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Recreation & Entertainment in Kittitas County

• Gift of Life for Dogs

Real Reindeer Romp in Roslyn and Issaquah

• Griff & Linda Griffith decorate for the holidays • Take a family-friendly stroll in Rotary Park

THIS MONTH: Annual Holidays in the Mountains Issue

See Page 15

www.mountain-echo.com


What’s the most

unusual gift you ever got for

Christmas? That is the question we asked people in Upper Kittitas County, when ECHO reporters hit the streets in search of people willing to share their memorable stories. Here’s what some residents had to say: Sharon Parks: I got a huge, round candle. Wrapped up – I thought it was a fruitcake. It had eight wicks in the middle and lit up the room, beautifully. I loved it! Mary Lou Bruner: A case of chicken soup. I was eight years old, and I cried and cried, but not because of the kind of gift it was. I was afraid everyone would eat it. I loved chicken soup. Linda Hutchison: A pair of lips, from my son. He told me it was symbolic of the lip he gave me growing up, and the lip I gave him in return, which he said, he now appreciates. Al Montgomery: Glider lessons. My wife got them for me. 50-something Cle Elum man: A case of C-rations. 60-something Cle Elum man: A jug with a cork in it from my brother.The jug was labeled,“Your Brother’s Farts.” Robert Baskette: A tube of glue. Darla Poteet: A five-piece jogging suit scrunched up and stuffed

in a poster tube. I thought I was getting a poster. My dad did that for me. 50-something Cle Elum woman: Garlic-chip cookies. I’ve never figured that out. Craig Nevil: I was getting ready to pick up the kids.They were at my wife’s house. I’m running around trying to get ready, and I look at the Christmas tree and there’s nothing under it for me. I thought, the kids are gonna think Santa forgot me.That can’t happen. Maybe they’ll even think there isn’t a Santa, or he didn’t do his job, or whatever. So I ran out and bought myself a teddy bear. Nancy Behrens: A relative of mine got a short golf club and a mat. It was made for golfing while he sat on the John. Jessica Beell: My dad got a coffee mug shaped like the wrong end of a horse, with a tail for a handle. He’s a ferrier. Steve Benavides: A pair of sunglasses with a built in 4-gigabyte USB drive. 30-something Cle Elum woman: A baby. [she laughs] 20-something Ellensburg woman: I got a box-in-a-box thing from an old boyfriend.The first box was huge, eight-square feet, and inside it was a pair of socks.The next box had a Frisbee, so I could play catch with his dog. Inside the next box was a squeegee, so I could wash his truck, so he said. And in the smallest box, the heaviest, was $50 in pennies, and $30 dollars in nickels, because he said he didn’t know what to buy me. I told him never to

TUNDRA

PAGE 2 DECEMBER 2009 - CELEBRATIONS ISSUE

do that again, and so he didn’t For the next 15 years, I didn’t get anything. Needless to say, he’s no longer with me [laughter]. Jim Parks: My hunting buddy gave me a whole box of 30-30 rifle shells. First time out, I loaded up – and nothing.Turns out they were all duds. We had a good laugh over that. Dolize Richards: One year I got rainbow colored toe socks, but I asked for those. Another year I got a pink toaster, and I loved it; proceeds went to breast cancer research. 30-something Cle Elum woman: A facelift. And I really needed it. It was wonderful. 50-something Cle Elum man: A bag of zippers. I was in fourth grade. My aunt used to do all her Christmas shopping at the local church bazaar, back when they had ‘surprise’ grab bags for a nickel. I’m not sure she knew she was buying a bag of zippers, and I never mentioned it to her. My mother covered for me. 50-something Cle Elum man: When I was 14 or 15 years old, my family lived next to a millionaire, the owner of Elephant Super Car Washes, nationwide. He gave me a box of bandaids. I’ll never forget it. 40-something Cle Elum woman: I got a pair of slippers that were four sizes too big, from a relative. I never asked why. 30-something Cle Elum man: The tag on the gift read, ‘Here’s that fifty-foot boat you always wanted.’ Inside, was a toy boat with 50, tiny, plastic human feet glued around the deck.

by Chad Carpenter

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MOUNTAIN-ECHO


Welcome to Cascades Mountain

Echo MAGAZINE An exciting new look for an old friend. Launched eight years ago, the Cascades Mountain-Echo has undergone a magazine make-over with this issue.

3 200 2004

5

200

6

200

THE CASCADES MOUNTAIN-ECHO is now Cascades Mountain Echo MAGAZINE. The first Echo came out in March, 2002. Echo Magazine will continue to focus on a different recreational or entertainment theme each month. The new format comes with a re-design of layouts and a new logo for the magazine.

8 0 0 2 7

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r e b o Oct 09 20

P.O. Box 308 • 807 W. Davis Street Cle Elum, WA 98922

(509) 674-2511, phone (509) 674-5571, fax

E-mail: echo@mountain-echo.com

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Cascades Mountain-Echo, a division of Oahe Publishing Corp.

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ch r a M 02 20

the Cascade mountains. As interest in the publication grew, the Echo evolved over the years from primarily black and white with a little spot blue, to full color throughout. In this next phase, the newly reformatted Cascades Mountain Echo Magazine reinvents itself once again. We look forward to hearing feedback from you, our readers.

