “I was thinking about taking a sabbatical from work and it just worked out in 2001 to where my wife found a job and I was able to

Le Vigne Winery

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Robles Press

17 Fall 2013


Winemakers

Winemaker

Larry Roberts All of the wine Penman Penman Springs Springs Vineyard Isn’t Flashy produces JustisConsistently with grapes Good from its estate vineyard.

Brian Williams/VINO

Larry Roberts has been the winemaker at Penman Springs Vineyard since it opened in 1998. Brian Williams VINO

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enman Springs Vineyard winemaker Larry Roberts isn’t flashy. He’s content to let the award-winning wine do the speaking for him. “Seeing people enjoying it is pretty gratifying,” Roberts said. Consistency and an outstanding working relationship with owners Beth and Carl McCasland are the keys to Penman Springs’ success. “The owners don’t enter a lot of wine competitions anymore, they used to,” Roberts said. “We’ve done really well. I think it speaks more to the consistency of the wines. Between 2004 and currently, we’ve come up with 20 gold medals, 38 silvers, 34 bronzes, one double gold and basically five best of class awards.”

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Published by the Paso

Roberts has been the only winemaker of Penman Springs Vineyard and its estate wines. They produce 2,500 cases a year of predominately red wines. The McCaslands bought the property on Penman Springs Drive, right off of Union Road in Paso Robles, in 1996 and have planted 35 acres with winegrapes. In 1998, they hired Roberts, who was born and raised on the Central Coast, to be their winemaker. “Carl started replanting but he needed someone to make his wine,” Roberts said. “We got together and the first year [1998] we made four barrels of cabernet and two barrels of merlot. We made it at the old HMR Winery, which was under different ownership at that time. “We fermented here and did all of our cellar work up there and

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Penman Springs Vineyard then later we worked out at Zenaida Cellars for a few years. And then in 2003 or 2004, Paso Robles Wine Services opened up on Commercial Way so we moved all of our barrels there. They moved out by the airport in 2006 and we have been out there ever since.” Roberts produise muscat blanc, a syrah rose, merlot, cabernet sauvignon, syrah, petite sirah, and a meritage of cabernet sauvignon, merlot and petit verdot. “We are sort of under the radar, not flashy at all. I think the wines are well made,” Roberts said. “Carl is real conscientious about the fruit. We don’t like to pick super-ripe, ultra-ripe like some people. The key word for me is balance.” The Penman Springs Vineyard 2009 Cabernet Sauvignon Old Block earned gold at the 2013 Central Coast Wine Competition and the 2009 Petite Sirah earned double gold from the 2011 San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition. Both are still available for purchase at the vineyard. “We don’t overdo it with ripeness. We don’t overdo it with oak, about a third is new oak,” Roberts said. “We have used primarily American oak. But we have had good success flavor-wise with barrels from cooler climate regions like Minnesota.” Roberts likes what he’s seeing and tasting as the 2011 goes into the bottle. 2011 was a year that some winemakers would like to forget due to frost damage and hail in April. “From what I can taste, I think 2011 was just a really cool year that stretched out,” he said. “They are not big on alcohol. The flavor, the concentration — everything is there. I think it is going to be a great year.” Roberts has been making wine professionally on the Central Coast for nearly 20 years, but has been making wine since 1980. The first wine he ever made was dry-farmed Paso Robles zinfandel, which coincidentally was the first wine he made commercially. “A friend of a friend was wanting to get into the wine business so they were starting to shop around for land,” Roberts said. “In the meantime, I located some grapes for them and we made a couple of vintages for them and the first wine I made for sale was also dry farmed Paso Robles zinfandel. It was quite an experience. The wine turned out to be a monster wine. It was about 16.7 percent alcohol which can happen with dry-farmed fruit.” Roberts’, who graduated from Cal Poly with a degree in graphic design, passion for wine and winemaking started as an adult while working for a publishing company in Reno, Nev. “It was one of those things where Reno was a tourist town and they dumped a lot of wine in Reno. So you could get cheap half bottles and try a lot of things. It was right at the start of the California wine boom.” It got to be a pretty serious hobby, Roberts admits. He moved back to San Luis Obispo in 1979 and spent part of his time working at an ad agency and also put some hours in at a local wineshop. “I sold some wine to a guy that looked familiar. I got some chardonnay’s for him,” Roberts said. “He placed his card down and it said ‘Sandy Koufax.’ I just about gagged. That was my best wine selling story.” Koufax played his entire career with the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers from 1955 to 1966 and in 1972 at the age of 36 became the

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youngest player ever elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. From 1961 to 1966, he was arguably the best pitcher in the game, earning three Cy Young awards by unanimous votes when the award was for all of baseball. The left-hander also threw four no-hitters, including the eighth perfect game in MLB history. Later, Roberts joined the fledgling Central Coast Wine Society. “It was kind of the first group on the Central Coast that was investigating not only new wineries around here but we were putting on dinners and having winemakers come in. There were some really fantastic events,” Roberts said. It was through that group that Roberts began making wine at home in 1980. “The experience of making wine the first time was sort of addictive —  the smell of your first fermentation —  and to actually turn those grapes into wine,” Roberts said. “It was one of those epiphany moments.” Around this time, Roberts landed a job at Cal Poly in the media department. The people at his work took an interest in his hobby and a home winemaking partnership developed. “It started out in an old building behind my parents house. It was really fun,” Roberts said. “It was a lot of work sometimes but it was great for all of my friends. We had something to do that we could all get in to.” Roberts, who still does some freelance graphic work, is having fun today and is happy at Penman Springs. “I’m just happy to be making wine,” Roberts said. “Carl and his wife Beth are great people. It’s been just a really nice working relationship over the years. Penman Springs Vineyard and its tasting room is located at 1985 Penman Springs Road. The tasting room is open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. For more information, call 805-237-7959 or visit www.penmansprings.com.

Penman Springs Vineyard 1985 Penman Springs Rd Paso Robles, CA 93446 (805) 237-7959 www.penmansprings.com

Robles Press

19 Fall 2013


Winemakers

Winemaker

Neil Collins Creating Wines That Are a Reflection of Place

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Courtesy of Tablas Creek

Neil Collins was named 2013 Winemaker of the Year for San Luis Obispo County. He is the winemaker for Tablas Creek and is owner/winemaker at Lone Madrone. 20 Fall 2013

Laura Ness VINO

nybody who’s anybody in the wine business knows about Tablas Creek, the iconic vineyard and winery born of a longstanding friendship between Robert Haas, an importer of vines with a love for all things Rhone, and the Perrin family of Château de Beaucastel. This relationship gave birth to one of the most widely recognized and respected vineyards and grapevine sources in the New World, in the beautiful limestone hills of westside Paso Robles. From this iconic vineyard, winemaker Neil Collins has consistently crafted some of the finest wines to come out of Paso Robles. Tablas Creek makes between 15,000 and 18,000 cases now, depending on vintage, and their Esprit de Beaucastel and Cote de Tablas reds and whites, give many their first introduction to what make Rhones so captivating. It’s a testament to his winemaking prowess that he was named 2013 Winemaker of the Year for San Luis Obispo County. Born in Great Britain, Collins was working in the restaurant business when his fancy turned to making wine. In 1991, he worked a harvest at Wild Horse with Ken Volk, on the eastside of Templeton, getting snatched up by Adelaida thereafter, where he spent seven years until Bob Haas discovered him and decided to tap his talent for a new project. First, though, it was off to the south of France to learn the inner workings of the Perrin family at Château de Beaucastel, where Collins was immersed in their philosophy of minimal intervention and organic farming. Says Collins, “They use almost no new wood. We follow a similar policy here at Tablas Creek.” Jacques Perrin, the third generation of Perrins to farm Beaucastel, was a pioneer in his vision of organic farming, and replanting of the estate with traditional Rhône varietals such as syrah, mourvédre, and Roussanne that had been neglected in favor of the easier-to-grow grenache. “When everyone else was going to chemicals and industrial fertilizers, Perrin was practicing organic farming,” notes Collins. “Jacques also believed in replanting with selections from his own stock, rather than buying outside vines. We do the same.” He came back to the limestone hills of Paso inspired to follow the Perrin way, and has slowly been converting the 110-acre organic vineyard property to biodynamic. “We brought in more animals, more fruit, more diversity. The whole thing is a bit bewildering. There’s a lot of faith involved. If it does nothing else, it makes us think differently about things and move in new directions. I can’t say for sure that biodynamic is helping us produce better wines, but we are sure liking the results.” Creating wines that are a reflection of place is his overriding mantra, and the 2005 Esprit de Beaucastel red is an example he points to, along with the 2003 Esprit white. However, he believes the vineyard’s expression of minerality has only grown more prominent in the past few years. His favorite aspect of biodynamic has been planting fruit trees and the introduction of all the animals. “We have a flock of 35 Dorpers sheep, which are a bit larger than Baby Dolls, with a Catadin ram, so we’re producing some interest-

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VINO

Central Coast Edition


Tablas Creek Vineyard

Courtesy of Tablas Creek

Tablas Creek makes between 15,000 and 18,000 cases now, depending on vintage, and their Esprit de Beaucastel and Cote de Tablas reds and whites, give many their first introduction to what make Rhones so captivating.

ing creatures. There are two donkeys to guard the sheep. You wouldn’t want to get on the wrong end of one of them. We have five alpacas, a couple of goats, a flock of chickens, 30 to 40, in a mobile coop, and a couple of pigs for our annual pig roast.” Christmas Day is “freedom day,” where all the animals are let free to roam. The donkeys were the toughest customers, refusing to go back in their pen. To add to the zoo-like excitement, they are planting additional acres of vineyards, installing the remaining Rhone varieties of the classic 13, including the new terra noir, claret and picardin, the latter a white that is similar to picpoul, citrusy and lemony. These will augment Neil’s stable of mourvèdre, grenache noir, syrah, and counoise for reds, and roussanne, viognier, marsanne, and grenache blanc for whites. Collins notes that the Perrins have now come up with four additional Rhone varieties, which will have to sit in quarantine for three years before they can be planted. Meanwhile, he has his hands full with Tablas Creek, his own label, Lone Madrone, where he specializes in everything he doesn’t make at Tablas Creek. The first wine he did was a 2006 Cabernet from York Mountain. Says he, of his 3,000 case winery, which is located near Adelaida, “It’s a runaway freight train of westside blends, mostly from dry-farmed vineyards. I’ve got a dry zin rose called Zin Blanco, and a tannat and cabernet blend, as well as a grenache and petite sirah blend. I love not being restricted to Rhones, but I do love Rhones.” It gives him yet another chance to create wines that truly express their sense of place. “I am making a total of 30 different wines. I’m trying to behave myself,” he says.

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Tablas Creek Vineyard 9339 Adelaida Rd Paso Robles, CA 93446 (805) 237-1231 www.tablascreek.com

Robles Press

21 Fall 2013


FEATURE

Blush Wines

Paso Wineries Gaining Notoriety for Award-winning Blush Wines Light, Elegant, Refreshing Wines Pair Well With Variety of Foods

Meagan Friberg VINO

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ant to see a winemaker blush at his tasting room? Ask him to pour you a sample of his gold medal award-winning rosè wine and that just may be the reaction you’ll get from two Paso Robles winemakers — Kevin Riley of Proulx Winery and Jim Shumate of Pomar Junction Winery. In early May, the two winemakers were awarded gold medals at the First Blush Wine Competition in Napa — Riley was recognized for his 2012 Proulx Grenache Rosé and Shumate for Pomar’s 2012 Syrah Rosè. “It was great to bring home a gold medal from Napa,” said Shumate. “We will definitely go back next year and try to repeat our award-winning performance.” Held at the Meritage Resort, the competition had 89 blush wines being sipped and judged by five wine connoisseurs — sommelier and wine journalist Christopher Sawyer, award-winning restaurateur Michael Dellar, Advanced Certified Sommelier Lamar Engel, wine industry professional Denise Gill, and attorney and winemaker Jeffrey Miller. There were three separate categories — dry, semi-dry and dessert — with Proulx and Pomar Junction taking medals for their dry rosés. A total of four double gold, six gold, 36 silver and 19 bronze medals were awarded and the public was invited to attend a celebratory event on June 8 where all gold medal-winning wines were poured. The Paso Robles American Viticultural Area (AVA) — 26,000 acres of wine grapes spread across 614,000 acres — received a total of 10 awards at First Blush and was named the Top Appelation for dry wineries. What exactly is a blush wine, one might ask. “In broad terms, any wine that is not white and is not red is considered a blush,” said Riley. “I grew up appreciating these types of Rhone varietals and I think they are just really exciting.” Meagan Friberg/VINO Pink is what to look for in regards to color — blush wines range from very light to medium. To ensure that color, a wineProulx winemaker Kevin Riley and his 2012 Proulx Grenache Rose earned a maker takes the clear juice of wine grapes and allows the skins gold medal at a blush wine completion earlier in 2013. of red grapes, or a mixture of red and white, in contact with the 22 Fall 2013

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BLUSH WINES

juice for the desired time. According to Riley, although blush wines — rosé in particular — are popular in the spring and summer, they are quickly gaining notoriety for pairing well with a wide variety of meals during every season. “I like drinking it on Thanksgiving,” he said, “and I keep stock at the winery especially for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. It’s the time of year I appreciate it the most. It’s a great way to freshen your palate; it’s light and refreshing.” Shumate agreed, saying “it is a nice, easy-drinking wine that you can have anytime with or without food.” “In general, it pairs well with light meals or salads — something that will not overpower the flavor of the wine but will help to enhance it,” Shumate said. “Of course, it depends on different peoples’ tastes but I wouldn’t recommend anything too heavy. It is a pretty versatile wine and goes well with a lot of different types of food.” Fermenting the wine all the way to dry, according to Shumate, prevents any residual sugars. “It’s the style that I prefer so that it doesn’t get confused with white zinfandel,” he said. “It is definitely more dry and more of a Rhone-style rosé.” The Proulx rosé is described by Riley as a “very light, elegant, refreshing style” of rosé that is commonly referred to as a Provencal rosé, a term originating out of Provence, France. “About 22-24 percent of the French market is rosé, so blush wines are very popular there,” Riley said. “Here, the blush market was really killed by white zinfandel for awhile and nobody wanted a blush wine. Paso is leading the way with the blush wines – it’s really somewhat of a local phenomena. Another great tasting that took place in Paso earlier this year, “Real Men Drink Pink,” brought attention to blush wines and it was a lot of fun.” As far as receiving gold medals for their wines, the two winemakers take it all in stride. “It’s always nice to get accolades and have the wine be recognized,” Shumate said. “But truly, it is nice to know when people enjoy a certain wine — and they do enjoy rosé, or blush wine — and that’s why I continue to make it.” Although the 2012 Syrah Rosè at Pomar Junction is already sold out, there’s still time to grab a bottle of 2012 Proulx Grenache Rosé, Riley said.

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Photos courtesy of Pomar Junction Winery

From top left: Pomar tasting room, Proulx grapes, Jim Shumate, Pomar picnic area. Pomar Junction was one of several Paso Robles wineries to show well at a blush wine competition earlier this year.

