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Academic Advising Center’s

First Year Advising Handbook


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10 Student Recreation Center 11 Northern Television Center 12 Barsema Alumni and Visitor Center 13 Chick Evans Field House 14 Graham & Gabel Halls 15 Campus Child Care Center 16 Gabel Hall

38 La Tourette Hall 39 Faraday Hall 40 Psychology—Computer Science Building Center for Southeast Asian Studies

25 Holmes Student Center

43 East Chiller Plant

26 Founders Memorial Library

44 Asian American Center

27 Academic Advising Center 28 NIU Parking Deck 29 Illinois ASBO / NIU Public Administration 30 Center for Black Studies 31 Women’s Resource Center 32 Campus Life Building 33 Adams Hall 34 Health Services

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Academic Advising Center For Appointments: 815-753-2573 aac@niu.edu www.aac.niu.edu

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45 Altgeld Hall 46 Lowden Hall 47 Montgomery Hall 48 Barsema Hall 49 Engineering Building 50 Anderson Hall 51 Wirtz Hall 52 Gilbert Hall 53 Still Gymnasium 54 Still Hall 55 Jack Arends Visual Arts Building 56 Music Building


Academic Advising Center’s

First Year Advising Handbook Nature of Advising..................................................... 3 The Advising Partnership.......................................... 4 Student Responsibility Checklist.............................. 5 University Requirements.......................................... 6 General Education Requirements............................. 7 Majors & Minors....................................................... 8 Developing Your First Semester Schedule............... 9 2014-2015 Advising Calendar................................. 10 Schedule Changes & Withdrawing......................... 11 Opportunities Provided by the AAC....................... 12 The Major Selection Process.................................. 13 Major Exploration Excercises............................ 14-16


The Academic Advising Center The AAC provides a variety of services to help students achieve their personal, academic, and career goals at NIU. We advise students as they develop meaningful academic plans compatible with their educational and life goals.

Our academic advising focus is on undecided—any college students, students seeking alternative majors, and students reassessing their current academic situation. Finally, we support the distinct nature of advising within the colleges and academic departments at NIU.

Meet the Staff

2

Michelle Pickett, Director

Colette Maher, Academic Advisor-Counselor

Steven Barleen, Associate Director

Beverly McCall, Academic Advisor-Counselor

Susana Das Neves, Academic Advisor-Counselor

Mazen Nagi, Academic Advisor

Cindy Carls, Secretary

Sharon Freeman, Secretary

Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook


Understanding the Nature of Advising

First Year Advising Handbook

Advising Objectives and Outcomes for First-Year Students

Welcome to Northern Illinois University and to the Academic Advising Center! We have prepared this packet of valuable information in order to give you: •

A better understanding of the role that academic advising plays in student success.

An introduction to the new academic and personal responsibilities you have accepted.

More knowledge about how the major selection process works.

We encourage you to: •

Read through the material.

Complete the exercises under “Things to Consider.”

Bring this folder to each of your advising meetings to stay organized and track your progress in completing university requirements.

AAC’s Administrative Services: •

Withdrawal from a course

Withdrawal from the university

Academic probation advisement

Third time course attempts

Concurrent registration approval

Overloads (semester course load over 18 hours)

Some Questions We Can Answer: •

How do I find a major?

Who can help me clarify my academic, career, and personal goals?

What are major and/or career options related to my interests, values, and goals?

What can I do with the major I have chosen?

What are the university’s general education requirements?

What are some introductory courses that would assist me in exploring possible majors or fields of study?

What is the difference between a B.A. and a B.S. degree?

What minors would complement my major?

What can I do to enhance my academic program?

How can I make adjustments to my schedule?

What are the implications of academic warning, probation, or dismissal?

Who do I contact if I have a question about an academic rule or regulation?

Where do I find specific campus resources I need?