Since March of 2002, the Echo has been bringing recreation and entertainment news and people features to visitors and residents of Kittitas County on the eastern slopes of

Volume 8 No. 12

On the cover: REINDEER MAY NOT BE INDIGENOUS TO WASHINGTON STATE, BUT SOME OF THESE CHRISTMAS ICONS MAKE THEIR HOME HERE IN IN ISSAQUAH’S ZOO, AND EVEN ‘FLY’ IN FOR A VISIT IN ROSLYN. SEE PAGES 6-7. SONYA BENHARDT PHOTO

MOUNTAIN-ECHO STAFF: Jana Stoner, Terry Hamberg, Janie McQueen, Lyn Derrick, Jim Fossett, Deanna Plesha, Paige Berrigan, Pat Ellis, Casey Clark, Jeff Bornhorst, Cindy Steiner, Carol Punton, Debbie Renshaw and Bonnie Montgomery

CELEBRATIONS ISSUE - DECEMBER 2009 PAGE 3


By Lyn Derrick

‘The wonders they will do’ With performances at the Vogue Theatre during the holidays and all year through

“If I could work my will,” said Scrooge indignantly,“every idiot who goes about with ‘Merry Christmas’ on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart.” Before long, those words of anger could explode from Scrooge’s mouth as he stands ‘center stage right’ in a production of A Christmas Carol at the newly renovated Vogue Theatre at 208 Pennsylvania Ave. in Cle Elum. It’s possible. And Scrooge may be joined by the kindhearted George Bailey in It’s a Wonderful Life, the dance of the sugar plum fairies in The Nutcracker, and a showing of Irving Berlin’s 1954 hit movie musical, White Christmas, too. “Just imagine,” said Rhonda Wilton,“the whole family sitting down to enjoy The Nutcracker, Scrooge, or Joseph and

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NOT EVEN SCROOGE will be able to resist holiday events at the newly restored Vogue Theatre. Built in 1923, as a Vaudeville theatre and movie house, it closed in the early 1970s and sat vacant until Community Builders took up the restoration project in 2007. They’re planning a community arts center for Cle Elum and Upper Kittitas County with live performances, movie nights, a venue for local schools and community groups. “The Vogue is more than a theater,” said Karen Choyce, a former resident who grew up enjoying the community landmark. “It was the social center of the town and it will be again.” Base image courtesy of Ward Design Group

His Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.” Perhaps, rather than Scrooge, Technicolor Dreamcoat should be the first show, of the first holiday season at the Vogue – after its completed renovation. It is after all, the story of a big dreamer, Joseph, whose dream finally comes true. “That’s a pretty easy production to put on,” said Kandis Branum, president of the Vogue board of directors. If Technicolor Dreamcoat did usher in the Christmas holidays at the Vogue, it would mark the realization of a dream for those supporting restoration of this treasured community landmark. Everyday they get a little closer to seeing that dream become a reality according to Wilton, executive director of Community Builders the non-profit umbrella organization guiding the project. Big dreams of this nature take money, and Community Builders is pursuing funding from organizations like the M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust and the Kresge Foundation. The Murdock Trust, which began at the behest of Jack Murdock, co-founder of Tektronix, aims to enrich the quality of life in the Pacific Northwest with grants to non-profit organizations seeking to strengthen the region’s educational, WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM • CASCADES

MOUNTAIN-ECHO


spiritual and cultural base. Since it’s inception in 1975, the Trust has granted arts and culture support to projects similar to the Vogue, including things like establishing a New Arts Facility in Eugene, OR, to the tune of $300,000, replacing stage rigging at the 7th Street Theatre in Hoquiam, WA, for $75,000.00, and a new lighting system at the Alaska Center for the Performing Arts in Anchorage at $157,000.00. The Kresge Foundation, started by K-Mart’s founder, Sebastian Kresge, is a $2.8 billion private, national foundation, which says it wants to influence the quality of life for future generations through its support of nonprofit organizations in areas like arts and culture. In 2008, Kresge awarded 342 grants totaling $181 million. The Vogue Theatre Project hopes to be a recipient of one of those grants in the future. But that’s not all. According to Wilton, the board is pursuing funding from the Washington State Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, too.“There’s a whole list of corporations we’re going to ask for funding,” she said.“But we have to start off with the small donations.These guys give money to match what has already been raised.They want to see that’s there’s local support in the community.” To that end, Community Builders and the Vogue Board are hosting a series of fundraising events in 2010, most in conjunction with another Community Builders project, ARRF Animal Rescue. In the meantime, as a part of the Saturday, Dec. 5, Christmas in Cle Elum event, Community Builders is holding an open house with refreshments at the Vogue (208 Pennsylvania), 4 – 7:30 pm. A theatre tour is a part of the open house. In the future, Wilton sees carolers dressed in old-fashioned costumes singing at the theatre during the annual Cle Elum event. Branum envisions the theatre as a place for upper county schools to hold holiday choir and band concerts.“To show off what they’ve been doing,” she said. “It will be an event center all year for all kinds of programming,” Branum added. The theatre will start with 136 performance dates during the first year, increasing to 160 performance dates by the third year of operation. With 350 - plus seats in the theatre, that’s a significant financial boost for downtown Cle Elum.“When you look at all the days the theatre is going to be in use,” said Wilton,“and you figure everyone goes out to eat before or after the theatre, spending $50 per person or even half that, that’s a lot of revenue for the downtown.”

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CONTINUED ON PAGE 11

Coal Mining

Coal Mining Books, Ornaments & Coal Candy make excellent LOCAL GIFTS! Come in or order below:

Roslyn History Buffs too!

Roslyn Museum

203 W. Pennsylvania Ave. - ROSLYN, WA

509-649-2355

History! ❏ YES! I want to Give the Gift of Roslyn Mining Qty. Amt. ❏ Coal Towns in the Cascades book

Mining Buffs who are really GOOD would be HAPPY to get THIS COAL in their stockings!

by John C. Shideler $50.00 +$9.85 S&H

___

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❏ Images of America, Roslyn book by Jaymi Trimble $21.95 +$9.85 S&H

❏ Ore Cart Ornaments - *Set of 3 Coal, Gold & Silver $12 +$4.80 S&H

❏ Coal Candy - tasty & fun! *3pk.