Additional Paso Robles medal winners at the First Blush competition included: Adelaida Cellars, Clayhouse Wines and Robert Hall Winery (all with silver); Broken Earth Winery, Grey Wolf Cellars — Pretty Girl, Hearst Ranch Winery, Minassian-Young Vineyards, and Villa San-Juliette Vineyard and Winery (all with bronze). Proulx Winery Tasting Room 5424 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles (805) 226-2800 Open Thursday-Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays Pomar Junction Winery Tasting Room 5036 S El Pomar Road, Templeton (805) 238-9940 Open daily 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Robles Press

23 Fall 2013


ARCHITECTURE

The Calcareous Vineyard’s tasting room, built by Templeton-based Jackson and Company and designed by Paso Robles-based JK Engineering. The tasting room was constructed in 2008 and has won many fans with its serene sitting areas and breathtaking views of the Salinas Valley.

Photos by Hayley Thomas/VINO

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Calcareous Vineyard Calcareous Vineyard

Come for the Wine, Stay for the View Calcareous Vineyard Offers Breathtaking Wines From an Unforgettable Vista Hayley Thomas VINO

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hose who climb Calcareous Vineyard’s steep, curling driveway are rewarded with more than remarkable wines. At 1,200 feet up, the unique tasting room and outdoor sitting area offer an expansive wine country expanse. Located on Peachy Canyon Road in the Westside hills of Paso Robles, there’s a reason locals and wine tourists come for the wine and stay for the view. “You’re looking over the southern Salinas Valley, back over the cities of Templeton and Atascadero, all the way down to Santa Margarita and the grade,” said Calcareous Vineyard winemaker Jason Joyce. “When you walk into the tasting room, the general vibe is all windows and all wood. It’s very, very open with no central beams. The idea is to emphasize the grandeur of the view by featuring a big, open space.” Glass roller doors make up the tasting room walls, allowing for maximum transparency. Light pours through the windows, creating an ethereal tasting experience. “It’s all about having the tasting space be part of the vineyards; the building doesn’t separate you from the grounds,” said Joyce. “As you taste, you are looking at the hills and seeing the place where the wine comes from. You know you aren’t at a bar — you’re at a winery.” Calcareous Vineyard’s label features estate-grown wines, while their

Twisted Sister label features grapes sourced from local vineyards. Established in 2000, the Calcareous Vineyard estate encompasses 442 acres, beginning one mile to the west of Paso Robles and stretching for several miles toward the Pacific Ocean. Chalky, limestone soils allow Joyce the versatility to grow Bordeaux, Rhône and Burgundy varietals side-by-side. The winery produces a little over 10,000 cases per year. Joyce said the balance between the wine, architecture and landscaping create a lasting impression. “Since the tasting room was built in 2008, the landscape has grown into a beautiful space with the lawn, flowering plants and trees,” he said. “It frames the view, and creates this perfect, peaceful feeling.” An antique truck parked amongst the flourishing California native plants is often used as a photo-op, Joyce added. Music events attract throngs of wine club members and new tasters each summer. “People love to stay, especially as we get into fall sunsets,” said Joyce. “A lot of people come up on the weekends to picnic, and that’s why we now have a kitchen with food available as well as concerts during the summer. [The ambiance] really gives people the excuse to hang out later, and once people discover us, they really like hanging out.” Joyce, who’s worked as Calcareous Vineyard’s winemaker since 2010, said he’s always striving to ensure the wines are as incredible Continued on next page...

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Robles Press

25 Fall 2013


Photos by Hayley Thomas/VINO

Calcareous Vineyard’s wine production building is well-groomed, featuring lush lawns and California native plants.

The Calcareous Vineyard’s wine production facility is flan

Continued from last page...

as the scenery. “I view the tagline, ‘Come for the wines, stay for the view,’ as a personal challenge,” said Joyce. “The view is a driver for me, and I’m competing with nature to create the best wine I can. I want tasters remember the wine and the view equally.” Wine critics agree: Calcareous wines certainly stand on their own. Most recently, the winery’s 2011 Chardonnay took a silver medal from the Houston International Wine Competition and their 2010 Zinfandel earned 92 points from Wine Spectator Magazine.

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Joyce said Calcareous wines are singular in the fact that they tell the story of a specific place. “Calcareous” is a direct description of the vineyard’s soil, and the tasting room adds to a complete celebration of terroir. “To me, architecture and wine are different ways of approaching the same topic, which is expressing the place,” said Joyce. “With the building, you are expressing visually, and with wine you are doing it more sensually. I’m trying to express our soil, our sun and that all effects how our wine turns out. I hope tasters experience that. The air


nked by 18 lush acres of syrah, grenache, mourvèdre, cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, merlot, malbec and chardonnay.

At 1,200 feet up, Calcareous Vineyard’s unique tasting room and outdoor sitting area offer an expansive wine country view.

is unique, the light is unique and the wine is unique to this place.” Wine tasters are encouraged to take part in the experience at the Calcareous Vineyard tasting room. Joyce said that, above all else, he hopes visitors take away a sense of place unique to the area. “It’s about the moment you’re in, sharing wine with friends, and the grounds elevate everything together,” said Joyce. “People fall in love with the wine and the space, and when they are both pushing themselves equally, it makes wine tourism worthwhile. It takes a bit of effort off Peachy Canyon Road to get here, but those who do leave

with a special memory. We have people coming hundreds of miles to experience our wines and we aim to deliver an experience that is worth the trip.” Calcareous Vineyard tasting room is located at 3430 Peachy Canyon Road and open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Private wine tasting and tours are available. Visit www.calcareous.com for more information or call the tasting room at 805-239-0289.

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FEATURE

local politics

Paso Robles AVA Moves Closer to Subdivision If Petition is Granted, 11 Sub-appellations Would Be Created

Brian Williams VINO

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he Paso Robles American Viticulture Area took a huge step toward being subdivided — something many in the local wine industry are fully behind and worked to make happen. The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) in Washington, D.C., opened the public comment period on Sept. 20 for the petition from the Paso Robles wine community to establish 11 subAVAs within the current Paso Robles appellation. Anyone can submit comments for or against the proposal at the TTB website for the next 120 days. The TTB is part of the U.S. Department of the Treasury. TTB designates viticultural areas to allow vintners to better describe the origin of their wines and to allow consumers to better identify wines they may purchase “This is the critical step called a ‘notice of proposed rulemaking’ at which the TTB — tasked, among its many other responsibilities, with protecting the public from misleading or confusing information about wine — has reviewed all the geological, climatological and historical information presented in the petitions and determined that they pass muster,” said Jason Haas, partner and general manager of Tablas Creek Vineyard. Tablas Creek along with many others in the Paso Robles AVA are behind this petition. The Paso Robles AVA Committee consists of 59 different grower and winery members. A winery or grower from each of the 11 proposed AVAs is on the committee. Haas was understandably elated with the recent development and optimistic of it receiving final approval. “I’m hopeful that with all the hard science that went into the petitions, and the broad cross-section of the Paso Robles wine community that was involved in their submission, approval will be relatively straightforward,” Haas said. Nearly seven years ago, the proposal, which is contains 11 separate petitions — one for each of the proposed AVAs — was submitted as one package to the TTB from the committee. Tablas Creek, Steve Lohr, chairman and CEO of J.Lohr Vineyards and Wines, Doug Kruse of Jack Creek Cellars, Justin Baldwin, founder of JUSTIN Vineyards and Winery, Kevin Kester of Parkfield, and the 28 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

late Dennis Collins, general manager of Treana Winery, were all instrumental in pushing this forward. “Normally they are done one or two at a time,” said Lohr. “But what you can often have then are little border skirmishes or confusing overlapping appellations. Doing it all at once, in what I call a holistic approach, to the entire appellation made sense to the entire committee.” The Paso Robles AVA was established in 1983 and encompasses approximately 614,000 acres, making it the largest unsubdivded AVA within the state. Under the proposal, 11 new viticultural areas would be named: Adelaida District, Creston District, El Pomar District, Paso Robles Estrella District, Paso Robles Geneseo District, Paso Robles Highlands District, Paso Robles Willow Creek District, San Juan Creek, San Miguel District, Santa Margarita Ranch and Templeton Gap District. The Napa Valley AVA is roughly a third the size of Paso Robles and it has 16 subdivisions. Over the past 30 years, the Paso Robles AVA has ballooned from five bonded wineries and less than 5,000 planted acres of wine grapes to 280 wineries and 32,000 acres of vineyards spread over roughly 42 miles east to west and 32 miles north to south. Rainfall in Paso Robles appellation varies from 30 inches a year on the westside to less than 10 inches on the east. Elevations go from 700 feet above the sea to more than 2,400. Soils too differ drastically across Paso Robles AVA, from the calcareous hills on the west to sand, loam and alluvial soils in the Estrella River basin. All of this was taken into account and used to delineate the districts by the petitioners. It also did not go unnoticed by the TTB. “In addition to the longhand descriptions of each region’s soils, climate and topography, the TTB included side-by-side comparative charts — unique, in my experience of AVA approvals — that detailed why each new AVA was worthy of being distinguished from its neighbors,” Haas said. “I can’t imagine anyone reading these petitions and concluding that there wasn’t grounds for subdivision.” But what does approval mean for the consumer? Wineries would then be allowed to put on the label the district in which the grapes were grown — if at least 85 percent of the fruit used in the wine is from that particular appellation.

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Paso Robles AVA

Even if the petition is granted, wineries would not be required to list the district on the label. “That is part of the beauty of it. You can choose not to use it, but if you want to further define the wine you can,” Lohr said. Currently, labels are only required to indicate Paso Robles and they would still have to do this regardless of the outcome of the petition. “Not all the (proposed) AVAs have a critical mass of established wineries, and it seems likely that a handful of the new AVAs will receive market recognition first, while the reputation of others will take time to build,” Haas said. “But I believe that it will be several of the currently less-developed areas that will benefit most in the long term, through the ability to identify successful winemaking models

and build an identity of their own.” A 2008 attempt, not put forth by the Paso Robles AVA Committee, to divide the Paso Robles appellation into an east and west AVA did not succeed. Lohr is hopeful that what is currently before the TTB will be . “It should happen — yeah, yeah,” Lohr said. “It was throughly vetted for quite some time by everyone on our committee. It’s taken a while, but I think the end product will be worth all of the patience everyone has shown.” To comment visit TTB online at http://www.ttb.gov/news/ ttb-proposes-11-new-viticultural-areas.shtml.

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Robles Press

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29 Fall 2013


Red Claw

FEATURE

home winemaker

Red Claw Founding Members Pass Along Passion to Next Generation Brian Williams VINO ome winemaking brought

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three Atascadero friends together. Twenty-five years later, a new group of friends has been added to the mix, ensuring that the Red Claw label will live on for possibly another 25 years. Griggor Jones, Gary Schonfeldt and Ray Bacon originally started Red Claw. “I got them together because they were looking to do something different and it just expanded from there,” said Jones, who was a private attorney for years and is now president of the Atascadero Chamber of Commerce. “We are all good friends.” Initially, the founding trio made the wine out of Griggor’s garage. Over the years, the operation moved from the garage to a lamb barn and a nearby storage shed. Recent additions include a covered patio and barbecue area that was once a chicken coop and modest estate vineyard. “We’ll be able to get our first harvest from it this year,” Griggor said. The new blood includes Cory Black, Caleb Davis, Ryan Ambros and Jim Lewis. All have helped the original crew over the years. “We were just there at the right time,” said Lewis, who is the city manager of Pismo Beach. “There was a year the guys

had to travel, there was a knee transplant and back-something or other and I was here cleaning up after them and just begging to get involved, and there was nobody to help one harvest and they said ‘your number is up partner you want to learn how to make wine?’ That was in 2008 or 2009.” Of course, they jumped at the chance and eventually became partners. “That wine actually turned out pretty decent and I think these guys enjoyed not having to work so hard,” Lewis said. Although everyone contributes to the final product, Lewis is the lead winemaker. “It’s a great hobby, a great passion,” Lewis said. “It really is a way of life. I wasn’t an athlete and I wasn’t artistic. But to me this is a personal form of expression. It really is cool.” Red Claw produces about 125 cases per year of merlot, primitive, syrah and petit syrah. The group’s 2010 merlot blend earned a platinum medal from the judges at the 2013 Central Coast Wine Competition. Three other Red Claw entries were awarded silver medals. The group has deep roots in the winemaking industry and this allows them to get good fruit and sage advice from area vineyards and wineries. Past coaches include Mike Sinor of Ancient Peaks Winery, Daniel Daou of Daou Vineyards and Winery and Aram Deirmenjian of Kiamie Wine Cellars. Doug Filiponi, who oversees the Shandon

vineyard for Ancient Peaks, and John Radike of Radike Vineyard, has provided the group with access to incredible fruit over the years, Jones said. “It all starts with good fruit,” Jones said. “We just try to let the fruit speak through the wine.” Currently, they are able to do everything from start to finish on the premises. They produce merlot, primitivo, syrah and petit syrah. The group plans to experiment with white wine this year after purchasing the proper fermenting tanks. “Each year, we focus on something new,” Lewis said. “So when we got it going again four years ago, we started working through the cleanliness, the strains of yeast, improved fermentation, then nutrients for the yeast, and last year, we really experimented with the sugars and acidity and when the fruit was picked itself. We actually went out and picked the grapes ourselves.” Every step of the process is geared toward keeping everyone involved as much as they possibly can. The patio and barbecue area were put in so that the entire family could be together during the process and enjoy the fruits of their labor. “It’s a real special operation,” Lewis said. “The best of what wine is — food, friends and family.”

Photos courtesy of Red Claw

A majority of the Red Claw group stand with their coach Mike Sinor, third from right, of Ancient Peaks. From left to right from Red Claw are Caleb Davis, Cory Black, Ryan Ambrose, Griggor Jones, Jim Lewis and Gary Schonfeldt. 30 Fall 2013

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Michael Gill Cellars TASTING ROOM

Michael Gill Cellars Where the Wild Things Are Danny Foster VINO

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estled deep within the rolling hills west of Paso Robles sits a tasting room that is ferociously unique as it pays homage to the owner’s heritage and enjoyment of the hunt. Michael Gill Cellars is part French hunting lodge and part winery. “The French lineage runs deep on both sides of my family as well as Shelley’s,” Michael Gill said. “We also wanted to pay homage to the land that brought us the great movement of the grape wineries.” Founding vintner Michael Gill and his wife, Shelley, wanted to bring something exclusive to the Paso Robles wine scene, as if to emblazon their name on the wine map,

with their own indelible mark. Gill had a good feeling that Paso Robles wine scene would develop into the next Napa Valley. He purchased the acreage, 15 of which is planted to grapes, in 1977 and slowly started cultivating, resulting in selling his grape yield yearly. After many years of being a grower, Gill felt it was time to take his business to the next level and start making and showcasing his wines. Michael Gill Cellars tasting room came about a little over year ago; it’s wrapped in French architecture and cobblestone, displaying a view showcasing how breathtaking the Central Coast can be. French elements such as the Eiffel Tower and the Fleur-de-lis are peppered throughout the tasting room on Peachy Canyon Road. Continued on next page...

Danny Foster/VINO

Michael Gill and his wife Shelley are always on hand to answer questions at Michael Gill Cellars.

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35 Fall 2013


Continued from last page...

