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ASEPBIANNUAL The Newsletter for the Academic Success and Enrichment Programs at Barnard College

A Biannual Newsletter

Issue 7, Fall 2014

Leadership through Internship By Rumana Kasime, HEOP ’17

This summer was eye-opening, intellectually stimulating, and emotionally challenging. I began my summer with an internship as an office assistant for the LEDA Scholars Program, a non-profit organization that helps highachieving, low-income students gain acceptance into the nation’s most competitive colleges and universities. Every summer, the program brings 60 students to Princeton University for a jampacked schedule. Students spend each weekday in classes: Aspects of Leadership, Writing Workshop, and Rumana SAT/ ACT prep. Kasime, I was extremely excited to start my HEOP 2017, journey as an employee with this preparing high school program because I myself had been students for involved in the program during my college junior year of high school. I wouldn’t be at Barnard if the program hadn’t exposed me to all the active. Throughout the next month and a educational opportunities available. The half, the commotion ensued. My days internship was a month long and my consisted of conducting individual responsibilities ranged from clerical duties meetings with scholars to assist them in such as entering data to contacting students researching colleges, completing college for information. However, I mainly guidance assignments, building their prepped for the upcoming seven week college lists, preparing paperwork, and program. At the end of the month, when the delivering any materials and supplies for all internship drew to an end, I knew that I did practice SAT/ACT exams, and providing not want this to be the end of my general administrative support to the involvement with the program. Therefore, I Director of College Guidance (including decided to apply to become College scheduling, photocopying, materials Guidance Assistant. preparation, phone calls, etc.). Although I really enjoyed a lot of the administrative July 16th marked my first day as a College work, my favorite part of the experience Guidance Assistant. From picking up the was working with the 61 amazing scholars. scholars at the airport to helping them set up their rooms, the summer started off very ASEP BIANNUAL

The growth I experienced this summer is truly indescribable. I went into it with the mindset that I would pass on my wisdom and help the students learn through sharing my experiences but it turned out completely different. The students taught me so much not only about life, but about myself. They continuously challenged me to explore what it meant to be a socio-economically disadvantaged student and how that affected my everyday interactions. I couldn’t believe how optimistic, motivated, and determined they remained even though they had experienced so many hardships. I couldn’t help but be inspired. Their continuous dedication really encouraged me and other students to attain what may seem intangible.0 1


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Education Is Freedom By Marletty Batista, STEP 10th grader

What freedom means to me is being able to express yourself and your opinions and having the liberty to do whatever one wants. Today our government recognizes the importance of freedom through the First Amendment, which grants citizens the freedom of expression, religion, speech, petition, and assembly. However, this was not always the case. At the Brooklyn Historical Society, we discussed freedom and learned about what it meant to slaves. On Friday, July 11, I went to the Brooklyn Historical Society, where I was informed on slavery in Brooklyn and the city’s abolitionist movements during the time period. Abolitionists were men and women who fought for freedom through different methods—publishing newspapers, preaching sermons, and even rescuing slaves— in order to end slavery. David Ruggles, for example, was a newspaper editor who believed that abolitionists needed to go above and beyond what they were already doing. Thus, David Ruggles rescued three illegally enslaved blacks who were being held hostage in a Brooklyn home by white Southerners. I also learned about freedom, not only from the abolitionist perspective, but also from the slave point of view. John Jea, for example, was a man sold into slavery along with his family in New York. Though hard to

“Education is freedom because it offers us the ability to study what we want and recognize that we can do something in life.” -Marletty Batista

imagine today, Brooklyn mostly consisted of farm land, where slaves like John Jae were forced to labor. In reflecting on the lives of slaves, I believe that education itself is a form of freedom. Slaves were denied the right to read, which frees the mind. When John Jea learned to read the Bible, for example, he

