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W I N T E R 2019

A CENTURY OF PUBLIC SERVICE THROUGH ENGINEERING

M A G A Z I N E

NJIT ESTABLISHES NEW SCHOOL OF APPLIED ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY NJIT ADVANCES RESEARCH, COMMERCE AND SECURITY THROUGH GLOBAL PARTNERSHIPS

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A Century of Public Service through Engineering


E X EC U TI V E SUM M A RY

A MESSAGE FROM NJIT PRESIDENT JOEL S. BLOOM

CELEBRATING A CENTURY OF PUBLIC SERVICE THROUGH ENGINEERING

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s we usher in the beginning of a new year, New Jersey Institute of Technology will mark the 100th anniversary of the Newark College of Engineering (NCE). The cover story of this issue commemorates the numerous achievements of

the past century and the illustrious women and men who have contributed to NCE’s remarkable trajectory throughout the years, from its beginnings in 1885 as Newark Technical School to one of the most highly regarded public polytechnic universities in the nation. The other feature articles in this issue demonstrate how NJIT has continued to evolve while remaining true to its mission and its history. Last March, New Jersey Governor Philip Murphy announced plans for a New Jersey Apprenticeship Network and, following a trip to Germany and Israel in October, launched a $4.5 million apprenticeship grant program supporting the state’s highdemand industries. He did so because he recognized a marketplace need that we, at NJIT, also have identified and are addressing — the incredible demand for professionals who possess hands-on experience in technical professions. That’s why NJIT has launched a School of Applied Engineering and Technology (SAET), which was unveiled Nov. 9, 2018 in the NJIT Makerspace, where students engage in hands-on, project-based learning complemented by training on industrial equipment that provides experience with modern manufacturing technology. Through this school, we are creating more opportunities for our existing students and future students, both freshmen and transfers, who will benefit from partnerships with community colleges. SAET also will develop new methods and pedagogy for the future of engineering and technical education to prepare students for industrial careers. As we continue to address industry needs nationally, NJIT is expanding its global reach. Over the past few years, the university has signed agreements with more than 30 universities around the world, from Israel, to Ireland, to Italy, in order to support student and faculty exchanges and joint research. These relationships are explicit priorities in 2020 Vision, NJIT’s strategic plan, which calls for “international collaborative research and exchange programs ... to promote innovative scholarship, global leadership and visibility.” As NJIT’s presence abroad grows, so do its international rankings. NJIT was one of only three New Jersey universities named to U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 Best Global Universities list, joining Princeton and Rutgers. I hope you enjoy reading the articles in this issue, and I welcome your feedback. n


WINTER 2019

NJIT MAGAZINE WInter 2019

f e at u r e s

Matthew Golden

Chief Strategy Officer

Celebrating a Century of Public Service Through Engineering 8

Denise Anderson

Associate Vice President Communications, Marketing and Branding

In 2019, New Jersey Institute of Technology marks the one hundredth anniversary of the establishment of Newark College of Engineering.

Christina Crovetto M.S. ‘03 Editor

Tanya Klein

Editorial Assistant

Shydale James

Contributing Editor

Julie Jacobs, Jesse Jenkins, Tracey L. Regan Contributing Writers

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Babette Hoyle

Production Manager

Diane Cuddy Designer

_______________________________________

Kenneth Alexo, Jr., Kevin D. Belfield, Reggie J. Caudill, Atam P. Dhawan, Craig Gotsman, Louis Hamilton, Moshe Kam, Anthony Schuman, Michael K. Smullen _______________________________________

NJIT Magazine is published by New Jersey Institute of Technology, Office of Strategic Communications. Its mission is to foster ties with alumni, university friends and corporate partners and to report on relevant issues, particularly those in education, science, research and technology.

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Please send letters of comment and requests to reproduce material from the magazine to:

Abstracts 2

NJIT news in brief

Point By Point 5

_______________________________________

Athletics update

Joel S. Bloom President

Michael K. Smullen

Executive Director of Alumni Relations _______________________________________

On the web:

magazine.njit.edu _______________________________________

66,225 2/19

Cover photo caption:

The first students to attend Newark Technical School studied in a rented building on West Park Street.

The university continues to seize opportunities to work with partners around the globe who help it expand the power and scope of applied science and engineering.

de pa rtm e n ts

NJIT Magazine Office of Strategic Communications University Heights Newark, NJ 07102-1982 crovetto@njit.edu

Vice President Development and Alumni Relations

NJIT’s School of Applied Engineering and Technology was designed to meet spiraling demand in the job market for applied engineering technologists in industries reliant upon production, manufacturing, process control and instrumentation.

NJIT Advances Research, Commerce and Security Through Global Partnerships 16

Editorial Advisory Board

Kenneth Alexo, Jr.

NJIT Establishes New School of Applied Engineering and Technology 12

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Giving 6

NJIT development news

Alumni Circuit 21

Class notes, calendar of events and more

In Conclusion 29

Leading-edge achievements by faculty, staff, students, alumni and friends of NJIT

Cover photo credit: University Archives

NJIT MAGAZINE | WINTER 2019

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A B S T R A C T S

NJIT LAUNCHES POTENT RESEARCH HUB: INSTITUTE FOR SPACE WEATHER SCIENCES

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oth on land and in space, Earth’s technology-centered civilization is increasingly vulnerable to the powerful bursts of electromagnetic radiation, energetic charged particles and magnetized plasma known as space weather. As the complexity of engineered systems increases, as new technologies are invented and deployed, and as humans venture ever further beyond Earth’s surface, both human-built systems and humans themselves become more susceptible to the effects of the planet’s space environment. It is with these vulnerabilities in mind – and in response to urgent calls from government agencies, insurers, electrical grid operators and others for more sophisticated research, forecasting and mitigation strategies – that NJIT is forming the multidisciplinary Institute for Space Weather Sciences to advance both theoretical and applied research on our civilization’s interface with these cosmic forces. Led by Haimin Wang, distinguished professor of physics and chief scientist at NJIT’s Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), the Institute will combine the strengths of the university’s groundbreaking solar scientists with powerful computing and mathematical capabilities. Its mission will be to safeguard national security, the global economy and human safety. At the institute’s launch at NJIT’s annual Research Centers and Laboratories Showcase and President’s Forum, Wang recalled knowing “nothing” about space weather while he was a graduate student, because the instruments to study it in-depth and with precision did not yet exist. “But as technology advances, we understand more and more about its impact,” he noted. Mona Kessel, Ph.D., the NASA program and research scientist who delivered the

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keynote address at the 2018 showcase, pointed to GPS as an example of a spacebased “highly utilized commodity we’re quite dependent on” that is at risk of major disruption from space weather. She added, “There are things we can do on Earth to prepare.” At the institute’s core is the Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research (CSTR). With its array of unique instruments on land and in space – the world’s largest operating solar telescope, a newly expanded radio array with 15 antennas, instruments aboard NASA’s Van Allen Probes spacecraft and devices deployed across Antarctica, to name a few – the Center is uniquely poised to advance understanding of the genesis, acceleration and impact of solar storms, as well as provide a comprehensive view of solar activity over months and years. Joining the CSTR are modeling and big data analytics experts at the Center for Computational Heliophysics, who partner with NASA’s Advanced Supercomputing division at the NASA Ames Research Center, and researchers at the Center for Big Data. The latter’s mission will be to synergize expertise in various disciplines across the NJIT campus and to build a unified platform that embodies a rich set of big data-enabling technologies and services with optimized performance. Indeed, the specter of a geomagnetic solar storm with the ferocity to disrupt communications satellites, knock out GPS systems, shut down air travel and quench lights, computers and telephones in millions of homes for days, months or even years is a low-probability, but high-impact risk that space scientists, global insurance corporations and federal agencies from the U.S. Department of

Homeland Security, to NASA, to the U.S. Department of Defense take seriously. While the recent solar cycle has been relatively inactive, Kessel noted, there have been periods in which storms have been more sustained and ferocious. “But it wasn’t so important back then. We didn’t rely on space the way we do now. It’s important to gather knowledge that we pass down.” The future of space-based research will also depend on the scientific community’s ability to create materials and systems able to withstand powerful cosmic radiation on long space trips. “We’d like to (send humans) to Mars, but we can’t yet,” she added. In addition to applied research, Wang says the institute will focus in particular on several fundamental questions: how energy builds toward a solar eruption; the mechanisms that trigger solar eruptions; the reason that some eruptions reach Earth, while others do not; and the effects of eruptions on Earth, such as high-energy particles and geomagnetic storms. But these questions do not preoccupy researchers alone. As NJIT President Joel S. Bloom noted at the launch, “As I travel, talking to leaders in the Air Force, China and Egypt, space is increasingly a topic of conversation.” As he watched NASA’s Mars InSight successfully land on the surface of the planet, Vincent DeCaprio ’72, co-vice chair of the NJIT Board of Trustees and a supporter, with his family, of the annual President’s Forum, noted the power of scientific discovery to bring researchers and peoples together. The point of the forum, he added, is to explore “the effect of science on society and on our lives.” n