Arrange advising meetings each semester prior to your MyNIU enrollment appointment to review course planning for the upcoming semester. Develop short and longrange personal, academic, and career goals. Make time to discuss this process with your advisor. Focus on completion of your Core Competency and Distributive Studies classes: strengthening your writing, math, and critical thinking skills. Use multiple resources to maximize your undergraduate experience (advisors, faculty, student clubs and organizations, community service, leadership opportunities, volunteering, etc.) Visit the Career Services Office: Learn about the ways you can explore interpersonal factors (interests, personality, values) related to your academic and career goals. Get to know your professors: it’s both a good way to find out what the different majors are really about and to begin building important collegial relationships. Know the degree requirements, responsibilities and university policies that apply to you.

Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook

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The Advising Partnership

A key aspect of academic advising is relationship building for student success. As a student with the Academic Advising Center, our goal is for you to develop a positive relationship with your advisor. The first step in developing this relationship is understanding each person’s role and responsibilities. The chart below outlines each parties role in developing a successful advising partnership. We look forward to working with you this year! Academic Advisor

Student

Parent

Monitor student progress and guide them toward academic success.

Responsible for learning and understanding.

Be available to support and encourage.

Help the student understand his or her responsibilities toward academic success.

Monitor his or her own academic progress.

Maintain regular contact.

Act as a liaison between the institution and the student.

Know the degree requirements of the college and major of interest.

Offer advice (as needed and when appropriate).

Act as an advocate for the student.

Communicate with the advisor regarding issues and/or concerns about academics or student life.

Encourage students to do things they can do for themselves.

Refer the student to appropriate institutional resources.

Attend classes.

Allow students to make mistakes in this safe environment.

Manage time for class preparation. Become familiar with university resources. Understand and adhere to university policies.

Adapted from Menezes, M. D. (2005). Advisors and parents: Together building stronger advising relationships. Retrieved from the NACADA Clearinghouse of Academic Advising Resources website.

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Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook


Your Student Responsibility Checklist I understand that it is my responsibility…

(1) To consult with my academic advisor when needed. My academic advisor is one of my primary resources and connections to Northern Illinois University. (2) To schedule and attend ALL mandatory advising meetings/workshops. If I do not complete ALL mandatory advising appointments/academic success meetings by the assigned deadline, I am subject to delayed registration and/or other penalties. • The Academic Advising Center requires advising for all students each semester. • The Academic Advising Center requires Academic Success Meetings for students whose cumulative GPA is below a 2.00 or retained on academic probation. (3) To meet with an academic advisor at least two times per semester. Your first meeting is for major exploration and academic progress checks. The second meeting is to plan courses for the next term. (4) To check my NIU e-mail account often before classes begin and on a regular basis once I am enrolled. I will periodically receive “Advising Alert” emails from the Academic Advising Center that provide important updates. (5) To know how to use the Undergraduate Catalog in order for me to understand all Northern Illinois University’s policies, procedures, and deadlines. I am also required to understand the material provided to me in the NIU Student Handbook. (6

To ensure full time status (minimum of 12 credit hours) to avoid jeopardizing my NIU Housing and/or Student Financial Aid responsibilities.

(7) To inform my academic advisor of all testing credit (i.e. AP/CLEP) and transfer credit (i.e. college credit from other institutions) during my academic advising session. I understand that I am required to have all official scores and final official high school and/or college transcripts sent to the NIU Admissions Office. (8) To ensure that I meet all NIU Graduation Requirements. I am responsible for monitoring the general education, major college, and major department degree requirements. I must also keep abreast of all major or university academic policy changes as they pertain to my academic career. I further understand that I may: •

Add and/or drop a class using MyNIU until the end of the first week of each semester. However, during the second week of the semester, I must meet with an academic advisor to drop a class from my schedule. If I choose to add a class during this time, I must meet with the specific college department for permission to add a class. Withdraw from a class during weeks 3-8 of the semester and will receive a grade of W. During weeks 9 through 12, I can withdraw from a class but will be subject to “academic jeopardy”. Academic jeopardy means that if I am failing my course at the time of withdrawal, I will earn a grade of F, which will negatively impact my GPA. [Please refer to the schedule changes and withdrawing section of the Academic Advising Center First Year Student Advising Handbook.]

