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Recreation & Entertainment in Kittitas County

Annual KITTITAS COUNTY EQUINES Issue

A horsey garden

New stamps immortalize ‘Cowboys of the Silver Screen’

See Page12

Trainer Shannon King discusses the human element in horsemanship


A fun repeat TRAIL OF THE MONTH “Trail Mix” is a description of a Cascades area trail from the perspective of an actual user.

We have had a really strange spring as far as weather is concerned! So, that’s why I’m going to take my readers on lower and familiar trails. It could still snow in the high country, and even at this writing, there is a lot of snow where I would normally go. We’ll start with a fun place to go that opens on May 1. That is Joe Watt Canyon in the L.T. Murray Recreational Area. I always go to the Joe Watt Canyon because it is fairly close and it’s also on the Manastash side of the valley which usually means there is less snow! You can camp overnight if you like and there is year-round stock water in the creek when you go

Joe Watt Canyon and John Wayne Pioneer Trail good lowland rides for late spring

There is also a “Fun Ride” scheduled at Joe Watt Canyon and sponsored by the BCHW Alpine Lakes Trail Riders on May 15. It used to be called a Poker Ride, but things change! Directions: Drive east on I-90 from Cle Elum.Turn off at the Thorp exit where the FRUIT stand is located.Turn right and then right again at Thorp Cemetery Rd.That’s the siding road that goes along the freeway.Turn left at Watt Canyon Rd. and continue driving to the end of the road past a couple houses.You can park before the fence or go through the gates and drive into the meadow area to camp. Please note that the L.T. Murray is owned by the Department of Fish & Wildlife and all of their rules apply. No parking permit is required.

The other place that is safe to go this month is anywhere on the John Wayne Pioneer Trail. It is also called the Iron Horse State Park. So, when you ride there, be sure to adhere to all the State Park rules.The beauty of the JWPT (Iron Horse State Park) is that it stretches for 110 miles through some of the most gorgeous and diversified country in Kittitas County! You can pick the countryside you’d like to ride through and access to the trail is easy. If you can legally park, do it, otherwise go to trailhead parking in your area. There is no parking permit required, but you do need to get a FREE trail permit when crossing through military land (Army West to Army East, about 20 miles. There is no one allowed to cross the dam anymore, but you can go to the Idaho border – first, you must call ahead and get the combinations or keys for gates along the trail. It’s also a good idea to remember that the only stretch that is maintained (facilities for camping) is the 110 miles inside Kittitas County.You can go to any of the eight trailheads in our county. Directions:

The Joe Watt Canyon is a wonderful place to bring your horse. The terrain is diversified, with rolling hills, forest, ridges, rocks or no rocks. And there is stock water in the creek. Janie McQueen photo

through the gates. Once inside the cyclone fence and gates, you can pick where you’d like to ride.There are no marked trails, but trails are easy to see.There are also dirt roads (green dot) for riding.The camping area is pretty open, so you can always see it or turn around and let your critter “find” its way back to your rig! PAGE 2 MAY 2010 - THE HORSE ISSUE

All of these directions are for when you’re driving east on I-90. A map will help you find them.The first is “Hyak” off of Exit 54 on I90.The second trailhead is “Easton” and is off of Exit 71.Then there is the South Cle Elum trailhead which can be reached by turning at Exit 84. From there you can go to Exit 101 and reach the Thorp trailhead.The next trailhead is off of Exit 106 (Ellensburg West at the Kittitas County Fairgrounds) and then to the Kittitas Trailhead which can be accessed off I-9- from Exit 115.There you can go to the Army West (same Exit 115) Trailhead which is in the desert area and requires a FREE trail permit at the kiosk on site. Once you go there, it’s another 20 miles until you get to the Army East trailhead near the Columbia River. WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM • CASCADES

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✦ BOOK REVIEWS

By Janie McQueen

“From My Hands to Yours”: This book is a really good for teaching you and for training a horse. It’s written by Monty Roberts, who began his horse career as a boy. He used to gather up wild horses and train them for riding (break them the traditional way) and then they were sold. He then went to Nevada to help capture wild horses in 1948.There, he discovered so much about a horse’s communication in the wild that he disagreed a great deal with the previous “cruelty” he had witnessed. So, Monty spent every chance he got observing the wild horse, and developed the “language of equus” that he has used to train over 12,000 horses. Monty’s motto is that he is always learning.“A good horse trainer can get a horse to do what he wants him to do. A great horse trainer can get a horse to want to do it.” The book,“From My Hands to Yours”, is well written and has lots of illustrations and color (as well as black and white) pictures to help with your learning and Monty’s credibility.The book was written as a teaching tool and you’ll use it often, but, be prepared to really read this book from cover to cover, over and over, because it isn’t light reading! You’ll learn so much from Monty’s book that your horse will LOVE you and you’ll love your horse! “I did not create my training concepts. I only discovered what nature already had in place.” – Monty Roberts Visit Monty Roberts online at his website: www.montyroberts.com