Rapping on the Intrepid

By Paola Hernandez, STEP 10th grader

Paola Hernandez (right), STEP 10th grader

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On June 27th, STEP gave our class the opportunity to attend the Science Genius Battles at the Intrepid Museum in Manhattan. We arrived early that day and looked around. What amazed me about the museum was its synthesis of contemporary music with science. Specifically, we engaged in a ship battle. However, it was not to be any ordinary battle. Our battle was a rap competition. Before the battle began, we were told that the competitors were to create a rap that explained any scientific process. Upon hearing the directions, I remember asking myself: How is this whole thing going to work out? How were we going to create a rap based on science? What would be the purpose? My honest assumption was that these raps were going to be “boring.” However, the energetic and creative volunteers proved that rapping about science was not only possible, but could also be interesting. Some of the contestants rapped about the process of

freed himself and began his journey as preacher, liberating others. Education is freedom because it offers us the ability to study what we want and recognize that we can do something in life. Just as John Jea, recognized his intelligence after receiving an education, I believe that education can teach us about ourselves and is ultimately, the most important freedom there is. 0

photosynthesis, others rapped about how diamonds are made, and others rapped about the passageway of digestion. After listening to a few lyrics, not only were these scientific raps amazing but their art proved that any person can rap about anything, even science. The raps that the contestants made were very entertaining. Most notably, one girl rapped about the process of swallowing food and made it a metaphor to swallowing one’s pride. This rap resonated with me the most. This was a clever way to introduce science to students—by meeting us on our own social terms. As the Science Genius program later informed us, this was their initiative: to help students memorize science in the same way they would memorize lyrics to a rap song. It was an enjoyable experience for me, as a fan of rap and hip-hop. I myself, listen to rap and hip-hop artists such as A$AP Rocky, Drake, and PartyNextDoor. In reflecting on the trip, I was grateful for the opportunity to participate in such an inventive learning experience. 0 ASEP BIANNUAL


White Dresses and Pearls A ceremony at Spelman College By Daena Reynolds, Spelman Exchange Student

This past fall, I attended Spelman College as a Domestic Exchange student. It was my first time in “Hotlanta” and my first time in the South. Spelman College is ranked as the number one HBCU (Historically Black College or University) in the nation and is an all women’s institution. It is a school known for its legacy and tradition. During my time there, it was normal to run into a student whose mother, grandmother, and great grandmother had all attended Spelman College. It was amazing to see so many generations of black excellence and to be surrounded by so many people who were proud of the skin they were in. As an exchange student, you are introduced to Spelman’s traditions even before the school semester begins. We were encouraged to participate in the New Students’ Orientation Program. While I chose not to participate in every event, I made sure to attend Spelman’s White Dress Ceremony. The day is characterized by a procession of

beautiful black women, clad in elegant white dresses and pearls, being greeted and congratulated by alumnae, faculty, and family. At the procession, alumnae give speeches about their experience at Spelman and what they went on to do afterwards. The Spelman hymn is sung and words of encouragement are shared. There are various performances and musical renditions. Lastly, you are showered with gifts and an alumna gives you a Spelman class pin. At the end of the day, you become an official Spelmanite. I appreciated this Spelman tradition because of the way it fostered community and acceptance. All of us came from different backgrounds, experiences, and had to overcome different obstacles. But at that moment, we were all in the same place, with the same goals, and we were united in sisterhood. So much love was shared in that moment, the experience was invaluable. There were ups and downs during my time at Spelman, but the White Dress Ceremony was one of the moments that convinced me that I had made the right choice by attending Spelman for a semester. 0

Daena Reynolds, BC ’16, is a Barnard junior majoring in economics

Looking at a Nursing Career By Edwin Martinez, STEP 12th grader

The experience I had visiting St. Luke’s Hospital was amazing. It was interesting because we learned a lot of specifics about the nursing field. We were shown a baby, for example, who was connected to a machine meant to imitate a real human heartbeat. We were told this medical advancement costs around $45,000 itself. “That’s a lot of money,” I thought to myself. Our tour also included a life-size human doll connected to a life-support machine. The machine could also ASEP BIANNUAL

control the human functions of the doll. It could make him sweat, blink, and replicate other human actions—it was awesome. Our speakers were three nurses, who spoke about their life, career choice, and how they got into the nursing field. I found this interesting as they explained that nursing required a lot of training and hard work to get to where they are now. Overall, the trip and their talk inspired me to not only work hard but continue to work hard. 0

Edwin Martinez, STEP 12th grader

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Exploring Architecture STEP students explored the built in environment by using architecture. In a highly innovative and engaging activity, students were given imaginary “clients” with specific needs and demands. Their task was to build homes for these clients using the 3D architecture program provided in class. The project and class involved and incorporated an understanding of the environment, architectural history, and how architecture caters to the needs of people.

