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Recreation & Entertainment in Kittitas County

Annual TREASURES OF KITTITAS COUNTY Issue

See Page19


They’re coming in more and hanging

out longer

Roslyn’s Last Friday Art and Music Walk is becoming a community treasure by Lyn Derrick Everyone says it. The art community in Roslyn is growing into a public treasure. In large part, that’s because of the monthly Art and Music Walk held in the downtown area on the last Friday of every month. This local art walk was the brainchild of Roslyn business owner, Cheryl Cox, in partnership with the upper county’s artists group, High Country Artists. It started in 2008, with two artistically inspired walks through the downtown, one in June and one in November. Then the Roslyn Downtown Association (RDA) posed the question: What if we do this every month? “We wondered,” said RDA’s art walk co-coordinator, Janine Brodine, “what would happen if it was every month so people could anticipate it – and it kind of snowballed from there.” Brodine says originally RDA, which financially supports the event, had a “three fold goal.” “We wanted to provide regular venues for local artists, we wanted to encourage people to visit local businesses, and we wanted to have fun,” she smiled. “Actually that last one might be number one.” So far, over 60 artists and musicians have participated in the monthly event. And since idea first took hold, a new gallery was added to the scene: Smith’s Exhibits at #3 First Street. Gallery owner, Janen Korth said the Art and Music Walk has been “phenomenal” for her. “It’s kind of like a big party every month,” she said. “It’s been a great vehicle for us and I schedule our shows around it so our art isn’t the same as it was last month.”

TUNDRA

PAGE 2 APRIL 2010 - TREASURE HUNT ISSUE

Now, a new gallery is coming on the scene according to Brodine. She should know, it’s called the Brodine & Brodine Gallery – and the other Brodine is her husband Marc. “It’s across from the Catholic Church,” Brodine said. (301 N. B St.) She added that the artwork to be displayed there is reminiscent of the 60s. “Tie die, flowers, the peace and love movement,” she smiled. Last year, every art walk had a theme. For example there was the plein air painting show in July, the quilt show in August and the student art show in April. While they’re hanging on to those three themes this year, other months will be more diverse. “That’s one of the changes,” said Brodine. “Businesses are taking a greater role in finding their own artists. It’s a way for folks to feel like they’re more a part of things.” One favored venue was the Roslyn Museum, when artist Max Lunger created etchings as visitors watched. – And new businesses are joining all the time, like Bei Capelli, the newest hair salon in town. RDA wants to encourage ‘first time’ displaying artists, too. “Susan Wambaugh had her first show at the Pastime [restaurant] last year,” Brodine said, “and she sold a painting on her first night.” On April 30, as already stated, they’re bringing back the Student Art Show – one of 2009’s most popular shows. “Last year we had the [Cle Elum-Roslyn School] Marimba Band playing,” said RDA president, Jennifer Basterrechea. Which brings us to the music part of the show. “It would be a lot less exciting without the music component,” Korth said. “It’s our goal to have lots and lots of music this year. It creates the kind of vibe we’re looking for.” Local musician Rob Witte has played, singer and guitarist, Kelly Martin, acoustic guitarist, Marc Brodine (a musician as well as a visual artist), and violinist, Michael Carlucci. “When Michael played people sat on the floor and listen to him till 11 o’clock,” Korth commented and added, “People are coming in more and hanging out longer.” Recent changes to the event include most artists and businesses keeping artwork up for the whole month following the walk, and the hours were changed: now the event runs 5-8 pm. One of the most encouraging signs of success for Brodine was seeing families out enjoying the monthly show – and the town. “They’d have dinner, at some place like Village Pizza and then do the artwalk,” she said. “They were making an evening of it.” by Chad Carpenter

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✦ BOOK REVIEW

By Janie McQueen

Do you really want something to sink your teeth into? Then, this is the book for you. Even the paperback edition is thick, and it took the author, Gary Kinder, ten years to complete the research before he could finally say it was done! This book is about a ship that was filled with gold and passengers which sank about 200 miles off the eastern seaboard in 1857. The ship was bound from the California gold fields to New York. Actually, there was a short lay-over and ‘ship change’ in Havana where the SS Central America was boarded by all passengers and cargo was transferred. While the ship stayed on course for New York, it was smack-dab in the middle of an extreme storm (one passenger who had sailed for over twenty-five years called the storm “a perfect hurricane”). There were 31 women and 26 children who were rescued by a nearby vessel while the men stayed behind. Over 400 people drowned and it was called the worst peacetime disaster at sea in American history! On that fateful day in September, 592 persons were onboard and nearly $2,000,000 worth of gold treasure! Then, the book flips over to more modern times in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s when a treasure hunter searches for the vessel in the bottom of the ocean. The book actually flips back and forth, from 1857 to the late 1960’S and on up to the early 1990’s without losing an ounce of intrigue. In fact, there is more of the treasure hunter’s story told (and everything leading up to AND the search) as of the sinking ship. But, I won’t tell you anymore about the search for the treasure! Though the novel, Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea is written in a way common to fictional novels, you’ll be surprised to find that this one is

written as closely to what really happened as possible. Not one of the characters in this story has a fictitious name. Kinder didn’t make up any dialogue nor did he create any of the scenes from his imagination. All the narratives are as historically accurate as he could make them and are from the diaries of real passengers aboard the SS Central America which sank in 1857. Along with hundreds of articles written about the survivors and real interviews with them, an author couldn’t write the story any closer to what really happened than this book, Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea. Gary Kinder also researched as much as he could about the California Gold rush, including the reading of several books on the subject. Kinder was also privy to several logs of the modern-day vessel Columbia, went onboard it and was able to read many personal letters of the crew, which searched for the treasure at the bottom of the deep blue sea. Whether you read slowly or quickly, you’ll love reading this book! It was mentioned to me by a friend and gold miner who used the novel to fall asleep with each night. You might try the same thing, because otherwise, if you’re like me, the Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea will spoil every other plan you’ve made during the day until it’s done! This novel is definitely one of those books with which you ‘stir the pot for dinner with one hand, and keep reading with the other’. But, this book is so large and thick, that you’d probably prefer to curl up on the sofa and read it clear to the end!