“Hearts of Horses”: The “Hearts of Horses” is a novel written by Molly Gloss. It’s set in the mountains of northeast Oregon and is about a girl, Martha Lessen, who lived during World War I.That was a time when women were just “coming into their own” because most of the younger men were off to war. Martha was probably one of the very first “horse whisperers” and prided herself in the knowledge that she knew how to “break a horse” without hurting it – unlike her father! So, she left home, riding her horse and she had two horses on a lead rope while they were saddled with the tools of her trade. George and Louise Bliss are the first family that Martha came across on her quest for a job doing just that – breaking horses. In fact, there were a lot of gals that were now working

ranches and things that used to be “man’s only” work. Martha liked that because she’d always been a tomboy and NEVER wanted to get married or have children. It was George Bliss who had the first idea for Martha to ride a “circle” to neighboring ranches while she broke their horses.“Well, here’s an idea I’ve been thinking up,” George said,“I was talking to Emil and W.G. [other ranchers with horses to break] and I told them we had Miss Lessen here, breaking them to beat the band.” George figured that she could easily find work (she had already finished his two horses) on the other ranches and suggested she ride a “circle” pattern to the other ranches where she would trade off horses to put “miles” on them. She had 14 horses in training and rode to seven ranches. She would trade off the horses so they were ridden every other day. Well, I won’t tell you the entire story, so I’ll suffice it to say that it’s one of those easy reading novels that you wish would never end!

“A Cowgirl Remembers When”: If you just can’t sit still long enough to read the other books, this book is ideal, because it’s chock full of short stories about the author’s growing up years in Washington.There isn’t actually a story over 10 pages, and that’s unusual. It’s written by Dawn Nelson, who was raised on a cattle ranch in Washington State. I met Dawn at the “Spirit of the West Cowboy Gathering” in Ellensburg this year and she is a delightful person. “A Cowgirl Remembers When” is easy to read and you’ll love reading about Dawn’s early life on the ranch and all of her short stories are TRUE! The book is written in three sections so you’ll never get lost and is laced with a few real-life photographs! It is also one of those books that you can put down and resume reading later, if you’d like. But, if you’re like me, you can’t wait to read the next story, so you just keep on with it! It will be a good one to read now that the weather is better and you want to spend more time outdoors. Visit Gray Dog Press Bookstore to find “A Cowgirl Remembers When” http://www.graydogpress.com/bookstore/

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Volume 9 No. 5

MOUNTAIN-ECHO STAFF: Jana Stoner, Terry Hamberg, Janie McQueen, Lyn Derrick, Jim Fossett, Deanna Plesha, Paige Berrigan, Casey Clark, Jeff Bornhorst, Cindy Steiner, Carol Punton, Debbie Renshaw and Bonnie Montgomery

THE HORSE ISSUE - MAY 2010 PAGE 3


Heading to college means

Sayin’ goodbye Chip to

by Jim Fossett a little over 14-hands, and there were huge boulDO YOU SAY GOODBYE to someChip’s a 17-year-old, quarter horse, a bay, HOW ders and rocks in our way. one you’ve loved – and trusted – the which, if you’re a greenhorn, means his body better part of your childhood? Lacey “As he was climbing, his back hoof slid and is burnished with reddish brown overtones, Wuesthoff brushes quarter horse Chip he belly flopped on a boulder – legs splayed. trusted friend of an entire Thorp and he’s black around his mane, tail, ear –family, He couldn’t reach the ground. who isn’t exactly your normal edges, and lower legs. But Chip’s more than horse, as Lacey will tell you. As will “The kicker is, where most horses would have Jim Fossett photo a horse, he’s the trusted friend of a young mom, Ninon. panicked – Chip didn’t. He just regained his footThorp woman who reluctantly, after the ten ing, got back up, and calmly moved to the trail. years Chip’s been in the family, has to put him up for adoption. “He’s the kind of horse that’ll ride three miles up a hill, It’s a goodbye-thing, as you might imagine, bringing love and neletting me grab his tail so I can get up the hill behind him. cessity head-to-head in a battle where necessity wins. “I dunno. I just feel like he’s our best horse.” “I’m 19 years old,” said Chip’s owner, Lacey Wuesthoff.“I’m Ninon went on to tell another story characterizing what in college, now. I work in my mom’s soup factory and help it is about Chip that makes it difficult for the family to part with the family rafting business. In August, I’m headed for Chile with him. to study abroad, if everything falls into place. I have no time. “Above Wenatchee, I was off Chip, leading him, making The best case scenario for me, would be to find him a home our way down this really steep cut. with kids, but any loving owner would be wonderful.” “At one point he was moving faster than I was, so rather Because of a hoof injury Chip picked up on a rugged than trample me, he lowered his head and literally picked mountain ride, an injury not unlike carpal tunnel, as Lacey’s me up with his snout to gently move me out of the way.Then mom, Ninon, explained it, he can travel uphill – but he can’t he went ahead of me and kept on going. get back down. “I just stood there at the side of the trail, stunned an ani“Chip loves children. He’s very tolerant of a variety of mal would do something like that. None of my other horses childlike behaviors and he’s perfect for indoor and outdoor would have done that.” arena riding, and flatland excursion, which is how young ridChip was Lacey’s first big horse and the two quickly beers start out. came best friends. “We got him when I was nine-years old, from the Owens “Early on I could ride him backwards, and I was smaller in Cle Elum. I rode him with the Cle Elum Pony Club, in the then, so he would put his head down, pick me up, and let Peoh Point area. me slide down to his back. “After I had him for a year, I never used a saddle, because “You know, most horses get their share of bumps and I trusted him. Nothing can spook him. He’s calm and levelbruises, cuts and scrapes over a lifetime, but Chip’s shown headed no matter what happens. Tarps blowing up in the this amazing amount of tolerance for all that. wind scare most horses. Not Chip.” “Like I said, his tolerance bridges to young children. As a Ninon, tells this story. kid, I remember having friends of every sort over to the “We went on a pack trip two days after we had him. house to play with him.They’d jump on him, run under him, “The second night we camped and then went up to a high pull his tail, and he put up with it all, loving the contact. lake over a really steep, treacherous trail. Chip’s a small horse, “Yes. I’ll truly miss him. We all will.” PAGE 4 MAY 2010 - THE HORSE ISSUE