Visitors are greeted with a playful sign — advising people to not feed the animals — that comes into focus once inside and surrounded by Gill’s trophies. The attention to detail is evident throughout the Westside tasting room. The main doorway and several other door handles feature brass casts of antlers from antelope. Just past the doors are trophies entailing a lifetime of adventures scanning every continent, except for South America. One of many personal touches to the tasting room is the superlative mix of elegant French imagery combined with an impressive array of game trophy animals — from elk to wolves. The centerpiece of the room is a 10-foot tall polar bear hunched over a wolf. As expected, the bear has become quite the celebrity with patrons and is easily the most photographed Polar bear in Paso Robles. “We were on an eight-day hunting expedition in the Arctic,” Gill said. “I was with four others, a guide and three scouts. Holman was where I killed the Polar bear and I used a 375 H and H rifle.” What component could match the décor and scenery outside? The answer is resounding, award-winning wine. Michael Gill Cellars offers a bevy of wines, including syrah, viognier and tempranillo; a couple of those varietals are available in different vintages, totaling seven wines to tantalize the taste buds of wine patrons. The star for Gill Cellars is the syrah that is available in two member’s-only labels — Black Cellars and Tuxedo Cellars. The aforementioned labels are truly extraordinary wines that are birthed from lower yield blocks and encase a more exotic finish in the product.

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Locally cultured cheeses, crackers and chocolates are available to tasters as a compliment to the wine. If you feel like a change of scenery, Michael Gill Cellars also offers a beautiful patio with laced cobblestone. The patio’s view showcases the true essence of the wine industries growth over the years. Vineyards as far as the eye can see in multiple directions and hilltops graced with historic oak trees that are only matched in age by their natural charm. Gaming trophies aren’t the only awards the Westside tasting room holds. Four wines were entered into the Central Coast Wine Competition and all four garnered medals. Two wines were entered and both placed at the International Women’s Wine Competition. The wines placing were syrah, viognier and tempranillo. “It makes for a great 1-2 punch, pairing the visuals of the hunting trophies with the high-quality wines,” Michael Gill said. A final addition to the décor is the Gill family. The Gill’s take pride in; manning the tasting room, sharing stories, laughs and the wine. Michael and Shelley take great pride in being able to share their knowledge with the patrons and answer every question fully. “There are questions asked only we could answer, no one could substitute for us and have the answers we have,” Gill said. The Gills have been known to entertain and house events at the Westside tasting room, ranging from pick-up parties to barbecues. Plans for further events are under way but not solidified as of yet. Michael Gill Cellars tasting room is open Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment by calling 805-239-1668. It’s located at 4125 Peachy Canyon Road.


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148 N. Ocean Ave., Cayucos


to Monterey, San Jose San Francisco

San Miguel

Lake Nacimiento

Vista Vista Del Rey Del Rey

Rd

ill Ln

d ock R ney R

Carina Cellars

Chim

Le Cuvier Hi

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Halter Ranch

eya rd

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Linne Rd

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Can

Arbor

101

Summerwood Booker Zenaida

Rd

Rotta

Rd gs rin

Veris Cellars

Twin Cities Hospital

Sp Ne

al

101

CrossLynn Estate

Venteux Las Tab las Rd

Aron Hill Vineyards

Donati Family Vineyard

15 debrees degrees C Wine Shop Shio Wine & & Bar Bar

Clavo Cellars

Turley

Vineyard Dr

ton

ple Rd

Wine Country Olives

Victor Hugo mar

El Po

Dr

Templeton

Trader Joes

m Te

Cayucos

Castoro Cellars

r Dr

Booker

Peachy Canyon

thel Rd

Zin Alley Cypher Cypher

Edward Sellers

46W

Kenneth KennethVolk/ Volk Lone Madrone

Paso Port

d

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Rd

Cayucos Cellars

Rd

Eagle on Castle

rs

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El P

las

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Harmony Cellars

Jac

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N Main St

Townsh ip Rd

ab sT

La

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Stephen’s Cellar Jack Creek Cellars

York Mtn

Red Hunt Shale Soles Cellars Oak

Oakdale Croad Linne Calodo

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Brian Dark Benson Dark Star Star Grey Wolf Sextant Niner

Rossi

Rd

Berardo Winery

sto

Rd

Niderer

Midnight

Donatoni

Cre

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Rd

Pipestone

Caliza

Rd

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Creek

Donatoni

Dunning

Changala/ Changala Kaleidos

eya

Epoch Epoch Estates Estates Wine

Live Oak

Hope Family

FS Cellars

Windward

Bethel Rd

Willow

L’Aventure

Westberg Vin

Rocky Creek Cellars

Sherwood Rd

Terry Hoage

Dover Canyon

1

d

Creston Rd

Dr

r

ard D

Viney

Hearthstone

Barney Schwar Park

nR

Niblick Rd

Kiler Ridge Olive Farms

Zin Alley

sto

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Fratelli Perata

Per Cazo Cellars

Rio Se

Stacked Stone

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Proulx Denner

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Villa Creek Cellars

Jada

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Unio

nyon Calcareous Rd

Chateau Margene/ Roxo Port Opolo Opolo

Cambria

Brochelle Vineyards

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Minassian-Young

Norman Vineyards

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Peac

Hug Cellars

Barrel 27

Paso Robles

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Twilight Cellars/ Cellars Thunderbolt

Nadeau Family Vintners

Poalillo Vineyards

Hammer Sky

Black Hand Cellars ria mb Ca

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Pasolivo

Thacher Whalebone

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Rangeland

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Tablas Creek Vineyard Moonstone Cellars

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Villicana/ Alta Colina Mt.Carina Olive Cellars Organic Farm

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San Antonio

Spring St

Tolo Tolo/ Kiamie

JUSTIN

Le Vigne Winery

Vines on the Marycrest

Adelaida

Wild Coyote

Carmody McKnight

Adobe

Bella Luna

Lupin

Dubost

Chronic Cellars Creek Mustard

Rd

Vine H

Pa A

Wellsona Rd

Airport Rd

Le Cuvier

s Rd San Marco Wellson a

J Lohr

Via Vega

RN Estate

San Marcos Creek

Rd

Roc

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ney

Chim

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Starr Ranch

Nac

Kukkula

Hearst Ranch Winery

Mondo Cellars

d kR

River star RiverStar Estrella Rd

River

San Simeon

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Rabbit Ridge

Caparone

101

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Drake

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Pretty-Smith

Mojo Cellars

Hearst Hearst Castle Castle n Sa

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Cross Ca

Locatelli

Hollyh

Piedras Blancas Lighthouse

Wild Wild Horse horse

Olea Farms Laraneta

on Rd

Templet


Ranchita Canyon Villa San Juliette

15TH STREET

Jardine Rd

Tower Rd

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aso Robles Airport

Derby Wine Estates

Dry Creek Rd

Eberle

46E

9TH STREET

Rockin’ R Winery

Bianchi

Vina Robert Robles Hall

Mill Rd Robert Hall Mitchella

10TH STREET

Tobin James

Branch

Broken Earth Derby Wine Winery Estates

eco

Anglim

8TH STREET

D’Anbino Cellars

7TH STREET

Steinbeck Paso Port

Barr Estate

Downtown

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ion

13TH ST

Grizzly Republic Paso Wine Pithy Little Wine Co. Asuncion Centre Frolicking Frog Ridge Ridge Herman 12TH STREET Story Wines Parrish Parrish Family Family CITY PARK Vineyard Vineyard

to I-5

Cellar 360

101

Paso Robles Street

Es

Bodegas

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14TH

Pianetta Pianetta Winery Winery Clayhouse Wines

RIVERSIDE AVENUE

Paso Robles Airport

We Olive

RAILROAD

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Rd trella

ThomasRobles Arroyo Hill Organics

Cinquain

PINE STREET

Hog C

PARK ST

Rd anyon Inde pend

J&J Cellars

SPRING STREET

Graveyard Vineyards

Ranchita Canyon

d ant R

Silver Horse Tassajara

We Olive

OAK STREET

Pleas

Tackitt Family n Rd Dolle Von

PARK STREET

n ns

Rd

Maloy O’Neill

Pear Valley

rtz Falcon Nest BranchRd Geneseo

Penman Springs Rd

Penman Springs

Shandon

Gelfand Vineyards

Tarrica Wine Cellars Clark Rd

ch

Pl

Clautiere Vineyard

Paso Robles

Camp 8

es

se

rR

an

Linne Rd Dr

Nichols

Sculpterra

41E

B&E Vineyards

Stanger

Cass Winery Cass

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nM

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Still Waters

Rd

Tarrica Wine Cellars

41E

Atascadero Santa Margarita

41W

41E

Sa

Neal Springs Rd

101

Barrel Room Haven Wine Haven Wine Bistro Bistro

ino R

Old Grove

High Ridge Rd

to Morro Bay

El Cam

Alta Cresta

to Creston

August Ridge

ay ic W

ff Tra

El

Charles Paddock Zoo Frolicking Frog

Ca

min

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Cripple Cre

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Ancient Pozo Ancient Pozo Peaks Peaks Valley Valley

Loma Linda

B&E Vineyard

d anch R Bella R

SE l Po Redondo Ln

Camp 8

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ma

Sarzotti

Pomar Junction

Ln ak nO AmByth Estate

Hidden Oak

August Ridge

Hansen Vineyard & Winery

Almond Drive

SE

l Po mar

Dr

Carriage Vineyards Homestead

to Atascadero

41E

to San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara Stanger

Olivas de Oro Olive Company

Creston Creston

La

Pa

nza

Chateau Margene

Rd

Shadow Run Vineyard

Winery

Olive Oil Tasting

This map is representational and not to scale


Kiamie Wine Cellars

Mention this ad and receive complimentary tastings! We are located on the beautiful Westside of Paso Robles at 9750 Adelaida Road. 805-226-8333 • www.kiamiewines.com


FEATURE

Photos courtesy of First Crush

HARVESTING

Get Hands-On With First Crush For an Anything-But-Typical Wine Experience, Paso Robles Is the Place To Be Meagan Friberg VINO

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or an up-close and in-depth look at what it takes to be a winemaker, from harvesting grapes to bottling wine, the First Crush Wine Experience offers visitors to the Paso Robles wine region a unique opportunity like no other. The experts at First Crush not only guide and educate participants along the way; they also offer a hands-on harvest and crush experience. “We are the only ones around who offer anything like this,” First Crush Cellars co-owner Becky Zelinski said. “This is the ultimate wine experience - we exceed people’s expectations.” The idea for the tour business was born serendipitously in 2007, Zelinski said, when her husband, Lowell, a viticulturist and winery manager, decided he wanted to try his hand at winemaking. “We were doing it just for kicks,” she said. As a former photojournalist, Zelinski filmed the entire process so the couple could share their experience with friends and family. “I can’t tell you how many people wrote to us and said ‘I’ve always wanted to do that,’ and so we started thinking about it,” Zelinski

44 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

said. In 2008, they gathered friends, family and colleagues together to raving reviews and, in 2009, kicked off their inaugural First Crush season. Now entering their fifth year in business, the Zelinskis offer wine classes, blending seminars and tours. And there’s plenty of fun to be had during each workshop and tour. “Besides being educational, what we do is a lot of fun,” Zelinski said. “We work with a lot of different wineries, so it’s not just a First Crush experience; it’s a Paso Robles experience. Our original philosophy was to allow people to have a well-rounded experience, go out to different wineries and vineyards and meet the winemakers.” With the harvest season currently in full swing for most local wineries, the folks at First Crush are offering two Harvest Crush Encounters this fall. The Crush Encounter I, on Oct. 4-5 was a two-day event with guests touring local vineyards and wineries to pick, crush, sip and stomp to their heart’s desire. Guests enjoyed a welcome reception with wine and cheese pairing Friday night and the Harvest Crush Encounter on Saturday. Wine country cuisine, live music, transportation, snacks, beverages and a bottle of custom-made wine, custom label included,

Robles Press

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Central Coast Edition


First Crush

People take part in the harvesting of grapes during the First Crush People sort grapes by hand as part of the First Crush Wine Experience. Wine Experience.

Participants of the First Crush Wine Experi- People de-stem grapes by hand as part of the ence enjoy stomping grapes. First Crush Wine Experience.

Final Toast

were included. Want to extend the fun? Crush Encounter II is a complete wine country weekend getaway of fun. This package was offered Oct. 4-6 and, in addition to the experiences in Encounter I, included a winemaker dinner on Saturday night and Sunday Brunch, Blend & Bottle and three bottles of premium local wine. “Both encounters offer a grape stomp and that’s always a lot of fun,” Zelinski said. “In everything that I do with this business, I like to add special touches, that special ‘oh wow’ factor.” Not interested in the “learn by doing” aspect of a Crush Encounter? Try a luxury tasting tour instead. Harvest Tour de Vin, in late-September, is a two-day, exclusive behind-the-scenes luxury vineyard and

winery tour that gives participants an opportunity to taste wines to see how wine is made. “The participants will learn about wine, food pairings, wine and cheese pairings — everything we do is much more than a tour,” Zelinski said. “We are teaching people and letting them experience something different at every winery location. The winemaker or the grower at each winery will be leading the tour and not everyone can offer that type of experience.” Discounted accommodations in Paso Robles are available and private Crush Encounters are available for businesses, teams, or groups of ten or more. For more information, call 805-434-2772 or visit www.firstcrushwinemaking.com.

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Robles Press

Published by the Paso

45 Fall 2013


food & Wine

46 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

Robles Press

VINO

Central Coast Edition


La Cosecha Bar + Restaurant

FINE DINING

Chef Santos Creates Latin Bounty at La Cosecha Bar + Restaurant There’s No Doubt About It: Chef Santos MacDonal Has Made His Mother Proud

I

Hayley Thomas VINO

l Cortile — the Italian restaurant he opened with wife and co-restaurateur Carole MacDonal in 2009 — enjoys a loyal following that continues to grow. The chef could have stopped with one successful Paso Robles restaurant, but a desire to share the timetested Honduran recipes of his childhood led to the opening of La Cosecha Bar + Restaurant. The eatery opened in June 2013, bringing a dose of bold, Latin flavor to the downtown culinary scene. With luxurious patio seating overlooking Paso Robles Downtown City Park, a lively, well-stocked bar and eye-catching creative touches (check out the locally-blown glass light sconces), the ambiance is high end, yet relaxed. The menu, which features a rainbow of craft cocktails, extensive wine list and seasonal, Latin-inspired small plates,

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Published by the Paso

entrees and desserts, reflect not only Santos’ passion for cooking, but his unique culinary history. Sitting across from Chef Santos at La Cosecha’s European-style community table, it’s easy to get swept up in his charm. Donning a worn, Texas Longhorns ball cap and a bright smile, his eyes light up when asked about the inspiration behind the new culinary venture. “This menu is a lot like how I cook at home, and many recipes are [inspired] by my mother,” said Santos. “The food she made was simple, and the memories are good.” Santos’ modern twist on Honduran, Spanish and South American recipes are made with fresh, locally-sourced ingredients as well as hard-to-find, authentic spices culled from Los Angeles farmer’s markets. Continued on next page...

Robles Press

47 Fall 2013


food & Wine Continued from last page...