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A B S T R A C T S

Louis Berger Fellowship Supports Real-World Practice “Of course, NJIT will always have a special place in my heart as the institution that provided the foundation that continues to inspire me today,” noted James Stamatis ’85, chief executive officer of Louis Berger, a full-service engineering, architecture, planning, environmental, program and construction management and economic development firm based in Morristown, N.J. The company, he pointed out, “has had a long and successful partnership with NJIT, dating from my years as a student [there] to the present, with the university the source of many of our finest employees.” This relationship, he added, “has been a model partnership between private industry and a leading institution of higher learning.” Indeed, Louis Berger has become a valued Recruitment Partner through

PRESIDENT BLOOM VISITS 50+ ALUMNI AT STRYKER CORPORATION

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ore than 50 NJIT alumni hosted President Bloom at Stryker headquarters on Sept. 11, 2018, in Mahwah, N.J. The event marked the fifth time Stryker engaged with NJIT last year. Previous events included a Stryker campus tour and basketball game, a lecture at Stryker headquarters by

C E L E B R AT I N G 1 0 0 Y E A R S O F N C E

NJIT’s Career Development Services. The company employs upward of 20 alumni, including Stamatis, who earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. Recent student-to-staffer conversions include Hardik Patel ’16 ’17, an environmental engineer, and Takudzwa Mugabe ’18, a structural engineer. Many NJIT students, like Patel and Mugabe, have found their way to Louis Berger through its Graduate Internship and Fellowship Program, launched in 2014 as a cooperative endeavor by NJIT and the Louis Berger Group. The program, which focuses on environmental services, transit, highways and bridges, aviation and energy, as well as economics, policy and management activities, “provides financial support to two NJIT engineering or architecture students annually, in addition to a full-time summer internship at one

of the company’s U.S. or international offices,” explained Stamatis. Last year, master’s students Catherine Brito ’19, studying architecture and infrastructure planning, and Abhishek Banyal ’19, pursuing civil engineering with a construction management track, were named 2018 Louis Berger Fellows. And just as their predecessors have done, they spent a summer immersed in real-world experiences, honing their know-how in their respective fields. n

Biomedical Engineering Professor Treena Arinzeh, and visits from students in the Pre-College Program and Biomedical Engineering Club. At the invitation of Stryker Joint Replacement’s chief technology officer and NJIT Trustee Robert Cohen ’83, ’84, ’87, Bloom toured Stryker’s new Additive Manufacturing Lab, 3D printing facility, and several other areas of the Stryker campus. Club co-chairs Joe Racanelli ’83, ’90 and Ken Trimmer ’92, ’99 hosted a lunch with dozens of NJIT Stryker alumni, followed by

a presentation to the club from Bloom, who highlighted new campus construction, new faculty research, increasing connections with Newark, and NJIT’s ranking in U.S. News & World Report, which placed the university 106th among all national research universities. Cohen encouraged the group to stay connected with NJIT. “You all know that we’re not here because we have to be,” he said, “We’re here because we care about the work we do, and because we care about our alma mater.” Following Cohen’s remarks, Racanelli and Trimmer conducted a Q&A with Kenneth Alexo, Jr., vice president of development and alumni relations; Vincent Lombardo, executive director of development; and Michael Smullen, executive director of alumni relations. Topics included: creating mentorship opportunities with students and other alumni, increasing the number of Stryker employees on volunteer boards at NJIT, and establishing consistent, meaningful touchpoints between Stryker and NJIT. The next Stryker alumni event took place Dec. 4 on NJIT’s campus, where alumni toured several lab facilities, including the new Makerspace. n

James Stamatis ’85

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A B S T R A C T S

LEFT: From left: John Seazholtz ’59, chair of the university’s Board of Overseers; Dale Gary, distinguished professor of physics in NJIT’s Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research; and NJIT President Joel S. Bloom. BELOW: From left: John Seazholtz ’59, chair of the university’s Board of Overseers; Edward Dreizin, distinguished professor of chemical engineering; and NJIT President Joel S. Bloom.

A NEUROBIOLOGIST, A SOLAR PHYSICIST AND A CHEMICAL ENGINEER RECEIVE EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH AWARDS

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aced with a formidable list of nominees for the annual Excellence in Research Prize and Medal, the Board of Overseers opted for its own brand of novelty and innovation: the prize committee picked three. The sector-spanning winners, all at the forefront of their fields, included a solar physicist, a chemical engineer and a neurobiologist. Dale Gary, distinguished professor of physics in NJIT’s Center for SolarTerrestrial Research, was recognized for his groundbreaking research on solar flares and for the creation of a radio telescope, composed of 15 antennas spread out over two kilometers, that is able to peer into their genesis. Edward Dreizin, distinguished professor of chemical engineering, was tapped for his research into novel

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energetic compounds for use in advanced propellants, explosives and pyrotechnics. In his Reactive and Energetic Materials Laboratory, Dreizin creates many of these compounds by milling together distinct metal-based materials into tinier and tinier particles, generating nanocomposites with unique properties that combine high-density energy with extremely high reactivity exceeding that of existing fuels. Farzan Nadim, professor of neurobiology and a founding director of NJIT’s Institute of Brain and Neuroscience Research, was honored for his fundamental insights into the mechanisms by which synaptic dynamics contribute to the generation and control of oscillatory neuronal activity. He has helped identify new mechanisms, for example, through which a fast and a slow oscillatory network

coordinate their activities; widespread synchronization of rhythmic activity among networks of neurons that normally produce distinct behaviors can lead to disorders such as generalized epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease. NJIT President Joel S. Bloom, who bestowed the medals along with John Seazholtz ’59, chair of the university’s Board of Overseers, lauded the three researchers for their hard work, prodigious talent and deep commitment to working across disciplines and industries. Seazholtz, who described each year on the board as a thrilling revelation of the “new knowledge” NJIT researchers were uncovering, said he was also touched as an alumnus by how their groundbreaking work had moved the university “into the research arena.” n

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P O I N T

B Y

P O I N T

The Latest News About NJIT Sports njithighlanders.com

NJIT Basketball Alumnus Shining in Luxembourg Former NJIT basketball star Tim Coleman ’17 is representing the Highlanders program with flying colors. In November, he was named Interperformances Player of the Week in the Total League for his performance with Etzella in Luxembourg. The Union, N.J., native notched 32 points and 10 rebounds in an 88-68 win over Sparta. In fact, Coleman is leading the league at 29.3 ppg. In the process, the 24-year-old product of St. Anthony’s High School has guided Etzella to a 6-1 record and a secondplace standing in the early stages of the season. Coleman finished his NCAA with 1,439 career points, which ranks fourth all-time at NJIT, and 762 rebounds, which ranked 41st among active Division-I leaders upon the completion of his senior season. He became the sixth member of NJIT’s D-I 1,000-point club vs. Army on March 16, 2016. He is also the only player in NJIT history to average better than 1.0 block and 1.0 steal per game for a season — a feat he accomplished three times (2013-14, 2014-15, 2016-17). n

ALLY NICK NAMED ASUN COACH OF THE YEAR; FIONA WRIGHT SELECTED ASUN FRESHMAN OF THE YEAR Three NJIT women’s soccer players were selected to the 2018 ASUN AllConference team, headed by Freshman of the Year Fiona Wright, and NJIT’s Ally Nick was named Coach of the Year. In addition to Wright, senior midfielder Arianna Gerber was selected to the 11-person first-team. Sophomore defender Nicole Loehle was named to the second-team while Wright was selected to the All-Freshman team. In her third season at the helm of the Highlanders, Nick recorded a programrecord 11 victories and nine shutouts, and placed second in the regular season, earning the No. 2 seed in the program’s first postseason appearance in the ASUN since joining the league in 2015-16. NJIT, which started off the season

with a 1-0 loss at five-time defending MAAC champions Monmouth, went 4-0-1 over the next five contests. NJIT closed out the regular season with a 5-1-1 mark, which included wins over both Florida Gulf Coast and Kennesaw State in the regular season. Wright, from Ajax, Ontario, Canada, registered 11 goals this season, more than any first-year player for the Highlanders and just one off the overall mark in program history as a Division I team. Wright added to her 2018 accolades, earning Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference (ECAC) Division I Women’s Soccer Rookie of the Year. In addition, she became the first female Highlander to be recognized on an All-Region team since the Highlanders began competing at the Division I level. The midfielder was one of three freshmen named to the secondteam at the end of November. Her 11 career goals rank one-shy of the NJIT Division