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THE HORSE ISSUE - MAY 2010 PAGE 5


Gardens Horses? for

If you’d like to grow fenugreek, plant seeds in full sun with well-drained, organically rich soil and regular water. Plants fruit about 4 months after germination. Dig up the whole plant and hang it upside down to dry. The leaves are comBARB YOUNG of Fourteen Carrot monly used dried and the seeds Farm in Ellensburg, who is also a Master Gardener, believes in have a maple or vanilla taste and growing horse munchies in her should be stored in an airtight garden. She practices “carrot stretches” with her horse Donny, container after harvesting. an exercise that helps with musBananas are rich in potassium cle tone. Young dips her carrots and high in energy, they don’t in fenugreek powder for an extra flavor boost for Donny. Fenugrow in our climate zone but in greek is one of the two top flaother countries they are a staple vors that horse like. horse treat like apples and carNola Forster photo rots are in the United States. Cherries and apples, however, by Nola Forster, grow happily in Kittitas County. If you plan to give cherries WSU Extension Master Gardener to horses though, be sure to remove the pits and stems first. Barb reminds me that, as with any change in diet, proceed If you ask urban gardeners about horses and gardens they very gradually. might imagine a horse standing in the middle of the vegOrchard trees grow best in deep, well-drained soils. They etable garden nibbling the parsley or maybe stripping fruit need at least 4 feet of soil above any impenetrable layers or and leaves off the backyard apple tree. They would say water table to give them adequate root development. Fruit horses and gardens don’t mix. So I went to my friend Barb trees require full sun and regular water, especially when the Young, owner of Fourteen Carrot Farm in Ellensburg. Barb trees are young, their roots are not developed enough to abis a Horsewoman Extraordinaire and a Kittitas County Massorb much water at a time. ter Gardener; she would say a complete garden should always have taste treats and forage for the horses. In the Herb Garden Research trials indicate horses crave variety. It turns out Cumin is also an annual grown from seed, but it requires that horses have quite discerning palates with a wide range a long hot summer and is mostly grown in Mediterranean cliof taste preferences. Barb referred me to an article written mates; but rosemary, peppermint and oregano are herbs by Tracy Williams who, along with Deborah Goodwin PhD commonly grown our area. All are considered perennials, and a team of British researchers, conducted taste test trials but in our climate zone rosemary must be brought indoors on a number of horses. during the winter to survive. According to Goodwin many horses experience “dietary Buy rosemary transplants in the spring and it will grow monotony” through domestication. If you watch horses in the fast in our hot summer sun and provide a harvest of rosewild they will consume up to 50 types of forage as they roam mary leaves until the first hard freeze. Rosemary grows in and graze. The team tested 15 flavors historically and currently poor to moderately fertile soil; it requires full sun and wellused to flavor horse feeds all over the world. The top two fadrained soil. vorites are fenugreek and bananas followed by cherry, roseOregano majoricum, also called hardy marjoram and Italmary, cumin, carrot, peppermint and oregano in that order. ian oregano, is a short-lived perennial. It grows in poor to Fenugreek you say? Trigonella foenum is a member of moderately fertile soil. It also likes alkaline soil, which we the bean family and is traditionally used to flavor Indian curmostly have east of the Cascades. Plant in full sun with wellries and other foreign dishes. Fenugreek is an annual herb drained soil; do not let the roots sit in wet conditions. In grown as a spice, a leafy vegetable and for forage. It grows early spring trim old flowered stems clear to the ground. about 2 feet tall, has 3-part leaves that resemble clover and Mentha piperita or Peppermint grows in sun to part white to purple pea-like flowers that become long slender shade, spreading rapidly by underground stolens and it green pods in late summer. PAGE 6 MAY 2010 - THE HORSE ISSUE

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Buckwheat is an antioxidant and for grazing horses it’s a rich source of calcium, potassium, magnesium and iron that helps build blood cells. You can share the buckwheat with the horses and turn the rest under to build up the soil for planting the vegetable garden following year.

attracts bees. Grow from cuttings, as it will not breed true from seed. Locate peppermint in rich, moist soil and give it regular deep watering; add moisture retaining compost to the growing area. It will live happily around ponds or fountains. It can become invasive but it can be grown in containers to restrict spread.