Chef Santos MacDonal

“My cooking philosophy is fresh, simple and flavorful — that’s my thing,” said Santos. “On Mondays, I go to the Los Osos farmer’s market and Tuesdays I do Paso Robles and Saturdays I go to Templeton. They have ingredients and it’s important to support the local people.” However, the term “simple” does not mean less flavor. Not by a long shot. Pastelitos Catracho (“Catracho” is actually a nickname for Hondurans) have been a huge hit as of late. The satisfying empanadas are stuffed with seasoned beef, potato and native Honduran spices. “We make the corn dough every morning, and we top it off with a bit of queso fresco and a little sauce,” said Santos. “People say, ‘Wow, what is this?’ They absolutely love it.” With entrees like pear-honey glazed pork chops marinated in Spanish spices, or braised lamb short ribs in red wine sauce over white polenta and mint pesto, the flavor profiles are culturally-specific, yet imaginative. “I create my food with a lot of passion and I put everything into my food. The most important thing, to me, is that the customer leaves happy,” said Santos. “To do that, I work hard in the kitchen and put my whole experience into each dish.” That experience is vast: Santos has worked in some of Southern California’s finest restaurants, including Locando de Lago, Koi, La Sosta and more. Like many successful chefs, Santos worked his way up from the bottom rung of the ladder. His career began in 1995 at Il Ristorante di Giorgio Baldi, a Malibu culinary institution beloved by movie stars like Tom Cruise and Steven Spielberg. “I worked as a dishwasher for three years at Il Ristorante di Giorgio Baldi,” said Santos. “I was sort of a half dishwasher, half cook. I really helped out in the kitchen. In 1998, they said ‘Hey, do you want to cook?’ So, I jumped in the kitchen and did everything I was supposed to do.” After years of working in L.A. area kitchens, Santos got what he called his “big break.” “Someone went to a restaurant that I used to work at and tried the food,” said Santos. “He gave me a card and said he wanted to talk to me about a position. A week or two later, he told me of his plans to build a huge restaurant in Hollywood; a 4 million dollar restaurant.” Santos served as executive chef at that Hayley Thomas/VINO

La Cosecha Bar + Restaurant Executive Chef Santos MacDonal combines passion, simplicity and authentic ingredients to create unforgettable Latin-inspired dishes. 48


La Cosecha Bar + Restaurant

Chef Santos MacDonal’s Pastelitos Catracho, Honduran style empanadas filled with seasoned beef, potato and native Honduran spices.

restaurant, Bridge, for two years, feeding up to 500 people per day. He also served as executive chef at L’Angolo Café in downtown Los Angeles. “I took the chance because I had the confidence in myself,” the chef said of that exciting and eye-opening time in his career. In 2004, Santos met his wife, Carole. At the time, he was working at Via Veneto in Venice Beach, and she frequented the restaurant. “The owner introduced us and it went from there,” said Santos with a grin. Carole has certainly lent her front-of-house skills to Il Cortile and La Cosecha. You can often find the smiling blonde mingling with customers at both restaurants. “She is part of the team and she is always sharing ideas with me,” said Santos. The chef said his ultimate goal is simple and sincere. He’s seen success at Il Cortile, and now he aims to share the bounty at La Cosecha — Spanish for the word “Harvest”— with Paso Robles. “When people take a bite of food and say, ‘Wow,’ that is the moment,” said Santos. “I work every day for that moment.” La Cosecha Bar + Restaurant is located at 835 12th Street in Paso Robles. For more information, visit www.lacosechabr.com.

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Photos courtesy of La Cosecha

With hand-crafted drinks like fresh, watermelon and thyme cocktails and an extensive wine and beer list, La Cosecha offers a truly colorful restaurant and bar experience.

Published by the Paso

Robles Press

49 Fall 2013


food & Wine

Photos Courtesy of the Shaffers

Fandango Olive Oil Medals and Accolades for Organic Producers from Paso

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Natasha Dalton VINO

hen Jerry Shaffer, a ‘city boy’ who worked at the Port of Long Beach, was thinking of his retirement, he envisioned lazy days and cool starry nights with a glass of wine from his own picturesque vineyard. He always loved gardening, and felt that his hobby had a potential to turn into an exciting business opportunity. But when Jerry and his wife Carolyn began researching the subject of winemaking, the idea lost its allure. “It’s not that we didn’t want to put energy into it,” Mr. Shaffer explained. “But we wanted to work and have a good time at the same time, rather than work because we had to.” That’s why, when their Paso Robles’ friends assured the Shaffers that they worked ‘only half as much’ as the winemakers next-door, the couple knew that they found their calling. A big advantage in growing olive trees is the fact that they use significantly less water than vineyards, and they’re easier to maintain—an attractive feature for new farmers.

50 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

In hopes of making their oils the best they could be, the Shaffers spent a lot of time at UC Davis learning the intricacies of the whole process. Their orchard is sustainable and organically certified, and the attention to detail is such that everything, from watering techniques to pest control, is done with the idea of health benefits in mind. After hearing from judges and millers that they could tell the difference between the mechanically-harvested and handpicked olives, the Shaffers switched to hand-picking their fruit. It’s more expensive and time-consuming, but it’s worth the effort. “I saw at an Open House in Fresno a big producer bringing in a large batch, harvested the night before,” Mr. Shaffer said. You couldn’t recognize the fruit: bruised by machines, it was all black and blue.” Still, the mill ran it through. And that’s the picture to keep in mind: when the fruit is damaged during harvesting, the fermentation, which causes olive oil’s flaws, begins, and you don’t get the freshness the small producers like Fandango, are proud of. In oil production, it’s the small farms that set the quality standards. The Shaffers keep their trees short, and mill the fruit within an hour

Robles Press

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Central Coast Edition


Fandango Olive Oil or two of picking. “We bring the mill to the property and process small batches all day long, for as many days as we need. What gets on the ground, stays on the ground: we’re very protective about our fruit and want to keep it free of grit and dirt,” Mrs. Shaffer said. Fandango oil is stored in a climate-controlled environment, in stainless steel tanks with floating lids, which protect oil from exposure to light or oxygen. To ensure maximum freshness, it’s only bottled to order. For the same reason, it comes in Italian lead-free port bottles made of very thick dark glass. “Freshness is everything,” Mr. Shaffer said. The couple planted its first 1850 Arbequina trees in 2007, and in 2009, it harvested its first crop. “We only had ¾ of a ton of olives, but we were so excited,” Mrs. Shaffer said. And for good reason: their first-crop oil won a medal at the prestigious Los Angeles County Fair Competition. Since then, the Shaffers have been getting increasingly more oil—and more medals, with 15 tons of oil and 18 medals to show for it just this year alone. The most important victories came from Yolo, the second largest competition in Calif. (where Gold medals were accompanied by the Best in Class and Best of Show titles), and from Napa (where Fandango brand also received Gold medals and the Best in Class award). At the Mid-State Fair all 3 Fandango oils earned Gold, accompanied by yet another Best in Class designation, as well. With this golden shower, Silver at the Los Angeles International Competition at first felt like a letdown—until the Shaffers realized that not a single Arbequina producer from California was awarded Gold. The judges for this competition come from all over the world, and sometimes Europeans, less familiar with American oils, have “different preferences.” Considering all this, Silver at a competition, which gets 500-600 entries annually, looks very respectful, placing Fandango in the leadership position on the national market. “You know, it’s pretty astonishing how strong Paso Robles olive oil has become,” Mr. Shaffer said. “A few years ago, nobody even heard of Paso. All California had, was big producers and the old-time growers up North. Now we’re coming on like gangbusters. Our microclimate and soil conditions are not only great for wine, they’re fantastic for olives.” To learn about Fandango’s Elelgante, Fiesta and Valiente, visit www.FandangoOliveOil.com

Photo by Fred Burgess

Carolyn and Jerry Shaffer with some of the medals they won for their olive oils.

Fandango’s award-winning oils Fiesta, Ellegante and Valiente.

Carolyn Shaffer is expecting a good crop.

Jerry Shaffer inspects his orchard daily.

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Published by the Paso

Robles Press

51 Fall 2013


food & Wine Di Raimondo’s Cheese Shop in Paso Robles Adds a New Dimension to Wine Tasting Tours Natasha Dalton VINO

L

Di Raimondo’s owner Jean Higgins is quick to smile and answer questions.

ike most Paso residents, Jean Higgins, the owner of Di Raimondo’s, loves the unspoiled beauty of this area. In 1989, escaping “the smoggy and dry San Fernando Valley,” she bought a house in Atascadero, and in 2002 relocated to Paso to open (with partner John Cardinale) Di Raimondo’s Italian Market. The concept of a small specialty store was inspired by the childhood memories of the Higgins’ family trip to Europe. They visited 5 countries in 5 weeks, and for Higgins, it was ‘a life-changing experience.’ She was mesmerized by the sight of old buildings, and by people walking on the streets late at night, eating outdoors, laughing. “Sausages hanging overhead and breads sitting around in big baskets” in small markets looked very enticing. “We’d order things for a picnic, and they’d slice everything fresh for us, and it was so appetizing,” Higgins said. When she decided to open her own business, she modeled it after those little markets she fell in love with in Europe. Originally, Di Raimondo’s positioned itself as an Italian marketplace. But right from the start, people began calling it a ‘cheese shop’, and ask for fancier varieties of cheese, such as Brie and Stilton. “In those days, people only stopped in Paso to fill up their cars on their way to the lakes, or to get something to eat,” Higgins said. A store displaying whole wheels of Parmesan and large blocks of Provolone was a real novelty. “That we’d cut the cheese in front of our

Brett Dalton/VINO

Brett Dalton/VINO

Italian Cheese Locatelli.

Blue Cheese Saint Agur.

Brett Dalton/VINO

52 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

Robles Press

VINO

Central Coast Edition


Di Raimondo’s Cheese Shop customers and give out samples was unique,” Higgins added. The word spread quickly. As locals began to learn about various cheeses, so did the shop proprietors. Higgins admits not knowing much about cheese, when she just started. The Sausage Company from Lompoc, Di Raimondo’s distributor, was very helpful. But ultimately, it’s the customers’ suggestions that ended up defining the inventory. ““People told us what they wanted, and we listened,” Higgins said. That’s how Italian Market turned into Cheese Shop that carries some Italian products. When wineries began to attract more visitors from out of the area, the store’s base expanded, adding a new category of the ‘regulars’ who stop by during their wine tasting trips. “Now that Paso’s become a destination, people come here to stay,” Higgins said. “So I’ve got a lot of regulars who return every 3 months, or every 6 months, or every fair season.” Higgins, currently the sole owner of the business, appreciates the customers’ loyalty that keeps her busier than ever. “I’ve been really lucky: people like the store, and they keep coming back,” she said. “We have a good reputation because we try to be helpful and make the shopping experience fun.” “Do people know their cheeses?” I ask. “Many regulars do,” Higgins said. It must be satisfying to be able to tell a discerning customer that, yes; the store does have their favorite cheeses. But there’s also satisfaction in introducing people to a product they’ve never tried before. “We here are very approachable,” Higgins said. “When people say, ‘I have a really dumb question,’ I want them to know that there’re no dumb questions.” After all, she’s been there, too: There was a time when Higgins didn’t know much about more exotic things— washed rind cheese, for example. Today, not only can she tell you about them, she’ll sell you on them, as well. “We do plenty of guiding people to the cheeses they like,” Higgins said, carving off a thin slice of aged Cheddar for a customer to try, and smiling at his enthusiastic nod of approval. “It’s important for me that people don’t feel intimidated to ask questions.” As with everything else, our taste and appreciation of food has an unlimited capacity for growth. A taste of quality espresso can give you another perspective on the cup of instant coffee you enjoyed at grandma’s. The same is true with cheese. There will always be those, who don’t mind ‘A Cheese Squeeze’ from a tube, or pre-prepackaged slices of ‘American’ from a supermarket chain. But those who know the taste of the cheese freshly cut from the wheel tend to seek a product that hasn’t sat in plastic for weeks. Fortunately for people like that, there is Di Raimondo’s. Some of the best dishes are really simple. You just have to make sure to use the best ingredients possible. So next time you get a craving for Carbonara or Quiche, you know where to look for Prosciutto and Parmesan for them. Di Raimondo’s is located at 822 13th St., and is open Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. On Fridays and Saturdays it sells its signature sea-salt baguettes. If you have questions, call (805)238-1268.

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Published by the Paso

Sasha Dalton/VINO

Robles Press

53 Fall 2013


FEATURE

Garagiste Festival

Celebrating the ‘garagiste’ spirit for a third year Main features 49 wineries, 125 wines at Windfall Farms in Paso Robles Saturday, Nov. 9

Hayley Thomas VINO

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he Third Annual Garagiste Festival is inviting wine aficionados to think small — small production that is. The celebration of boutique wineries — producing no more than 1,200 cases per year — is back with an ever-growing emphasis on quality over quantity. The four-day event benefits the Cal Poly Wine and Viticulture Program and is slated for Nov. 7-10 in the North County. The main event, featuring 49 local wineries and more than 125 wines, will be held on Saturday, Nov. 9 at Windfall Farms in Paso Robles. Named one of the “Top Nine Incredible Epicurean Vacations” in the world by ABC News and an event “not to miss” by The Los Angeles Times, the festival has introduced more than 100 artisan winemakers to thousands of passionate wine consumers and members of the trade and media. “Garagiste” is French for garage: A make-shift production space small-batch winemakers have utilized around the world. Doug Minnick said he and fellow co-founder Stewart McLennan were blind-sided by the festival’s initial success. He likened their 2011 debut to the experience a new winemaker might feel putting out

his or her first vintage. “Demand was so great, so overwhelming and we’ve sold out every year,” said Minnick. “It’s nice to know that we have hit on something that people want, and that’s good for the winemakers. Over the last three years, we have really made a difference in these winemakers’ lives.” Minnick said he and McLennan play the role of “matchmakers,” pairing small, cutting edge wine producers with their future fans. “We take hard-to-find wineries and we bring an enthusiastic, well-targeted audience to their door,” he said. “Those wineries have no idea what the demand is for the wine, and they come to the festival, get a lot of attention and — sure enough — they end up selling out.” Paso Robles winemaker Nick Elliott of Nicora Wine, San Miguel winemaker Nick de Luca of Ground Effect and the Westside Paso Robles winery Paix Sur Terre l — French for “peace on Earth” — have all experienced great success through Garagiste Festival exposure, according to Minnick. “Our audience likes to interact with the winemakers, and it’s the winemakers that pour at our event,” he said. “The winemakers tell us this is the most knowledgeable audience they’ve experienced.” Continued on next page...

54 Fall 2013

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Robles Press

VINO

Central Coast Edition


Garagiste Festival

Pictures courtesy of Garagiste Festival organizers

The 2013 Garagiste Festival comes to Paso Robles-based Windfall Farms on Saturday, Nov. 9. Garagistes (gar-uh-zhe-stuh) is a term originally used in the Bordeaux region of France to denigrate renegade small-lot wine makers, sometimes working in their “garages”— anything considered not a chateau.

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Continued from last page...