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Volume 9 No. 4

On the cover: PERHAPS THE 1895

MAP OF CENTRAL WASHINGTON OFFERS CLUES TO SOME OF THE TREASURES AWAITING VISITORS TO THE AREA. THOSE TREASURES TAKE THE FORM OF NATURAL BOUNTY, ANTIQUES FROM THE REGION’S MINING, RAILROAD AND TIMBER INDUSTRIES, AS WELL AS TRADITIONAL TREASURES LIKE GOLD AND OTHER MINERALS. COMPUTER COMPOSITION BY

TERRY HAMBERG

MOUNTAIN-ECHO STAFF: Jana Stoner, Terry Hamberg, Janie McQueen, Lyn Derrick, Jim Fossett, Deanna Plesha, Paige Berrigan, Casey Clark, Jeff Bornhorst, Cindy Steiner, Carol Punton, Debbie Renshaw and Bonnie Montgomery

TREASURE HUNT ISSUE - APRIL 2010 PAGE 3


Scott Olson’s 30-year search for round rocks has presented him with a goal he says he’s in no hurry to fulfill.

In se

arch roun d of the

elusiv

By Jim Fossett

OLSON WITH ANOTHER ROUND. He’s shown standing in front of the wall mount (far left) he engineered that mimics the design of a board game popular in the 1950s. Remarkable: If you look at the rocks stacked in the mount, each one appears to be a little bit bigger than the one below it. Over 30-years collecting those rocks, Olson remarked … “I didn’t look for rocks that would be one size larger than the last. I didn’t plan it that way. It just happened.” Jim Fossett photo

PAGE 4 APRIL 2010 - TREASURE HUNT ISSUE

e 4-in

ch

He needs one more perfect round, exactly four-inches in diameter, which will fit nicely at the top of an unusually creative wall mount he engineered to display the 26 rounds he’s collected over the last 30 years. The mount copycats the design used for the 1950’s board game called ‘Shoot for the Moon,’ in which a metal ball rolls down an incline between two metal rods. “It’s just a matter of time, and I’ve got a lot of time,” smiled Olson, a youthful 52-year-old who says he loves to spend his free time in the outdoors, fishing, rafting, hiking – and hunting for perfect rounds. It was in 1980 Olson accidentally discovered a twoinch round while excavating in Everett for Boeing Construction Company. That’s when he said he got the bug to start collecting. “I’ve got about 40 altogether,” he said. “Most I’ve found on my own. I have a friend who found one in Montana and gifted it to me. My rounds vary in diameter from 3/4-inch to 6.5-inches. “I find them all over the place: Yakima River, near Ellensburg, Lake Cle Elum, Mount St. Helens, you name it. I also have about a dozen heartshaped rocks I’ve given to my wife, Dianne.” Hunting for rounds, as you might expect, leads Olson to other interesting finds. “A round I discovered in the Chehalis River Valley is actually petrified biomass. A paleontologist told me it most likely came from inside the stomach of a bird-like dinosaur. They used stones to digest, just like chickens do. “I’ve also got a branch of some sort that’s turned into coal, with flecks of diamonds in it. The University of Washington

carbon-dated that piece to 30 million years ago.” Olson says the kinds of rocks he finds vary from granite and CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

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sedimentary rock, to sandstone, agates, and lava. The last rock he found in the Yakima River, in the summer of 2009. “I have a pretty high standard,” he laughed. “It’s got be near perfect if it’s going to make my collection. Perfect rounds

aren’t something you find every day. It’s a passion, though, and I’ll never stop doing it.” Based on the numbers of rocks in his collection, Olson has averaged one near perfect round per year for the last 30 years. “Earlier you asked me why I collect round rocks,” Olson

mused, “and it got me to thinking. When I was five years old, living in Napavine, Washington, my buddy’s folks had a round displayed in their home. Looked as perfect as a bowling ball. I really loved that rock and I think, somehow, I might have been imprinted with that memory. Maybe that ex-

plains some of my passion. “Love to get a hold of a fourinch round for my display,” Olson winked. “Maybe one of your readers will see this story.” Scott Olson is a resident of Cle Elum. If you’ve got a hot tip on a four-inch round, email jim@nkctribune.com, and we’ll pass it on.

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By Janie McQueen

A Gold Mine in the Poker winnings The night was cold, dank and gloomy inside the tent, but Thad was certain he’d heard the claim-holder right. Thad Nuebauer had heard about that mine and the fact that it was a heavy producer of gold! He’d never been there, because he was a busy man, and not interested in a mine that wasn’t his, but,Thad figured it was about time for his luck to change – if not in mining for gold, he felt lucky in poker tonight! You see, that claim-holder had just put up his gold producing mine in the poker game because he’d lost everything else that night.“Deal me in!” hollered Nuebauer as he got another beer from the barkeeper. He knew that the man betting the mine had lost all his money already and figured he heard him right the first time he spoke about the bet. “There’s jest one thing about me betting that good of a mine,” he said,“and that’s the odds. I’m going to deal just one hand, and to win that gold mine, one of you fellas dealt in the hand has to git a royal flush!” Thad stared dumbly for a moment before he became pensive.Then a smile crossed his face and he decided that a night’s winnings (that was the ante) against such a huge jackpot as the mine was well worth it! So, they all four sat at the table and proceeded to play stud poker. Nuebauer couldn’t help grinning the whole time.“Couldn’t that fella pull away from the table and just go about his business?”Thad thought to himself. But, then again, what miner didn’t love the poker tables as much as he did? So, he simply said,“I wouldn’t mind having that gold mine for my own.” The game began and so did the sweat! The man shuffled the cards after he put the mine’s documents into the ante.After the cut, he dealt them sort of carelessly.Thad picked up his first card. It was a jack.Then he picked up the second card and found it was a ten of the same suit! This surely made him sit up and take notice.The next card was a king and it was also of the same suit. He made a feeble attempt at sitting still and staying calm.Thad almost lost control when he picked up the fourth card and found it matched his straight flush! Now, he only needed one card to fill in a straight flush, but filling that gap with not only the right card, but the proper suit – seemed unlikely and the odds against it happening were very high, indeed.The man dealing gave Thad’s last card a reckless spin across the table.Thad used his sweating fingers to reach for it. Slowly, he looked at the card and screeched with delight! “I won that mine in a poker game,” he grinned.“It belongs to me!” It was hard for Nuebauer to contain himself as the man calmly transferred the title to the mine. I won’t tell you the name of the mine or anything like that, but to this day, it has something to do with that winning poker hand! PAGE 8 APRIL 2010 - TREASURE HUNT ISSUE