MEET THE ARCHITECTS AND THEIR CLIENTS: Jacky Cruz, 12th grade My client is Ryan, a lawyer. He has a wife who is a professional clarinet player and a son who is a quadriplegic. Because Ryan’s wife often practices the clarinet late through the night, I designed a home keeping in mind that Ryan’s wife would need a space to practice that is not only comfortable but that would also keep noise to a minimum.

JAC KY C RUZ My house for Ryan is designed in a way that the direction would move from the second floor to the first. I intentionally shifted the position of the top floor to create this direction. Had the top floor been perfectly aligned with the first floor, the first thing that people would notice would be the first floor. However, the purpose of shifting the angle of the second floor was to give a modern look to the building. Both floors do align with each other to create a sense of unity within the structure. For the entire building to display this sense of unity, I also slanted the smaller room, the music room. The door of the house is made of glass and slides open to facilitate Ryan’s quadriplegic son in being able to enter and exit the building. To allow Ryan’s son to go to his room on the second floor with ease, a key feature of this house is the elevator. Another key aspect of the house is the staircase that spirals around the elevator. I designed the staircase this way to create more space around the house for Ryan’s son to move around. and give the house an aesthetic appeal. I also designed a separate music room that is connected to the house for Ryan’s wife who is a clarinet player.

DIANA VENTURA

Diana Ventura, 12th grade My client Niyla, lives alone. She enjoys entertaining and loves to host guests. I proposed a house with a lot of compartments for her enjoyment. Carolina Pena, 8th grade My client’s name is Judith, a chiropractor. She lives with her two sons, Jack and Jim. Jack is 12 years old and Jim is 2 years old. Sydney Santamaria, 8th grade My client is a farmer. He has a wife who is a writer and does not like to be disturbed. The farmer needs a place for a greenhouse and a chicken coop for his chickens. I designed a home especially so that it has both a greenhouse and a chicken coop in one.

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My house is rare yet approachable because of the way the house is shaped and built. There is a bathroom in the entrance that guests can go to as to avoid using the owner’s bathroom. I built a living room in the middle of the house with a kitchen on its side so that guests can enjoy the food as well as the space the living room provides. The living room also features window seating which allows for space in the center of the home for dancing and other forms of entertainment. ASEP BIANNUAL


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What’s special about my building design is the balance and emphasis on the windows that are distributed throughout the building. There is emphasis on the awning and proportion of the building structure. These are aesthetic features that catches the viewer’s eye by making specific areas of the building stand out in it’s contrast of size and shape to the rest of the building. My floor plan also consists of a balcony, 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, a spacious living room, a dining room, kitchen, and a chiropractic office for my client, who is a doctor. The balcony that was added on the second floor behind the home was done because it felt as though something was missing. Thus, I designed a balcony to create unity and make the home feel complete. The way I designed the 3 bedrooms was specifically for my client and her two children. The bedroom for two-year old Jim, for example, is next to his mother’s room so that his mother can easily access him. The living room on the first floor by the entrance also provides a space for relaxing and socializing. The dining room on the same floor also provides a place for mealtimes and a good place for family interaction. Lastly, my client’s chiropractic office was made to suit her needs when she works at homes. I designed it at the back of the home to serve as a private office, facilitating the needs of patients who need privacy.

Something unique about my house is that it has both a greenhouse and chicken coop. Another special feature of my house is that the second floor and third floor are elevated and built on a slant. This feature was done to emphasize the modern structure and create balance. I designed the chicken coop and greenhouse in my building to conserve space and to give it distribution. The first floor of my home contains the essential rooms: living room, guest bathroom, kitchen, and dining room. The second and third floors are bedrooms and work rooms. The second floor provides a writing room for my client’s wife and a bathroom on the third floor. The master bedroom also has two big windows where light shines through to avoid darkness and a shadowing effect that the structure causes. Thus, on the sides of the elevated slant, where the second and third floors are, two big rectangular shaped windows are located. This is to provide creative inspiration for my client who is a writer while also opening up the space.

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Barnard College proudly celebrates the achievements of our

ASEP Scholars

A Passion to Perform An extracurricular that alleviates the stress of college life

“The most rewarding part of being a member of the choir is the community. Being able to sing with a group of people has allowed us to become very close and to connect.”