The End Product We can’t talk about horses and all the good things to feed them unless we address what comes out – horse manure. Here is where gardeners everywhere perk up and also may experience a twinge of envy of their farmer-gardener friends. Composted horse manure, if managed correctly, can be a wonderful addition to the garden soil; it will build good soil structure and texture, and increase the soil’s moisture holding capacity. Be sure to locate your compost pile away from nearby streams, ditches, wetlands and residences so nitrates that leach out of the pile will not leak into ground or surface water. A well-managed compost pile will reach temperatures high enough to kill fly eggs and larvae as well as parasites and bacteria and weed seeds in manure. Your pile should be at least 3 feet high to get to those temperatures. Be careful not to overheat the pile, temperatures over 160 F may also destroy the beneficial organisms needed for decomposition. Next, keep up good airflow, if your pile is very large you may need a tractor to turn the pile at regular intervals, especially during the first weeks after building the pile. Moisture must be managed as well. Heat and airflow generated during composting and our hot summer sun can evaporate water quickly. Water it down with a garden hose when you turn the pile. If it becomes too wet during the short rainy season turn the pile and cover it with a tarp until it quits raining. If the pile gets too wet it will become heavy and compacted, smell bad and slow the decomposition process. Check it by taking a handful from the middle of the pile and squeezing it. It should feel like a damp wrung-out sponge. For your gardening questions contact the WSU Master Gardener offices anytime and a Master Gardener will return your call. The Diagnostic Clinic is open May through September, Tuesdays 11:30 am - 2:30 pm at the WSU Extension Office, 507 Nanum Rm. 2, Ellensburg; Phone: (509) 962-7507 Upper County Toll Free: (509) 674-2584.

Speaking of Containers Barb has obtained several large barrels and plans to grow a variety of herbs that she knows her horses like and some they might like. Calendula for example, sometimes called pot marigold (although it isn’t really a marigold), has beautiful yellow and orange flowers. We use it to decorate home salads, but it is also good for horses because it has anti-inflammatory and anti-fungal properties; it helps with digestive inflammation and it also aids in skin problems. When the herbs are large enough to withstand some nibbling, she will place them just within reach of the horses, on the other side of the fence. So they won’t pull the plants out by the roots she will try anchoring chicken wire in the pots so the plants will grow through it and only the tops will be available to the horses. Carrot Stretches OK, now to carrots – a treat for horses we all can relate to. Barb dips her carrot in fenugreek powder to give it an extra flavor burst. She tells me that “in the industry” it’s a common practice to urge the horse to stretch the head for that special carrot treat to help keep muscles toned, just like human athletes do before a workout. It is especially good for old or injured horses that don’t get the exercise that they should. In the photo Barb shows carrot stretches with her beige buckskin named “Don Bunnell,” grandson of “Doc Bar,” whom she lovingly calls Donny. Carrots are a cool season crop; grow in full sun on light, stone free and fertile soil. Rake the soil until the soil particles are fine before sowing the seeds; they will grow straight if they don’t have to bend around objects. Carrots need very low nitrogen levels so don’t rotate the crop to where peas grew the prior year; peas and legumes fix nitrogen in the soil so that’s where your beets and potatoes might go. While we are talking about the vegetable garden, if you grow a cover crop a good one to grow in fall is buckwheat. Get Your Spring/Summer Seasonal Shots Now

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THE HORSE ISSUE - MAY 2010 PAGE 7


By Janie McQueen

Of

Kings, Woods, Horses and ...

Dragons

Sounds like something straight out of a medieval tale, doesn’t it? Well, when Shannon King was a little girl, her parents bought 150 acres of land overlooking the Teanaway River in Cle Elum, for the equine facility they later built. Shannon’s mom, Barb King, LOVES everything that has to do with the Middle Ages, and because Shannon’s folks actually own the place, it was natural for it to be called something like Dragonwood (dragon was for the middle ages – wood was because the property is in the woods). In fact, when, as a family, they used to camp on the property before the horse facility was built, Shannon (only thirteen years old) and her mom would unload their horses and ride, pretending they were from that era and play Middle Ages games on horseback! Today, Shannon is a John Lyons schooled horse trainer. She is truly a horse communicator and believes in training people (horse owners) as well as their horses. She takes students through her Horse2Human® courses with the ease of a professional. Participants are expected to do the classroom as well as the round pen work, whether they are horse owners, or training with one of her horses. Shannon does clinics and training at Dragonwood.The King family also board and breed horses, and even host weddings. (For more information about the facility, visit www.dragonwoodbreeding.com or call 509-674-5961.) Most of the teaching takes place in the large indoor arena on site. She has written material to learn as well and students need to go home and practice, practice, practice! Another “King”, my own horse King, and I participated in one of these clinics earlier this spring. Shannon is a good teacher and a good teacher knows that when people are learning, questions arise. Just ask her. That’s how we learn faster. Notice that HORSE is before HUMAN in Shannon’s trademark Horse2Human® equation! Yes, that’s right, Shannon believes in subtle contact with the horse, and students must learn the “language of horses” or they simply won’t progress. She demonstrates ways to communicate correctly with the big animals.There is much to learn. Like what does Shannon mean by “indirect” and “direct” rein? What is a “hip-over” exercise? In addition, she also teaches how to be safe when riding. “You can always do the ground work that you learn from the saddle!” shared Shannon. And getting the groundwork is difficult for most people. It’s really important to remember that the horse must memorize everything PHYSICALLY first. Not only does the human need to know where the horse’s feet are placed at all times, but to be reasonably safe with the horse, it’s important to make sure that the horse knows to THINK about their own feet. To learn more about her program, visit Shannon online at:

PAGE 8 MAY 2010 - THE HORSE ISSUE

www.horse2human.com The following is an excerpt from an article she wrote that touches on Shannon’s philosophy about her work with horses and their humans: Excerpt from: The Next Step… By Shannon King ...The next step in the evolution of man’s passion for the horse is Relationship Training.While incorporating many of the techniques of Natural Horsemanship, Relationship Training takes the next step. Relationship Training goes beyond teaching the horse and into the realm of the horse teaching the human! The horse and the human are teaching and learning from each other - together. How many times have we heard the story of the person who takes their horse to what they believe is the best trainer in the world, only to find that two weeks after the horse returns home, the performance of the horse with their human is right back where it was before! The reason is because a critical component of training - the RELATIONSHIP - is missing. Would it not seem reasonable that the human undergo the same intensity of learning the horse does? It is a recognized fact that a horse will perform at the same level that their human performs. If the human’s performance or skill level does not improve, why would we think that a horse’s would? The key advancing component that evolves Relationship Training beyond that of Natural Horsemanship is the Human! At lower levels, the human is involved in learning at the same rate that the horse is and the human begins training to be perceptive and listen to what the horse is saying. At higher levels, we begin to learn directly from the horses’ behavior or actions. A horse can and does “talk” to their human. If we listen, we will understand and begin to improve personal traits such as focus, consistency, anger management, confidence, will power, and we will gain personal satisfaction and empowerment and heal the wounds and scars of our soul.The result is positive both for the horse and the human.The positive result can ultimately be demonstrated by achieving higher levels of performance together - horse and human. Is this method for everyone? Probably not. Have you spent as much time improving yourself as your horse has? The next time you are on a trail ride and eat dirt, or in the arena when your horse won’t settle down or perform a certain maneuver, you might just ask yourself - is it me? WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM • CASCADES

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Timeless spring rituals of Kittitas County

SAM KAYSER

Cattlemen bring history to life

By Jim Fossett

In Kittitas County, ranch hands still have a hook on the rack to hang their dusty, weather-beaten hats. Still visible in the valley are horizon-kissing flats of bunchgrass and networks of mountain-fed streams that stitch together the minds and souls of cattlemen on horseback. Still breathing are sweet spots on the open range, where you can, even today, sit quietly away from I-90, soak in the sun, transcend to the slower pulse of Mother Nature, and watch cowboys and cowgirls work their herds. And zooming in on the county’s portrait of modern age cattle ranchers: Still growing is a half century-old patch of cottonwoods, not far f r o m SAM KAYSER, SHARON ALMBERG and BILL JOHNSON persistently hold on to the cattle ranching tradition Fairview Road in Ellensburg, still stubb o r n l y herding bald eagles to its craggy limbs, while half-century r a n c h owner Sam Kayser and his cutting horse still stubbornly move mothers and calves toward pastures set aside as springtime nurseries. On horseback with Kayser this time of year are Cle Elum’s Bill Johnson and Sharon Almberg, two equally stubborn ranch hands who refuse to let go of a county tradition that tracks to the days before the county was ever mapped and named. Why do they do it? Because, as they will tell you: The work still tastes good.

NEWBORN CALF shown seconds before it got up and walked the planet for the very first time.

BILL JOHNSON cuts a mom and her calf.

NOT FAR AWAY from this open pasture is the City of Ellensburg and I-90, one of Washington’s busiest highways. Tranquility prevails over the pasture and - a tradition nearly as old as the hills themselves cutting calves, as demonstrated here by cattleman Sam Kayser.

PAGE 10 MAY 2010 - THE HORSE ISSUE

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❖ SATURDAY, MAY 1 Kittitas Audubon Society First Saturday Bird Walk, 8:00 a.m., meet at Irene Rinehart parking lot near Ellensburg. Most walks run 2 hrs. Everyone welcome. For info, visit www.kittitasaudubon.org. WA State Fly Fishing Conference (May 1-2), Kittitas County Events Center, Ellensburg. For more information, call 1-800-426-5340.

❖ MONDAY, MAY 3 Cascade Field & Stream Club, 7:00 p.m. at Sunset Cafe in Cle Elum. Info: call 509-674-1714.

❖ WEDNESDAY, MAY 5 7th Annual “Planting the Seeds for EMS” luncheon with Gardening with Ciscoe. For info, contact Life Support, 509-304-5055.

❖ FRIDAY, MAY 7 Swauk-Teanaway Grange Mother’s Day Tea. Swauk-Teanaway Grange 1361 Ballard Hill Rd., Cle Elum. Contact: Judy Doolittle, 509-674-9539.