PROPERTIES: Gold is bright yellow when pure, but the color intensity varies to lighter or darker with the amount of silver or copper present. Gold powder produced by precipitation or volatilization is violet, purple or ruby colored. Gold is very heavy and soft and is the most ductile and malleable of metals. It is a good conductor of heat and electricity. Its electrical conductivity is exceeded only by silver and copper. The element is not attacked by air or oxygen and is extremely inactive. It is insoluble in all acids except Aqua Regia and Selenic Acid. It is bivalent and tetravalent but combines with only a few other elements to form compounds. USES: Gold has little use other than monetary and decorative. Since earliest historical time gold has been used for currency or as a monetary standard, and (presently) these are the principal uses of the metal. In the arts, it is used in the manufacture of jewelry, watches, and gold foil for lettering and decorative purposes. Lesser amounts are used in dental work and in the electrical and chemical industries. Small quantities are used in medicine and photography. Most of the industrial uses stem from its resistance to corrosion, excellent ductility and malleability. But, because of its extreme softness as the pure metal, it is often alloyed with silver or copper. Gold occurs most commonly as the native metal, which is usually alloyed with varying amounts of silver, generally 10 to 20 percent. Native gold may occur as irregular masses, ranging in size from nuggets weighing several ounces to pounds, down to sub-microscopic particles. Also, and more rarely, it occurs as well formed crystals, as in some of the lode deposits in the Swauk District in Kittitas County.

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By Lyn Derrick

AN OUTDOORSY COUPLE like Holly and Steve had to have an outdoor cooking area, too. Steve is famous for the pancakes he cooks on this vintage stove. Lyn Derrick photo

The Burlingame’s house of

treasures PAGE 10 APRIL 2010 - TREASURE HUNT ISSUE

In a treasured environment

Steve and Holly Burlingame’s South Cle Elum Ridge home holds a lot of treasures. Some the couple found here, and some they added.

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Among the treasures they found was the ideal place to live their active lifestyle. “We’re outdoor-oriented,” Holly said. It’s that outdoor orientation that led them to this area. “We were coming over almost every weekend,” Holly said,“for hiking, hunting, fishing, river rafting and snowmobiling.” In fact, it was a friend they met through snowmobiling who led them to the site of their future home. “They said,‘you’ve got to come and see the property we bought,’” said Steve. Venturing across the road, the Burlingames found their own piece of land. That was in 1988. Soon Holly and Steve had their RV parked and were ‘rec-creating’ from this base of operations to beat the band. The natural environment here is one of the things the couple treasures. So, when it came time to build their retirement dream home in 2003, the Burlingames wanted to preserve as much of that atmosphere as possible. “Our goal was to build a home that blended into the natural setting,” Holly explained. They had a pretty good idea about what they wanted, and builder Mike Houser executed their plan through the finished sheetrock stage. Steve took over from there; working on weekends he completed all the finish work. By 2006, the couple moved into what Holly refers to as their “cabinesque” home. On the outside there’s natural cedar siding, a forest green roof and all natural landscaping – including rock unearthed when their basement was dug. On the inside there’s a natural river rock fireplace with a real wood-burning stove, warm colors reflecting the outdoors – plus trim, window and doorframes Steve made from timber cleared from the property. Then Holly added some treasures of her own in the form of artwork, paintings, pottery, sculpture and burls – all of it a celebration of the outdoors, too. Besides being cabinesque, the Burlingame’s home

A RIVER ROCK FIREPLACE anchors the Burlingames’ open living space – Lyn Derrick photo an ideal setting for entertaining friends.

is warm and inviting, with an open living area made for entertaining friends. “We have a lot more friends than we ever did in Bellevue,” Steve smiled. In fact he says it’s the people here that he treasures the most.“You go into the post office here,” he said,“and people say ‘hi’ to you.You don’t get that over there.” Nor do you generally get a regular round robin of dinner parties.“We were meeting for dinner every Saturday night in town,” Steve said about their group of friends.“Then I thought, you know, we could socialize better at someone’s house.” The Burlingame’s move here didn’t require leaving family behind, either. In short order, Holly’s Dad and sister, and Steve’s sister moved to the area, too. Perhaps they discovered one of the things Holly treasures – not just a more enjoyable way of life, but a more peaceful one, too. “When you cross over those mountains,” she said, “you can feel the tension rolling off.This place is a great stress reliever.”