If I choose to cancel my enrollment after I have registered for classes: (1) I must drop all of my courses through MyNIU by the Friday prior to the first day of classes. I also must notify the NIU Housing & Dining and Student Financial Aid offices, if applicable. (2) If classes have started, I must contact the Academic Advising Center to facilitate a university withdrawal. I must also notify the NIU Housing & Dining and Student Financial Aid offices, if applicable. If I do not withdraw appropriately and/or fail to contact the NIU Housing & Dining office, I risk accruing unnecessary financial obligations such as NIU tuition and housing bills.

Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook

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University Requirements

Understanding the first-year/first semester schedule includes understanding University Graduation Requirements and possible majors of interests. Most first-semester schedules will consist of courses within NIU Core Competency & Distributive Studies requirements.

A typical schedule can vary greatly between students given the following factors: Intended Major, Placement Evaluations and AP credits. As we work with students, many factors go into course planning and registration. We... • Identify appropriate general education courses that compliment your major(s) of interest. • Identify general education courses that assist in the major exploration process. • Identify and ensure your schedule meets University General Education requirements.

Basic Graduation Requirements 120 total semester hours

Semester hours of core competency requirements

12

(minimum requirement for baccalaureate degree)

29

Semester hours of distributive studies

79 Semester hours of electives and requirements for major (40 of these semester hours must be in 300/400 level courses)

Sample First Year Schedule First Semester Schedule

COURSE DEPT & NUMBER

Second Semester Schedule

Credit Hours

COMS 100 (Core Competency) ENGL 103 (Core Competency) MATH 110* General Education Course General Education Course UNIV 101 (Elective) Total credit hours

3 3 3 3 3 1 16

COURSE DEPT & NUMBER

Credit Hours

ENGL 104 (Core Competency) MATH 211* (Core Competency) General Education Course General Education Course CAHC 211 (Elective) Total credit hours

* A student’s math choice is based on placement test results and academic interests. Your academic advisor will help you choose the right math course.

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Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook

3 3 3 3 3 15


General Education Requirements

29-41 Credit Hours

Core Competency Requirements

*ENG 105 may be taken in lieu of ENGL 103 and 104 (placement test through NIU Testing Services required for ENGL 105). See catalog for other exceptions.

Class Hours/Grade COMS 100 ENGL 103*

See “Core Competency Requirements” in the catalog for complete math requirements. In most cases your major determines the appropriate math course.

ENGL 104* Appropriate MATH† MATH 101 or “C” in MATH 155, 201‡, 206, 210, 211, 229, (or MATH 110 + STAT 208)

MATH 201 is restricted to elementary education, special education, early childhood and child development majors.

Distributive Studies (29 Semester Hours)

A variety of courses must be taken in each the four categories below. HUMANITIES & THE ARTS

(9-12 semester hours) At least 1 course must be taken in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and at least one course must be taken in the College of Visual and Performing Arts. No more than 6 hours in any one department.

SCIENCES & MATHEMATICS

(7-11 semester hours) Courses must be in at least 2 but no more than 3 departments.

Class Hours/Grade

Class Hours/Grade

(LA&S)

(V&PA)

HUMANITIES & THE ARTS COURSE CHOICES EDU: EPFE 321, EPFE 410 LA&S: ANTH 102; COMS 220, 230, 240, 356, 410; ENGL 110, 115, 116, 310, 315; FLCL 271; FLFR 371; FLIT 272; FLRU 261; HIST 110, 111, 112, 140, 141, 170, 171, 260, 261, 377; PHIL 101, 105, 231; POLS 251 V&PA: ARTH 282, 292, 294, 310, 320, 330, 340, 350, 370, 380, MUHL 220; TH-D 222; THEA 203

SOCIAL SCIENCES

(6-9 semester hours) No more than 6 hours in 1 department.