The main event at Windfall Farms is usually attended by about 1,000 people, keeping the festival bustling yet not too crowded, Minnick added. “It’s an indoor event, so it’s not a bunch of tents in a field, where here’s unlimited capacity,” he said. “Our desire is to keep the festival intimate, comfortable and manageable.” Preview events included an Aug. 16 mini tasting held at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles and an Aug. 21 event at the Sanoma Wine Garden. On Friday, Nov. 8 from 4 to 7 p.m., attendees are welcomed to attend an Opening Round tasting event showcasing 15 garagiste winemakers at the Atascadero Lake Park Pavillion. Wineries include Archium Cellars, Ascension Cellars, Barton Family, Casa Dumetz, Cholame Vineyard, DuBost Winery, Frequency Wines, Michael Gill Cellars, Pence Ranch, PlanB Cellars, Sea Shell Cellars, Turiya Wines and Vinemark Cellars.

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“[The Atascadero Lake Park] is beautiful and we wanted to spread our wings a little bit,” said Minnick. “In the past, we have sold out, so we wanted to find a way to grow the festival a bit.” The Gargaiste Festival may be growing in terms of buzz, but the event itself has kept true to its main goal: Celebrating small, hardworking winemakers and bringing the fruit of their labors to light. Minnick said it’s not so much about the limited amount of wine each winemaker produces, but the heart behind that effort. “The Garagiste movement brings attention to these smaller wineries and gives wine lovers a new reason to come to Paso all year long,” said Minnick. “The number [of cases produced] is somewhat arbitrary. It’s all about the spirit in which the wine is made.” The Garagiste Festival offers limited numbers of tickets to preserve the quality of the experience. To purchase tickets go to www.californiagaragistes.com. For festival updates, news and to learn more about the Garagiste Festival, sign-up for “The Dirt” online at www.garagistefestival.com.

2013 Garagiste Winemaker Lineup

Garagiste Festival Schedule of events:

Artisan winemakers slated to showcase their wines at the 2013 festival include: Aaron Wines, Alma Sol Winery, Alta Colina Vineyards, AmByth Estate, Archium Cellars, Ascension Cellars, Asuncion Ridge, Baker & Brain, Barton Family, Bella Luna Estate, Bon Niche Cellars, Caliza Winery, Casa Dumetz Wines, Cayucos Cellars, Cholame Vineyard, Cloak & Dagger, Clos Solene, Culton Wine Co., Cutruzzola Vineyards, Dilecta Wines, Double Bond Wine, DuBost Winery, Edmond August Wines, Felten Cellars, Filipponi Ranch, Frequency Wines, Ghost Cellars, Goodland Wines, HammerSky Vineyards, Harrison Clarke Wine, Hoyt Family Vineyards, Hug Cellars, Jacob Toft Wines, Kaleidos Wines, La Filice Winery, LaZarre Wines, Les Deux Chats, LXV Wine, Michael Gill Cellars, The Missing Leg, Nicora, ONX Wines, Paix Sur Terre, Paso Port Cellars, Pence Ranch, PlanB Cellars, Poalillo Vineyards, Ranchero Cellars, Rendarrio Wines, Samsara Wine Company, Sea Shell Cellars, Seven Angels Cellars, Sinor-LaVallee Wines, STANGER Vineyards, The Farm Winery, Thomas Alexander Winery, Turiya Wines, Vinemark Cellars, Vines on the Marycrest, Westberg Cellars and Zin Alley.

Thursday, Nov. 7 Multi-course winemaker dinner (location and details to be announced). Friday, Nov. 8 The Opening Round at Pavilion on the Lake in Atascadero From 4 to 7 p.m., enjoy 15 Central Coast wines including a few from favorites from the Santa Ynez Valley. Saturday, Nov. 9 Main Event at Windfall Farms in Paso Robles From 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., enjoy 40 garagiste wines, including several lectures, food and an after party where winemakers mingle, eat dance and continue conversation with guests. Sunday, Nov. 10 Winemaker Symposium at Vitner’s Vault At 11 a.m., enjoy a winemaker symposium for serious and aspiring beginning winemakers.


lodging

FEATURE

Villa Vino at Poalillo Vineyards All Photos by Meagan Friberg/VINO 57


FEATURE

Villa Vino at Poalillo Vineyards

Enjoy a Secluded Getaway at Villa Vino This One-Bedroom Cottage Offers a Relaxing Retreat for Wine Lovers Meagan Friberg VINO

Nestled in the vineyard of an authentic winery operation, the Villa Vino vacation rental beckons visitors to a secluded getaway among the lush surroundings of the Paso Robles wine region. “Some of our guests have friends join them for lunch or wine tasting, but many of our guests want to come out here, unwind, and just keep to themselves,” Villa Vino co-owner Susan Poalillo said. Located on the grounds of the family-owned Poalillo Vineyards, the villa is just 30 minutes from downtown Paso Robles and, in addition to the Poalillo tasting room on the property, there are several wine tasting rooms within a 6-mile radius. “There are 11 wineries located within five minutes, one direction or the other,” Poalillo said. “We are part of the Far Out winery group and if somebody has a specific type of wine they’re looking for there are several around here.” With a colorful, warm and eclectic décor, Villa Vino features a private bedroom with a queen-size pillow top bed, private bathroom, two private patios and a fully-stocked kitchenette, the villa offers accommodations for the perfect getaway — including free wine tasting at Poalillo. Additional amenities include a television and DVD player with an assortment of movies to choose from, a barbecue grill, dining area, refrigerator, microwave, toaster oven, coffee pot and dishwasher.

On booking.com, positive comments from guests of the villa attest to the quality of their stay — “very relaxing and enjoyable stay,” “staff friendly and attentive,” “views were spectacular,” “great location and comfortable bed.” Situated in a small valley, the property offers stunning views of the surrounding countryside. And with its vibrant décor and views of the Poalillo Vineyards, Villa Vino continues to receive rave reviews as it approaches its first anniversary of being open to the public. A decorating and design expert, Poalillo has a knack for mixing color and texture to create a unique ambiance. The villa and the surrounding property are evidence of her talents. “Our guests like to use the patios and enjoy the morning sun with their coffee,” Poalillo said. “In the evening it gets a bit cooler and they might enjoy a glass of wine out front while they look out at our beautiful vineyard scene.” With many of the guests at Villa Vino visiting from larger metropolitan areas, Poalillo said she consistently receives comments on how much they appreciate the peaceful and quiet surroundings during their stay. “We get so many comments like how they ‘never slept so well’ or how it is ‘so quiet, so wonderful’ out here,” Poalillo said. “A lot of people come out this way from a big city so they appreciate being out here where it’s quiet.” And they appreciate the opportunity to “live like a winemaker” during their stay as well, according to Poalillo.

With a colorful, warm and eclectic décor, Villa Vino features a private bedroom with a queen-size pillow top bed, private bathroom, two private patios and a fully-stocked kitchenette, the villa offers accommodations for the perfect getaway — including free wine tasting at Poalillo. 58 Fall 2013

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VINO

Central Coast Edition


lodging “Our guests can walk among the working vineyards, and out in our garden where we encourage them to pick some fresh veggies,” Poalillo said. “If we are doing something like harvest, or picking, crushing, or pressing, we invite whoever is staying here to walk back, watch the action and help if they want to — they really get a good idea of what a small family-run winery is like.” That invitation includes the concerts or music sessions that may be happening on the property at the time of the guests’ stay. “They can just walk right out and join in on the fun,” she said. “The guests love that, and they also love that they can be alone; the rental is just one unit so there is solitude if that’s what they want.” As far as pets, Poalillo said the property is “friendly-pet friendly,” so it’s a good idea to ask before bringing along a furry friend. Be sure to pick up some provisions in town to stock the fridge during a stay at the villa. “This is not a B&B — it’s a bed and you can cook me breakfast if you’d like,” Poalillo laughed. Although there is no cell reception in the rental, Poalillo invites her guest to her family home, adjacent to the rental, if they need to use the phone. “Down at the tasting room, there is Wi-Fi so guests can set up and use their computer out on the patio,” Poalillo said, but a lot of people like knowing there’s no contact and they can just get away.” Book a room online at www.booking.com or, better yet, give Poalillo a call at (805) 238-0621. “I like when people call so I can have a personal conversation with them, ask what they’re expecting to do in the area or if they are here for a special event,” Poalillo said. “We also offer intimate winemaker dinners in the tasting room, so we can take care of 2-4 people in the tasting room for special occasions such as a birthday or anniversary.” Rates at Villa Vino are $125 weekdays, $150 weekends; discounts available for Poalillo wine club members and locals. Rates include complimentary wine tasting for two at Poalillo, a $20 value. Guests also enjoy a 15 percent discount on Poalillo wines during their stay.

Situated in a small valley, the Villa Vino offers stunning views of the surrounding countryside.

More about the winemakers Poalillo Vineyards was established in 1992 by Charles and Joyce Poalillo. In 2010, their daughter, Susan, and son-in-law, Dave Garretson, built a new facility at their home and the wine operation was moved to the new location. Many days, Charlie can be found assisting Dave with winemaking as the family continues their tradition of making handcrafted premium wines. In this family winemaking operation, the owners and winemaker are often found manning the tasting room or hanging out on patio with their guests as they enjoy a glass of cabernet sauvignon, zinfandel or one of a variety of other wines offered by the Poalillos. Oftentimes, guests are greeted with the sound of Dave’s guitar or banjo music. For more information on Poalillo Vineyards, go to www.poalillovineyards.com. Villa Vino at PoalilloVineyards is located at 7970 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles. For more information, call (805) 238-0621.

VINOCentral Coast Edition

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59 Fall 2013


Art featured artist

Joe Thomas Reveals the Landscape Within a Face Studios on the Park Resident Artist Creates Vast, Bold Portraits

60 Photo courtesy of Joe Thomas


Joe Thomas

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Hayley Thomas VINO

t the peak of Thomas Hill Farm, surrounded by Asian pears, pomegranate trees and shocks of lavender, Joe Thomas works. Between rows of vineyards heavy with Barbera grapes, the artist sweeps charcoal across a canvas three feet taller than his own head. A few yards away, his farm assistant sits in a wooden chair, a hand over her right eye; mouth curled into the beginnings of a laugh. Behind her, golden hills and blue skies roll on. Thomas, a new addition to downtown artist’s nonprofit Studios on the Park, creates vast, colorful and engaging portraits that are as gregarious as his own personality. “Being on the farm, the scope is just so expansive, and how that expanse relates to the figure I find really amazing,” said Thomas. “When I do my large portraits, the portrait becomes a landscape for me.” Thomas, originally a teacher, first came to Paso Robles from Pasadena a little less than eight years ago. After falling in love with the 10-acre Thomas Hill property located in the hills of Paso’s eastside, he put his naturally green thumb to work. “I had more experience with art and academia than farming,” Thomas said, admittedly. “But, when I was a little kid, my grandfather and parents taught me if you like to eat, you have to learn how to grow things. We always had gardens and we always grew things.” Even at his home in Pasadena, Thomas had maxed out about an acre of land with a plethora of figs, persimmons, pluots, citrus and avocados. “It’s a way of living,” said Thomas. “I’ve always loved food and food always meant being around family. My grandmother always said one of the greatest acts of love is to not only be able to cook for someone, but also to grow the food.” Thomas Hill Organics, which opened in downtown Paso Robles in 2009, became the natural conduit for Thomas’ exotic bounty (ten different kinds of pomegranates, 15 varieties of figs and at least three varieties of pear, to name a few). Between daily tasks on the farm, Thomas said he has always made time to work on his art. Now, more than ever, he’s sharing that side of himself with the Paso Robles community. “I’ve always done my art, but never really released it to the public until now,” said Thomas. “I’m definitely a fish out of water, but it’s wonderful to get a response from the public.” Some of Thomas’s biggest fans are children, who stand wide-eyed before his bold, towering canvases, which range up to 9-feet-wide by 12-feet-tall. “I think kids enjoy the sense of scale and the color,” said Thomas. “There’s also a strangeness there.” With artistic influences like abstract expressionist Philip Guston and avant garde filmmaker David Lynch, it’s no wonder there is a tinge of the bizarre in all Thomas touches. “My art is a mixture between cartoons and an Alfred Hitchcock movie,” the artist said with a laugh. “There’s a sense of drama, a cinematic scope there. “ Thomas discovered his love of film and photography while studying at Loyola Marymount, where he received his undergraduate degree in philosophy and English literature. Thomas then went on to attend

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graduate school at Cal State Long Beach and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. “I had a teacher who told us to have a good run, then paint when you’re exhausted,” said Thomas. “That way, you are painting faster than you can think. I fully do that — I work faster than I can think, and the work really reveals itself.” Another rule of thumb Thomas lives by is to draw and paint in the moment. “If I’m going through a tough time in my life, it will show in my work,” he said. “My work is exceptionally personal; it’s raw.” Thomas often portrays friends and family, finding peaks and valleys amongst the flesh. He said he enjoys getting lost within “the expanse of a face.” When viewers ask about the stories behind his portraits, Thomas often turns the question back around. “There’s a sense of ambiguity there where you just don’t know; it’s a twilight,” said Thomas. The artist said the older he gets, the more interested he becomes in other people’s narratives. Those personal stories are written on the faces he paints, yet ultimately left up to the viewer’s imagination. “I wish, that if my artwork does anything, that it teaches people how to dream,” said Thomas. “That it reveals more questions than answers.” View Joe Thomas’s work at Studios on the Park, located at 1130 Pine Street in Paso Robles. For more information, e-mail thomashillfarms@earthlink.net.

Hayley Thomas/VINO

Studios on the Park resident artist Joe sketches a large portrait of his farmhand, Caitlin Frampton. The portrait artist is pictured working amidst Barbera vineyards at his 10-acre Thomas of Thomas Hill Farm in Paso Robles.

Robles Press

61 Fall 2013


Art

Rendered by artist Morse Clary, who Dorothy Schuler met in Washington state when a moving truck damaged one of her sculptures in transit, the Bodegas Paso Robles label is supposed to represent the warmth and excitement of Spain.

Bodegas Paso Robles An Iberian Tribute to Bacchus

D

Laura Ness VINO

orothy Schuler, winemaker and owner of Bodegas Paso Robles, landed in Paso because it was half way in between family in L.A. and the Bay Area. Given she’s an Atlantic City, N.J. native, who eventually came to the West Coast via New York, France, Spain and Oregon, it’s amazing she’s settled anywhere, based on her love of being on the move. She’s been an artist, a writer and most recently, a winemaker. “I did everything in the publishing world except work on a daily newspaper,” she says. Living in Europe really honed her appreciation for the all the

62 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

finer things in life, most specifically, art, food and wine. Back in the early 1980s when she lived in Paris, the strength of the dollar really worked to her advantage: “Romanée Conti was only $30! It was heaven! It wasn’t cheap, but it wasn’t expensive.” Love of all things Spanish and Portuguese drove her choice of wine grapes to focus on for the brand her husband and a friend started in Paso Robles in the early 2000s, then left in her lap. Fortunately, she met Allan Kinney, who helps her make her wines at Zenaida Cellars. Dorothy’s penchant for albarino, tempranillo, graciano and that true fave of hers, bastardo, also called Trousseau, has led to many winemaking adventures. Says Dorothy, “Bastardo was delisted from the official California grape varietal list in 1991, because it was so little

Robles Press

VINO

Central Coast Edition


FEATURE The artist, who is famous for his book sculptures, presented Dorothy Schuler, owner and winemaker of Bodegas Paso Robles, with three different versions of the Bacchus face, from which she chose this colorful rendition. She uses the same label for each variety, changing the background color to suit the mood of the wine inside.