By Naomi Dubissette

In the first row of the alto section of the Columbia University Gospel choir is where you will spot BOP junior Imani Pardue Bishop. After moving from her hometown of San Francisco, California, Imani decided to join the Columbia University Gospel Choir as a way to cultivate her passion to perform. “Gospel choir sparked my interest,” Imani says, “because when I got to New York I wanted to get back into singing while doing something where I could continue to practice my spiritual beliefs.” Performance has always been of Imani’s interest. “I’ve been singing for as long as I can remember,” Imani says. For those who know the witty chorus girl around campus, we know Imani as a singer who is always involved in some form of visual and performing arts. Her activities include musical theatre, a repertoire class, jazz, campus events, and of course, the annual Christmas concert. Singing is something Imani cannot retreat from and is very much part of her identity. As Imani recalls, “I spent my summers in the theatre camps at SOTA (School of the Arts) in San Francisco since I was a kid.” Imani is by no means your average entertainer who dreams of being a musician—she is the real deal. With a voice that has the ability to mesmerize her listeners, it is no surprise that she has not only attracted critical acclaim as a member of the choir but has also built her reputation as an integral member of the eboard. Imani is in charge of judging auditions as well as organizing and coordinating the other forty singers, which consists of alumni, and graduate students. 6

-Imani Pardue Bishop, BOP 2016

But what is most noteworthy about Imani’s extracurricular activity is that she stands as a true paragon of a student who has found a balance between wellness and college life. For Imani, performance is more than a passion, but a medium that alleviates the stresses of college life. Studies have shown that group singing has been proven to reduce anxiety and decrease symptoms of depression by releasing endorphins. For a student like Imani who attends an elite research university where academic demands can become mentally taxing, singing in the choir has become a medium where she can free herself from the demands of college stress. “For me, singing with the choir is therapeutic, singing by myself, is stressful” Imani jokes. The choir has been a community and safety net that

supports her mentally and emotionally during times of stress. As Imani recalls, “last semester when I took a break from choir, I was really stressed out. I realized then, that I needed the choir not only as a stress relief but as a family on campus.” In this context, the extracurricular activity is like a support group. As Imani states, “The most rewarding part of being a member of the choir is the community. Being able to sing with a group of people has allowed me to become very close and connect.We always have a good time during rehearsal, we are loose and free. Although the choir is composed of such a diverse demographic, we all connect and support each other. If I’m feeling down spiritually or mentally, I have the choir to uplift me. That’s made such a difference in my college experience.” 0 ASEP BIANNUAL


Programming with Ben

Interview with Ben Karasik STEP Senior Ben Karasik (BK) is currently a high-school senior who joined the STEP program in the summer of 2014. He is an exemplary student who has lived in three countries. Below is an interview conducted by Naomi Dubissette (ND) as Ben discusses how he made a computer game and how STEP helps him prepare for college. ND: What grade are you in? Why did you join STEP? BK: I am currently a senior in high school and I came to the STEP program to gain exposure to college classes and for preparation for both college and high school. ND: Were your goals realized in the program? How did STEP contribute to your college preparation? BK: I am really enjoying the STEP program. All the STEP staff continues to be extremely helpful in terms of college preparation and helping me tap into opportunities that I would not have had elsewhere. When I visited Rutgers, Princeton, and the Steven Institute of Technology with STEP, for example, it was a totally different experience than I would have had if I had visited the colleges by myself. Visiting colleges with STEP, our tour was well set-up and organized and we gained access to exclusive parts of the campuses.

BK: Computer programming, along with art and robotics were offered as electives in the STEP program over the summer. I was placed into the programming class along with other seniors and although I was generally interested in it, I became more interested in it after seeing the many thing you can do with it. In Mr. Mota’s class, for example, we were able to make a video game. ND: Very cool. Tell me about your video game. BK: In the class I created a video game featuring a sumowrestler, where the objective is to collect coins and move to the next level by jumping on platforms. The character goes from country to country, and the coins symbolize airplane ticket costs. ND: Sounds international. What countries are featured in the game? BK: My game includes Russia, France, Japan, England, Egypt, and the United States. (continued on page 12)

ND: Do you feel as though STEP has provided an advisor-mentee relationship for college guidance? BK: Definitely. I feel as though I can contact Mr. Howie and Mr. Wolfe for just about anything—financial aid, setting up interviews, college visits, etc. They constantly email with helpful information as well. All of the teachers and STEP staff, whether they go to Barnard or Columbia, have all been great resources. ND: What colleges are you currently considering? BK: I am looking at Columbia University, NYU, uPenn, Fordham, Binghamton, and Stony Brook. ND: What majors are you potentially looking at? BK: I am thinking about computer science, mechanical engineering, finance, or pre-med. ND: You mentioned computer programming first, did STEP spark your interest in computer programming over the summer? If not, what did?