❖ SATURDAY, MAY 8 Ellensburg Wine Festival, Ellensburg. Call Ellensburg Chamber, 1-888-925-2204.

❖ THURSDAY, MAY 13 Alpine Lakes Trail Riders (ALTR) chapter of Back Country Horsemen of WA, 7:00 p.m. at the Roslyn Riders Clubhouse off State Route 903. For info, call Dana Bailey, (509) 304-8701.

❖ MAY 14-15-16 38th Annual Ellensburg National Art Show & Auction, Kittitas Co. Fairgrounds, Ellensburg. For info, call Western Art Assoc., 509-962-2934.

❖ SATURDAY, MAY 15 Alpine Lakes Chapter - Back Country Horseman of WA Poker Ride, riders out 9 a.m. - 12 noon from Joe Watt Canyon. For more info, call Karen Bailey, 509-426-1998 or visit www.alpinelakesbchw.com.

❖ MAY 21 - JUNE 6 John Wayne Pioneer Wagons & Riders Assoc.29th Annual Cross State Ride. For more info, call Kathy Cowin, 360-886-1729 or visit www.jwpwr.org.

See more horse events on back cover ❖ FRIDAY, MAY 28 ‘Final Friday’ Live Music & Art Walk 5:00 - 9:00 p.m., downtown Roslyn. For more information, call 509-649-2551

❖ SATURDAY, MAY 29 Easton Memorial Day Parade, Festival and Car Show, downtown Easton. For more info, call Chuck White, 509-656-0180.

❖ SUNDAY, MAY 30 Roslyn Riders Annual Poker Ride, riders out 9:00 a.m. - 12 noon from Playfield off Hwy. 903. For more info, call Griffins 509-674-2404 or Maria Fischer, 509-304-8701 or mariaf@bmi.net.

❖ MONDAY, MAY 31 Memorial Day service, 10:00 a.m. at the Cle Elum Veterans Cemetery. For more info, call Cle Elum City Hall, 509-674-2262.

State Horse Park breaks ground in Cle Elum In early April 2010, after a quarter century of planning and fundraising, crews assembled at the site of what will become the Washington State Horse Park – and broke ground. The site is on Ranger Road, in Cle Elum, and by the time you read this, patches of forest will have been cleared for buildings, stalls, arenas, and parking lots. By August, the Park’s $3.5M Phase One build will be complete and 26-acres of the 112-acre project will be readied to host a first event. What’s in store for the Horse Park’s soft opening in August? The Cowboy Mounted Shooters. Then in September the Park is to host an event with Arabian Region 5, an association encompassing Alaska, Washington, Northern Idaho and Western Montana. Also in September the Washington State Horse Park Foundation will host a Poker Ride. Solbakken said tentatively booked are a Pony Club Polocross and a breed show with the Irish Draught Horse Society. Then in June 2011, the Park is to feature the Region III American Vaulting Association Championships. The Washington State Horse Park will become a world-class venue, hosting breed shows, western competitions, hunter-jumper shows, dressage competitions, three-day events, and combined driving and competitive trail riding. On the drawing board are plans to connect the Horse Park to the Coal Mine Trail east of the site and to the Iron Horse State Park to the south.

EVENTS CALENDAR

MAY • 2010

Check for more events or post your own events FREE online at:

mountain-echo.com/Calendar

PAGE 12 MAY 2010 - THE HORSE ISSUE

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‘Cowboys Cle Elum Silver Screen’ Medical Center ride again & Urgent Care of the

Four legends of the silver screen get their firstclass stamps of approval tomorrow when the Postal Service issues the Cowboys of the Silver Screen stamps and stamped postal cards. The stamps honor four extraordinary performers who helped make American Westerns a popular form of entertainment — Gene Autry, William S. Hart, Tom Mix and Roy Rogers. ”The Postal Service has a long-standing tradition of honoring men and women who have helped define our great nation,” said James C. Miller III, of the U.S. Postal Service Board of Governors. “Today, we continue that tradition by celebrating the ‘Cowboys of the Silver Screen’ — William S. Hart, Tom Mix, Gene Autry and Roy Rogers — four extraordinary performers who helped make the American Western a popular form of entertainment. They rode the silver screen nearly a century ago, and decades from now, our grandchildren and great-grandchildren will talk about them when discussing the history of film, radio and television.” Stamp artist Robert Rodriguez of Los Angeles, CA, created the artwork under the direction of art director Carl Herrman of North Las Vegas, NV. “We are delighted that the Postal Service selected these popular stars for the ‘Silver Screen Cowboys’ series,” said National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum President Charles Schroeder. “Each of these fine actors took seriously the values they would model in their film careers. Collectively, they used their considerable talents to make the American Western movie a popular and inspirational form of entertainment. We at the National Cowboy Museum believe they did something of lasting importance, and we hope these beautiful stamps remind folks everywhere to revisit their message. It surely remains relevant to our culture today.” Have stamp idea? Visit www.usps.com/communications/organization/csac.htm to learn the criteria for submitting your ideas in writing.