I record (12) held by Kori Washington (2007-10) and two-shy of the NJIT alltime single-season record (13) held by Cathy Wasko ’01. Gerber was recognized on the 2018 ASUN Conference Fall Winners for Life team and selected to the 2018 United Soccer Coaches NCAA Division I Women’s Scholar All-East Region Team. Gerber owns a 3.81 cumulative GPA working towards her bachelor’s degree in biology and on schedule to graduate in May with magna cum laude honors. Her leadership and play were instrumental in leading NJIT to its best-ever season with 11 victories in 2018. Gerber, an ASUN first-team all-Conference honoree, finished her playing career tied for most assists (18) in NJIT program history. Gerber appeared in all 18 matches, recording one goal and six assists. The lone goal on the season for Gerber was a game-winner, coming in the 89th minute against Temple, in the Highlanders’ 1-0 victory. Nicole Loehle, the Highlander sophomore on the backline, started 17 matches, notching two goals and four points. Loehle scored the game-winning penalty kick in NJIT’s 1-0 victory at North Florida and scored the lone goal in the Highlanders’ 1-0 victory over FGCU for the first all-time win over the Eagles. n

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G I V I N G

A TIME FOR CELEBRATION

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wo distinguished individuals were recognized for achievements beneficial to the state and our nation, as was an organization exceptional for its commitment to NJIT’s mission, at Celebration, NJIT’s annual fundraiser for campuswide scholarship endowment funds, held Nov. 9, 2018 at The Pleasantdale Chateau in West Orange, N.J. Since its inception in 1995, Celebration has raised nearly $6 million in endowed scholarship funds, ensuring that top-quality higher education is accessible for talented, motivated students. “This year, Celebration takes on additional significance, because tonight we publicly mark the successful completion of our NJIT NEXT campaign – the most ambitious fundraising initiative in the university’s entire history,” said NJIT President Joel S. Bloom. “I am delighted to share with all of you that, thanks to contributions from more than 23,000 alumni, students, faculty, staff, friends, foundations and corporations, we surpassed the NEXT campaign’s $200 million goal by more than a million dollars.” Gregory Sauter, founder of Smart City Works and a member of the NJIT Board of Overseers, and Stephanie Tonic, senior vice president, Wells Fargo At Work Director and a member of the NJIT Board of

Overseers, served as co-chairs of this year’s event. ABBA: The Concert provided the evening’s entertainment. Along with raising funds, Celebration also is an occasion to recognize important friends and alumni of the university. R. Cynthia Pruett ’55, retired director of environmental affairs at IBM Technology Group, was awarded the President’s Medal for Lifetime Achievement. Active as an alumna, Pruett served on the advisory board for the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, received an Outstanding Alumni Award, and has supported a scholarship, since 1993, for women studying engineering. Daniel J. Carroll Jr. ’65, ’70, retired president and chief executive officer at Telcordia Technologies, received the Edward F. Weston Medal for Professional Achievement, given to an alumnus in recognition of outstanding professional and civic accomplishments, as well as support of the university. IBM Corporation received the Outstanding Corporate Partner Award. Naguib Attia, vice president of Global University Programs, accepted the award on the organization’s behalf. At the event, Dikasse Zalla ’19, a senior majoring in international business, emphasized how scholarship support has enabled her to pursue her dreams. “You’ve probably heard the quote, ‘Investing in yourself is the best investment you can make,’ which is what I’ve been working toward when I acquire a new Naguib Attia, vice president of Global University Programs, IBM, accepted the Outstanding Corporate Partner Award on the organization’s behalf.

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From left: NJIT President Joel S. Bloom; Daniel J. Carroll ’65,’70; R. Cynthia Pruett ’55; and Dr. Diane Bloom.

certification, a new badge or a new skill,” she said. “But I want to furthermore remind [you] that each and every one of you, ladies and gentlemen, have also invested in me and all the other scholars present here tonight, through generous scholarships, unique opportunities and incredible support. So, for that, I thank you from the bottom of my heart.” n

Dikasse Zalla ’19 was the student speaker at Celebration 2018.

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From the lone building which was Newark Technical College in 1919,

to the campus we occupy today ...

we offer sincere THANKS to our alumni and friends for your steadfast commitment and continued support of NJIT.

100

years

N E WA RK CO LLE G E O F E N G INE E RING

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

To make a secure donation online, please visit: njit.edu/givenow


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Public Service Through

Engineering 8

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100

years

NE W ARK C O LLE G E O F E NG I NE E RI NG

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

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HE YEAR 1919 WAS SIGNIFICANT IN OUR NATION’S HISTORY. ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO, THE LEAGUE

of Nations, the predecessor to the United Nations, was created, the rotary dial telephone and pop-up toaster were invented, and the U.S. Congress approved daylight saving time. Prohibition was ratified and came into force with the 18th Amendment, and the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing women the right to vote, was passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification. As New Jersey Institute of Technology marks the 100th anniversary of the establishment of Newark College of Engineering this year, it is important to note that the history of the college exists because of the men and women who have dedicated their lives and work to its preservation.

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Newark Technical School’s first dedicated building was located at High Street and Summit Place.

THE EARLY YEARS The New Jersey Institute of Technology that we know today has a rich history, one that began during the height of the industrial age. Like many of the port cities around the world, the Newark of the late 19th century was a thriving industrial center. Its factories churned out thread, metals, paints and BELOW: The first students to attend Newark Technical School studied in a rented building on West Park Street.

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leather goods. In Newark, Thomas Edison set the stage at his Ward Street factory for his later astounding achievements, and Edison rival Edward Weston established the first factory in the United States for commercial production of dynamo electric machines. On March 24, 1880, the Essex County Assemblyman in the state Legislature introduced “An Act to Provide for the Establishment of Schools of Industrial Education.” The Newark Board of Trade sponsored the bill. The Act established three schools of industrial education: one in Newark, one in Trenton and one in Hoboken. The first Board of Trustees met July 1, 1884. The Newark Technical School opened Monday, February 9, 1885 with 88 students who attended despite a terrible snowstorm. The first class, mostly evening students, attended classes in a rented building at 21 West Park Street. Soon the facility became inadequate to house an expanding student body. To meet the needs of the growing school, a second fundraiser — the institution’s first capital campaign — was

launched to support the construction of a dedicated building for Newark Technical School. In 1886, under the leadership of the school’s dynamic first director, Dr. Charles A. Colton, the cornerstone was laid at the intersection of High Street and Summit Place for the three-story building later to be named Weston Hall in honor of the institution’s early benefactor. A laboratory building, later to be called Colton Hall, was added to the campus in 1913. Daniel Hodgdon served as the director of Newark Technical School from 1918 to 1920. Under Dr. Allan R. Cullimore, who led the institution from 1920 to 1949, the modest Newark Technical School was transformed into the robust Newark College of Engineering. Campbell Hall was erected in 1925. During the lean years of the Depression and World War II, only the former Newark Orphan Asylum, now Eberhardt Hall, was purchased and renovated by the college.

THE POSTWAR ERA The postwar period was one of enormous n j i t .e du


“REVIEW OF WHAT THE PROFESSION HAS ACCOMPLISHED DURING

THE LAST CENTURY, AND WHAT NCE AND OUR GRADUATES HAVE ACHIEVED DURING THE SAME PERIOD, PROVIDES A STRONG SENSE THAT OUR DISCIPLINE IS STILL IN ITS INFANCY.”

- NCE Dean Moshe Kam

LEFT: Charles A. Colton, first director of Newark Technical School MIDDLE: Allan R. Cullimore was the first president of Newark College of Engineering. RIGHT: As across the nation, the call to service in the Armed Forces and defense industries was strong at Newark College of Engineering during World War II.

activity during which President Cullimore — like today’s post-Cold War university presidents — challenged the college to turn “war-time thinking into peace-time thinking.” In 1946, about 75 percent of the freshman class had served in the U.S. armed forces. Robert W. Van Houten was acting president of NJIT from 1947 until 1950 when the board of trustees named him president. Cullimore Hall was built in 1958 and two years later, the old Weston Hall was razed and replaced with the current seven-story structure. Doctoral-level programs were introduced and six years later, in 1966, an 18-acre, four-building expansion was completed. William Hazell succeeded Dr. Van Houten as president of NJIT in 1970.

AN EXPANDED MISSION In 1973, with the addition of the New Jersey School of Architecture, the institution had evolved into a technological university, emphasizing a broad range of graduate and undergraduate degrees and dedication to significant research and public service. A stronger-than-ever Newark College of

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Engineering remained intact, but a new university name — New Jersey Institute of Technology — signified the institution’s expanded mission. A broadened mission called for the creation of a residential campus. The opening of NJIT’s first dormitory, Redwood Hall, in 1979 began a period of steady growth that continues today. Under the leadership of Saul K. Fenster, who served as president of NJIT from 1978 to 2002, four new schools were established at the university: the College of Science and Liberal Arts in 1982; the Martin Tuchman School of Management in 1988; Albert Dorman Honors College in 1995; and the Ying Wu College of Computing in 2001. During the administration of Robert A. Altenkirch, New Jersey School of Architecture was reconstituted as the College of Architecture and Design in 2008.