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ND: Was there a purpose for

Ben Karasik STEP ’15 is a high incorporating different school senior interested in computer science

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Beyond the Laboratory: Psyche Research By Tatiana Vera, CSTEP ’15

Tatiana Vera, a senior majoring in psychology, has made the world her laboratory

My name is Tatiana Vera and I am currently a senior at Barnard College of Columbia University majoring in psychology and minoring in Spanish literature. My first real experience with research was with my own senior project in high school on the concept of self-esteem in adolescent girls as it related to American and Ecuadorian teenagers. I worked on this project for the majority of the school year taking a trip to Quito, Ecuador, where I visited schools and youth educational departments at the Ecuadorian Red Cross division. Because I enjoyed working with this adolescent and teenage girls, I continued my research in the summer of 2013, working in tandem with the Ella Institute where I worked under Dr. Angelica Perez-Lidwin, clinical psychologist and CEO of the institute. During my research at the Ella Institute, I created an eight-week leadership development program that covered a wide range of topics: biculturalism, leadership development, college application processes, networking, self-esteem and confidence building. We collected pre- and post-data on all of these variables, as well as data on feminism and self-perception

ASEP Poll

to assess any changes in those additional variables as well. At the end of the eight weeks, the project proved to be exponentially successful and I, along with Dr. PerezLidwin, hope to continue it in the future as well. In addition to my research at the Ella Institute, I have conducted two independent projects at Barnard with Dr. Tara Well, both focusing on meditation studies as it relates to rumination and self-compassion. In our final project, we developed a personalized guided meditation and we found that mandating allotted times for students to come into the psychology lab for a relaxation period, decreased their scores in depression, anxiety, stress, and increased their scores in self-compassion. This is also research that I would like to explore to some degree in the future. Because of my interest in research, I joined CSTEP in my sophomore year and I am happy that I did so. Many of my peers are in the HEOP/BOP program and I wanted to access the opportunities that they had available to them. From day one I felt welcomed and I always know that I can come to anyone in the ASEP office if I have a stressful day or if I have exciting news. My ASEP (continued on page 9)

Poll Results:

Do you listen to music while studying?

Yes.......................................48%

a.) Yes b.) No c.) At times (both)

No..........................................2%

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2%

At times...............................50% Yes

48%

50%

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Ask the Experts How STEP scholars take a study break 1. EXERCISE “After studying for a long time I like to go outside and play soccer.” —Max Langtigua “Going to the gym or going outside.”—Kevin R 2. ENTERTAINMENT “Watching a Disney movie.” — Danielle Quick Holmes

Beyond the Laboratory [continued] mentors have helped me with so many personal projects. From being a present body, informing me of resources that I should be tapping into to helping me re-launch Mujeres, Barnard College’s only Latina, leadership based, support group on campus, ASEP has been there for me. Upon getting past the midpoint of my final year, I am happy to say that my time here has included so many memories that I will never forget. I’ve made so many friends with other students under the ASEP umbrella on Columbia and Barnard Colleges’ campuses that I could not feel any more blessed. With the confidence I have gained from CSTEP guiding my educational path, I hope to take the

research experience that I have utilized in college and pursue my doctorate in Clinical Psychology and even become CEO of my own for-profit company. 0

“Watching any reality

The Liberty Science Center

show.” —Cristal Díaz

By Nicholas Carrero, STEP 10th grader

“Playing 2KLS” — Unique Woods “Watching a movie on NETFLIX” — Jackeline Rodriguez 3. REJUVENATION “Stretching helps me to calm down and study better.” —Mariam Waggen “Having some soft music in the background helps.” — Fatauameta Wague “Taking a Nap.” —Henzley Pierre Louis 4. SOCIALIZING “Playing ROBLOX with my best friend.” —Shayan Huda Chowdry “Talking about non-work related things ” —Greer Bizzell-Hatcher