THE HORSE ISSUE - MAY 2010 PAGE 13

Clinic: 509-674-5331 Monday - Friday 8:00 am-5:00 pm

Urgent Care: 509-674-6944 Monday - Friday 3:00 pm-11:00 pm Saturday, Sunday & Holidays 8:00 am-11:00 pm

201 Alpha Way • Cle Elum, WA 98922


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Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark announced the release of the popular map of Washington and its 3 million acres of state trust lands.“The State Trust Lands map features not only the state trust lands, but locates major parks, natural areas, federal forests and other public ownerships and is a useful resource for Washington’s citizens and visitors,” said Commissioner Goldmark. Both sides of the 24” X 41.5” map are filled with information. Typically updated about every five years, the map can be viewed online at www.dnr.wa.gov/BusinessPermits/Topics/Maps/Pages/major_public_lands_map.aspx. Or order the map online for $3.50 or pick up a free copy at one of DNR’s regional offices throughout the state (locations are listed on www.dnr.wa.gov ).

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State Trust Lands Map available

This calendar brought to you as a public service by your friends at Hearthstone Cottage Sunday, May 23, 7-10am at the South Cle Elum Depot

Cle Elum’s Centennial Center “Working with Seniors and Community”

Senior Center Events Calendar:

Buffet Breakfast

PUBLIC INVITED to these events (509) 674-7530

Just $5.00 Fundraiser for UKCSC

Saturday, May 29, 8am-4pm 615 East 1st St, Cle Elum

Garage Sale

Benefits UKCSC To Donate Items: 509-674-2525

www.centennial-center.org

Hearthstone Cottage

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... It’s how you live! “Carefree Independence with 24-Hour Safety & Security”

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www.FrontierMgmt.com Call or stop by for your tour today

(509) 925-3099 802 E. Mountain View Ave. Ellensburg, WA 98926 HearthstoneEL@FrontierMgmt.com PAGE 14 MAY 2010 - THE HORSE ISSUE

Central Washington’s Premier Senior Living Community WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM • CASCADES

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MAY 3 Frankie Valli, Singer (73)

MAY 21 Lisa Edelstein, Actress (44)

MAY 6 Tom Bergeron, TV Host (55)

MAY 22 Apollo Ohno, Athlete (28)

MAY 12 Stephen Baldwin, Actor (43)

MAY 23 Drew Carey, Comic (52)

MAY 15 Emmitt Smith, Athlete (41)

MAY 24 Priscilla Presley, Actress (65)

MAY 16 Megan Fox, Actress (24)

MAY 25 Mike Myers, Comic (47)

MAY 17 Jordan Knight, Singer (40)

MAY 26 Lenny Kravitz, Singer (46)

MAY 18 Tina Fey, Comic/Writer (40)

MAY 27 Joseph Fiennes, Actor (40)

MAY 20 Tony Stewart, NASCAR driver (39)

MAY 29 LaToya Jackson, Singer (54)

ELECTION FIND WORD WORD SEARCH Just in time for BBQ Month, see how many related words you can find & circle throughout the puzzle. BARBECUE BEEF CHICKEN FIRE

FLAVOR GRILL PORK RUB

SLOW SMOKE TASTY VEGETABLES

ANSWERS ON PAGE 14

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

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24. NFL tiebreakers 25. Danced recklessly 26. Choose 28. Lose one’s cool 29. Failed to 32. Porter’s regretful Miss 34. Talk like a tosspot 37. Actress Meyers 38. Military diplomat 41. Merkel of moviedom 42. Reply to a schoolmarm 44. “__ boy!” 45. Treble clef lines 47. “Little Iodine” cartoonist Jimmy

49. Actress Arthur 50. Type of pear 52. “__ you nuts?” 54. Caron title role 58. Buoyed up 59. Makes privy to 61. Slo-__ (type of fuse) 62. Certain church officer 64. Back muscle, for short 65. Martini garnish 66. __ Haute, Ind. 67. Addis Ababa’s land: Abbr. 68. Basic principle 69. Marked a ballot

sponsored youth group 12. Saint-Sa‘ns’s “__ Macabre” 13. Rainbow shaped 18. Owl’s call 22. Tag sale caveat 27. School org. 28. Typewriter type 29. Calendar page 30. Wrath 31. Kitchen worker’s rag 32. Director Preminger 33. Tit for __ 35. Sturm __ Drang 36. UK airmen 39. Whopper of a story

40. Shoebox letters 43. Big shark 46. Classic Italian astronomer 48. “I’m a Little __” 49. “Little Women” woman 50. Luxurious fur 51. D sharp equivalent 52. Still kicking 53. Bowling alley button 55. Like helium or neon 56. “Casablanca” actor Peter 57. Signed, as a contract 60. “__ Network 90” (‘80s comedy series) 63. __ Tin Tin

HOW THEY SAY IT...

• 1862: THE U.S. BUREAU OF AGRICULTURE IS CREATED. • 1928: MICKEY MOUSE PREMIERES IN HIS FIRST CARTOON. • 1988: THE SOVIET UNION BEGINS WITHDRAWING TROOPS FROM AFGHANISTAN.