FULL CIRCLE As it did in the 1880s, NCE continues to have a major focus on industrial education, production and manufacturing. NJIT has developed and expanded several units

— such as the Engineering Technology Department and the new 10,000-square-foot Makerspace — whose primary domain of interest is industrial education. Although the applications have changed, NCE’s current interests are in medical devices, avionics, communications, aerospace, robotics and transportation. And, as in 1881, governmentindustry partnerships continue to be the cornerstone of industrial education. “Review of what the profession has accomplished during the last century, and what NCE and our graduates have achieved during the same period, provides a strong sense that our discipline is still in its infancy,” said NCE Dean Moshe Kam. “Likewise, ours are likely to be nowhere near the technology, engineering and industry that will be celebrated at NCE’s Bicentennial in 2119. The main adventures in engineering and technology are still ahead of us.” To read more about NCE 100, visit njit.edu/engineering100. n Author: Christina Crovetto is editor of NJIT Magazine. NJIT MAGAZINE | WINTER 2019

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NJIT’s Makerspace will be at the core of the new School of Applied Engineering and Technology within Newark College of Engineering.

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NJIT Establishes New School of Applied Engineering and Technology AN ARRAY OF MORE THAN 100 TECHNOLOGYFOCUSED ENGINEERS, DEVICE DESIGNERS AND PROJECT MANAGERS, JOINED BY NJIT ALUMNI AND ELECTED OFFICIALS, GATHERED ON CAMPUS NOV. 9, 2018,

PHOTO: OSCAR MASCIANDARO

TO MARK THE ESTABLISHMENT OF NJIT’S SCHOOL

C E L E B R AT I N G 1 0 0 Y E A R S O F N C E

OF APPLIED ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (SAET) WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY’S NEWARK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. NJIT MAGAZINE | WINTER 2019

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esigned to meet spiraling demand in the job market for applied engineering technologists in industries reliant upon production, manufacturing, process control and instrumentation, the new school will emphasize internships, co-ops and apprenticeships within private industry and government. When fully implemented, SAET will serve close to 2,000 students and will have roughly 30 full-time instructors and faculty members, as well as approximately 100 auxiliary faculty and adjunct professors from industry. With its industrial-grade machines, NJIT’s Makerspace will be at the core of the program. “This space, much more than the classroom or the standard lecture hall, is the natural environment for students like

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us; future engineers and technologists,” said Amelia Sapirman ’18, a senior majoring in Mechanical Engineering Technology. “This is a place where you can design, experiment, build, measure, test, recalibrate and redesign until you achieve what you and your team set out to do.” The School of Applied Engineering and Technology will include 10 baccalaureate degree programs in engineering technology, including Mechanical Engineering Technology, Electrical Engineering BELOW: The Concrete Industry Management (CIM) program is designed to train and educate the student in the field of concrete industry by exposing the student to a multidisciplinary program which draws on management and technology to produce a well-rounded graduate who is able to enter a career in the concrete industry.

Technology, Manufacturing Engineering Technology, Construction Management Technology and Concrete Industry Management. The new school will be home to a four-year General Engineering program culminating with a Bachelor of Science degree. NJIT’s concrete program, one of only four in the country, already incorporates many of the new school’s core principles, including mandatory internships. Throughout the year, students travel around the country to competitions and industry conferences, such as the World of Concrete conference in January which annually attracts more than 65,000.

ANALYTICALLY ADVANCED “NJIT Engineering Technology programs are already known in the community and

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industry as some of the most analytically advanced, and what is being done here will also make them known as the most sophisticated in terms of access to advanced machinery and modern gear, and superior in preparing students for leadership in industry and governmental facilities,” said Sapirman, who spent last semester working in the Disney College Program in Orlando. Sapirman said she switched her major from Mechanical Engineering to MET during her sophomore year because she “wanted to be the person physically making or working on the machines that I was learning about, not the person analyzing their structures.” “Some highlights of my experiences within MET are the countless number of design classes that have been offered to me. I have learned how to use Creo, Solidworks, Inventor as well as others and have enjoyed each one. This design background has already set me apart from some of the other applicants in jobs that I have applied for,” she

added. “With the amount of design software work I have received throughout my years here at NJIT I am confident that I could go into any machine design job I wish to pursue.”

LINKING INDUSTRY AND HIGHER EDUCATION NJIT President Joel Bloom, who was joined by members of several of NJIT’s governance boards, called the new school a boon to both job-seeking students and the employers who need them. “In recent years, I’ve spent a great deal of time in conversation with industry leaders who have made it clear that they need more NJIT graduates for their enterprises, but not just engineers,” Bloom said. “There is an abundant demand for professionals who possess hands-on experience as well as a solid technical background in manufacturing, fabrication, maintenance and service that enables them to focus on practical applications of engineered products and processes.”

At the official opening of NJIT’s new SAET were, from left: NJIT Provost Fadi Deek ’85, ’86, ’97; Senator Paul Sarlo ’92, ’95; Stephen P. DePalma ’72; NJIT President Joel S. Bloom; Robert C. Cohen ’83,’84,’87; Amelia Sapirman ’18; and Newark College of Engineering Dean Moshe Kam.

The new school dovetails, he added, with the emphasis New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy is placing on apprenticeship. On his first day back from a trip to Germany and Israel, the governor announced a $4.5 million apprenticeship grant program supporting the state’s highdemand industries. “As a state, we do well to invest in higher education. We do particularly well when our educational investments help link industry and higher education,” said Paul Sarlo ’92, ’95, the deputy majority leader of the New Jersey Senate. “This school is a step in the right direction.” n Author: Tracey L. Regan is an NJIT Magazine contributing writer.

“THERE IS AN ABUNDANT DEMAND FOR PROFESSIONALS WHO POSSESS

HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE AS WELL AS A SOLID TECHNICAL BACKGROUND IN

MANUFACTURING, FABRICATION, MAINTENANCE AND SERVICE THAT ENABLES THEM TO FOCUS ON PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS OF ENGINEERED PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES.”

- NJIT President Joel S. Bloom

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NJIT ADVANCES RESEARCH, COMMERCE AND SECURITY THROUGH GLOBAL PARTNERSHIPS

New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has reached out to giants in the field of cryptography nearly 7,000 miles away to advance blockchain, an evolving digital security technology designed to enable enterprises both large and small to expand transactions across borders, supply chains and diverse stakeholder groups. 16

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NJIT President Joel S. Bloom met with researchers at JD.com, China’s largest retailer, to sign a partnership that will advance blockchain.

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n a recently announced partnership, NJIT’s Ying Wu College of Computing has joined forces with JD.com, China’s largest retailer, and the Institute of Software at the Chinese Academy of Sciences (ISCAS) to pursue fundamental improvements in consensus protocols, privacy protections and security for the sort of decentralized operations blockchain was designed to facilitate. “Working with international partners advances our mission to solve problems that affect people, businesses and infrastructure, both at home and across the globe,” said NJIT President Joel Bloom, who completed a multileg trip to China, where he delivered a keynote address on future paths for applied research at the China Annual Conference for International Educational-Applied Science in Beijing. “Our alliance with JD.com and ISCAS is a case in point — we expect it will accelerate our own fundamental research into this still-emerging technology so critical for privacy and security protections, while leading to a host of applications that will allow diverse businesses in many sectors to confidently C E L E B R AT I N G 1 0 0 Y E A R S O F N C E

expand,” Bloom added. Promising applications in the near-term, he noted, include supply-chain finance, logistics and international trade. Blockchain technology, the major technical innovation behind Bitcoin, allows multiple partners engaged in enterprises over the internet to jointly maintain time-stamped, tamper-resistant digital ledgers. The technology is not yet mature enough to support large-scale operations, and its speedy evolution in that direction will be the focus of a joint lab led by Jian Pei, president of JD Big Data and Smart Supply Chain; NJIT’s Qiang Tang, an assistant professor of computer science; and Zhenfeng Zhang, vice chief engineer at ISCAS. “JD’s enormous ecosystem will provide us many real-world problems that motivate better questions regarding blockchain research as we look to test and deploy this technology in large and complex industrial applications,” Tang noted.

GLOBALIZING RESEARCH

Partnerships in China, which include a research center sparked by alumnus Jingong Pan, Ph.D. ’08, between NJIT and the China National Building Materials

Company, one of the largest gypsum, cement and fiber glass producers in the world, as well as talks around scholarly exchanges with as many as five universities across the country, are just some of NJIT’s recent initiatives designed to globalize its research, while the university remains firmly rooted in the state it serves. In coordination with New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy’s economic development team, NJIT signed an agreement with the Digital Hub Cybersecurity center run by the Fraunhofer-Institute fur Sichere Informationstechnologie in Germany to embark on joint research projects and a variety of scholarly exchanges. “Our new relationship with the Fraunhofer Institute enables opportunities for NJIT cybersecurity researchers to engage with German researchers who have a unique understanding and insights into industrial cybersecurity, thus allowing NJIT to improve its global reach,” commented Kurt Rohloff, co-director of NJIT’s Cybersecurity Research Center. “This relationship also will make it easier for German entrepreneurial researchers to make extended visits to NJIT and engage in technology transition to the U.S. market in partnership with our faculty.” NJIT MAGAZINE | WINTER 2019

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LEFT: Brendan Dente ’18 (at far right) with other Fulbright recipients at the U.S. Ambassador’s residence in The Hague, Netherlands.