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The prospect of crawling through a dark labyrinth guided only by touch and the lights of cameras as they record one’s struggle may not seem like the most scientific of experiments, but it is one of many diverse collections of exhibits on display that allows us to embrace science in interactive and creative ways. During our trip to the Liberty Science Center, the younger students of the STEP program were given the opportunity to explore a few of these exhibits. Exhibits ranged from the various sources of energy that are used today that power our technologically advancing world to the ecosystems of the Hudson River. The exhibits specialized in topics that many do not know the science of. Most notably, the mechanics of the Rubik’s Cube and the nature of nanoscience are two scientific concepts that the average person is oblivious to. Another fascinating aspect of our trip was the IMAX theater at the Liberty Science Center, which features a video

highlighting scientific processes and matters of our world that are invisible to naked eye, including the majority of light waves, microscopic bacteria, and lightening—all of Nicholas which, for Carrero different reasons, 10th grade cannot be seen to their fullest extent without proper engage in various teamtechnology. Personally, I building exercises with my found the experience to be quite fellow students. An outdoor entertaining, although I was obstacle course, for example, looking for more of an in-depth was among one of these teamexplanation on the science of building group activities. certain exhibits that I found particularly fascinating. Despite Overall, the trip to the center this, I was surprisingly amused was an invaluable experience in and intrigued by many exhibits providing students with the exposure needed to expand and at the Liberty Science Center and I would have loved to visit develop their scientific understanding of the world. 0 all exhibits if granted more time. The exhibits that I immersed myself in reinforced my burgeoning interest in science while allowing me to 9


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Perfect Paintings By Danielle Quick Homes and David Melo

Danielle Quick Homes, STEP 10th grade

David Melo, STEP 10th grade

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“This is a painting that I made using glitter to emphasize the woman's eye. I wanted to paint a portrait that I thought represented the most important feature of the face. It's commonly known that eyes are the windows to the soul as they portray much of human emotion. Therefore, I found it intriguing to capture the importance and beauty of one’s eyes through an entire portrait. I depict half of a face to avoid distraction from the eye and so the viewers could really focus in on her eye.” 

“In this piece the source of inspiration came from the singer Lana Del Rey and her song “Summertime Sadness.” Although Del Rey’s music is dark, her simplicity is something to admire. I wanted to create a stencil of the song on a canvas while incorporating an idea from her song. In “Summertime Sadness,” I see the colors of orange, red, and yellow. Initially the stencil did not exactly work so I rearranged pieces to make sure I got the image I wanted. Black was an ideal color because it is not only simple but also dark like Lana is. It is one of my first pieces on a canvas and I am extremely proud of it.”

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A Sorority Sister’s Experience

How Joining AO∏ changed my college experience By Jordan Hollis, BOP 2016

I am a BOP student at Barnard College studying Political Science and Human Rights and I am also a member of the PanHellenic sorority, Alpha Omicron Pi. Joining Greek Life my first year at Barnard was a difficult decision. I came into college thinking I would never join a sorority—it did not seem like a lifestyle I would enjoy. However, during my second semester freshman year when recruitment began I decided to check out the new sorority that was coming to campus just for kicks and giggles. Little did I know that I would end up falling in love with the organization. The values and initiative of AO∏ had truly resonated with me along with the amazing women I had the opportunity to meet from around the country. After attending the information session, I decided to go through with their recruitment process to learn more about the sorority. What astounded me was how easily I connected with each sister I met. The women come from a diverse array of backgrounds, yet each sister seemed to care about what I had to say. I honestly did not realize how much I wanted to be apart of Greek Life until I received the phone call from AO∏ and was told that I had received a bid to join! From that day forward my college life was completely changed for the better.

“The collegiate membership experience is based on these promises: to live our values, to learn, to lead and to serve. Sharing good times and sisterhood are at the heart of each of AO∏ chapter’s activities.” -Alpha Omicron Pi

everyone’s ideas are used in the most cohesive way possible. AO∏ also helped me to break out of my shell. I came into college extremely shy and I lacked the incentive to leave the comfort of my dorm room and branch out from the small group of friends I already had. However, because of AO∏, I can walk up to anyone and start a conversation. This newfound confidence, to speak to different people without fear, is especially helpful as I start my study abroad in London. Overall, joining Greek Life has been one of the best decisions I have made in life. It isn’t always perfect and you don’t always get along with everyone 24/7, but I know I have a group of women, who I share a common bond with, that I can call on at any moment. I honestly cannot put into words what it means to not only be apart of AO∏, but to be apart of this network of women. There is nothing like Being apart of Greek Life is so much more than what the walking through campus and running into a sister or the media portrays. The hard work that goes into running and comfort of just having someone who will sit up with you all maintaining an organization is no joke, especially since night or having someone to go to breakfast with in the ours is fairly new. Yet, because of AO∏, I have acquired so morning. It’s these simple things that truly brighten my day many skills that add to not only my college life, but my and I never realized how much I needed this until I joined. future and the rest of my life. Being a former office member While Greek Life isn’t for everyone, I highly recommend in the sorority, I learned how to maintain my own budget, that anyone interested give it a try. My advice to anyone: go mediate between people, enforce rules that aren’t always to events see what the organizations are really about, and the most fun for everyone, communicate my ideas with maybe you’ll find your home just like I did. 0 others, and compromise with others to ensure that Jordan Hollis (centered in the middle) is a BOP student from Missouri and member of Alpha Omicron Phi