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TREASURE HUNT ISSUE - APRIL 2010 PAGE 11


The collecting Peterson bug that bit

By Jim Fossett with Nick Henderson

A bug bit Cle Elum’s Karen Peterson. It bit her hard, and immediately she was infected with a passion to collect commercial memorabilia. Not just any kind. Only the kind with a sentimental hook to the place she and her extended family have called home sweet home for years. Some might venture to say that from the mysterious spiritual world closed to prying human intellects, Peterson received a calling to become a tradition bearer of sorts, in the form of a surrogate-museum curator, and a member of a select group in the Upper County devoted to building bridges from generations past to those of us who live in the present. Some do it by telling stories. Some do it by writing. Others do it by collecting and preserving things. Today, after a decade, Peterson’s collection rests in a stately display case at her husband’s dental practice in Cle Elum. How did the bug bite? She explains. “Well, I guess, it would be this. I have very fond memories of my grandfather walking me to the Freezer Shop in Roslyn, when I was a child. Fast forward to ten PAGE 12 APRIL 2010 - TREASURE HUNT ISSUE

years ago, I was shuffling through a storage box at home and found an old, red, plastic salt and pepper shaker with a decal that read:The Freezer Shop. So, I put it in a safe place, and from that point, started collecting. Friends and neighbors would give me things. My mom would call me and tell me she found this or that, and I’d add it to my collection.Then I started going to antique malls and yard sales, looking for stuff.” What’s in her collection today? Here are a few items, just for starters. An Inventory of Historical Proportions • An autographed script from the Northern Exposure television series filmed in Roslyn.“My daughter was an extra in one show,” she said. • A program dated August 8, 1967, celebrating the I-90 opening, signed by then Governor Daniel Evans. KAREN PETERSON holds the Roslyn Freezer Shop salt and pepper shaker that infected her with the bug to collect commercial memorabilia, and other things that remind her of the place where her extended family sank roots. Jim Fossett photo

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Beau’s Pizza is today, on First Inside the program are Street in Cle Elum; Union shreds of plastic, what reTavern, which was located in a mains of the ribbon used for building that doesn’t exist anythe ribbon cutting ceremony. more, near El Caporal, on First • An ice pick embossed Street in Cle Elum; and, King’s with – Cle Elum Dairy Tavern, once located in the buildProducts, 1910, Phone: 373. ing next to Marko’s in Roslyn. The Dairy occupied the build• Loggers Festival programs ing where Personal Touch Emthat date back to the 1960s. broidery is located today, on Back in the day, the festival took First Street, in Cle Elum. place near Memorial Park in Cle • Peterson’s collection Elum. isn’t restricted to commer• A foot-long pencil used as a cial memorabilia. On a shelf marketing novelty, distributed by in her display cabinet rests a HOW ABOUT THIS NOVELTY. A cardboard tube full of perfume samples, the Freezer Shop in Roslyn, Valentine card her dad, Gene Jim Fossett photo distributed to customers of McKnight Motors. where Roslyn Café is today. Sandona, gave to his mom in • A rain bonnet tucked away 1945. cardboard tube are several thin, glass neatly in a golf-ball-size plastic pouch, ad• A bread wrapper from the Roslyn tubes, each one designed to be snapped, vertising Brown’s Funeral Home, where Bakery, printed with the bakery’s phone to let loose a tiny sampling of perfume. Cascade Funeral Home is today, on North number: 521. McKnight Motors occupied the Harris Street, in Cle Elum. • A 1957 calendar distributed by the building where Cle Elum’s City Hall is • Paper nickel rolls from Seattle Miner Echo Newspaper, predecessor of today, on First Street. First National Bank, now home of Bank the NKC Tribune.“My husband’s grandfa• Wooden nickels from several differof America, on First Street in Cle Elum. ther and dad owned and operated the ent taverns in the area that have long since • Various knick-knacks used to marEcho at one time.” disappeared: Longhorn Tavern, where Saket businesses from a day gone by, includ• A cardboard tube the size of a plashara’s Pizza is today, on First Street in Cle ing: Simpson’s Texaco, where Subwaytic chapstick container, printed with the Elum; Office Tavern, where Marko’s is words: McKnight Motors. Inside the CONTINUED ON PAGE 14 today, in Roslyn; Cle Elum Tavern, where Dig up mining town historical treasures!

Visit the

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BRING IN THIS AD & SAVE! Buy ANY dinner & get $3.00 OFF 2nd Dinner. Expires April 15, 2010.

509-649-2355

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203 W. Pennsylvania Ave.

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El Caporal Family Mexican Restaurant & Cantina 105 W. First • Cle Elum, WA • 509-674-4284

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TREASURE HUNT ISSUE - APRIL 2010 PAGE 13


Find all your Treasures at Ruby’s!

Ask abou our classe t s!

Yarn, Floss Thread, Needles, Hooks, Patterns, Rubber Stamps, Ink, Card Making Supplies, & More!

Printing, Scrapbooking & Things, llc 116 E. First St. • Cle Elum, WA • 509.674.2296 • ruby@rubysstore.com

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

New LOWER PRICES Every Day!

801 W. Davis • Cle Elum

509-674-1831

www.QUIZNOS.com

Shell is today, on First Street, in Cle Elum; Tony’s Transfer, where the old NKC Tribune office used to be, on Pennsylvania Avenue, in Cle Elum; Sandona’s Chevron, where Cle Elum’s Dairy Queen is today, on First Street; Pioneer Transfer; and, City Grocery, PAGE 14, PUZZLE SOLUTION Y

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the sandstone building in Roslyn, on Second Street. Sentimental Journey “At a yard sale, I picked up a matchbook from the old bowling alley in town, Evergreen Lanes,” Peterson said, “but somehow it got lost on the way home. “You know, all of these things I collect represent the place where I grew up, where my parents grew up, and where my grandparents grew up. I think that explains some of the passion, too.” Do you have something to contribute to what arguably may become the first brick in the foundation for a city museum? Give Karen Peterson a call at (509) 674-8914.