“AS WE TACKLE CRITICAL ISSUES IN SUSTAINABILITY, DIGITAL SECURITY AND HEALTH CARE, WE WILL CONTINUE TO SEIZE OPPORTUNITIES TO WORK WITH PARTNERS AROUND THE GLOBE — FROM EUROPE, TO THE MIDDLE EAST, TO ASIA — WHO HELP US EXPAND THE POWER AND SCOPE OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING.”

- NJIT President Joel S. Bloom

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Over the past few years, NJIT has signed agreements with more than 30 universities around the world, from Israel, to Ireland, to Italy, in order to support student and faculty exchanges and joint research. These relationships are explicit priorities in 2020 Vision, NJIT’s strategic plan, which calls for “international collaborative research and exchange programs ... to promote innovative scholarship, global leadership and visibility.” “Diversity — of backgrounds, ideas, problem-solving abilities — is essential for higher education,” Bloom noted. “There is still another form of diversity that also is critical, while it gets less attention, and that is the differing and sometimes unique ways that societies apply the same technology. I think it’s important that our students and faculty experience this on the ground.” Insights from industrial powerhouses such as Germany and experts at apprenticeship programs in countries such as Ireland are helping to guide aspects of NJIT’s new School of Applied Engineering and Technology, which was launched this fall. A growing number of NJIT students are pursuing international study, as well. For many, these stints are a first trip out of the country. Recent graduate Brendan Dente ’18, a chemical engineer, currently is earning a master’s degree at one of Europe’s major STEM hubs, the Technological University of Delft in the Netherlands, on a two-year Fulbright scholarship. “Process control and molecular design are areas that excite me because of the possibilities to advance product efficacy, 16 N J I TIf products MAGAZINE sustainability and performance. can be made more useful to consumers or more beneficial for the environment, then the windfall would go beyond profits for the company,” he said. “They would start to have a physical impact on the people who use them and the environment around them.” In his Fulbright proposal, Dente also described the role of foreign travel in n j i t .e du

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expanding possibilities — and people themselves. He said he wanted to take himself further out of his comfort zone by studying in a country whose first language is not English.

China with Bloom. “They are proud of the university and keen to hear in person about its upward trajectory,” he noted.

INTERNATIONALLY-BASED ALUMNI

As NJIT’s presence abroad grows, so do its international rankings. NJIT was one of three New Jersey universities named to U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 Best Global Universities list, joining Princeton and Rutgers. On The New York Times Higher Education list, NJIT’s computer science program ranked in the top 250 universities worldwide. “We continue to improve our performance in an increasingly competitive environment,

Author: Tracey L. Regan is an NJIT Magazine contributing writer. BELOW: Blockchain technology is a focus of Assistant Professor of Computer Science Qiang Tang’s research.

PHOTO: OSCAR MASCIANDARO

Through graduate programs that attract foreign students, the number of internationally-based NJIT alumni also is booming. There are, for example, more than 1,000 NJIT graduates living in China, according to Kenneth Alexo, Jr., vice president for development and alumni relations, who met with more than 25 alumni in Beijing alone on a recent trip to

GLOBAL RANKINGS

and we’re pleased to be recognized by prestigious global rankings for our research impact,” noted NJIT Provost Fadi Deek. Bloom added, “As we tackle critical issues in sustainability, digital security and health care, we will continue to seize opportunities to work with partners around the globe — from Europe, to the Middle East, to Asia — who help us expand the power and scope of applied science and engineering.” n

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Paying It Forward for NJIT.

In honor of the 100th

anniversary of the founding of the Newark College of Engineering, James R. Pennino ’66 and his wife Krisha decided to establish a scholarship through their estate. “NCE has exercised a lifelong influence on who I am and what I have accomplished – as a person, an engineer, a veteran, and a civil servant. The outstanding education I received, together with my experience in the Air Force ROTC, served as a launching pad for my career with the U.S. Air Force. My wife and I made this gift not only as a way of expressing our gratitude to the university, but also to help NCE continue to launch hardworking students into successful and rewarding careers that contribute to our nation’s good.”

To join Jim and Krisha in supporting NJIT’s students – through a bequest or a deferred charitable gift that will also provide for you and your loved ones – contact us today. Beth Kornstein Associate Vice President of Planned Giving 973-596-8548 • elizabeth.s.kornstein@njit.edu

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MAL & FRIENDS NJIT Magazine invites new correspondents to join Mal Simon in sharing news about class members and alumni organizations. Professor emeritus of physical education and athletics, Mal was director of physical education and athletics, and men’s soccer coach, for 30 years. In 1993, he received the Cullimore Medal for his service to the university.

If you would like to be a regular correspondent, don’t hesitate to send an email to the editor of NJIT Magazine: crovetto@njit.edu First, the latest news from Mal –

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n the story about Joe Crecca on page 26 of NJIT Magazine’s Fall 2018 issue, I incorrectly indicated that Danang Air Force Base, Hanoi and the Hanoi Hilton were in North Korea. The correct location is North Vietnam. I apologize to Joe and the magazine’s readers for this regretful error. My previous column featured alumni who were members of the first NJIT Air Force ROTC program. This column will likewise feature alumni who were among the first graduates of the university’s School of Architecture (SOA) founded in 1973. The students in these classes were transfers from NCE programs, other schools of architecture and first time NCE entries. As a result of the SOA being the first non-engineering program at NCE, it was felt that NCE needed a name that reflected a broader than only engineering mission. Alumni were asked to propose a new name and Joseph Anderson ’25 proposed NJIT. The Board of Trustees approved the new name in the fall of 1974 and it became official in January 1, 1975. It could not have been anticipated that the new school would bring about the first on-campus quasi-residential students. Some of the SOA classes required projects that could not be transported off campus so the students had to stay on campus to complete these projects. I recall visiting the SOA labs to see students fast asleep under their desks. Initially, this caused some angst that took some time to work out between the SOA and the administration and other schools, but a strong relationship soon evolved. C E L E B R AT I N G 1 0 0 Y E A R S O F N C E

The alumni featured are Joe Flock ’78, Bob Cozzarelli ’79, Stan Kufel ’78, Alex Levitsky ’78, Paul Tiajoloff ’79, Tom MacDonald ’78 and Tom Rybak ’79. Also included are Frank Cozzarelli, Jr. ’49, ’51, and Michael Squeo ’77. While not SOA graduates, they have a close relationship to two of the alumni. JOE FLOCK is proud to be one of the first SOA graduates. He proclaims to one and all that NJIT is a great birthplace for some of the best architects in New Jersey and the good old U.S.A. He credits the SOA faculty and staff for always helping and caring for the students and will always remember their “mantra” “You came here not to learn how to be an architect. You came here to learn how to think like an architect.” I got to know Joe well during his academic days at NJIT. He was active in extracurricular activities and was elected the first president of the Student Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Joe worked with Bob Swanson and me to organize intramural programs for the SOA students and as a ski instructor on the NJIT Indoor Ski Machine, one of only two such machines in the United States. After graduation, Joe got his architect’s license and was a partner in a New Jersey architectural design firm for ten years. He then moved to ADP as Global Head of Design & Construction where he spent 17 years managing a number of great teams and many major real estate/design/construction projects in the United States, Canada and Europe. After some consulting work for Hertz in

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New Jersey, Joe went to Deutsche Bank to manage their Design/Construction/ Workplace team in North America and South America. Joe then returned to good old Newark to manage the complete renovation of the corporate headquarters for Horizon Blue Cross. He then crossed the Hudson River to manage a design/ construction team for Citibank. He then took the ferry back to New Jersey and now leads a national team of 22 professionals for Realogy Corporation in Madison, New Jersey. Joe is an active member of the Newark Section of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and served as its president. He currently sits on the organization’s board and runs its annual roundtable discussions on trends in architecture. He has lectured at various universities including NJIT and Princeton. Joe has been happily married to his wife, Lily, for over 35 years. They live in Rutherford, N.J. MIKE SQUEO started NJIT in the SOA, but after two years transferred to the School of Industrial Administration. His reasons for leaving the SOA were: 1) He could not get his GPA over 2.0 and knew he could do better but could not find his footing; 2) He had a strong right/wrong system but in design there generally isn’t a right/wrong and no matter what he presented, he was always asked what else could have been done; and 3) There was a downturn in the economy and he was worried he might become an unemployed architect. Hearing about a new Industrial Administration major at NJIT and finding out that he could graduate on time by getting credit for his architecture classes and TOP Joe Flock in his yearbook photo. BOTTOM: Joe Flock and his wife, Lily