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Programming with Ben [Continued] Ben Karasik STEP ’15 countries beyond entertainment? BK: I thought it would be creative to have different countries and use national backgrounds such as the Eiffel Tower and the Statue of Liberty.

ND: Is the game multi-player or single-player? BK: Single-player

ND: Does your game fall under certain genre? I know there are race car games, war games, ect? ND: You are kind of worldwide student, yourself. Can you BK: Yes, action and coin collecting. I tried to implement tell me about your background? familiar aspects of mainstream games so that people can BK: My mother, who is Russian, taught me to speak fluent easily understand how to play. Russian. I also lived in Switzerland and France before moving to New York. Because of this experience, I also speak conversational French. ND: What computer programs did you use to make this game? BK: We used Java and Game Maker’s Studios. The language of Java was the foundation for the game, which we incorporated into making the program. ND: How does that work? How do you integrate Java into the game? BK: It goes hand in hand. For example, if you want to use physics in the game, so that the character doesn’t blow away, there is a Java code for that. In incorporating the type of language used in Java, we were also able to look online as a resource for more information. ND: That’s amazing. I know Java is complex. Who was your instructor? Did you work with anyone? BK: Yes. Thankfully, you don’t have to “master” Java to incorporate the knowledge in the game. And you certainly can’t master Java in that little amount of time. Mr. Mota was the instructor and I was assisted by my group partners— Khurram Paravaz and Caleb Vargas— in the creation of the game. ND: Tell me about the process. How long did it take to make the game? BK: We worked on the game throughout the entire course. Earlier in the course, we worked with getting familiar with Java and looked at examples of how games are designed. We created an updated version of tic-tac-toe, for example, to see how video games are created and to grasp what people look for in a video game. In the latter part of the course we programmed our own game using the language of Java and the skills we learned from practice.

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“Programming in the STEP class opened me to the world of computer science.” -Ben Karasik

ND: Whether computer games are good or bad is a controversial debate. What side of the argument do you fall on? BK: It depends on what the game is and how people react to them. I noticed I would get mad when I played Call of Duty and I decided to stop playing it and I’ve chosen to play other games now. ND: Aside from inventing your own game, what did you take from this experience? BK: It opened me to the world of computer science. I feel as though computer science is definitely an area that I’m interested in. There are a wide range of teachers, like Mr. Mota, who are really passionate about what they do and I know I would be passionate about what I do in this field. After designing this game, I recognize that it’s extremely rewarding. 0

ASEP BIANNUAL


Using Her Journalism as Protest “The small ways that our voices are being heard, very much impacts the large ways in which we as a people are trying to change this world.” -Marquita Amoah

Marquita Amoah, HEOP ’16 is a junior majoring in English, who uses her writing to advocate for political and racial equality.

A HEOP Junior’s Protest Against Police Brutality By Marquita Amoah, HEOP ’16

In the wake of the recent verdicts regarding race and police brutality, Marquita Amoah is a HEOP scholar who has used journalism and writing to advocate for political and racial equality. Below is an article on recent events.