(*available individually at museum) $12 +$4.80 S&H ___ _____ TOTAL ENCLOSED: (Mail to: Roslyn Museum, PO Box 281, Roslyn, WA 98941) Name: __________________ Mailing Address: ____________________________________

Museum open: Mon, Tues & Sat. 1-5p.m. | Sun. 11:30-3 CASCADES MOUNTAIN-ECHO •

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CELEBRATIONS ISSUE - DECEMBER 2009 PAGE 5


Zoey Bell, age 4, makes a new friend at Roslyn’s Winterfest. Jim Fosset photo

Reindeer Christmas

everywhere: gearing up for

THE GOOD NEWS IS: Washington state has reindeer and they’re all within reach to ... ... visitors and residents of Kittitas county.The zoo in Issaquah has a herd numbering nine, and recently, two reindeer from a herd in Reardan visited Roslyn for the town’s Winterfest event. Reardan Reindeer Saturday, November 28, Reardan’s Ben Hardt showed up in Roslyn for Winterfest with two reindeer, a male and a female – both with impressive racks.The older of the two, Nick, was the first to appear from the back of Hardt’s trailer, much to the delight of area children gathered to meet Santa’s trusty legends. Both reindeer were led inside a petting pen

REARDAN’S BEN HARDT gets his reindeer ready for a Winterfest showing in Roslyn. Jim Fosset photo

PAGE 6 DECEMBER 2009 - CELEBRATIONS ISSUE

erected in front of the Coal Miners Memorial – then flocks of children converged. “My wife and I haul the reindeer to about 12 events a year,” Hardt said.“Then they do one-day appearances at nurseries when called for. “I’ve been raising exotic animals since 1997. I’ve got camels and wallabies, and about 25,000 pheasant, raised for hunting preserves.” Hardt and his reindeer showed up in Roslyn at noon and left around 6:00 p.m., just after the city tree lighting ceremony. “Kids love the reindeer,” Hardt said. “They’re really very gentle.” Issaquah Reindeer There are exactly nine Siberian reindeer at Issaquah’s Cougar Mountain Zoo, and all of them were born and named there. They are Santa’s reindeer, one and all: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, Blitzen, and Rudolph. “We haven’t always had nine reindeer,” said General Curator Robyn Barfoot. “The herd size has fluctuated, but we haven’t been breeding, because we like having Santa’s nine. “Antler patterns and facial markings make each one an individual, but their personalities are what gives them away. “Reindeer are amazing. They’re very sweet, which early on in history made domestication an easy chore. WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM • CASCADES

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Their noses are furry, for colder climates, but they’re a feature that makes them adorable looking, too.” Barfoot explained both males and females have antlers. Females use them to protect youngsters and joust other females for mating rights. Males also use their antlers for jousting, and bigger-racked males are more successful in attracting a mate. Reindeer Have Personality Barfoot characterized the personalities of her favorite reindeer, seemingly in the manner one friend might describe another. “Rudolph is easy going, a gentleman to all the female reindeer, very much the big man on campus, pleasant toward zookeepers, and not aggressive at all. “Dancer, the youngest in the herd, is the Diva on the block. She’s feistier than CURATOR ROBYN BARFOOT, shown here with “Little Almos” a the other females. She likes tiger cub, works with all the animals, but cats are her specialty. things a certain way – on Reindeer are her loves. Cougar Mountain Zoo photo her schedule. Prancer is easily distinguished by her white nose, and she’s usually easy going, respected by the herd as the ranking matriarch. “Dasher is gorgeous. She’s got a rich-looking dark muzzle. But she pals around with Dancer, the Diva, and they usually get into trouble. They’re young, which explains some of that. Together, they work to position themselves for first-in-line, for apple treats. “Vixen is a glamour girl with good confirmation, accented by good posture. She’s very gentle, with a sense for etiquette. She’s got a striking beauty mark that stands out, from a snow white muzzle.” Diet, lifespan, breeding Barfoot explained that all the reindeer are fed a special diet designed for animals in captivity. They eat vitamin enriched grains, hay, and apples. Barfoot indicated the herd has it pretty good at the zoo.“We trim their hooves, and perform routine health checkups. We monitor their nutrition, too.” The lifespan of a male reindeer is about eight years, and over a lifetime a husky brute can reach weights of 300-pounds. Females live until they’re 12, and at maturity can weigh as much as 150-pounds. “The age range of the Cougar Mountain Zoo herd is about four to ten. Rudolph is seven.” Asked how the zoo manages reindeer breeding season, Barfoot replied, “We use birth control. But when we’re breeding, we simply pair them up when they’re in heat.” CASCADES MOUNTAIN-ECHO •

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SANTA gives Cupid a little extra attention at Cougar Mountain Zoo in Issaquah, Washington. Cougar Mountain Zoo photo

Reindeer roots and usefulness Reindeer have a family tree rooted in Alaska that dates back to the days just before and after statehood. They’ve been used throughout history for meat and their ability to haul through regions with extreme winter climates. “They’re primarily beasts of burden,” Barfoot said. “They’re actually a domesticated version of caribou, which are North American. Reindeer are northern European. In Alaska they still use them for pelts, to stay warm.The hide is nice and warm.” Recycling antlers for a good cause “Every year, both the males and the females drop their antlers.We retrieve them and sell them to patrons,” Barfoot said.“We’re a non-profit, so antler sales help out some. Reindeer antlers are multi-tined beauties, so when they grow they’re really very extraordinary. Antler growth has nothing to do with age, by the way.You can’t count the tines and say, for example, a reindeer is five years old.Antler growth has to do with genetics.The bigger the antlers, the higher up the reindeer is in the herd. Royalty, in a sense, runs and stays in a family.” Barfoot’s first encounter Asked if reindeer have accepted or welcomed her presence in the compound, Barfoot replied,“Most definitely. I do remember our introduction. I’m used to working with cats, and when I walked into the reindeer compound the first time, all of a sudden they charged and surrounded me, and my cats-are-charging-meinstinct kicked in: total fear. But, they just stood there, looking at me, and I reached out to pet their adorable, fuzzy noses. Because of that experience … it’s become a longtime friendship with them.They are a lovable lot.” CELEBRATIONS ISSUE - DECEMBER 2009 PAGE 7


Wandering an end comes to

By Lyn Derrick

At the Griffith’s modern mountain dream home Griff and Linda Griffith finally settled down about a year ago. It’s been a long time coming. Forty-five years, actually, before this wandering couple found their mountain dream home here in Upper Kittitas County. That’s not to say there weren’t some truly wonderful homes for the Griffiths over those 45 years. – Thirteen of them to be exact, in locations from Montana to Alaska. “We just never stayed in one place too long,” said Griff, whose career in wholesale metals, took his family from Billings to Anchorage.