Photos courtesy of Bodegas Paso Robles

planted. It has 27 synonyms!” She discovered some at Ron Siletto’s Circle S vineyard in San Benito, where she sources the grape to make her popular “Pimenteiro,” a blend of bastardo and tempranillo: the name translates into “pepper pot.” “Nobody else was doing these varietals when I started making wine in 2004,” she notes. Now there are two other Bodegas labels in Paso alone with an Iberian focus — Bodegas M and Bodegas d’Edgar. Wines from Iberian varietals deserve to have a bright, sunny label reminiscent of their sun-drenched origins. The first thing you notice about the Bodegas Paso Robles label is that playful Dali-Picasso-esque rendering of a face that is supposed to be Bacchus. Rendered by artist Morse Clary, who Dorothy met in Washington state when a moving truck damaged one of her sculptures in transit, the label is supposed to represent the warmth and excitement of Spain. The artist, who is famous for his book sculptures, presented her with three different versions of the Bacchus face, from which she chose this colorful rendition. She uses the same label for each variety, changing the background color to suit the mood of the wine inside. She’s moving from 2,500 cases to eventually 3,500. Her lineup presently includes a grenache rosé, which she makes in the Provencal style, meaning lots of color and body, and an albarino from Edna Valley. Dorothy says she doesn’t care for Paso albarino, as the pH is too high. She fights over some grenache blanc from a Paso vineyard along with her friend and sister winemaker, Carol Shelton, as often happens in the wine biz. When she can get it, she will make verdelho, a classic Portuguese varietal that is widely planted on the island of Madeira and on the Azores.

All her red blends are based on tempranillo, a dark thick-skinned grape that is known for its flavors of plum, dark cherry, spice licorice and almonds. Dorothy considers it a fabulous food wine, especially with the spicy and varied foods of Spain. Incidentally, she is a member of the TAPAS society, and recently served as president for the group, which aims to promote the fun-loving Iberian varietals that go so well with traditional tapas. As a former chef, Schuler admits it took a while to get the blend right for the graciano, a wine she describes as very elegant. Blending with just the right amount of tempranillo gives this wine the horsepower it needs to make an impression. “Wines are supposed to attack your palate,” she explains. Two real crowd-pleasers include her ¡Viva Tu! Tempranillo, and her ¡Viva Yo!, a blend of tempranillo and cabernet sauvignon. The former she suggests with mussels, sausage or eggplant and chicken parmesan; the latter, with rack of lamb, game or coq au vin. The 2010 Bodegas Paso Robles Monastrell was the top wine of the Central Coast Wine Competition. The wine is still available for purchase but going fast. Bodegas Paso Robles has a tasting room on 13th Street in downtown Paso Robles on the square, where everyone walks their dogs. Dorothy says it’s great having a tasting room where you can keep up with the current trends and find out how people are reacting to your wines. Progress has been made. “Ninty percent of people now know how to pronounce ‘tempranillo’ correctly! A few years ago, they didn’t even know what it was or how to say it,” she chuckles.

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63 Fall 2013


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feature

October 18–20, 2013

Harvest Wine Weekend Shows True Colors of Paso Wineries Unique Events Unfolding Across the Region Oct. 18–20 to Showcase Wine Production, Celebration of New Vintage

Hayley Thomas VINO

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ew vintages are around the corner as harvest picks up across Paso Robles Wine Country. The Annual Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance Harvest Wine Weekend uncorks Friday, Oct. 18-20 with a variety of unique events, including peeks into real-life wine production, live music, food, dancing and plenty of celebratory sipping. PRWCA Director of Marketing Chris Taranto said, as always, there is no single marquee event for Harvest Wine Weekend. Instead, a plethora of singular celebrations will unfold across the region’s more

66 Fall 2013

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than 200 wineries. “Harvest Wine Weekend is about whatever the wineries themselves are doing,” said Taranto. “Every year, we encourage wineries to get creative and plan something fun that celebrates the new vintage.” Taranto said on an average weekend, locals and tourists will usually enjoy wine tasting — or perhaps the odd wine club event — but nothing out of the ordinary, so to speak. “Harvest Wine Weekend is not just business as usual,” said Taranto. “This is exciting because it offers added lifestyle events, and these events package the experience for [the consumer]. Likely, there will be a barbecue or something happening at the winery. It’s also unique to the season because, right now, many of the wineries — that have

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Paso Robles Wine Country production facilities on-site — are actively creating the wine, and they’re often willing to show off how it’s done.” Taranto said, in essence, Harvest Wine Weekend replaces the romantic thought of grape stomping with what real-life wineries are doing to mark the busy harvest season. “There is a lot of romance, but also a lot of agriculture,” he said. Croad Vineyards winemaker Martin Croad had just finished harvesting 10 tons of zinfandel and had cracked open a beer when he picked up the phone one Monday in September. “We’re still two to three weeks away from harvesting the rest of our zinfandel, grenache, syrah, mourvedre and petite sirah,” said Croad. “We are on the westside of the AVA, so we can typically wait till the end of the season to finish picking, as it is a little cooler weather.” Croad Vineyards will host its annual Downunder Harvest Park Oct. 19–20, complete with New Zealand-and Australian-themed food, live music and dancing. A proud New Zealander, Croad said the winery’s didgeridoo contest is always a huge hit. “We have three didgeridoos here, and people can practice throughout the day. Later, the band stops and everyone lines up and gives it their best shot,” said Croad. “The crowd chooses the best one, and they get a prize.” Taranto said its unique events like Croad Vineyards’ Downunder party that really allow people to see beyond the wine country mystique and glimpse more of a winery’s soul. “Our marketing efforts throughout the year reach a lot of new people, who get turned on to the area,” said Taranto. “Harvest Wine Weekend is a great way for people to come and have their first experience of Paso.” For more information on Harvest Wine Weekend events unfolding across the region, visit www.pasowine.com. Photos courtesy of Visit San Luis Obispo County

Harvest Wine Weekend kicks off Oct. 18–20, bringing unique events to wineries across Paso Robles Wine Country.

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FEATURE

Ashley McMahan

More Than Just a Pretty Face McMahan Enjoys Working, Learning at Oso Libre Tasting Room Brian Williams VINO

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shley McMahan is more than just a pretty face behind the bar. At 26 years old, this brunette tasting room beauty takes working at Oso Libre Winery and Vineyard on the Ranch seriously. She wants to excel and her passion shows. Everyone she works with and the hundreds of weekly visiting wine tasters appreciate her. “Just by listening you learn something every day,” McMahan says. “There is something new everyday. I think it’s awesome if you can come to work and learn something every day.” There are several reasons to visit the Ranch. Vines, wines and Angus are what they are known for and McMahan is more than capable of passing on what she’s learned to guests. She has been working in the Oso Libre, which is Spanish for free bear, tasting room for the past eight months. “It’s a perfect fit for me. I’m a people person,” McMahan says. “I love meeting people and talking to people. And this kind of environment it just really fits for me. I’m really happy that I found something that I love to do. “It’s different you know. It’s a different kind of job. I get to meet really cool people every day,” she says. The Ranch, located at 7383 Vineyard Drive, west of Paso Robles, is more than just an award-winning winery. In 1996, Linda and Chris Behr purchased 90 acres of raw land in the Adelaida region of Paso Robles and started the Angus cattle ranch. In 2000 the vines were planted and in 2007 their son and daughter in law Jeff and Liz Freeland moved up to help run the winery. The first vintage wines were in 2003 and Oso Libre Winery opened to the public in late 2009. That’s brochure stuff McMahan explains as she steps outside of the tasting room and points out all of the “cool” elements that make Oso Libre a modern working Angus cattle ranch and winery — from the solar panels and windmill to the animals, some wild and some domestic, grazing off in the distance. “We have all of the sheep and two alpaca,” McMahan says. “We have Babydoll Sheep. They are really stout and low to the ground. The go under the vines and eat everything underneath. The Alpacas, they actually guard the sheep. They make this sound to alert the sheep to go into the barn.” As she transitions from one to the other, McMahan’s eyes brighten and she becomes more and more animated. “We have our windmill and the solar panels on top of the winery. We produce enough energy so that we are off the grid,” McMahan says. “I love the fact that we are sustainable,” McMahan says. “I 68 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

Brad Koyak/VINO

Oso Libre tasting room attendant Ashley McMahan enjoys meeting people and introducing them to Oso Libre’s wines.

Robles Press

VINO

Central Coast Edition


Oso Libre

think that is really cool. It’s like we give back in a little way.” In the tasting room, McMahan takes visitors through the winery’s offerings with the deft touch of a seasoned veteran. Few would guess that she has been working in the industry for roughly a year. McMahan credits the team around her for everything she knows — the owners; everyone in the tasting room, especially coordinator Reggie Pike; the winemakers Freeland, Jeff Fandrick and Chris Behr and consulting winemaker Michael Baretto. “Here, I work with the greatest people, and I work for the greatest people,” McMahan says. “My team is amazing, I really couldn’t do anything without them. It’s pretty much what makes it.” Working at Oso Libre is fun and challenging for McMahan. One of her most memorable moments involves a lizard and a couple during a pickup party. McMahan was stationed outside of the tasting room and watched the husband bend over, pickup a lizard off of the ground, put it on his shoulder and walk up to her table with his wife. “They come to my bar and I have this look on my face and his wife sees me and says, ‘I’ve seen that face before,’” McMahan says. “Then she asks me, ‘What is he doing.’ So, I tell her her husband has a lizard on his shoulder. It’s just chillin’ on his shoulder. “She looks and starts freaking out and the lizard starts freaking out and then it starts running around on his back and then it jumps from him onto his wife and it runs up into her hair and she is screaming. I’m like oh my God there is a lizard on a club member what am I supposed to do. And she is screaming, ‘Get it off, get it off.’” Eventually, the husband takes the lizard off of his wife and puts it on a bush. Just another exciting day in the tasting room McMahan goes

on to explain. “People think it’s easy peasy but it’s actually a lot of work,” McMahan says. “Especially on the weekend, you are on your feet all day. You have to constantly be on point. You are constantly — go, go, go. I love it because it’s exciting and there is always something happening and going on but it’s a lot of work and some people don’t realize that.” McMahan was born in Redding and raised in the Los Osos-Morro Bay area. She graduated from Morro Bay High School and attended Cuesta College for a couple of years. Working at Oso Libre, McMahan thinks she may have found a career. “I went to Cuesta for awhile but I just didn’t know what I wanted to do,” McMahan says. “Now, having worked in the wine industry, I’ve found I really like this and would like to stay and learn everything I can and keep moving up.” Oso Libre Winery and Ranch is located at 7383 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles. For more information, call 805-238-3378 or visit www. osolibre.com.

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Robles Press

Published by the Paso

69 Fall 2013


15 Degrees C

FEATURE

Brittany App

15 Degrees C Sommelier Chills With New Wine Bar

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Laura Ness VINO

amed for the perfect cellar temperature at which to serve red wines, 15 Degrees C in Templeton, is the culmination of over a decade of immersion in the wine industry and the love of sharing new discoveries with wine lovers. Certified Sommelier and wine bar owner, Ali Rush Carscaden, began her career at Castoro Cellars while she was still in college at Cal Poly, majoring in commercial tourism. While pursuing an master’s degree in agriculture from Cal Poly, she wrote a business plan for a wine bar during one of her business classes: it has certainly come in handy. Her palate for international wines was honed while working for the Henry Wine Group, where she was a fine wine specialist for four years. She still brings those many connections to bear in stocking her wine bar with international delights, particularly from Austria, Spain and France. 15 Degrees C started out in the Trader Joe’s shopping center in Paso four years and then moved in 2012 to downtown Templeton, where she has three times the amount of seating, is able to stay open later, can offer live music and can serve up an expanded menu. A temperature controlled wine cellar holds over 500 fine wines, selected from her years of visiting Europe and the racks are filled 70 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

with all manner of bargain wines, many at the fun risk-free pricepoint of $10. Her selection of sparklings is generously global, with Krug Grand Cuvee, Billecart-Salmon and J Lasalle at the upper end of the price spectrum, and well-priced (under $20) gems like Laetitia Brut and Prosecco, plus a sparkling Gruner Veltliner from Austria. “I’m a big bubbles fan!” she enthuses. “I even have a sparkling rose of pinot noir from Tasmania!” Her vision for a wine bar where locals could gather and hang out, sharing new and old favorites with one another, has certainly come to fruition. Says Ali, “We’re essentially the local ‘Cheers!’ and we pride ourselves in our selection of local Central Coast wines, most of which are not sold at other retail outlets. We are happy to give recommendations on where people should go wine tasting locally, and we prepare lots of cheese platters for people to take with them when they go exploring.” You can also customize your own cheese and meat plates to enjoy while you’re imbibing on site. All platters include Castelveltrano olives, marcona almonds and fresh fruit. She also serves locally baked breads and York Mountain olive oil, and insists on serving meats made without nitrates, like those she gets from Applegate farms. Says Ali, “We have really simple, really fresh, really good food!” Much of it is sourced from local organic food purveyor, Melanie Blankenship, of Templeton’s Nature’s Touch, her go-to source for everything from plants to local meats to organic produce. The wine bar also serves up tasty sandwiches (BBQ pork is her fave) and housemade mozzarella, available in both a caprese salad and a panini. The Central Coast is front and center at the wine bar, with a host of prominent labels including Alta Collina, August West, Cain 5, Clavo, Denner, Giornata, Herman Story, Luli and Morgan. Some of the young winemakers she’s most fond of include Aaron Jackson, Amy Butler, Janelle Dusi and Anthony Yount. She specializes in offering tastes of wines from people without tasting rooms, like Janelle Dusi, of who she says. “She is making fabulous stuff, and she’s the first one of her family to make wine. I really love her pinot grigio!” The Dusi’s are an institution in the Paso area, with winemakers fighting to get their hands on this incredibly concentrated fruit from old head trained, dry-farmed Zin. One of Ali’s most popular chardonnays is made by Broadside Cellars from fruit off the famed James Berry Vineyards, where renowned Saxum sources fruit. “At $24, it’s simply awesome!” she says. Fond of sharing her knowledge of the world of wine, she does frequent focused tastings. Recently, she offered tasters the chance to try 40 different Nebbiolo’s from all over California. Highly popular are her futures tastings in November, where consumers can buy wine that is not yet available on the market at a discounted price. She also offers sake tastings for those who want to branch beyond the grape into the land of rice wine. Ali believes fully 75 percent of her business comes from onsite consumption, where you only have to pay $5 to have a bottle of wine opened for immediate enjoyment. The staff are all trained and tasted on the wines she brings in, so any one of them can steer you to that perfect 15 Degree C experience. Over and over again, every day of the week. Go check it out and maybe you’ll find a new reason, and a new way, to say “Cheers!” 15 Degrees C is at 624 S. Main St., Ste 101, Templeton, CA 93465

Robles Press

VINO

Central Coast Edition


FALL 2013

BarrelHouse Brewing Co.