CASCADES MOUNTAIN-ECHO •

WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM

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1. Boat skippers, familiarly 6. Dutch cheeses 11. Pharmaceutical approving org. 14. Stan’s pal 15. Salk’s conquest 16. Dory propeller 17. Where hygiene is taught 19. Dad’s bro 20. Beat at the rifle range 21. Like a crow’s call 23. Amtrak map pts.

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THE WORD ‘BARBECUE’ MAY DERIVE FROM THE WORD ‘BARABICU’ FROM THE TAINO PEOPLE OF THE CARIBBEAN, MEANING ‘SACRED FIRE PIT.’

English: HOT Spanish: CALIENTE Italian: CALDO French: CHAUD German: HEISS

HORSING AROUND ISSUE - MAY 2010 PAGE 15


Upcoming 2010 Horse Events Roslyn Riders May 29 – Meet in Easton for the Easton Parade, scheduled for noon. May 30 – Memorial Day Weekend Poker Ride starts at 9:00 a.m., at the clubhouse on 70 Martin Road in Roslyn. July 3 – Meet in Cle Elum at 9:00 a.m. for the Fourth of July Parade. Then at noon, meet at the clubhouse for Fourth of July Play Day. September 5 – Meet at Roslyn Park, at 11:30 a.m., for the Coal Miners Parade. For more info logon to www.roslynriders.com

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Back Country Horsemen of Washington September 17 thru 19, 2010, Back Country Horsemen will host a Leave No Trace, Train The Trainer event at the Middle Fork of the Teanaway, near Cle Elum. For more information contact Jane Byram via email, LNTjane_3@hotmail.com.

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Washington Prize Rides May 15 – Alpine Lakes Chapter Ride, Joe Watt Canyon, contact Karen

Bailey (509) 304-8701, or logon to www.alpinelakesbchw.com. May 21-June 6 – John Wayne Pioneer Wagons and Riders cross-state ride, www.jwpwr.org. May 30 – Sunsations Mounted Drill Team, Nile, old sawmill site near Naches, contact Val (509) 952-4183, or email vsippola@aol.com. June 5 – Ellensburg Rodeo Posse, contact Punk Bender (509) 925-5215, or email punk@eburgchev.com. June 6 – Eastern Washington AQHA Prize Ride, Silver Ridge Ranch, Easton, logon to www.silverridgeranch.com. June 12 – Wenatchee Chapter Steak Ride, Eagle Creek, Leavenworth, contact Darlene Walton (509) 663-8615, or email waltonbd@clearwire.net. June 26 – Treasure Hunt at Silver Ridge Ranch, Easton, logon to www.silverridgeranch.com June 26-27 – Celebrate the Horse, Puyallup Fairgrounds, logon to www.celebratethehorse.org. July 16-18 – Olympic Chapter Western Dream Ride at Flying Horseshoe Ranch, Cle Elum, contact

Lynne Smith (360) 8950127, or email iluvbrnds@wavecable.com. August 7 – C-B’s Charity Ride at Silver Ridge Ranch, logon to www.silverridgeranch.com. August 27-29 – AQHA Golden Harvest Charity Ride 2010 at Flying Horseshoe Ranch (near Cle Elum), contact Tina Laguna, or email rancholaguna@msn.com. Oct 2 – Silver Ridge Ranch Charity Ride, Play day on Sunday, Easton, www. silverridgeranch.com.

--------------Dates not to miss

Kittitas County 4H For more info logon to www.co.kittitas.wa.us/extension/4hProgram.asp – or – http://4h.wsu.edu..

Riding Lessons Kittitas County 4-H’ers are invited to take riding lessons from Patience Grant and Nancy Harcus at Bloom Pavilion in Ellensburg. Dates are June 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29. July 6, 13, 20, 27, and August 3, 10. All lessons are conducted from 4-6:00 p.m. There are a variety of openings for various skill levels. For more info contact Brandy Siekawitch at 509962-7507.

4-H Training Days Yakima County 4-H Light Horse Training School will be held Friday, June 18 through Sunday, June 20 at the Central Washington State Fair Park in Yakima. For more info visit http://4h.wsu.edu. 4-H Dates to Remember July 5, 19, 26 – Monday Night Riding at the Rodeo Arena in Ellensburg, from 7-9:00 p.m. July 16-18 – 4-H Horse Pre-Show at the Bloom Pavilion in Ellensburg, from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. August 19-22 – Kittitas County Junior Horse Fair at the Bloom Pavilion and Rodeo Arena in Ellensburg. September 2-6 – Kittitas County Fair. September 26 – 4-H Horse Recruitment Show at Bloom Pavilion in Ellensburg. For more info logon to http://4h.wsu.edu.

Ga Cerem rden o Rustic nies & Recept Barn ions!

Nestled in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains, Ritter Farms offers a truly unique setting that surrounds you with the character and charm of a country farm as well as breathtaking views of mountain peaks.

Weddings • Corporate Events • Family & Class Reunions

Ritter Farms • www.ritterfarms.net 24 Lund Lane • Cle Elum, WA • 509.656.2564 PAGE 16 MAY 2010 - THE HORSE ISSUE

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May 2010 - ECHO_Magazine - Horses