because yelling loudly doesn’t save lives apparently. Trayvon Martin yelled, Eric Garner yelled, Michael Brown yelled. And many women and men before and after them yelled. So what will it take to hear us? As many of my peers know now, we cannot wait to be heard. “Why are you hiding underneath the table?” I asked. We have to demand our presence, our right to be on this Earth. “So the police don’t see me!” he answered. And it is hard, but silent is what black and brown people have I was probably nine or ten when I was with my cousin at an been forced to be for centuries. And we always find a way to outside birthday party. Sirens were hollering around the park, voice our feelings. It’s no different now. It’s not any easier as three police cars sped down the street. My cousin, who was now. Through our protests, speeches, and journalistic pieces, previously playing with a toy on the table, ran to hide we are using our voices to fight against this unjust police underneath it when he heard the sirens. I was barely aware of brutality. Injustices are taking different forms now and we as a police brutality the way I am now, but I knew that in my young whole community have to adapt to the changing tides. For me, mind, I thought it was sad that my 4 or 5-year-old cousin was I use my written words to express my disdain with injustice in hiding from our “protectors.” the world. In any forum I find a way to make my voice heard. Fast forward to the 2013 Trayvon Martin trial. I am sitting on And it can be very simple. It can start with a 140 character the steps of Columbia University on a chilly summer night. tweet, or a Facebook status, or an Instagram post. We can all My friend looks at her phone, and then looks at me enraged. do it. The small ways that our voices are being heard, very She starts ranting about the system and how it is unfair that a much impacts the large ways in which we as a people are man can go unpunished for killing an unarmed teen. She is trying to change this world. So although I would like to hide telling me that it’s crazy that a boy got killed for going to the myself and others underneath a table to keep from harm, I store. The word verdict comes out of her mouth over and over simply can’t. We have to stand in the fire, until the smoke has again. I sit there looking at the sky and sigh. My sigh is one cleared. 0 that is pleading and yelling. I am yelling ever so quietly, ASEP BIANNUAL

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About ASEP Programs The Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program (CSTEP) at Barnard College is a New York state funded program for current Barnard undergraduates, designed to increase access for historically underrepresented minorities or economically disadvantaged students, who demonstrate interest in and show potential for, scientific, technical, health and health-related fields or the licensed professionals. The Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP) is a program for high school students that provides comprehensive science and mathematics enrichment and college preparatory support for historically under-represented and academically undeserved high school students who show promise in math and science. The Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) is a statewide program put in place by the New York State legislation in 1969. Barnard College started its program in 1970 and is funded by both the New York State Education Department and Barnard College. Barnard and The Arthur O. Eve HEOP Scholars Program give the bright and motivated students who are economically disadvantaged access to higher education. Once a student is admitted to Barnard as an Arthur O. Eve HEOP Scholar, the Program provides academic support services to ensure her success in college. The Barnard/Spelman Domestic Exchange Program: Established in 1996, the Barnard and Spelman College Domestic exchange program offers an opportunity for current Barnard and Columbia undergraduate students to undergo a semester or year-long course of study at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. The Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF): Established in 1996 for current Barnard undergraduates, the MMUF program encourages minority students, and other with a demonstrated commitment to racial diversity, to pursue academic careers. Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, MMUF provides opportunities for the talented undergraduates to work with faculty mentors in research and other activities designed to encourage the pursuit of the PhD in the humanities and sciences. The Intercollegiate Partnership (ICP): Established in 1991, the ICP program is a collaboration between Barnard College and LaGuardia Community College of the City University of New York that seeks to facilitate the transfer of community college students to four-year colleges. Sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, ICP focuses on students interested in the natural sciences.

Message from ASEP

ASEP Staff

The Academic Success and Enrichment Program (ASEP) staff proudly presents the sixth issue of the biannual newsletter. We are committed to providing opportunities that will enrich and compliment the intellectual life of all students. We work in collaboration with various College offices to achieve its objectives in recognition of Barnard’s mission: to engage students in rigorous academic experiences while providing the support needed to meet academic challenges and to discover their own capabilities. Since its inception in 2008, this newsletter has been a medium to display the incredible accomplishments of the students within the ASEP programs. This issue is no different. It features the summer 2014 and fall 2014 accomplishments of our scholars. As you read our stories and hear our experiences, you will understand how ASEP has played a vital role in student discovery and academic fulfillment. Thank you, and we hope you enjoy our newsletter!

Michell Tollinchi-Michel — Dean of Academic Associate Enrichment & Community Institute Nikki Youngblood Giles — Director, ASEP Elida Martinez-Gaynor — Associate Director, Collegiate Programs Kevin Collymore — Counselor, Collegiate Programs Jason Wolfe— Associate Director, Pre-Collegiate Programs Nyoka Joseph— Counselor, Pre-Collegiate Programs

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Contact Us ASEP Office 105 Milbank Hall Tel: 212-854-2024 Pre-Collegiate 5 Milbank Hall Tel: 212-854-1314

Collegiate 001 Milbank Hall Tel: 212-854-3583

ASEP BIANNUAL

Fall2014 (2)  

ASEP's Fall 2014 Newsletter

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