Their Brewing System, Scenic Beer Garden and a DIY Ethic is Making a Serious Mark on the Microbrew Scene Published by the Paso Robles Press VINOCentral Coast Edition

71 Fall 2013


Beer

Brewery

BarrelHouse Brewing Co. With Their Brewing System Front and Center, a Scenic Beer Garden and a DIY Ethic You Can Taste and See, the Guys at BarrelHouse are Making Their Mark on the Microbrew Scene

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Hayley Thomas VINO

arrelHouse Brewing Co. co-owner Jason Carvalho bellies up to the concrete bar he crafted with his own two hands. Outside, a waterfall gurgles while birds chirp and chatter. A rusty, antique flatbed truck-turned-stage adorns the lush beer garden. The brewery itself is large almost cavernous, but sizable windows and pops of reclaimed barn wood and scrap brick keep the vibe rustic. At the center of the 15,000-square-foot facility, the heart of BarrelHouse’s operation gleams. “We wanted the centerpiece of BarrelHouse Brewery to be the brewhouse itself,” Carvalho said, motioning to the cluster of shiny, stainless steel tanks just a stone’s throw from the bar. In its current configuration, the brewery can produce about 8,000 barrels per year and with minor modifications and additional storage tanks, the brewery can produce over 20,000 barrels in its current facility. “People enjoy seeing and smelling the beer as it’s being made,” said Carvalho. “They like to be part of the action.” About 2,000 people proved that point when they flooded the brewery during a February grand-opening party. With seven unique beers on tap and newly-appointed brewmaster George Numair and Lead brewer Mathew Jacobs on board, BarrelHouse Brewing Co. is carving its unique impression on the county’s burgeoning microbrew scene. The brewery started keg distribution in early June and their

Photo courtesy of BarrelHouse Brewing Co.

BarrelHouse brewmaster George Numair is in charge of the brewery’s daily offerings that include a Kolsch, a blonde, a pale ale, an India pale ale and a stout. The brewery also has limited release beers such as a double IPA and a bourbon barrel-aged stout. 72 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

beers are already on tap in over 90 different bars and restaurants. BarrelHouse will begin bottle distribution in October and plans to be canning by Spring. “We have a great climate for outdoor activities here and cans are the ultimate package for active lifestyles,” says Carvalho. “You can take cans anywhere.” Originally from the Central Valley, Carvalho grew up with fellow brewery owner Kevin Nickell and Director of Sales and Marketing, Chris Vaughn. For years the friends have dreamed and schemed about starting a brewery, and in 2012, that fantasy finally found its footing. Strangely, it started with a single click on www.probrewer.com. “I stumbled upon a used brewery system in Muskoka, Canada, about three hours north of Toronto,” Carvalho said. “Two days later, we flew to Canada and took a look at it, gave them a deposit, and five months later flew back and decommissioned the entire system and loaded it up on a truck.” About a week later, the team unloaded the equipment and painstakingly put it back together. Handy with their hammers, it took less than a year for the team to get the brewery up and running. A group of friends and family also rolled up their sleeves to lend a hand. “We know the building process, which questions to ask, which not to ask, and how to get things done fast,” Carvalho said with a grin. “We did all the brewery design ourselves. We built every single square inch of this.” That’s pretty much the truth. Aside from the stainless steel sanitary welding (you need a special certification for that.) Carvalho Nickell and longtime friend Chris Vaughn have touched and tinkered with every part of the brewhouse. Vaughn, an integral part of the BarrelHouse team has been involved with the project since its early days in Carvalho’s garage. “We just wanted to create something unique for the people. There’s a need here, with over 300 wineries and just a handful of breweries,” said Carvalho. “We wanted to bring the outside in. There are atmospheres similar to this at wineries, but no breweries like this on the Central Coast with a real beer garden area and a family friendly environment where you can relax outside, enjoy good music and great beer.” Several wineries are moving into the industrial park near the brewery, and Firestone Walker Brewing Company whom Carvalho considers a good friend lies just 1.8 miles away. According to Carvalho, more breweries and wineries in the area mean more interest and exposure for the microbrewing industry. Currently, word of mouth and radio serve as their main advertising tactics, and it seems to be working.

Robles Press

VINO

Central Coast Edition


BarrelHouse Brewing Co.

A slew of local bands have played on the rusty, antique flatbed truckturned stage in the beer garden at BarrelHouse Brewing Co.

BarrelHouse Brewing Co. has carved its unique impression on the county’s burgeoning microbrew scene.

“We’re excited. It has been a lot of hard work but the feedback has been great,” said Carvalho. “We have been diligently working on process, consistency and refining our recipes. We want to create beer as unique as the people who create it.” That’s where BarrelHouse brewmaster Numair and lead brewer Jacobs come in. The team works together to create the recipes and Numair and Jacobs work to make them reality. Numair cut his teeth at Spoetzl Brewery in Texas before landing a job at Firestone Walker Brewing Company. He brewed at Firestone for about two years, also running its sensory analysis program for a year. Jacobs has extensive barrel experience that he gained working in the local wine industry at places like Eberle Winery. Jacobs is also an avid homebrewer with a passion for brewing and barrel-aged beer projects. “[Sensory analysis] is a new thing in the industry, and I want to incorporate a lot of that here,” Numair said. “Through that, we can really figure out the finer parts of our beer and really work it to making it the best every time, and consistent every time.” Numair noted that Carvalho, Nickell and Vaughn have a lot of passion, which is definitely an important component to creating incredible beers. “We all really have a good time and that’s the best part about it,” he said. “We have an unbelievable team with crazy talent,” added Carvalho, who acknowledged the hard work of his entire team. For Carvalho, it’s all about putting the beer front and center. In a way, he’s wearing his heart on his sleeve and inviting the community to partake in a taste. BarrelHouse recently acquired the 2 acre property behind the brewery where Carvalho has big plans including additional parking, expanded beer gardens and most importantly, the BarrelHouse hop farm project irrigated entirely by reclaimed water from the brewery operations. “Every bit of our spent grain goes to local farms to be used as livestock feed. We want to go green and save green.” said Carvalho. Check the brewery’s website at www.barrelhousebrewing.com for the schedule of upcoming music, food and events. For more information, call 805-236-1128. The brewery is located at 3055 Limestone Way, Paso Robles.

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Published by the Paso

Photo courtesy of BarrelHouse Brewing Co.

BarrelHouse Brewing Co. founders Chris Vaughn, Kevin Nickell, and Jason Carvalho. Nickell and Carvalho are the owners of the operation in Paso Robles.

Robles Press

73 Fall 2013


From the Heart of Paso Robles Wine Country ESTATE WINE TASTING WEEKEND WINE & CHEESE FLIGHTS CHEF-TAUGHT COOKING CLASSES LIVE & LOCAL MUSIC SATURDAYS

OPEN DAILY 10AM TO 5PM

Fri - Sun 12-5 appt or byy ap ppt p

2400 Highway 46 West, Paso Robles, CA 805.239.2233 www.ninerwine.com

Small,family-owned winery specializing in handcrafted p premium wines

6640 Von Dollen Rd, San Miguel • 805-467-9490 tackittfamilyvineyards.com


2013 Paso Robles Events Calender Golden Oak Festival

Sat., Oct. 19, 2013—Vendors: 9 am - 3 pm Vendors - Food - Downtown Paso Robles City Park | Info call 238-4103

Safe & Fun Halloween Downtown

Thur., Oct. 31, 2013—3 to 6 pm | Downtown Shops, Holiday House, Pumpkin-Carving Contest! PRYAF—”Thriller” Dance

Elegant Evening Downtown

Sat., Nov. 9, 2013 - 5:00 to 8:00 pm | Downtown Paso Robles Merchant Open House featuring refreshments, entertainment, drawing for a John Patridge Painting! Noon to 5 pm Paderewski Exhibits/Concert at the Paso Robles Inn.

Holiday Craft Bazaar

Fri., Nov. 29, 2013 - 9 am to 3 pm—City Park | Hand-made crafts by local artisans!

Downtown Lighting Ceremony

Fri., Nov. 29, 2013 - 5:30 pm—City Park Candlelight caroling, refreshments, holiday characters!

Christmas Light Parade

Sat., Dec. 7, 2013 - 7 pm | Theme: “Celebrate The Season”

Vine Street Victorian Showcase

Sat., Dec. 14, 2013 - 6 pm to 9 pm on Vine Street between 8th and 21st streets. Free to the Public. Enjoy entertainers, refreshments, caroling, Scrooge, The Snow King & Queen, Frosty the Snowman and much more.

Victorian Teddy Bear Tea

Sat., Dec. 21, 2013 - 2:00 to 4:00 pm Paso Robles Park Ballroom (1232 Park Street.) Tickets: $13 Adults & $7 for Children (includes punch, cookies & a commemorative tea cup & saucer)


premier wine aerator.

& many more.


north county

Wineries & Tasting Rooms

15 degrees C Wine Shop & Bar — 624 Main St. Ste.101, Templeton • 805-434-1554 • www.15degreescwines.com Adelaida Cellars — 5805 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-8980 • www.adelaida.com Alta Colina Vineyard & Winery — 2725 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-227-4191 • www.altacolinawine.com AmByth Estates — By Appt. Only • 510 Sequoia Lane, Templeton • 805-305-7355 • www.ambythestate.com Ancient Peaks Winery — 22720 El Camino Real, Santa Margarita • 805-365-7045 • www.ancientpeaks.com Anglim Winery — 740 Pine St., Paso Robles • 805-227-6813 • www.anglimwinery.com AronHill Vineyards — Lunch served daily • 3745 Highway 46 West, Templeton • 805-434-3066 • www.aronhillvineyards.com Arroyo Robles Winery — 1317 Park St., Paso Robles • 805-226-5454 • www.arroyorobles.com Asuncion Ridge — 725 12th St., Paso Robles • 805-237-1425 • www.asuncionridge.com August Ridge Vineyards — 8790 Highway 41, Creston • 805-239-2455 • www.augustridge.com B&E Vineyard — 10000 Creston Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-4815 • www.bevineyard.com Barr Estate Winery — 6950 Union Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-2505 • www.barrestatewines.com Barrel 27 Wine Company — 2323 Tuley Court Ste. 110, Paso Robles • 805-237-1245 • www.barrel27.com Bella Luna Estate Winery — By Appt. Only • 1850 Templeton Road, Templeton • 805-434-5477 • www.bellalunawine.com Berardo Winery — 3280 Township Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-9432 • www.ajbvineyards.com Bianchi Winery — 3380 Branch Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-9922 • www.bianchiwine.com Black Hand Cellars — 766 Main St., Ste. B, Cambria • 805-927-WINE • www.blackhandcellars.com Bodegas Paso Robles Winery — 729 13th St., Paso Robles • 805-237-3780 • www.bodegaspasorobles.com Bon Niche Cellars — By Appt. Only • 2627 Golden Eagle Way, San Miguel • 805-286-7798 • www.bonniche.com Booker Vineyard — 2640 Anderson Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-7367 • www.bookerwines.com Brian Benson Cellars — 2985 Anderson Road, Paso Robles • 805-296-9463 • www.brianbensoncellars.com Brochelle Vineyards — 2323 Tuley Court #130, Paso Robles • 805-237-0519 • www.brochelle.com Broken Earth Winery — 5625 Highway 46 East, Paso Robles • 805-239-2562 • www.brokenearthwinery.com Calcareous Vineyard — 3430 Peachy Canyon Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-0289 • www.calcareous.com Caliza Winery — 2570 Anderson Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-1480 • www.calizawinery.com Caparone Winery — 2280 San Marcos Road, Paso Robles • 805-467-3827 or 805-610-5308 • www.caparone.com Carina Cellars — 3525 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-252-0860 • www.carinacellars.com Carmody McKnight Estate Wines — 11240 Chimney Rock Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-9392 • www.carmodymcknight.com Cass Winery — Lunch served daily • 7350 Linne Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-1730 • www.casswines.com Castoro Cellars — 1315 N. Bethel Road, Templeton • 805-238-0725 • www.castorocellars.com Cayucos Cellars — 131 North Ocean Ave., Cayucos • 805-995-3036 • www.cayucoscellars.com Cellar 360 — Picnic lunch available • 7000 Highway 46 East, Paso Robles • 805-226-7133 • www.cellar360.com Cerro Prieto Vineyard & Cellars — By Appt. Only • 3432 Las Tablas Willow Creek Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-8448 • www.cerroprietovineyard.com Changala Winery — 3770 Willow Creek Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-9060 • www.changalawinery.com Chateau Lettau — 840 13th St., Paso Robles • 805-603-4434 • www.chateaulettau.com Chateau Margene — 6996 Peachy Canyon Road, Paso Robles & 4385 La Panza Road, Creston • 805-238-2321 or 805-238-3500 • www.chateaumargene.com Chronic Cellars — 2020 Nacimiento Lake Drive, Paso Robles • 805-237-7848 • www.chroniccellars.com Cinquain Cellars — By Appt. Only • 6404 Independence Ranch Place, San Miguel • 805-400-5978 • www.cinquaincellars.com Clautiere Vineyard — 1340 Penman Springs Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-3789 • www.clautiere.com Clavo Cellars — 315 Main St., Templeton • 805-226-0174 • www.clavocellars.com Clayhouse Wines — 849 13th St., Paso Robles • 805-238-7055 • www.clayhousewines.com Croad Vineyards — 3700 Vinedo Robles Lane, Paso Robles • 805-226-9899 • www.croadvineyards.com CrossLynn Estate — By Appt. Only • 1436 Brambles Court, Templeton • 805-434-9838 Cypher Winery — 3750 Highway 46 West Templeton • 805-237-0055 • www.cypherwinery.com D’Anbino Cellars — 710 Pine St., Paso Robles • 805-227-6800 • www.danbino.com Dark Star Cellars — 2985 Anderson Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-2389 • www.darkstarcellars.com Daou Vineyards — 2777 Hidden Mountain Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-5460 • www.daouvineyards.com Denner — 5414 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-239-4287 • www.dennervineyards.com Derby Wine Estates — 5620 Highway 46 East, Paso Robles • 805-238-6300 • www.derbywineestates.com Doce Robles Winery — 2023 12 Oaks Drive, Paso Robles • 805-227-4766 • www.docerobleswinery.com Donati Family Vineyard — 2720 Oak View Road, Templeton • 877-511-WINE • www.donatifamilyvineyard.com Donatoni Winery — 3225 Township Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-0620 • www.donatoniwineryandvineyards.com Dover Canyon Winery — 4520 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-237-0101 • www.dovercanyon.com