Class Hours/Grade

SOCIAL SCIENCES COURSE CHOICES ANTH 120, 210, 220, 230; ECON 160, 260, 261; EPFE 355; FCNS 230; GEOG 202, 204, 253; HIST 381,382; POLS 100, 150, 220, 260, 285; PSPA 220X; PSYC 102, 225; SOCI 170, 250, 260, 270

SCIENCES & MATHEMATICS COURSE CHOICES ANTH 240; BIOS 103, 105, 106, 107, 109; CHEM 100, 110, 111, 210, 211, 212, 213; CSCI 205; ELE 100; FCNS 201; GEOG 101, 102, 105, 106; GEOL 103, 104, 105, 120, 121; ISYE 100; MATH 229; PHIL 205, PHYS 150, 150A, 162, 180, 181, 210, 211, 253, 273; STAT 208

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (3-6 semester hours)

Class Hours/Grade

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES COURSE CHOICES AHRS 200; ANTH 101; ARTH 360; BIOS 101; BKST 200, 211, 219; CLCE 100; EPFE 201, 400; FCNS 207, 280, 406; HIST 323; IDSP 225; ILAS 100, 261; KNPE 100, 111; MEE 101; PHHE 201, 206, 295; PSYC 245; SEAS 225; TECH 245, 294; WOMS 230, 235

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For descriptions and requirements of programs of study refer to the 2014/2015 Undergraduate Catalog

Majors of Undergraduate Study

DIRECTIONS:  Check programs you want to know more about & cross out programs that you know you are not interested in.

College of Business

 Accountancy (B.S.)  Business Administration (B.S.)  Finance (B.S.)  Management (B.S.)  Marketing (B.S.)  Operations Management and Information Systems (B.S.)

College of Education

 Athletic Training (B.S.)  Early Childhood Studies (B.S.)  Elementary Education (B.S.Ed.)  Kinesiology (B.S.)  Physical Education (B.S.Ed.)  Special Education (B.S.Ed.)

College of Engineering & Engineering Technology  Electrical Engineering (B.S.)  Industrial and Systems Engineering (B.S.)  Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)

 Technology (B.S.)

College of Health & Human Sciences

 Communicative Disorders (B.S.)  Early Childhood Studies (B.S.)  Family and Child Studies (B.S.)  Health Education (B.S.Ed.)  Health Sciences (B.S.)  Medical Laboratory Sciences (B.S.)  Nursing (B.S.)  Nutrition, Dietetics, and Hospitality Administration (B.S.)  Public Health (B.S.)  Textiles, Apparel, and Merchandising (B.S.)

College of Liberal Arts & Sciences  Anthropology (B.A. & B.S.)  Biological Sciences (B.S.)  Chemistry (B.S.)

 Communication Studies  Community Leadership and Civic Engagement (B.A. & B.S.)  Computer Science (B.S.)  Economics (B.A. & B.S.)  English (B.A.)  Environmental Studies (B.A. & B.S.)

 French (B.A.)  Geography (B.A. & B.S.)  Geology and Environmental Geosciences (B.S.)  German (B.A.)  History (B.A. & B.S.)  Journalism (B.A. & B.S.)  Mathematical Sciences (B.S.)  Meteorology (B.S.)  Philosophy (B.A. & B.S.)  Physics (B.S.)  Political Science (B.A. & B.S.)  Psychology (B.A. & B.S.)  Sociology (B.A. & B.S.)  Spanish (B.A.)

College of Visual & Performing Arts  Art (B.A.)

 Art and Design Education (B.S.Ed.)

 Art History (B.A.)  Music (B.A. or B.M.)  Studio Art (B.F.A.)  Theatre Arts (B.F.A.)  Theatre Studies (B.A.)

Pre-professional Studies •

Pre-dentistry

Pre-law

Pre-medicine

Pre-optometry

Pre-pharmacy

Pre-veterinary medicine

Minors and Certificates of Undergraduate Study College of Business

Minors Business Administration Business Innovation & Entrepreneurship Finance Marketing Social Entrepreneurship

Certificates of Study Business Analytics Using SAP Software Finance Information Systems Interactive Marketing Professional Selling Service Management Social Entrepreneurship

College of Education

Minors Coaching Dance Education Kinesiology & Physical Education Certificates of Study Foundations of Education Studies Middle School Literacy Philosophy of Education Professional Teaching Practices

College of Engineering & Engineering Technology Minors Biomedical Engineering Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering Technology 8

Energy Technology Environmental Management Systems Manufacturing Engineering Technology Mechanical Engineering Productivity Safety Sustainable Engineering