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Mike Squeo

taking three summer classes, he transferred to the BSIA program. After graduation, Mike was hired as a claims adjuster at Liberty Mutual, which turned out to be the only firm he worked for. He retired from Liberty Mutual in 2015 as a regional vice president in charge of workers’ compensation in eight states. Mike felt he had to thank me for my unsuccessful attempts in kill him in his physical education classes. He specifically mentions that water polo was deadly, soccer was dangerous and tennis was embarrassing. Joe and Mike have been close friends since their freshman year at NJIT. They were in each other’s wedding party. Mike concludes his erudite monologue by explaining why Joe has been worth his weight in gold as a friend. He states that: “Joe is not AN architect. Joe is THE architect and is OUR architect,” having helped Mike complete additions to his house. Before beginning the first addition, Mike showed Joe the sketches of his ideas. Then Joe started talking about space, traffic flow and views and Mike realized that Joe must have been paying attention at the SOA because his skills were incredible. Without hesitation, we incorporated all his ideas in our additions. BOB COZZARELLI credits his father, Frank Cozzarelli, Jr., for encouraging him to attend the SOA in its inaugural years. Bob says that he will always be grateful that his father pointed him in the right direction. Bob graduated with the first fully accredited SOA class in 1979. He’s had his own practice since 1986 and has been very active with the American Institute of Architects (AIA) for over 30 years. Bob served as AIA Newark and Suburban Section President, then as AIA New Jersey State President, AIA National Regional Director and AIA National Regional Bob Cozzarelli

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Representative. Currently, he is Presidentelect for the New Jersey State Board of Architects and represents the State Board at the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. He lives in Belleville, N.J. with his wife, Susan, whom he met at an NJIT “mixer.” FRANK COZZARELLI, JR. started his college career at Newark College of Engineering (NCE). After completing three semesters, he joined the U.S. Navy, where he served as an electronics technician. After an honorable discharge, Frank became a proud veteran of the U.S. Navy, returning to NCE where he earned his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering in 1949. He followed that with a master’s degree in chemical engineering in 1951. For 38 years, Frank commuted over an hour every day to Bound Frank Cozzarelli Brook, N.J., where he worked for Union Carbide Corporation, a worldwide leader in chemicals and plastics. Frank became a senior leader within the Union Carbide Research and Development Organization, as well as an industry recognized professional as a Fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and was presented the Alumni Achievement Award by New Jersey Institute of Technology. At the age of 50, he decided to reinvent himself and enrolled in Seton Hall Law School. Frank graduated from law school in 1982 and transitioned to the intellectual property team at Union Carbide. He finished his career at Union Carbide as a lawyer and U.S. patent attorney. After leaving Union Carbide in 1990, Frank continued to work in private practice as a lawyer and U.S. patent attorney up to May of this year, never retiring. He emphasized that the greatest accomplishment of his life occurred the day he married Angela. Frank passed away in July 2017, at the age of 91. He and Angela were married for 66 years and were lifelong residents of Belleville, N.J.

STAN KUFEL has been a volunteer firefighter in Oradell, N.J. for 44 years and has served as the department’s President and Fire Chief for a number of those years. He recently did an IPOD show with National Fire Radio, which can be found on You Tube by adding Stan Kufel to your search. Stan is currently president of the New Jersey and New York Volunteer Firemen’s Association representing Bergen and Rockland counties. Stan and his wife have always stressed community service, which is demonstrated by their children also being firefighters in Oradell and Wyckoff. Stan’s dedication to firefighting began as far back as his NJIT days, and possibly sooner. As an SOA student, he joined the Newark Fire Department Auxiliary and slept at Truck 2/Engine 4 on High Street (now MLK, Jr. Boulevard). When not at the firehouse, Stan slept under his drawing board at NJIT. Stan played soccer and ice hockey at NJIT. He would walk to ice hockey practice at Branch Brook Park at 6 a.m. on Fridays. He was goalkeeper for the ice hockey team and would get bombarded by the opponents. After watching one of his games, I allegedly commented to Stan that he looked like a piece of Swiss cheese. (I don’t recall saying this, but Joe Flock, who was also at the game, swears it is true. I ask you, “Who do you believe?”) Stan has maintained his devotion to firefighting to this day. ALEX LEVITSKY was a member of the soccer and volleyball teams at NJIT. Currently, he is active in sports architecture and planning. As principal of Global Sports & Tennis Design Group since February 2000, Alex has worked on the design of hundreds of tennis courts including: stadium courts, field courts, training courts, hard and soft courts, indoor and outdoor courts. He participated in the inspection of construction of the major court expansion of the National Tennis Center at Flushing Meadows, Flushing, N.Y. (1994-1997), and in 2007, contributed to the design of the tennis courts in the Indoor Training Center. Since the mid-1990s, Alex worked

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on the designs of over 50 sports facilities, including projects in 20 states and 10 foreign countries. Alex has been active in the American Sports Builders Association (ASBA), United States Tennis Association (USTA), the USA Pickleball Association (USAPA), and the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM). Alex has represented both the ASBA and the USTA on the Joint Editorial Board; the body responsible for revisions to the Tennis Courts: A Construction and Maintenance Manual, official manual of the USTA & ASBA. (Editorial Board Member 2006, 2010; Drawing Editor 2001-2018). For the last 20 years, Alex has been on the Russian Orthodox Church outside of Russia (ROCOR) Arts and Architecture Commission, responsible for the review of new construction and renovation of Russian Orthodox Churches and other parish properties. During this time, Alex has also been a Church Alex Levitsky Warden; first at the St. Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Howell and currently at the St. Vladimir and St. Olga Memorial Churches in Jackson, New Jersey In 1993, Alex supervised the design of the first post-Cold War development project in Volgograd, Russia. In the housing component (33 townhouses), the Ambassador of the United States presented the keys to the units to each Russian family. In the mid-1980s, Alex was a designer for 100+ architectural and land planning projects, including mixeduse developments at N/K Architects, Morristown, N.J. Before that, Alex worked abroad. In 1981, he was co-designer of the Canadian International Development Agency funded Community Medical Auxiliary Campuses in Surkhet and Dhankuta, Nepal, and in 1980, Alex co-authored the United States Agency for International Development funded Master Plan for Nepal’s only Institute of Agriculture and Animal Sciences campus in the Terai for the King of Nepal. In 40 C E L E B R AT I N G 1 0 0 Y E A R S O F N C E

years of practice, Alex has been recognized more than 50 times for excellence in design and planning by local, state and international authorities and associations. Alex is a registered architect in New Jersey, Florida, Alabama, Delaware, Massachusetts and South Carolina; and was a professional planner in New Jersey for 15 years; received National Council of Architectural Registration Boards Certification in 1996; and was a member of the AIA, CSI & USTA Technical Committee (2003-2012) and American Society for Testing and Materials and president of the American Sports Builders Association (2004-2007). TOM MACDONALD is a registered architect currently practicing from Madison, Connecticut, a small shoreline town 15 miles east of New Haven. Upon graduation from the SOA in 1978, Tom moved to Raleigh, North Carolina, to continue his architectural career. While in Raleigh, Tom became a partner in Raleigh’s largest architectural and engineering firm. His design projects in North Carolina included buildings for IBM, Sheraton Hotel Services, Nationwide Insurance and the Boys Scouts of America. More importantly, Tom met and married the extraordinary Lisa MacCartney upon her receipt of her master’s in architecture degree from NC State University. In 1991, Tom moved to the New Haven area and with Lisa founded East Wharf Architects. Tom claims they only provide design services on projects that bring them great satisfaction and delight. It is also important for his projects to have a public use and orientation. The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center and the Guest Houses at the four-diamond Saybrook Point Inn and Marina were recently completed and recognized in the local media. When allowed some time off from work, Tom will be hiking, trail running and continuing his quest to grow the Tom MacDonald

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finest tomatoes east of the Mississippi. After graduating from NJIT, PAUL TIAJOLOFF attended the University of Pennsylvania for a master of architecture and master of city planning degrees from the Urban Design Program, obtaining these degrees in 1990. After a brief internship with Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, he worked 11 years for the firm of Harsen and Johns Architects and passed his license exam in 1988. During this tenure, he was responsible for multiple residential, educational and commercial designs eventually becoming Director of Design in 1993. He joined the American Institute of Architects in 1993. In 1993, he teamed up with fellow classmate Tom Rybak, and was director of design with TMR and Associates before venturing out to open his own firm, Paul K. Tiajoloff Architect LLC, in a storefront in Boonton, New Jersey, over 20 years ago. He is currently continuing with his firm providing architectural services to a variety of clients with projects ranging from residential design to commercial renovation to educational and recreational facilities. Paul is president-elect for the Newark Suburban Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). He sits on the Board of Trustees for the Friends of the Kinnelon N.J. Museum, having served 20 years as a commissioner to the Kinnelon Historic Commission. Paul and his wife, Tatiana, live in Boonton, New Jersey. TOM RYBAK is principal in charge and senior architect of T. M. Rybak and Associates, P.C. TMR, which is an awardwinning architectural, engineering, planning, interior design, construction management and design/build firm serving clients since 1986. Licensed in 17 states and based in New Jersey, TMR offers unparalleled design quality and exceptional client service. TMR expertly manages every phase of the design process and focuses on strong utilization of design Paul and energy efficiency. n Tiajoloff