“I think the longest we ever lived in one house was eight years,” Griff said. When your life is somewhat nomadic, it influences how you approach homeownership.“Every other house we’ve had,” Linda explained,“we’ve looked at from a resale point of view.” Resale often meant sprucing up and remodeling. “I’ve always kind of gravitated toward older houses,” Linda said and smiled.“I got to do the decorating, all the fun stuff. And Griff got to take care of the rusty old plumbing and electrical wiring.”

WELCOME to Griff and Linda Griffith’s Upper Kittitas County mountain dream home. After many years of moving, the Griffiths say this will be their permanent home. “We fell in love with it,” Linda said about this area. “We both grew up in the country, like this, outside of Spokane that’s why we like it here so much. We’re really impressed with the sense of community.” Lyn Derrick photo

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It’s a vision hard to describe with mere words. White and black, marble, mirrors, glass and light, that’s what hits you first.There’s no ‘lip’ separating the bathroom floor from the shower floor, and the shower floor has a large glass bowl of stones for foot soaking and massage.“Sometimes Griff will say ‘are you ever going to come out of there,’” Linda laughed. There’s a little touch of Italy, a favorite vacation spot for the Griffiths, in the bathroom, too. Gesturing to the towels Griff said,“Linda used the pastel colors you’d see in the gelato [Italian ice cream] shops.” During the Christmas holidays Griff and Linda see their modern mountain dream home as a great place ITALIAN MARBLE on the counters and the colors of Italian gelato for the towfor family gatherings.The guesthouse is just that – a els in the master bathroom. Reflected in the mirror is the wall of bottle glass Lyn Derrick photo separating the shower from the rest of the bathroom. place for daughter Jennifer and son-in-law John to stay.The kitchen has plenty of Then about five space for Rhonda and grandyears ago their daughdaughter Rachel and Star to help ter, Rhonda, talked with holiday meal preparations, Linda and Griff into and the dining room is ideal for a buying land in Upper traditional sit-down family meal. Kittitas County – as an The setting? Well Linda says, investment. Now that “Any window you look out it’s investment is paying just beautiful.” Looking out those off, but not in cash. windows at the surrounding trees “We’re looking at this puts one in mind of an old-fashas our permanent ioned tromp through the woods place,” said Linda.The to find a ‘real’ Christmas tree. But only thing this permathe Griffiths gave up real trees ENTRY, LIVING ROOM, dining room and kitchen all flow together. nent place lacked was The wall to the right separates the living area from the master when they settled into their modan old house to fix up. bedroom. Note the stain glass windows above the doorway to the ern home – in favor of the artifibedroom and the bookcase. Griff said this is his favorite feature Instead, as a blank Lyn Derrick photo in his dream home. cial type – thinking it would be slate, it came with a easier.“But we got carried away,” chance for something a said Griff, referring to the tree’s 12-foot size. little more modern.“Something with electrical outlets “It’s not easier,” Linda said emphatically about the in the right spot,” joked Griff. task of hauling out and setting up their artificial “We wanted to do things the way we’d like to Christmas tree. But then again, this year it might be. have them,” said Linda,“with an eye to staying here.” Jennifer and John are in the guesthouse sleeping the So Griffiths began to build, starting out with a sleep of the innocent. When they get up, there’s a surshop and a guesthouse, eventually adding the 2900prise in store. This year, John is going to help. foot home they will live in from now on. Besides electricity in all the right places, what are Linda and Griff’s favorite features in their new modern home? For Griff it’s the unique placement of stained glass in the wall separating the living area from the master bedroom.“When I was a kid,” he said, “I used to get tonsillitis a lot. My mom would have me lay in the living room on the couch. I remember the sun shining through the stained glass and how the colors would dance. I took a picture we’d had for years of that window, and had a similar pattern made.” You pass under Griff’s highly placed stained glass to get to the master bedroom – and then to Linda’s faA KITCHEN MADE FOR HOLIDAY meal preparation. Picture the whole famvorite feature in the home – the master bath. ily in here helping – there’s plenty of room.