We service & repair any fireplace or furnace. PAGE 14 APRIL 2010 - TREASURE HUNT ISSUE

201 E. First St. Cle Elum, WA

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APRIL 1 Susan Boyle, Singer (49)

APRIL 19 Tim Curry, Actor (64)

APRIL 3 Alec Baldwin, Actor (52)

APRIL 21 Tony Danza, Actor (59)

APRIL 4 Robert Downey, Jr., Actor (45)

APRIL 23 Valerie Bertinelli, Actress (50)

APRIL 5 Colin Powell, General (73)

APRIL 24 Kelly Clarkson, Singer (28)

APRIL 7 Russell Crowe, Actor (46)

APRIL 27 Sheena Easton, Singer (51)

APRIL 13 Tony Dow, Actor (65)

APRIL 28 Jay Leno, Talk Show Host (60)

APRIL 14 Loretta Lynn, Singer (75)

APRIL 29 Michelle Pfeiffer, Actress (52)

APRIL 18 Melissa Joan Hart, Actress (34)

APRIL 30 Kirsten Dunst, Actress (28)

ELECTION FIND WORD WORD SEARCH Just in time for Easter, see how many related words you can find & circle throughout the puzzle. BASKET BONNET BUNNY CANDY

CELEBRATE CHURCH DINNER EASTER

EGGS FAMILY HUNT PARADE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 14

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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46. Hang around 47. Record holder before Bonds 49. Source of roe 51. Airport porters 54. Do business 59. Glass of public radio 60. Hotel lobby’s locale, often 62. Put on 63. __ up (spoil) 64. Meriting a 10 65. Otoscope user, for short 66. Op-ed piece, e.g. 67. “My bad!”

13. Fed the kitty 18. Partner of greet 22. King discovered by Howard Carter 24. Big steps 26. Fit for duty 27. Place for a dinette 28. NBA star signed at age 17 29. Jeans brand 31. Sad sack’s list 32. Draw the curtain on 34. Tadpole, eventually 36. “Picnic” playwright 37. Place of refuge 39. New England catch

40. Winery cask 42. Get by trickery 43. “Semper __” (Marines motto) 45. Fabulous flier 46. “Dragnet” force, for short 47. “All kidding __ ...” 48. Ohio rubber center 50. Food that doesn’t easily spoil 52. “Aye” voters 53. __-chef (kitchen #2) 55. Give a fresh look to 56. State firmly 57. Mad dash 58. __ May Clampett 61. World Baseball Classic team

HOW THEY SAY IT...

• 1865: PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN MAKES HIS FINAL PUBLIC SPEECH.

• 1979: UGANDAN DICTATOR IDI AMIN IS DEPOSED.

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A MATURE, HEALTHY TREE PRODUCES ENOUGH OXYGEN IN A SEASON TO PROVIDE AIR FOR 10 PEOPLE TO BREATHE FOR A YEAR.

English: GRASS Spanish: HIERBA Italian: ERBA French: HERBE German: GRAS

TREASURE HUNT ISSUE - APRIL 2010 PAGE 15


By Janie McQueen

TRAIL OF THE MONTH

Short trails are a breeze at Wild Horse

“Trail Mix” is a description of a Cascades area trail from the perspective of an actual user.

Looking for a new trail? Puget Sound Energy’s (PSE) Wild Horse Wind Facility may offer just the ticket! The gate opens on April 1 (really, not an April Fool’s joke) and remains open until November 30. There are a few requirements for your safety, however. For starters, call ahead of time to the office just to make sure the trails will be available, as PSE monitors conditions and may opt to close the trails to hikers when the wind is just too strong. I can attest to the wind up there, because even on the day I went which was relatively calm as the trail was open, it was still extremely windy. Depending on age and fitness level, the short trail may prove more strenuous than it would be under less breezy conditions, as you buck the wind all the way back. Call PSE at (509) 964-7815 for weather details.

WALKING SAFELY down the trail at Puget Sound Energy’s Wild Horse Wind Facility (outside Ellensburg) with hard hats and safety glasses in place for the guided tour.

Visitor Center tours begin at 10:00 a.m. and end at 2:00 p.m., although the gate is open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. These tours are given daily no reservations are needed. If use of the beautiful Visitor Center for a group of up to 48 people is appealing, that does require reservations for that day and provide your own food and water or beverages. A brief liability form needs to be filled out to see a wind turbine on a guided trail tour.

PAGE 16 APRIL 2010 - TREASURE HUNT ISSUE

Janie McQueen photo

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Closed-toe shoes are required to protect your feet, and it is also recommended that you wear layered clothing. Be prepared for it to be cold at the Wind Facility.Though it might seem like the weather is fine in the valley, it can quickly get cold and windy up there. It’s easy to see why PSE chose that site for a wind facility! A few rules to keep in mind - ATV’s are prohibited, as is driving on cross country areas and any maintenance roads to wind turbines.There is no overnight camping and a permit is needed to hike or ride horseback cross-country (during the hunting season and for general recreation). Isn’t it pretty cool that we can still use the private land if we follow a few simple rules? Permits are offered FREE because the folks at PSE just want to make sure that trail users know about the fragile environment under their feet! “A history and ecology of this area is really important,” said Jennifer Diaz.That’s one of the reasons she leads a guided hike on the 2-3 mile roundtrip trail to simply look at the wildflowers! The trail for that trip does go down into a canyon, so for those unsure if the climb may be more challenge than their fitness level is up to, Jennifer can set up a bus to board at the bottom and head back up to the Visitor Center. There is no way to tell when the wildflower hike will be this year, so keep watching in the local newspapers for dates or call the facility. Jennifer promised that she’d know a little ahead of time! When you let the PSE folks know you’re coming to visit the trail system, they provide a guide and loan the use of safety glasses and hard hats for each member of your group to use for free.There are orange cones set up in the middle of the short trail to let folks know where the “hard hat” area begins.Also, remember that you don’t have to be part of a group for this trail as it wraps around the Visitor Center and has gorgeous views! The trail isn’t overly strenuous for most hikers at only 1 ½ miles roundtrip, but it is extremely interesting. Your guide will actually take folks INSIDE one of those giant wind turbines! The wind turbines are set up to give us renewable energy. Feel free to ask your guide, who will most likely be Adam Crawford or Jennifer Diaz, any questions you might have about the big wind turbine. Wildlife can be seen ALL OVER, and the elk even meander around the big turbines without seeming to mind them at all.That’s a plus for this county! Remember a hunting permit can be obtained onsite during hunting season for free. Just call 509-964-7815.