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Top 20 Under 40: ÁINE O’DWYER ’07, ’08

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ine O’Dwyer, PE, CEO of Enovate Engineering, LLC, was named to the Engineering News Record (ENR) National Top 20 Under 40 for 2018. Honored earlier in the year with the regional Top Young Professionals award, O’Dwyer was chosen from a pool of more than 400 regional candidates from which 20 winners were chosen. In her role as majority owner in Enovate Engineering, LLC, O’Dwyer recently underwent a huge effort moving her team and office to their new headquarters in Cranford, N.J., and reorganized the company. Under her leadership, the company recently became certified as a Women’s Business Enterprise and Small Business Enterprise. Her experience includes over 10 years in the heavy civil and infrastructure market in both engineering and construction. She is a registered professional engineer in New York, New Jersey, Michigan and Delaware and is actively involved with the American Society of Civil Engineers, Professional Women in Construction, New York Building Congress and American Council of Engineering Companies of N.Y. ENR spotlighted the winners in the July 23/30 issue, including their thoughts on important issues facing the industry, such as mentorship, diversity, technology and work-life balance. The publication honored the 2018 Top 20 class in San Francisco prior to their FutureTech event, where O’Dwyer participated in a roundtable discussion on the important issues facing young leaders in the industry today. What are your thoughts about being named to the ENR National Top 20 Under 40 list? I feel incredibly honored to be part of such a talented and accomplished group and am quite inspired by the careers and 24

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personal backgrounds of those that I got to share this award with. The experience of spending time with the other 20 Under 40 awardees has been an incredible opportunity to further open my career and personal horizons. Do you think your NJIT degrees helped you in your career? Absolutely. I came to NJIT as an international student. Other than my wonderful aunt and uncle who at the time lived three hours away, I essentially didn’t have any local support or structure around me when I first arrived to the states and to Newark. NJIT immediately filled that void, becoming the place where I quickly found my family and friends through the NJIT community. The high bars of expectations in the courses that I took, as well as continually being surrounded by a collaborative work environment set me up for my career ahead. Additionally, I was studying engineering while being a full-time student-athlete during my time there. This helped create a strong structure of discipline and time management, which engrained in me the importance of limited time and efficiency. Did you enjoy your time at NJIT? Definitely. I lived on campus all four years of undergrad and my one year of graduate. I loved the campus experience. I was on campus August through May, including winter break due to our basketball season, so I really had the full collegiate experience. There was always so much to do; between campus activities, 5 a.m. practices (which I don’t miss!), jumping on the PATH to New York City for a few hours, post-game “cheat meals” at the Highlander Pub and, of course, buckling down and working. Some of my closest friends today I met at NJIT, and when I visit the campus now, I have a strong sense of nostalgia and wonderful memories.

What was your most memorable moment as a student? My most memorable moments at NJIT were being part of the basketball team. This entails many moments, so there’s really not just one. Throughout my four years of playing, I learned so many lessons that have translated to so many other parts of my life up until today. Whether it’s teamwork, building off each other’s strengths, perseverance when you’re down, enjoying and embracing the moments when you’re up, and ultimately setting and aiming for both short- and long-term goals. There are so many other parts of my life that this has translated to, and I’ll be forever grateful for the lessons that I learned both on and off the court at NJIT. This has played a significant part in helping me to where I am today with having and running my own company. It’s about the team that you’re surrounded with, the hard work that you put in together and no one person’s success can drive this, but rather the combined force of the team. What advice would you give to students who are planning to pursue a similar career path? Your time at NJIT will go by faster than you think. Make the most of it. Engage with others and network with industry folk as much as you can. Develop your network wide and early. Not only will this help you as you start out your career, but it will also help you determine sooner which career is right for you. As most people know that go to NJIT, getting a degree in one course opens up so many diverse career opportunities and the sooner you understand the opportunities that are right for you, the sooner you can advance doing something that you love every day. n Author: Christina Crovetto is editor of NJIT Magazine. n j i t .e du


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An Alumna’s Journey to CEO: TONI VASQUEZ-SHAWAN ’10

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fter graduating from the University of Santo Tomas in 2007 with a B.S. in architecture, Toni Vasquez-Shawan ’10 acquired a full-time position at T.I. Vasquez Architects & Planners, Inc. (TVAP), a Manila-based architecture firm founded in 1993 by her father Topy Vasquez. “I didn’t work directly under my father,” says Vasquez-Shawan. “He made sure that I started from the bottom. Nepotism was never his thing. As a matter of fact, he was harder on me than any of his other employees.” Still, there were skeptics. VasquezShawan quickly learned that being the daughter of the boss and a woman in a male-dominated field have a certain scrutiny attached to it. She remembers having to resort to bropropriation (when a man claims credit for a woman’s idea) to outsmart a sexist client. “I pitched an idea to a developer and was immediately shut down — no rhyme, no reason, no explanation,” she says. To seal the deal, she pulled her father to the side and insisted he present her next idea as his own. “Lo and behold,” she adds, “the client went for it. His jaw dropped when my father told him the idea was mine. I’ve never seen anyone look at me in such disbelief.” This was when she decided to break free from her father’s influence and resources to prove to everyone — especially herself — that she had the tenacity to pursue a career in architecture. Vasquez-Shawan decamped to Wayne, N.J., where she lived with a relative while attending graduate school at NJIT, a college she chose because of the “rich, technical content” and the ability C E L E B R AT I N G 1 0 0 Y E A R S O F N C E

to engage with “students of diverse backgrounds.” She was a bundle of nerves in the hallway of Weston Hall, home of the College of Architecture and Design, while preparing to present her design work for the first time, when then Dean, Urs Gauchat decided to stop by and listen in. “I left the Philippines to seek training overseas because I wanted the challenge, the advancement,” she says. “I had this perception that my training was inferior and my output would reflect that.” With Gauchat in the audience, she pushed through her presentation. But before she could finish, he stood up, interrupted her mid-sentence and declared, “This is how it’s supposed to be done! This is the work of a graduate student.” The validation from Gauchat aimed at the heart of her insecurities, and put to bed any lingering concerns about the legitimacy of her professional development. “I was anticipating the opposite reaction in my head,” she admits. “I was selling myself short. His appreciation of my work came as a pleasant surprise. NJIT is where I found my backbone.” Armed with a master’s degree in architecture from NJIT, Vazquez-Shawan was eager to conquer the world of design and construction. Meanwhile, back in Southeast Asia, real estate was booming. Topy urged his daughter to return home to manage TVAP’s Cebu branch. She agreed. “He gave me the liberty to regenerate in the direction I saw fit,” she says. In less than a year, Vasquez-Shawan had tripled the size of the staff and moved the office to a bigger location. By 2015, she was handling most of the firm’s high-rise

projects — and had done the impossible: stepped out of her father’s shadow to carve out a career on her own terms. But in June of 2016, Topy died of cancer, leaving the firm in limbo and a grieving daughter’s professional identity intertwined with her father’s once again. In August 2017, Vasquez-Shawan succeeded her father as CEO and principal architect. Today, Topy’s collaborative work ethic and professional legacy live on through his daughter, who stands firm in her father’s convictions, often relying on his proven past methods to foster a spirit of community in the workplace and maintain the creativity and technical proficiency for which TVAP is celebrated. This past October, TVAP celebrated 25 years in business, with a healthy streak of projects in the pipeline: a few beach resorts in Batangas and Bohol; two high-rises in Manila and Cebu; and the master development and renovation of Southwestern University, a private college in Cebu, where Vazquez serves as the first dean of architecture for the School of Design and Communications. CEO. Architect. Writer. Teacher. Dean. To say Vasquez-Shawan has her hands full would be a vast understatement. Yet the busy multi-hyphenate added another title to the list — and it’s her most important role to date: mother. She and her husband, Elias, recently welcomed their first child. And although running a business while raising a family is no easy feat, her passion for architecture, rigorous education and knack for self-invention, suggests it’s a balancing act she’s destined to master. n Author: Shydale James is an NJIT Magazine contributing editor. NJIT MAGAZINE | WINTER 2019

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1970’s

’78 General ELLEN PAWLIKOWSKI (Chemical Engineering) was elected to the board of directors of Raytheon Company. Pawlikowski retired as Commander, U.S. Air Force Materiel Command, WrightPatterson Air Force Base, Ohio, on September 1, 2018.

1980’s

’80 BARRY FREIFELD (Mechanical

Engineering) joined Pitts Trailers as sales director for its new dedicated lowboy division, Pitts Heavy Haul. Most recently, Freifeld served as sales director for Trail King Industries. Before that, Freifeld worked as national sales manager for Hermes Abrasives and held sales roles at Henkel AG & Company and at Loctite Corporation.

’82 MARY AMEEN (M.S. in

Civil Engineering) was appointed executive director of the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority, where she has worked since 2006. She most recently served as deputy executive director, a position she was appointed to in 2012. Prior to that, Ameen was the director of external affairs.