Certificates of Study Lean Six Sigma Logistics Nanotechnology

College of Health & Human Sciences

Minors Communicative Disorders Deafness Rehabilitation Family & Child Studies General Minor in FCNS Gerontology Health Education Military Sciences Nutrition, Dietetics, & Hospitality Administration Public Health Textiles, Apparel, & Merchandising Certificates of Study Illinois Director Credential Certificate—Level 2 Infant Toddler Credential Certificate—Level 5 Gerontology

Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook

College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Minors Actuarial Sciences Anthropology Applied Probability & Statistics Biological Sciences Black Studies Chemistry Chinese Studies Classical Studies Cognitive Studies Communication Studies Community Leadership & Civic Engagement Comparative Literature Computer Science Economics Elementary Mathematics Education English Environmental Studies French Geography Geology & Environmental Geosciences German Global Studies History Italian Japanese Studies Journalism Latino/Latin American Studies Linguistics Mathematical Sciences Philosophy

Physics Political Science Professional Communication Psychology Public Administration Russian Sociology Southeast Asian Studies Spanish Urban Studies Women’s Studies

Certificates of Study Actuarial Sciences Asian American Studies Civic Engagement Creative Writing Criminology Geographic Information Systems Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Studies Mobile Programming Public Sector Leadership Religious Studies Women & Gender Studies Interdisciplinary Concentration Medieval Studies

College of Visual & Performing Arts

Minors Art Art History Dance Performance Theatre Studies


Developing Your First Semester Schedule

Keep in mind that a typical first-year/first-semester schedule can look considerably different depending upon the student & their major. As a broad guideline, most students enroll in between 13 and 16 credit hours. (TIP: 12 credit hours is full-time status).

The most important factor to remember as you plan your first term will be your GPA (grade point average). Your cumulative GPA may determine whether you can pursue a particular major. Many programs at NIU are LIMITED ADMISSION with GPA being the key factor to admission in those programs. As you prepare to register for your first semester, we strongly recommend that you ask yourself some key questions: 1.

Do you have any pending Advanced Placement (AP) and/or College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) Credit?

2.

Do you have any transfer credit or are you enrolled in any classes this summer at a community college?

3. What NIU Placement Evaluations have you taken? (Core Competency Requirements, Sciences, and Foreign Languages). 4.

Are you considering a particular major or do you have a few in mind?

Registration Tips ✔

Meet with an advisor BEFORE registering.

• Not just today — but each & every semester. ✔

Remember to avoid time conflicts.

Most classes do not meet each day of the week.

Classes that meet twice per week are typically longer than those that meet three times per week.

Most Math classes require a “recitation” outside of the lecture course time.

Be aware of the location and time of your classes. Give yourself ample time to travel to/from each academic building.

Become familiar with MyNIU.

Other Courses to Consider

UNIV 101 (University Experience) and UNIV 201 (The Transfer Experience) provide an invaluable introduction to Northern Illinois University. These elective, 1-credit, 12-week courses are designed to help new students adjust to NIU and develop the skills necessary to succeed in college and beyond. CAHC 211 is an undergraduate course which presents career development and career decision making as lifelong processes. Career Planning focuses on the relationship of individuals to their work. Throughout the course, students are provided hands on opportunities to practice decision making and application of learned skills to personal, academic, and career planning.

Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook

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2014-2015 Advising Calendar

Other important academic dates and deadlines can be found on the NIU Registration and Records website at www.reg.niu.edu/regrec/dates

Date

Description

Fall 2014 Aug 25

Fall 2014 Semester begins.

Aug 31

Last day for undergraduates to add or drop a first-half-semester or full-semester course via self-service in MyNIU.

Sept 1

NIU Closed – Labor Day

Sept 5

Last day for undergraduates to add a first-half-semester or full-semester course with approval of course department. Last day for undergraduates to drop a first-half-semester or full-semester course with approval of major department. Students must meet with their advisor to drop a class.

Sept 23

Exploring Majors Fair, HSC Ballroom, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Sept 30 to Oct 1

MidSemester Check Tuesday, September 30, 4-6 pm (Barsema Alumni & Visitors Center) Wednesday, October 1, 6-8 pm (Barsema Alumni & Visitors Center)

Early to mid-Oct

Advising period for major exploration. Make an advising appointment to get acquainted with your academic advisor and explore majors. This is a good time to review your New Student Profile with your advisor.