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Lyn Derrick photo

CELEBRATIONS ISSUE - DECEMBER 2009 PAGE 9


Look for the

By Janie McQueen

Christmas Cross The Northern Cross (Cross of Calvary) sets in the west-northwest on Friday, Dec. 25 at 8:00 p.m. and Christmas makes this constellation a noteworthy object to see. Why? December 25 is the date that Christians celebrate the birth of the Lord Jesus Christ. So, go outside and look up into the stars as Christmas approaches! A little history In 1627, Julius Schiller wrote a star atlas called the “Christian Starry Heavens” in which all of the zodiacal constellations are renamed for the 12 apostles. He also gave all of the northern constellations a New Testament figure’s name, and all the southern constellations were named after figures from the Old Testament. During that time in centuries past, it was a common practice to publish your personal views about the heavens, so Schiller did just that! That was how the Swan (Cygnus) Constellation came to be known as the Cross of Calvary held by St. Helen.The position of the Northern Cross is also upright and can always be seen from the Northern Hemisphere on the west-northwestern horizon after sunset around Christmas each year. Life versus death Stars rise in the east and set in the west, so astronomers have always symbolized “birth” with their rising, and “death” with their setting.This name, “The Northern Cross”, symbolizes the death of Jesus. In Matthew 27: 51 it is stated that darkness fell on the land at the moment of His death, and “the veil of the temple was rent in twain, from the top to the bottom.” That scripture is one that correlates with the view of the sky temple (the Milky Way) on which sits the Northern Cross. It is also split in two! Known today as the Great Rift, the split is a dark cloud of dust separating the galaxy lengthwise. The Northern Cross (which is only visible at Christmastime) is located precisely along the length of that rift. Rebirth The Northern Cross stands at death’s door on the northwestern horizon so, just what is out there in the heavens to symbolize the new birth Jesus gave us when God raised Him from the dead? In 1987, the director of the Miami Space Transit Planetarium was researching his Christmas show for television’s Star Gazer program when it happened. He found that the Beehive Cluster, M44, was originally called “Praespe” which means “MANGER” or the root word,“presepio” which means “NATIVITY SCENE”. With his curiosity peaked, he dialed in a starwheel for December 25, 8:00 p.m. When the Northern Cross is visible on Christmas, M44 is directly opposite in the eastern sky.Yes, according to astronomy, M44 is rising or being born – a perfect match for the Northern Cross which symbolizes death!

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December meteors This is always a good month for meteor observing! You can get ready to watch a gorgeous display of Geminid meteors before dawn on Dec. 14.The show actually begins about 1:00 a.m. with the shower’s radiant (apparent source) in the south. But, if you wait until the predawn hours you could see about 100 meteors per hour streaking across the sky! That is, if it’s able to be observed from a dark, clear sky. This show isn’t from a comet, either, but it comes from an asteroid called 3200 Phaethon. Scientists believe that this asteroid is, in fact, the nucleus of a dead comet. If the weather doesn’t cooperate and you miss the Geminids, don’t be concerned because the Ursids (another December meteor shower) will peak before dawn on December 22.Though this is a secondary shower, you should see about 10 meteors per hour. But, the rates have been known to escalate up to 50 per hour, so it’s still worth taking a look. Neither shower has much interference from the Moon’s light – so enjoy! Planets This month is the last time in 2009 you get a chance to observe Jupiter in the southwest.Take a look, even though it’s 25% smaller, it won’t fail you and continues to offer great detail through a telescope. Mars is now beginning its evening views and Mercury will join them after twilight. It’s a bit more difficult to locate Mercury because of its smallness – but if you look on Dec. 18 when it is farthest from the Sun, it will be just below the crescent Moon.Also, it’s a good idea to remember that planets don’t “twinkle” like stars! Lunar eclipse from afar On December 31 you might be on vacation in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe or far north in Northern America. If so, you’ll get a shot at observing a partial lunar eclipse when our planet’s shadow is on the Moon’s South Pole. Though this eclipse won’t be a really good one (only 8% of the Moon will be in our shadow), it is about the only decent one happening in 2009. Blue Moon The Full Moon of Thursday, December 31 just happens to be the second one of the month.That means it is officially a “Blue Moon”, which is the first one occurring in the Americas since May of 2007. There are always things happening in our night sky, so go and look, even if it’s not the date or time for a celestial event. If you know yourself and doubt that it’s a simple matter to get up in the wee hours before dawn or late at night, it just won’t make any difference. What is important is to look up at the night sky whenever you can – it’s indescribable! WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM • CASCADES

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 They’re already planning for an opening night gala complete with searchlights beaming into the night sky, parking valets and red carpet arrival for project supporters. “I see this as a dress up event for adults,” said Wilton,“with lots of different talent, local, regional and national.” By that time, Community Builders hopes to have a new name for the theatre, which has been called the Rose Theatre and the Lane The-

atre at various times since it’s opening in 1909. Naming rights and/or establishing a legacy for your family name, a traditional method of raising funds for capital projects like this one, is a part of fundraising efforts. If not the whole building, contributors can see their name on the marquee, the box office or one of the 590 entrance bricks. Then on the first night, of the first Christmas production at the theatre, they’ll walk across those bricks to see Scrooge turn from ‘bah humbug’ to“ … as good a man, as the good

Cle Elum’s Centennial Center “Working with Seniors and Community”

Senior Center Events Calendar:

old city knew.” Or listen to the story of Joseph in his amazing Technicolor dreamcoat, a guy who – like the supporters of the Vogue Theatre Project – “dream[ed] of the wonders they will do, before their time on this planet is through.” To participate in the dream, get more information about or help with upcoming fundraising events – or to be a volunteer board member, contact the 501(c)(3) Vogue Theatre Associates, 509-674-5930 or voguetheatre.org.

This calendar brought to you as a public service by your friends at Hearthstone Cottage

PUBLIC INVITED to these events! at Cle Elum Eagles Club (509) 674-7530

Sat., Dec. 5, 9am-4pm at the Cle Elum Dec. 6 - Bake Sale @Safeway - 9am Eagles, 220 Pennsylvania Avenue Jan 21 - Chef’s Dinner - 5pm @Eagles Jan. 26 - Legends Casino Trip $10 -

Holiday Craft

BAZAAR

Breakfast & Lunch, Pictures with Santa

(limited to 1st 20) 509-674-7530 info/sign up

Jan 30 - CRAB FEED!! 5pm ($2 off for members)

www.ukcsc.com

Live Well, Laugh Often, Love Much ... “Carefree Independence with 24-Hour Safety & Security”

Services: • Independent Retirement Apartments, Assisted Living and Memory Care • Well trained, skilled and caring staff • 3 Meals offered daily • Menus prepared by a professional dietician • Housekeeping, Laundry and Transportation • Full Menu of Social Activity Choices

www.FrontierMgmt.com Call or stop by for your tour today

(509) 925-3099 802 E. Mountain View Ave. Ellensburg, WA 98926 HearthstoneEL@FrontierMgmt.com CASCADES MOUNTAIN-ECHO •