THESE SOLAR PANELS PROVIDE all the energy (electricity) for the Visitor Janie McQueen photo Center at the Wild Horse Wind Facility .

WANT TO GET CHARGED UP? Adam shows us where we could charge our electric cars while we’re going on a guided tour or trail! Janie McQueen photo

Directions to Wild Horse Wind Facility From Cle Elum travel east on I-90 to Exit 106. Follow the exit to a four-way stop. Keep driving straight as it becomes University Way. Drive on University Way until it becomes the Vantage Highway. Continue on Vantage Highway for a little over 16 miles.The Wild Horse Wind Facility is wellmarked with an archway on your left. VISITORS STAND OUTSIDE the Visitor Center on this deck to get a great view of the Wind Farm facility. It’s recommended that you always dress in layers for the cold! Shown are Adam Crawford, Christina Bettis, and Jennifer Diaz. Janie McQueen photo

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TREASURE HUNT ISSUE - APRIL 2010 PAGE 17


Warm nights observing and April

By Janie McQueen

Spring is here and so is some great night skywatching. April is that time of year when the evenings are warmer so it is perfect for night viewing. I’d still grab a snuggly blanket and a thermos of hot coffee or cocoa, though, because there is plenty to see in April and you might end up staying outside at night for a while! Planets Mercury and Venus will offer superb views in the evening twilight hours.To the south, Mars will be in view and as well, Saturn will be visible, rising in the east.The ringed beauty will remain a beacon for telescopes all night! Simply watch it in the southeast as the planet climbs higher in the evening sky (even if you didn’t get to see it in opposition in March, it’s still pretty). Have you got a telescope handy? If so, you’ll get to see the rings as they tilt 2-degrees during mid-April. Then focus on the planet itself throughout April for some nice observing. Because of Saturn’s clouds it will appear a reflected color of yellow. You can even see a couple of Saturn’s moons (Titan and Iapetus) which will be on display this month.Titan will be visible in the first week of April, glowing at a magnificently bright 8th magnitude, to the large planet’s west.Then it will orbit to the east side of Saturn on April 7.The moon will then return to its mother planet on April 14, and moves to the west of Saturn again before it completes its orbit on April 22. Titan will be visible to the east - from the 23rd of April until the end of the month. Titan actually completes two orbits around Saturn each month. Iapetus is the next moon out of the six largest of Saturn’s moons to observe. It will brighten considerably as it moves to the east and west of Saturn. This (the brightening) takes place all month! It becomes brighter because one of its hemispheres reflects about 90 percent of the sunlight while the other half PAGE 18 APRIL 2010 - TREASURE HUNT ISSUE

THIS IMAGE WAS TAKEN BY the Cassini-Huygens in July, 2008 and shows us completely natural colors. NASA’s Cassini spacecraft captured the images at a distance of approximately 690,000 miles from Saturn. The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. It is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who designed the spacecraft and two onboard cameras. The next scheduled flyby is for April 5, 2010 and it will take place at Titan, one of Saturn’s moons. Photo courtesy of NASA/Space Science Institute

only reflects about 10 percent. And the brightest side faces the Earth whenever Iapetus is farthest west of Saturn.The bright moon will lie a little over one inch to the south of Saturn on April 17. Most of the celestial activity for planets takes place in the evening sky because Jupiter and Uranus don’t make a showing until the predawn hours and after. Because it’s so difficult to spot, it’s best to wait until May for observing Uranus. Jupiter will come into the southeast sky just before dawn. It will behoove us all to wait until the month’s end as the big planet will rise earlier and earlier as the month advances. It will be in the east-southeast sky just 30 minutes before the Sun rises in late April. Meteors This month is the beginning of our annual meteor activity. It begins with the Lyrid meteor shower peaking just before dawn on April 22. If you can get to a dark sky, you’ll be able to see between 15 and 25 meteors per hour.That is, if you wake up that early! There is a Quarter Moon that sets just before 3:00 am and that will be perfect for viewing meteors in a dark sky. In 1982, the shower peaked at 90 meteors per hour (though it didn’t last very long) and that was far more than astronomers originally thought! So, even though astronomers don’t predict a strong showing of meteors this year, the Lyrids can surprise us.They can even be bright, fast and will often leave trains in the night sky above us! Have a wonderful time all month as you view the celestial happenings because April is the beginning of good astronomical events yet to come for 2010! WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM • CASCADES

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❖ THURSDAY, APRIL 1 WSDOT I-90 East Construction 2010 Projects Open House, 3:30 - 6:00 p.m. in multi-purpose room at the Easton School, 1893 Railroad Street.

❖ SATURDAY, APRIL 3 Kittitas Audubon Society First Saturday Bird Walk, 8:00 a.m., meet at Irene Rinehart parking lot near Ellensburg. Most walks run 2 hrs. Everyone welcome. For info, visit www.kittitasaudubon.org. Suncadia Annual Easter Egg Hunt, 9:30 a.m. on Prospector Golf Driving Range. Free admission. For more info, visit www.suncadiaresort.com. Cle Elum Easter Egg Hunt, 12 noon sponsored by Volunteer Fire Dept. at 700 E.Third St., Cle Elum.

❖ SUNDAY, APRIL 4 Northwest Cutting Competition, 12 -2 p.m. 409 W. 12th Ave., Ellensburg. Free admission. For more info, visit www.bladesports.org.

architect who is known for her work in sculpture and landscape art. Her best-known work is the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. For info, contact Cindy Coe at coecy@cwu.edu.