’84 JOSEPH DOMINGUEZ (Mechanical

Engineering) joined ComEd as CEO. Prior to this role, Dominguez served as executive vice president of governmental and regulatory affairs and public policy for ComEd’s parent company Exelon.

’85 DAVID KROPACZEK (Engineering

Science) was named director of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Kropaczek has served as chief scientist of CASL since 2016 as well as the Duke Energy distinguished professor in nuclear engineering at North Carolina State University.

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2000’s

1980’s

2010’s

’86 MYRON PETRUCH (Chemical

Engineering) was appointed president and CEO, effective January 1, 2019. Petruch assumes leadership after serving as president of Sun Chemical Performance Pigments and general manager of the Pigments Products Division since 2008.

’89 DON FUSCO (Construction

Engineering Technology) was named president and CEO of Skanska USA Civil. Fusco has more than 29 years of experience in engineering and construction, including 16 years with Skanska.

1990’s

’92 DAWSON BLOOM (Civil

Engineering, M.S. ’99) joined McLaren Engineering Group as civil technical director. Prior to this role, Bloom managed significant projects throughout New Jersey, including Newark’s Broad Street Station Plaza, the Edgewater Marina Park and Ferry Landing, and the Clinton Street Streetscape in Newark.

’92 ELVIS PEREZ (Industrial

Engineering, M.S. in Manufacturing Engineering ’97) joined Click Bond Inc. as vice president of sales and marketing. Before joining Click Bond, Perez served as vice president of sales for North America and Asia/Pacific at KLX Aerospace Solutions.

’94 FRED FERRARO (M.S. in both

Architecture and Management) joined CRG as vice president of development for the company’s Northeast region. Ferraro previously served as vice president of development, East Region for DCT Industrial.

’96 SABET ELIAS (Mechanical

Engineering and M.S. in Information Systems ’99) joined BNY Mellon as chief technology officer (CTO). Previously, Elias served as sales and trading CTO at Bank of America. He spent nearly eight years at the firm working on the strategy

1 1950’s

1970’s

and building of various technological products.

2000’s

’00 PRASANT TANGIRALA (M.S. in

Computer Engineering) published a children’s e-book on Amazon entitled The Magic Seedling and Other Short Stories. When not writing books, Tangirala works in financial services at MUFG Bank in the area of information risk management.

’00 ROBERT WARD (M.S. in

Management) was appointed to the board of directors of OncoSec Medical Incorporated. Ward currently is chairman and CEO of Eloxx Pharmaceuticals. Prior to joining Eloxx, Ward was president and CEO of Radius Health, Inc.

’04 MICHAEL MONTELEONE

(Computer Science, M.S. in Management ’08) was inducted into the Senior Executive Service of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command during a ceremony on November 1, 2018. Monteleone currently serves as the director of its Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate. ’06 JANET CORZO (Architecture, M.S. ’08) joined E4H Environment for Health Architecture’s New York office as a senior lab planner. Corzo has more than 11 years of laboratory programming, planning and design experience and has a diverse portfolio of laboratory projects that includes undergraduate and graduate teaching and research, corporate and pharmaceutical R&D, clinical, government, vivaria and biocontainment suites. ’08 WILLIAM DUÑGO (Civil Engineering) was named one of Airport Business’s Top 40 Under 40 for 2018. This list showcases top talent and leading thinkers in the aviation industry who are building success today and innovations for the future. Duñgo is a professional n j i t .e du


1950’s 1990’s

1960’s

engineer with 10 years of experience performing traffic impact analyses for major airport improvement programs. ’08 ERIC MACWAN (MBA in

Management of Technology) joined Reliant Funding as vice president of information technology. Previously, he has served as CIO of IT at Family Health Centers of San Diego, William Warren Group, Rutgers University and New York City Government.

2010’s

’12 DAVID THOMPSON (Chemical

Engineering) joined Diamond Chemical Company Inc. as project engineer. Prior to joining Diamond Chemical, Thompson worked for over five years increasing efficiency in the manufacture of urethanes, resins and other chemicals.

100

years

NEWARK C OLLEGE O F ENG INEERING

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

1940’s

1930’s

2000’s ’13 CAROL HONG (M.S. in both

Architecture and Infrastructure Planning) joined HOLT Architects as interior architect and project manager. Hong has 15 years of housing and commercial design and has spent her career working in New York City, San Francisco and Shanghai.

’14 JINGRAN ZHANG (M.S. in Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. ’17) joined Lewis College of Business as a tenure-track assistant professor of supply chain and business analytics in the division of management and health care administration. Zhang’s research focuses on the performance advantage of innovative operation systems for online retailing and warehousing using fast and intelligent supply chains. ’17 JAKE COSMILLO (Mechanical

Engineering) joined Systems West Engineers as a mechanical designer. He

1950’s

C L A S S

N O T E S

has a year of experience as a plumbing and fire protection designer in New York City and Vancouver, Washington.

IN MEMOR I A M Bernard Speckhart ’49 Frank Cummins ’56 Frederick Neff ’58 Arthur J. Katz ’59 John Salvador Jr. ’59 Oleg Moiseenko ’67 Richard Saxon ’69 David Skuba ’77 Jan Butrym ’07


C A L E N D A R

O F

E V E N T S

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NJIT SPRING ALUMNI EVENT SERIES

Check out the Highlander Athletics schedule at njithighlanders.com

Silicon Valley Meetup: Student-Alumni Networking at Dolby HQ March 21, 2019 San Francisco, CA 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

DC Metro Alumni: Embassy Series March 29, 2019 Austrian Embassy Washington, D.C. 7:30 p.m. - 10 p.m.

Annandale Alumni Meetup March 28, 2019 Beneduce Winery Annandale, NJ 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Speed Networking April 4, 2019 NJIT Campus 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

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Speaking of Careers at WeWork NYC April 9, 2019 New York, NY 5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m.

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I N

C O N C L U S I O N

S. R. Nandakumar and Bipin Rajendran have been developing brain-inspired computing systems that could be used for a wide range of big data applications.

NJIT RESEARCHERS AIM TO BUILD BRAIN-INSPIRED COMPUTING SYSTEMS

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wo NJIT researchers, working with collaborators from the IBM Research Zurich Laboratory and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, have demonstrated a novel synaptic architecture that could lead to a new class of information processing systems inspired by the brain. The findings are an important step toward building more energy-efficient computing systems that also are capable of learning and adaptation in the real world. They were published in a paper in the journal Nature Communications. The researchers, Bipin Rajendran, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, and S.R. Nandakumar, a graduate student in electrical engineering, have been developing brain-inspired computing systems that could be used for a wide range of big data applications. Over the past few years, deep learning algorithms have proven to be highly successful in solving complex cognitive tasks such as controlling self-driving cars and language understanding. At the heart of these algorithms are artificial neural networks — mathematical models of the neurons and synapses of the brain — that are fed huge amounts of data so that the synaptic strengths are autonomously adjusted to learn the intrinsic features and hidden correlations in these data streams. However, the implementation of these

brain-inspired algorithms on conventional computers is highly inefficient, consuming huge amounts of power and time. This has prompted engineers to search for new materials and devices to build specialpurpose computers that can incorporate the algorithms. Nanoscale memristive devices, electrical components whose conductivity depends approximately on prior signaling activity, can be used to represent the synaptic strength between the neurons in artificial neural networks. While memristive devices could potentially lead to faster and more powerefficient computing systems, they are also plagued by several reliability issues that are common to nanoscale devices. Their efficiency stems from their ability to be programmed in an analog manner to store multiple bits of information; however, their electrical conductivities vary in a nondeterministic and non-linear fashion. In the experiment, the team showed how multiple nanoscale memristive devices exhibiting these characteristics could nonetheless be configured to efficiently implement artificial intelligence algorithms such as deep learning. Prototype chips from IBM containing more than one million nanoscale phasechange memristive devices were used to implement a neural network for the detection of hidden patterns and correlations in time-varying signals. “In this work, we proposed and

experimentally demonstrated a scheme to obtain high learning efficiencies with nanoscale memristive devices for implementing learning algorithms,” Nandakumar says. “The central idea in our demonstration was to use several memristive devices in parallel to represent the strength of a synapse of a neural network, but only chose one of them to be updated at each step based on the neuronal activity.” Nandakumar, who joined NJIT in 2016, is a recipient of the prestigious IBM Ph.D. fellowship and has been working with the Memory & Cognitive Technologies group at IBM Research - Zurich on this problem for the past year. “The goal of our research is to build novel computing systems that are inspired by the architecture of the brain,” notes Rajendran, his research adviser at NJIT. “While there have been significant successes in the past decade in using machine learning algorithms for a wide variety of complex cognitive tasks, their use in mobile devices and sensors embedded in the real world requires new technological solutions with substantially lower energy and higher efficiency. While significant challenges remain, our team has now shown that nanoscale memristive devices, albeit being noisy and non-ideal, can be used for such applications in a straightforward manner.” n Author: Tracey L. Regan is an NJIT Magazine contributing writer.


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