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Central Washington’s Premier Senior Living Community CELEBRATIONS ISSUE - DECEMBER 2009 PAGE 11


ARRF photo

A Dog’s Life E-mail: dogslife@mountain-echo.com

ARRF

does Christmas

By Dixie Dog

photos

Woof! I get to see Santa this year and it’s about time! Woof! I get to see Santa this year and it’s about time! What I wonder about is if Santa understands ‘doggie language’? Maybe I should bring my human along to interpret – just in case! I’ll be at the bank that day, so it would be a good idea to be on a leash led by a human being. Santa Paws Picture with Pets: There is only ONE day for the Santa Paws Pictures with Pets and that date is Saturday, Dec. 5 from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. at the US Bank office, 402 East First Street, Suite 105 in Cle Elum. There will be a photo fee for a 5x7 photo of your pets with Santa. Woof! I happen to like the pooches best, but you can bring any pet.This is the second year upper Kittitas County’s Animal Rescue Regional Facility (ARRF) has brought Santa down to do photos with your pets. ARRF will use the proceeds for the ARRF Animal Rescue’s Spay/ Neuter Fund. A fundraiser - goody, goody - or rather WOOF and a tail-wag! But, wait, the Animal Rescue Regional Facility isn’t just a ‘fundraising’ outfit, but they are an Animal Rescue place serving the entire upper county! There is a website you can visit at www.communitybuilders501c3.org or call Lori Clemente directly at (509) 304-4805 if you’d like to make donations (a good idea instead of getting a live puppy or kitten for a Christmas present – don’t surprise your loved ones).You’ll find that there are many needs for animals in upper Kittitas County that only YOU can fulfill.

(509) 304-4805 for information about becoming a foster home for rescued animals. Pet gift idea There is always the chance of fire and we should never think our beloved pets are exempt from harm. After all, they have lungs and breathe the same air we do. So, what about oxygen masks that are made just for Fido? Those few seconds of fiddling around with the modifications necessary to make a human being’s mask fit a dog or any pet, for that matter, could mean life or death for your precious friend! I figured that Christmas is a good time to get an oxygen mask for your pet, even though October was ‘Fire Safety Month’.The pet oxygen masks come in different sizes and can be ordered through www.petsafetygear.com. The fun part is that my new friend,‘Katie Marie’, a 2 year-old rescue dog Border Collie, who was adopted by Steve and Jenny Jensen from a shelter in Wenatchee. Katie is now the Easton Fire Department mascot along with Steve and Jenny who are both volunteer firefighters. Another good idea came from Barbara Ludt about local folks purchasing the masks and donating them to their local Fire Departments.“I spoke with Nancy at “BARK 10-4” and she said they were literally inundated with purchases to be donated to local Fire Departments across the U.S. after their [pet oxygen masks] appearance on Fox News Channel.” Barbara shared,“They sold 2,000 sets in the month of October and were not prepared for that number! So, they needed more staff and she apologized profusely for any delays.”Woof! I can bark for those oxygen masks and will definitely sponsor them for our local Fire Departments. Plus, an oxygen mask is going on my Christmas list because now I can tell Santa what I’d like!

ARRF donations wish list Large cat carriers • Large dog crates • Pet food for HopeSource • Towels • Comforters • Dog collars They also accept items ARRF can sell to raise funds You can always donate CASH if you like. Online, ARRF does the ‘paypal’ accounts or simply send a check to ARRF, P.O. Box 875, Cle Elum, WA 98922; all cash donations will be used for the Spay/Neuter Fund. So far this year, ARRF has placed over 50 pets in homes and we can expect more in 2010. ARRF can always use foster care for animals – so, if that intrigues you, call Lori Clemente, ARRF Animal Rescue at PAGE 12 DECEMBER 2009 - CELEBRATIONS ISSUE

A GREAT GIFT IDEA FOR YOUR PET! Katie is a 2 year-old Border Collie that was adopted by Steve and Jenny Jensen (Easton Fire Dept. volunteer firefighters). Katie poses by the ‘pet oxygen mask’ available at www.petBarbara Ludt photo safetygear.com. I can’t wait to meet Katie, woof!

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DECEMBER 20 David Cook, Singer (27)

DECEMBER 10 Bobby Flay, Chef (45)

DECEMBER 21 Samuel L. Jackson, Actor (61)

DECEMBER 11 John Kerry, Senator (66)

DECEMBER 23 Cory Haim, Actor (38)

DECEMBER 13 Taylor Swift, Singer (20)

DECEMBER 27 Cokie Roberts, Reporter (66)

DECEMBER 15 Don Johnson, Actor (60)

DECEMBER 28 John Legend, Singer (31)

DECEMBER 17 Bill Pullman, Actor (56)

DECEMBER 29 Jude Law, Actor (37)

DECEMBER 18 Steven Spielberg, Director (63)

DECEMBER 30 LeBron James, Athlete (25)

DECEMBER 19 Alyssa Milano, Actress (37)

DECEMBER 31 Tim Matheson, Actor (62)

ELECTION FIND WORD WORD SEARCH Just in time for Winter, see how many related words you can find & circle throughout the puzzle. COAT COLD FLURRY GLOVES

HAT ICE INDOORS SCARF

SNOW TEMPERATURE WIND WINTER

ANSWERS ON PAGE 15

DECEMBER 8 Terri Hatcher, Actress (45)

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

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23. Far-fetched 25. Kemo __ 28. Gear for a bird watcher 33. Far from tactful 35. Smelter loads 36. “Dapper” one 37. Bloggers’ revenue sources 38. Tribe infant 41. Formula __ auto racing 42. Thumbs-downs 43. Flaws and all 44. Suit fabric 46. Ironman competitor