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Published by the Paso

Robles Press

77 Fall 2013


north county

Wineries & Tasting Rooms

Dubost Winery — 9988 Chimney Rock Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-8463 • www.dubostwine.com Dunning Vineyards Estate Winery — 1953 Niderer Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-4763 • www.dunningvineyards.com Eagle Castle Winery — Lunch served daily • 3090 Anderson Road, Paso Robles • 805-227-1428 • www.eaglecastlewinery.com Eberle Winery — 3810 Highway 46 West, Paso Robles • 805-238-9607 • www.eberlewinery.com Ecluse Wines — 1520 Kiler Canyon Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-4998 • www.eclusewines.com Edward Sellers Vineyards & Wines — 1401 Highway 46 West, Paso Robles • 805-239-8915 • www.edwardsellers.com EOS Estate Winery — 2300 Airport Road, Paso Robles • 805-591-8050 • www.eosvintage.com Epoch Estate Wines — 7505 York Mountain Road, Templeton • 805-237-7575 • www.epochwines.com Falcon Nest Vineyard and Winery — 5185 Union Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-0227 • www.falconnestwinery.com Fratelli Perata Winery — By Appt. Only • 1595 Arbor Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-2809 • www.fratelliperata.com Frolicking Frog Winery — 739 12th St., Paso Robles, inside Siegel’s • 805-239-4367 • www.frolickingfrogwine.com F/S Cellars — 1337 Vendels Circle, Paso Robles • 805-431-8146 • www.fscellars.com Gelfand Vineyards — By Appt. Only • 5530 Dresser Ranch Place, Paso Robles • 805-239-5808 • www.gelfandvineyards.com Graveyard Vineyards — 6990 Estrella Road, San Miguel • 805-467-2043 • www.graveyardvineyards.com GreMarK Vineyards — By Appt. Only • 5325 Rancho La Loma Linda Drive, Paso Robles • 805-237-0154 • www.gremarkwine.com Grey Wolf Cellars — 2174 Highway 46 West, Paso Robles • 805-237-0771 • www.greywolfcellars.com Grizzly Republic — 840 13th St., Paso Robles • 805-237-1378 • www.grizzlyrepublicwines.com Halter Ranch Vineyard — 8910 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-9455 • www.halterranch.com HammerSky Vineyards — 7725 Vineyards Drive, Paso Robles • 805-239-0930 • www.hammersky.com Hansen Winery — 5575 El Pomar Drive, Templeton • 805-239-8412 • www.hansenwines.com Harmony Cellars — 3255 Harmony Valley Road, Harmony • 805-927-1625 • www.harmonycellars.com Haven Wine Bistro — 6155 El Camino Real, Atascadero • 805-468-4880 • www.havenwinebar.net Hearst Ranch Winery — 442 SLO San Simeon Road, San Simeon • 805-467-2241 • www.hearstranchwinery.com Hearthstone Vineyard & Winery — 5070 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-238-2544 • www.hearthstonevineyard.com Herman Story Wines — 1227 Paso Robles St., Paso Robles • 805-714-9966 • www.hermanstorywines.com Hidden Oak Winery — 4671 S. El Pomar, Templeton • 805-237-9315 • www.hiddenoakwinery.com Hope Family Wines — 1585 Live Oak Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-4112 • www.hopefamilywines.com Hug Cellars — 2323 Tuley Court, Ste. 120, Paso Robles • 805-226-8022 • www.hugcellars.com Hunt Cellars — 2875 Oakdale Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-1600 • www.huntcellars.com J&J Cellars — 2850 Ranchita Canyon Road, San Miguel • 805-467-2891 • www.jjcellars.com J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines — 6169 Airport Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-8900 • www.jlohr.com Jack Creek Cellars — 5265 Jack Creek Road, Templeton • 805-226-8283 • www.jackcreekcellars.com Jada Vineyard & Winery — 5620 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-226-4200 • www.jadavineyard.com JK Wine Company — By Appt. Only • 805-226-7514 • www.jkwinecompany.com JUSTIN Vineyards & Winery — Dinner served daily, lunch served on Saturdays and Sundays and picnic lunches available Friday to Sunday • 11680 Chimney Rock Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-6932 • www.justinwine.com Kaleidos Wine — 3770 Willow Creek Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-0828 • www.kaleidoswine.com Kenneth Volk Vineyards — 3101 Highway 46 West, Paso Robles • 805-237-7896 • www.volkwines.com Kiamie Wine Cellars — 9750 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-8333 • www.kiamiewines.com Kukkula — 9515 Chimney Rock Road, Paso Robles • 805-227-0111 • www.kukkulawine.com L’Aventure Winery — 2815 Live Oak Road, Paso Robles • 805-227-1588 • www.aventurewine.com Laraneta Winery & Olive Oil — 2602 Templeton Road, Templeton • 805-434-5090 • www.laraneta.com Le Cuvier — 3333 Vine Hill Lane, Paso Robles • 805-238-5706 or 800-549-4764 • www.lcwine.com Le Vigne Winery — 5115 Buena Vista Drive, Paso Robles • 805-227-4000 or 800-891-6055 • www.levignewinery.com Linne Calodo — 3030 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-227-0797 • www.linnecalodo.com Locatelli Vineyards & Winery — 8585 Cross Canyons Road, San Miguel • 805-467-0067 • www.locatelliwinery.com Loma Linda Vineyards — By Appt. Only • 5155 Rancho La Loma Linda Drive, Paso Robles • 805-227-7172 • www.lomalindavineyards.com Lone Madrone — 2485 Highway 46 West, Paso Robles • 805-238-0845 • www.lonemadrone.com LXV — By Appt. Only • 3690 Willow Creek Road, Paso Robles • 530-763-3821• www.lxvwine.com Maloy O’Neill Vineyards — 5725 Union Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-6430 • www.maloyoneill.com Midnight Cellars Winery & Vineyard — 2925 Anderson Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-8904 • www.midnightcellars.com Minassian-Young Vineyards — 4045 Peachy Canyon Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-7571 • www.minassianyoung.com Mitchella Vineyard & Winery — 2525 Mitchell Ranch Way, Paso Robles • 805-239-8555 • www.mitchella.com 78 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

Robles Press

VINO

Central Coast Edition


Mondo Cellars Winery — 3260 Nacimiento Lake Drive, Paso Robles • 805-226-2925 • www.mondocellars.com Moonstone Cellars — 801 C Main St., Cambria • 805-927-9466 • www.moonstonecellars.com Nadeau Family Vintners — 3860 Peachy Canyon Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-3574 • www.nadeaufamilyvintners.com Nichols Winery & Cellars — 4615 Traffic Way, Atascadero • 805-466-7278 • www.nicholswinery.com Niner Wine Estates — 2400 Highway 46 West, Paso Robles • 805-239-2233 • www.ninerwine.com Norman Vineyards — 7450 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-237-0138 • www.normanvineyards.com Onx Estate Wine — By Appt. Only • 1525 Paradise Meadow Lane, Templeton • 805-439-0539 • www.onxwine.com Opolo Vineyards — 7110 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-238-9593 • www.opolo.com Oso Libre Winery — 7383 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-238-3378 • www.osolibre.com Parrish Family Vineyard — 1220 Park St., Paso Robles • 805-286-4028 • www.parrishfamilyvineyard.com PasoPort Wine Company — 95 Booker Road, Templeton, and 5940 Union Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-2229 • www.pasoportwine.com Paso Wine Centre — 1240 Park St., Paso Robles • 805-239-9156 • www.pasowines.com Peachy Canyon Winery — 1480 N. Bethel Road, Templeton • 805-239-1918 • www.peachycanyon.com Pear Valley Vineyards — 4900 Union Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-2861 • www.pearvalley.com Penman Springs Vineyard — 1985 Penman Springs Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-7959 • www.penmansprings.com Per Cazo Cellars — 5325 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-227-4949 • www.percazocellars.com Pianetta Winery — 829 13th St., Paso Robles • 805-226-4005 • www.pianettawinery.com Pipestone Vineyards — 2040 Niderer Road, Paso Robles • 805-227-6385 • www.pipestonevineyards.com Pithy Little Wine Company — 1244 Pine St., Paso Robles • 805-546-1059 • www.pithywine.com Poalillo Vineyards — 7970 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-238-0621 • www.poalillovineyards.com Pomar Junction Vineyard & Winery — 5036 S. El Pomar Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-9940 • www.pomarjunction.com Pretty-Smith Vineyards & Winery — 13350 River Road, San Miguel • 805-467-3104 Proulx Wines — 5424 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-706-0425 • www.proulxwines.com Rabbit Ridge Winery — 1172 San Marcos Road, Paso Robles • 805-467-3331 • www.rabbitridgewinery.com Ranchita Canyon Vineyard — 3439 Ranchita Canyon Road, San Miguel • 805-467-9448 • www.ranchitacanyonvineyard.com Rangeland Wines — By Appt. Only • 10425 Klau Mine Road, Paso Robles • 805-674-9232 • www.adelaidasprings.com Red Soles Winery — 3230 Oakdale Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-9898 • www.redsoleswinery.com Rio Seco Vineyard & Winery — 4295 Union Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-8884 • www.riosecowine.com RiverStar Vineyards — 7450 Estrella Road, San Miguel • 805-467-0086 • www.riverstarvineyards.com RN Estate Vineyard — By Appt. Only • 7986 N. River Road, Paso Robles • 805-610-9802 • www.rnestate.com Robert Hall Winery — 3443 Mill Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-1616 • www.roberthallwinery.com Rockin’ R Winery — 8500 Union Road, Ste. C, Paso Robles • 805-835-8529 • www.rockinrwinery.com Rocky Creek Cellars — 8687 Apple Road, Highway 46 West, Templeton • 805-238-1919 • www.rockycreekcellars.com Rotta Winery — 250 Winery Road, Templeton • 805-237-0510 • www.rottawinery.com Roxo Port Cellars — 6996 Peachy Canyon Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-1600 • www.roxocellars.com San Antonio Winery — 2610 Buena Vista Drive, Paso Robles • 805-226-2600 • www.sanantoniowinery.com San Marcos Creek Vineyard — 7750 Highway 101, Paso Robles • 866-PASO-WINE • www.sanmarcoscreek.com Sarzotti Winery — 179 Bella Ranch Road, Templeton • 805-226-2022 • www.sarzottiwinery.com Sculpterra Winery and Sculpture Garden — 5015 Linne Road, Paso Robles • 888-302-8881 • www.sculpterra.com Sextant Wines — 2324 Highway 46 West, Paso Robles • 805-542-0133 • www.sextantwines.com Shale Oak Winery — 3235 Oakdale Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-4800 • www.shaleoakwinery.com Shadow Run Vineyards & Winery — 2720 La Panza Road, Creston • 805-227-0554 • www.shadowrunvineyards.com Silver Horse Winery — 2995 Pleasant Road, San Miguel • 805-467-WINE • www.silverhorse.com Stacked Stone Cellars — 1525 Peachy Canyon Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-7872 • www.stackedstone.com Stanger Vineyards — 5255 Highway 41, Paso Robles • 805-238-4777 • www.stangervineyards.com Starr Ranch Vineyard & Winery — 9320 Chimney Rock Road, Paso Robles • 805-227-0144 • www.starr-ranch.com Steinbeck Wines — 5940 Union Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-1854 • www.steinbeckwines.com Stephen’s Cellar & Vineyard — 7575 York Mountain Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-2412 • www.stephenscellar.com Still Waters Vineyards & Winery — 2750 Old Grove Lane, Paso Robles • 805-237-9231 • www.stillwatersvineyards.com Summerwood Winery — 2175 Arbor Road, Paso Robles • 805-227-1365 • www.summerwoodwine.com Tablas Creek Vineyard — 9339 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-1231 • www.tablascreek.com Tackitt Family Vineyards — 6640 Von Dollen Road, San Miguel • 805-467-9490 • www.tackittfamilyvineyards.com Tarrica Wine Cellars — By Appt. Only • 111 Clark Road, Shandon • 805-237-8693 • www.tarricawinecellars.com

VINOCentral Coast Edition

Published by the Paso

Robles Press

79 Fall 2013


Tassajara Cellars (at Silver Horse) — 2995 Pleasant Road, San Miguel • 805-239-8511 • www.tassajaracellars.com Terry Hoage Vineyards — 870 Arbor Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-2083 • www.terryhoagevineyards.com Thacher Winery — 8355 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-237-0087 • www.thacherwinery.com Thunderbolt Winery — 2740 Hidden Mountain Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-9907 • www.thunderboltjunction.com Tobin James Cellars — 8950 Union Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-2204 • www.tobinjames.com Tolo Cellars — 9750 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-2282 • www.tolocellars.com Turley Wine Cellars — 2900 Vineyard Drive, Templeton • 805-434-1030 • www.turleywinecellars.com Twilight Cellars — 2740 Hidden Mountain Road, Paso Robles • 805-226-9907 • www.twilightcellars.com Venteux Vineyards — 1795 Las Tablas Road, Templeton • 805-369-0127 • www.venteuxvineyards.com Veris Cellars — 1266 N. Bethel Road, Templeton • 805-434-0319 • www.veriscellars.com Via Vega Winery — 2378 Adobe Road, Paso Robles • 805-423-2190 • www.viavega.com Victor Hugo Winery — By Appt. Only • 2850 El Pomar Drive, Templeton • 805-434-1128 • www.victorhugowinery.com Villa Creek Cellars — 5995 Peachy Canyon Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-7145 • www.villacreek.com Villa San-Juliette Vineyards & Winery — 6385 Cross Canyons Road, San Miguel • 805-467-0014 • www.villasanjuliette.com Villicana Winery — 2725 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-9456 • www.villicanawinery.com Vina Robles Winery — 3700 Mill Road, Paso Robles • 805-227-4812 • www.vinarobles.com Vines on the Marycrest — 5076 Mustard Creek Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-0378 • www.vinesonthemarycrest.com Vista Del Rey Vineyards — 7340 Drake Road, Paso Robles • 805-467-2138 • www.vdrvineyards.com Westberg Cellars — 3180 Willow Creek Road, Paso Robles • 805-238-9321 • www.westbergwine.com Whalebone Winery — 8325 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles • 805-239-9020 • www.whalebonevineyard.com Wild Coyote Estate Winery — 3775 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-610-1311 • www.wildcoyote.biz Wild Horse Winery — 1437 Wild Horse Winery Court, Templeton • 805-788-6310 • www.wildhorsewinery.com Windward Vineyard — 1380 Live Oak Road, Paso Robles • 805-239-2565 • www.windwardvineyard.com Zenaida Cellars — 1550 Highway 46, Paso Robles • 805-227-0382 • www.zenaidacellars.com ZinAlley — 3730 Highway 46 West, Templeton • 805-238-0959 • www.zinalley.com

north county

Olive Iol Tasting

Alta Cresta — 6075 High Ridge Road, Paso Robles • 805-227-4751 • www.altacresta.com Carriage Vineyards — 4337 South El Pomar, Templeton • 800-617-7911 • www.carriagevineyards.com Kiler Ridge Olive Farms — 1111 Kiler Canyon Road, Paso Robles • 805-975-6066 • www.kilerridge.com Mt. Olive Organic Farm — 3445 Adelaida Road, Paso Robles • 805-237-0147 • www.mtoliveco.com Olea Farms — 2985 Templeton Road, Templeton • 805-610-2258 www.oleafarm.com Olivas de Oro Olive Company — 4625 La Panza Road, Creston • 805-227-4223 •www.olivasdeoro.com Pasolivo — 8530 Vineyards Drive, Paso Robles • 805-227-0186 • www.pasolivo.com ad2.ai 6/25/2008 9:11:18 AM We Olive — 1311 Park St., Paso Robles • 805-239-7667 • www.weolive.com ad2.ai 6/25/2008 9:11:18 AM Wine Country Olives — 12 Ocean Ave., Ste. 122, Cayucos • 805-434-6063 • www.wineolives.com ad2.ai 6/25/2008 9:11:18 AM

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wine storage - licensed & bonded www.vintagestorehouse.net

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80 Fall 2013

Published by the Paso

Robles Press

VINO

Central Coast Edition


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VINO - Fall/Winter 2013 - Paso Robles CA