❖ FRIDAY, APRIL 16 Family Poetry Night, 7 - 9 p.m. at Ellensburg Public Library Hal Holmes Center. For more info, contact Debby at desoerd@ci.ellensburg.wa.us.

❖ SATURDAY, APRIL 17 Leavenworth Ale Fest For more info: www.leavenworthalefest.com. Variety Talent Show & Dessert Potluck Swauk-Teanaway Grange Hall, 1361 Ballard Hill Road, Cle Elum. For more information, call Gerry Lloyd, 509-674 1989. Cle Elum Roslyn Chamber Feathernester Dinner & Auction, The Lodge at Suncadia. For more info, call the Chamber 509-674-5958.

❖ SATURDAY, APRIL 24

❖ MONDAY, APRIL 5 Cascade Field & Stream Club, 7:00 p.m. at Sunset Cafe in Cle Elum. Info: call 509-674-1714.

❖ TUESDAY, APRIL 6 WSDOT I-90 East Construction 2010 Projects Open House, 4:00 - 7:00 p.m. in multi-purpose room at Cle Elum-Roslyn Elementary School, 2696 State Route 903, Cle Elum.

❖ THURSDAY, APRIL 8 Alpine Lakes Trail Riders (ALTR) chapter of Back Country Horsemen of WA, 7:00 p.m. at the Roslyn Riders Clubhouse off State Route 903. For info, call Dana Bailey, (509) 304-8701.

❖ FRIDAY & SATURDAY, APRIL 9-10 Annual Leavenworth Choral Festival. Info, visit www.leavenworthchoralfestival.org.

❖ SATURDAY, APRIL 10 Sons of Italy Spaghetti Fundraiser, 4-7 p.m., Cle Elum Eagles Club, 220 Pennsylvania Ave. For more info, call Ron Dalle, 509-674-5125.

❖ THURSDAY, APRIL 15 Maya Lin - speaker at CWU in conjunction with Women’s Votes, Women’s Voices, 1910-2010. Maya Lin is an American artist and

Roslyn’s Annual Arbor Day and Earth Day Citywide Clean-Up events. For information, call City Hall, 509-649-3105. Campership “Hoe Down” Fundraiser at Ritter Farms, Cle Elum. Info: Katie, 509-260-0848. “Spring Fling” Food & Live Music, Cle Elum Eagles Club, 220 Pennsylvania Ave.; 509-674-2385.

❖ FRI. & SAT., APRIL 30 - MAY 1 4th Annual WSCFF Fly Fishing Fair, Kittitas Valley Event Center (Kittitas County Fairgrounds), Ellensburg. For more information, contact Carl Johnson 1-425-308-6161 ‘Final Friday’ Live Music & Art Walk 5:00 - 9:00 p.m., downtown Roslyn. For more information, call 509-649-2551.

• APRIL EXHIBITS • • Carpenter House Museum and High Country Artist Gallery, Cle Elum; 509-674-9766. • Roslyn Museum 203 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Roslyn; 509-649-2355. • Clymer Museum of Art 416 N. Pearl St., Ellensburg; 509-962-6416. • Kittitas County Historical Museum 114 E.Third Ave., Ellensburg; 509-925-3778.

EVENTS CALENDAR

APRIL • 2010

Check for more events or post your own events FREE online at:

mountain-echo.com/Calendar

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TREASURE HUNT ISSUE - APRIL 2010 PAGE 19


IN THIS PHOTO, the Japanese Painted Fern, Violets and Hosta may appear to be planted far apart, but they are young plants and need the space to grow. Photo courtesy of Nola Forster

Treasures in the shade by Nola Forster, WSU Extension Master Gardener

WHEN I THINK of treasure hunting I think of dark caves, long hikes in the woods and hidden places. As you might guess, I spend a lot of time working in the yard, but this last year I’ve been thinking about having a special place to retreat, to be able to sit and relax where no one else can see; for meditation and reflection. Oh, I have a bench under the big willow tree, but that is out front for visiting with neighbors out for a walk.This new space will be just for me. PAGE 20 APRIL 2010 - TREASURE HUNT ISSUE

So this year I will be putting together my own hidden treasure in the form of a shady, secret space in the very back of my yard by the creek. During my research I’ve focused on shade loving plants. Anyone who has a house probably has a shady side that can become either a hideaway or showcase just by adding plants such as hostas with their wide range of colorful, streaked and patterned foliage, fine textured ferns or the bold flower plumes of astilbe and the long flowering hellebores. So once you have a design in mind and the hardscape and structures are in place, it is time to select plants. Shrubs give structure and add weight and substance to the landscape.They can be used to create barriers or alter traffic flow.They define the shape and limits of the garden. A very hardy shrub for our area and one I don’t see here too often is Cletheraalnifolia or Summersweet.The only thing it can’t stand up to is drought and our local deer, so keep it irrigated and if you have deer in your area then you may want to cage the younger and smaller plants for the first couple of years until they get established. Otherwise, it takes full sun to full shade, ordinary native soil to salty, sandy coastal conditions or wet boggy soils. Summersweet grows 3 to 5 feet tall and flowers in late summer with 2 to 6 inch long spikes of white or pink; its leaves turn yellow before they fall in early winter. WWW.MOUNTAIN-ECHO.COM • CASCADES