50. Tarot card reader 51. Do some KP work 52. Spacewalks, in NASA-speak 54. Spelunkers’ needs 57. Boob tubes 60. Village Voice bestowal 61. Center of many campuses 64. __ mater 65. Rebuke from Caesar 66. “Get lost!” 67. Salt lick visitor 68. Like one end of many pools 69. Proctors’ handouts

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12. Monopoly payout 13. Nervously irritable 18. Rooster’s topper 21. Added benefits 23. Lawnmower brand 24. Deck foursome 25. Barely sufficient 26. Intense passion 27. Low men at the Met 29. Oater “necktie” 30. Be nuts about 31. Place to practice driving 32. Villain’s look 34. Sudden outpourings 39. Arthur __ – Tennis great

40. Dosage unit 45. Heart of the matter 47. Come into view 48. Prepared to drive 49. Penultimate fairy-tale word 53. Salt’s “Halt!” 54. Dryer unit 55. Up to the task 56. Performer in whiteface 57. __ Modern (British museum) 58. Swellheads’ problems 59. Schedule opening 61. Proof-ending letters 62. Sport __ (versatile vehicle) 63. Martians, e.g.

1. Teen hangouts 6. Fresh-mouthed 10. In __ straits 14. Nose around 15. Pizzeria fixture 16. How the duped feel 17. Circus rider 19. Rhames who played Kojak 20. Hot, in Vegas 21. Unhealthy-looking 22. Wheels for a CEO, maybe

1. East Lansing sch. 2. Part of AD 3. Pork or beef cut 4. Settings 5. “Heidi” author Johanna 6. Hoi __ 7. Satan’s doing 8. In medias __ 9. Explosive stuff 10. Hagen player in “The Godfather” 11. Cow-horned goddess

• 1620: THE PILGRIMS ARRIVED IN PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS. • 1937: “SNOW WHITE” FROM DISNEY, THE FIRST FEATURE-LENGTH COLOR CARTOON, PREMIERED. • 1970: ELVIS PRESLEY MET WITH PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON AT THE WHITE HOUSE.

CASCADES MOUNTAIN-ECHO •

3

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HOW THEY SAY IT...

THE FIRST SNOWBOARD WAS DEVELOPED IN 1964 BY ATTACHING 2 SKIS TOGETHER.

English: BLIZZARD Spanish: VENTISCA Italian: BUFERA DI NEVE French: TEMPETE DE NEIGE German: BLIZZARD

CELEBRATIONS ISSUE - DECEMBER 2009 PAGE 13


It’s now

By Janie McQueen

the

Rotary Park

TRAIL OF THE MONTH “Trail Mix” is a description of a Cascades area trail from the perspective of an actual user.

Do you need a quick break from the weather? When I say weather, I mean all the rain and snow we’ve had this year and it isn’t even winter until December 21! Do you desire a trail that is short, easy and even wheel-chair friendly? Look no further than the trail at the “new” Rotary Park in Ellensburg. Drive southeast and you can escape some of the weather.You can even go to downtown Ellensburg for Christmas shopping and take a lunch break walking this trail if you like. The trail is located at the Rotary Park, which is on the way to the freeway interchange that goes to Cle Elum, near Perkins Restaurant and it’s only about a mile if you decide to only walk one direction.That makes it only two miles to get back to your vehicle! And since the city put in a connector trail that goes directly underneath I-90, you can walk straight to Irene Rinehart Riverfront Park. It’s possible that the gate won’t be open for driving and parking, but there is ample parking just off Umptanum Rd. for Irene Rinehart Riverfront Park.There’s a public restroom at both parks, so that makes it nice, but, I prefer the restrooms at the Rotary Park because they’re nicer. The connector trail is totally paved as it connects the two parks. Being completely asphalted makes this trail perfect for wheel-chairs. It is plenty wide for the “weavers” in your family or for passing, if necessary. There is only one slight rise as the free-wheeler rolls toward the freeway and that rise in the trail is easy for most people. Otherwise, it’s very level and open. In fact, you can even take folks on that trail that use a cane or a walker. Of course, don’t attempt to go alone, because it’s way nicer to have a caretaker or buddy in case you fall and need help or just for conversation. And you can turn around whenever you like – just remember that the same amount of trail lies in front of you, even though you turned around! NO MOTORIZED vehicles are allowed on the trail, so make sure not to go too far if you have little ones or granny with you. This park has a new name, The Rotary Park, because folks kept confusing it with the other West Ellensburg Park which is located at the end of Pacific Ave. and beginning of Third St.The Rotary Park used to be called the West Ellensburg Park, too, so, the park was renamed, new signs put up, and now people are much happier. Another nice thing about these parks is that they alPAGE 14 DECEMBER 2009 - CELEBRATIONS ISSUE

ways have play equipment for the kids to get the “ants out of their pants”! So, go and take a break at the Rotary Park in Ellensburg, but dress in layers for whatever weather we’re having. Just remember that Ellensburg is in the Kittitas Valley and usually has milder weather than Cle Elum! Directions to the Rotary Park: From I-90, turn at the first Ellensburg exit you get to a stop sign (Perkins is there). Turn RIGHT at the “four-way” stop. Drive to Fifth Ave. and turn RIGHT again. Go just past the Dead End sign to the Rotary Park parking lot. If the gate happens to be closed, don’t despair because there is a nice turn-around road and you can park at the West Ellensburg Park.The City allows pedestrian usage no matter what! To get to the other park, just go back to the beginning of the Dead End and turn RIGHT.That is Pacific. Drive to the end of Pacific, which is just a couple more blocks to a smaller parking lot at West Ellensburg Park. Get out and walk across the grass and a tennis court to an easily visible asphalt path leading to the Rotary Park parking lot.The asphalt also leads to another parking area for West Ellensburg Park on Lincoln and Second.The paved trail begins alongside the only stand of poplars at the end of the Rotary Park parking lot. Directions to Irene Rinehart Riverside Park: From I-90, turn at the second Ellensburg exit and then turn RIGHT on Canyon Rd. Drive to Umptanum Rd. and turn LEFT. Continue driving, go under the freeway overpass, and you will get to the well-signed Irene Rinehart Riverfront Park parking on the RIGHT.

AN EASY STROLLING PATHWAY. Sherrie Sienia is a first grade teacher at Cle Elum-Roslyn Elementary school. This was her first time on the Rotary Janie McQueen photo Park Trail, and she LOVED it!

WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM • CASCADES

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❖ TUESDAY, DEC. 1

CWU Brass Choir Concert, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. Central WA University Music Bldg., 14th & Alder, Ellensburg. Free admission. For more information, visit www.cwu.edu/~music.

❖ THURSDAY, DEC. 3 Symphonic Band & Wind Ensemble Concert 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. at CWU Music Bldg., Ellensburg.

❖ DEC. 3-5 Ware Fair at CWU New Student Union and Recreation building; free admission. For more info, visit www.cwu.edu.

❖ DEC. 4-6, 11-13, 18-22, 24, 27-31 Suncadia Winterfest; www.suncadia.com.

Kittitas Audubon Society First Saturday Bird Walk, 8:00 a.m., meet at Irene Rinehart parking lot near Ellensburg. Most walks run 2 hrs. Everyone welcome. For info, visit www.kittitasaudubon.org. Christmas in Cle Elum, 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. for more info, contact Cle Elum Roslyn Chamber, (509) 674-5958 or http://cleelumroslyn.org/ . Upper Kittitas County Senior Center hosts Breakfast with Santa, 8-10 a.m. and Holiday Craft Bazaar, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the Cle Elum Eagles Club, 220 Pennsylvania Ave. Info: (509) 674-7530. Holiday Wreath Workshop, 10:00 a.m. - 12 noon at Bloomtime Gardens, Ellensburg.To pre-register, call (509) 962-6687. Build a Decorative Birdhouse, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. at Knudson Lumber, 1791 Vantage Hwy., Ellensburg. Ages 11 & under, must be accompanied by adult. Thorp Community Christmas celebration, 11:30 a.m. at District 1 Fire Station. Thorp PTSA Holiday Craft Bazaar, Thorp School. Vogue Theater Open House, 4:30 p.m., 208 Pennsylvania Ave., Cle Elum; free admission. E

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Parade of Lights, 5:00 p.m. downtown Cle Elum. West on First Street to Oakes Ave. Judging at 4:30 p.m. Event hosted by Cle Elum Roslyn Chamber of Commerce, (509) 674-5958.

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An Evening of Tea and Poetry with the High Country Artists, 7:00 p.m. at the Carpenter House Museum & Art Gallery, corner of Third St. & Billings Ave., Cle Elum. Public welcome.

❖ MONDAY, DEC. 7 Cascade Field & Stream Club, 7:00 p.m. at Sunset Cafe in Cle Elum. Info: call 509-674-1714.

❖ THURSDAY, DEC. 10 Alpine Lakes Trail Riders (ALTR) chapter of Back Country Horsemen of WA, 7:00 p.m. at the USFS Craven Conference Center, Cle Elum. For info, call Debbie at 509-674-2503.

❖ SATURDAY, DEC. 12

❖ SATURDAY, DEC. 5

PAGE 13, PUZZLE SOLUTION

Hospice Friends Tree of Love and Lighting Ceremony, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. at South Cle Elum Depot, 801 Milwaukee Ave. Public welcome. For more information, call (509) 962-7379.

Whiskies of the West, 5:30 - 9:00 p.m. at The Clymer Museum of Art, Ellensburg. For more info/tickets, call (509) 962-6416.

❖ SUNDAY, DEC. 13 An Old-Fashioned Christmas Concert by Mountain Voices, 3:00 & 5:30 p.m. shows at Old Roslyn School, 205 Idaho Street, Roslyn. Swauk-Teanaway Grange Christmas Dinner. For more info, call Violet Burke, (509) 674-2708.

❖ MONDAY, DEC. 14 Kittitas County Snow Grooming Council 7:00 p.m. at Tom L. Craven Conference Room, Cle Elum Ranger District, 803 W. Second St. For info, call Howard Briggs at 509-674-7229.

❖ THURSDAY, DEC. 24 Santa Visits Roslyn Christmas Eve, downtown Roslyn. Hosted by Roslyn Volunteer Fire Department, (509) 649-3105. Suncadia Village Candlelight Service, 8 p.m. Refreshments served. Info: www.suncadia.com.

• DECEMBER EXHIBITS • • Carpenter House Museum and High Country Artist Gallery, Cle Elum; 509-674-9766. • Roslyn Museum 203 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Roslyn; 509-649-2355.

EVENTS CALENDAR

DECEMBER • 2009

• Clymer Museum of Art 416 N. Pearl St., Ellensburg; 509-962-6416. • Kittitas County Historical Museum 114 E.Third Ave., Ellensburg; 509-925-3778.

Check for more events or post your own events FREE online at: mountain-echo.com/Calendar WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM

CELEBRATIONS ISSUE - DECEMBER 2009 PAGE 15


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‘Supplying’ Holiday Cheer

Holiday Stationery Select your style

It’s easy and fun to dress up your holiday letters with printer-ready seasonal • Printer Ink stationery! • Glitter & Metallic Pens Office Supplies for the Holidays:

• Colored Envelopes & Paper • Blank Gift Certificates • Photo Paper • Scissors • Tape Kids’ Gift Thank You Cards PAGE 16 DECEMBER 2009 - CELEBRATIONS ISSUE

807 W. Davis Street Cle Elum 509-674-2511

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December 2009 Echo Magazine - holidays  

"Celebrations" - our annual Holidays in the Mountains issue, spotlighting holiday traditions and events in Kittitas County. Reindeer in Rosl...

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