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Another deciduous shrub happy in either shade or sun is Kerria japonica. My Mother lived just south of Portland, OR and she had one in full sun that stood probably 8 to 10 feet high and cascading to about 10 feet wide it bloomed all season long. Here, with our shorter growing season it won’t get that big. Kerria has golden yellow single flowers and K. peniflora has double pom pomlike flowers 2 inches across. In the winter the bare stems stay a beautiful lime green contrasting wonderfully against the snow. When grown in the shade Kerria will be lankier than bushy, forming a semi-vining habit but it will still have some bloom all season long. Kerria will accept rather poor soils, dry deep shade and will survive a drought season once it’s established. Working with natives almost always means low maintenance and pest free – I like that.Two that come to mind are Mahoniareptens, or Oregon Grape, and Spiraea densiflora, a subalpine spirea that forms 3 foot high clumps and has pink conical shaped flowers that grow above the foliage in summer. Our native Mahonia grows from the sagebrush steppe to the high rocky ridges of Upper County and stays evergreen; but its holly-like, shiny leaves turn red in fall. It grows a couple of feet high, has yellow flowers in spring and edible blue-black berries in summer, which make a fine jelly. I am fortunate to have lots growing in my yard so I just made flower beds around them and let them go, they also sucker and form clumps. Because they are in so many different places it gives my yard a more cohesive feel. Another shade loving shrub that most people know is the Hydrangea and one that will survive our cold winters is Hydrangeapaniculata. Called PeeGee hydrangea, it will get 10 feet or higher and produces large flower heads 8-12 inches long beginning white but turning pink, aging to tan. They remain on the plant even after leaves drop in late fall.This is not a drought tolerant plant, it actually has a derivative of hydro right in the name; it requires moist, but well drained soil and partial shade. Perennials are non-woody plants that live for 2 or more years.There is an immense variety to choose from and my favorite this year is the Helleborous niger. The hellebore, also called the Lenten rose, is the first to bloom in the spring. Best in dappled shade with morning sun it grows to around 2 feet high.The amazing thing about this plant is that its flowers last sometimes up to 4 months. There are a lot of new hybrids out now and they come in shades of white through

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pink and burgundy to yellow, green and almost black.The hellebore will grow in most soils except the poorly drained or very dry, but what they like best is compost enriched, well drained soil.They also need to be protected from strong cold winds. Hostas have been a standard in the shade garden since my grandmother’s day and are used as specimen plants or focal points by planting in mass.They have solid or variegated foliage with color ranges from powder blue to dark green with snow-white edges and stripes in olive green and gold. Hostas like fertile and moist but well drained soil, dappled shade and morning sun. Each hosta variety is a little different in its tolerance for extremes of sun and water; a little experimentation may be needed until you get the right combination for your yard.Their white, lavender or purple flowers appear on stalks above the foliage in summer. Ferns provide a fine texture and background for subtle shade loving bloomers in mid summer.The sword fern isn’t native east of the Cascades but will grow here just fine with regular water and will survive some drought once it’s well established. Some very beautiful ferns are also hardy in our area such as Athyrium niponicum (Japanese painted fern) with its silvery gray green fronds; and in the same family the Lady Fern is also deciduous and has light green fronds sometimes 3 feet long with red stalks. Also the dainty Maiden Hair Fern and the Autumn Fern with its yellow and orange spring colors all provide a delightful cover for faded stalks of early spring bulbs. In the photo here, the Japanese Painted Fern, Violet and Hosta appear to be planted a little far apart, but they are still young and will need room to grow in the coming years. In moist shady areas plants need good air circulation or they can become susceptible to mold and mildew problems. Other plants that grow well in the shade are Lily-of-the-Valley,Trilliums and the Old-Fashioned Bleeding Heart. Heuchera and all the many hybrids that are being developed now are simply stunning; from bright lime green to deep burgundy and all colors in between, grandma’s old fashioned Coral Bells have come a long way. Brunnera also grows well here and the cultivar Jack Frost is one of my favorites with its green and frosty white leaves, it sends out a profusion of forget-me-not like flowers floating above the foliage in spring. Groundcovers can reduce water evaporation from exposed, freely drain-

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ing soils and, once established, they reduce the need for weeding by shading out and preventing weed seeds from taking hold. My most favorite is Galium Odoratum, or Sweet Woodruff. While it will grow in all but the hottest afternoon sun, it will take dry, full shade. Sweet Woodruff bears star shaped scented white flowers above whorls of lance shaped emerald green leaves in the spring. When the leaves are dried they smell like new mown hay – probably why it was once called bedstraw; the flowers were used to make May wine. While it will grow in dry shade without additional water, it will be fuller and grow faster if given regular water in summer. It dies back in winter but once you clip off the dead leaves during spring cleanup you’ll see fresh new shoots coming up and that’s the last you’ll have to do for it all year. Ajuga reptens, or Carpet Bugleweed is usually bronze leafed and spreading with rhizomes; it has 6-inch tall spikes of indigo blue flowers in spring.The spent flower spikes are usually clipped off when they finish flowering to keep the beds neat. If ajuga gets regular water and spreads to a large enough area, you could actually mow it. Just set the lawn mower on its highest cutting level; then don’t worry about it again until the next year. It needs partial to full shade and moist rich soil. It can invade lawns. Vinca minor, sometimes called Creeping myrtle, is a mat forming subshrub with a trailing habit. It has violet blue flowers beginning in spring and continuing through autumn. I know my shade garden is going to be a lot of work at first but as I get older and my muscles don’t recover as fast as they used to I am looking forward to a garden that will somewhat sustain itself and still be a comfortable and restful place to sit; a treasure in my own backyard. The plants mentioned here are hardy in all of Kittitas County and most can be found at local nurseries.

For your gardening questions, contact the WSU Master Gardener offices anytime and a Master Gardener will return your call. The Diagnostic Clinic is open May through September, Tuesdays 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. at the WSU Extension Office, 507 Nanum Rm. 2, Ellensburg; Phone: (509) 962-7507, Upper County Toll Free: (509) 674-2584. TREASURE HUNT ISSUE - APRIL 2010 PAGE 21


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April 2010 Echo Magazine - Treasure hunting  

The annual Treasure Hunting Issue of the Cascades Mountain ECHO Magazine.

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