Oct 17

Last day for an undergraduate to withdraw from a full-semester course or from the university. Students must meet with their advisor to request a course or university withdrawal.

Mid-Oct to mid-Nov

Advising period for Spring 2015 registration. At this meeting we will focus on a final selection of appropriate course options for the coming semester. This appointment is a requirement for all Academic Advising Center students; make it early.

Early to mid-Nov

Registration Begins: Spring 2015. Students will be assigned registration appointments mid-November 2014. Registration appointments are assigned based on the number of cumulative hours. Students must check MyNIU for their appointment day and time. Students may register on or after the assigned appointment day and time as long as there are not any holds assigned to their record.

Nov 21

Last day to change or declare a major to be effective for the fall semester.

Nov 26-30

Thanksgiving Break

Dec 8-13

Fall 2014 Finals Week

Spring 2015

10

Jan 12

Spring 2015 Semester begins.

Jan 18

Last day to add or drop a first-half-semester or full-semester course via self-service in MyNIU.

Jan 19

NIU Closed—Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday

Jan 23

Last day for undergraduates to add a first-half-semester or full-semester course with approval of course department. Last day for undergraduates to drop a first-half-semester or full-semester course with approval of major department. Students must meet with their advisor to drop a class.

Early to mid-Feb

Advising period for major exploration and academic progress checks.

March 6

Last day to withdraw from a full-semester course or from the university. Students must meet with their advisor to request a course or university withdrawal.

March 8-15

Spring Break

Mid-March to early April

Advising period for Summer/Fall 2015 registration. This meeting is an opportunity to review and follow up on your progress and/or planning so far during your first year.

Early to mid-April

Registration Begins: Summer/Fall 2015. Students will be assigned registration appointments mid-March 2015. Registration appointments are assigned based on the number of cumulative hours. Students must check MyNIU for their appointment day and time. Students may register on or after the assigned appointment day and time as long as there are not any holds assigned to their record.

April 17

Last day to change or declare a major to be effective for the spring semester.

May 1

Reading Day

May 2-8

Spring 2015 Finals Week

Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook


Understanding the Withdrawal Process

Advising Alert!

Consider using a course withdrawal if you are experiencing significant academic difficulties that will impact your GPA! Talk to an academic advisor BEFORE the withdrawal deadline each semester to see if a course withdrawal would be in your best interest.

Students needing to withdraw from a course or the University MUST follow official University Policy: www.niu.edu/withdrawals 1. All course & university withdrawals MUST BE INITIATED with your College Advising Office or the Academic Advising Center if your major is Undecided— Any College.

All 16 week/full semester course withdrawals & university withdrawals must be completed by 4:00 pm on the Friday of the end of the 8th week term. If you are in an eight week half session course the deadline dates are earlier!

2. A student can withdraw from a course ONLY if requested up to the end of the eighth week of the term for a full session course or the fourth week for a half-semester course. Students are limited in the number of semester hours from which they can withdraw. Students with fewer than 7 transfer hours are allowed to withdraw from a total of 17 semester hours during the pursuit of the baccalaureate degree. A student may withdraw from a course after the established deadlines only in exceptional cases (medical reasons, military reasons, or because of hardship) when supported by acceptable evidence. Approval of a course withdrawal after the deadline may be granted only by the college office of the student’s major (major college office), or by the Advising Center if has no college affiliation.

Academic Jeopardy refers to the current grade the student has earned at the time in which the withdrawal has been requested & that letter grade will impact GPA.

If such approval is given, academic jeopardy will be enforced: • W will be recorded only if the instructor indicates the student was passing the course at the time in which the withdrawal was requested. (GPA not impacted.)

Transfer plus Pre-enrollment NIU Hours

• grade of F will be recorded if the instructor indicates the student was not passing at the time in which the withdrawal was requested. (GPA is impacted!)

1-6 7-15 16-30 31-45 46 or more

It is the student’s responsibility to initiate withdrawals PRIOR to set deadline dates.

Maximum Withdrawal Hours

Failure to know deadline dates is not an “exceptional case.” Thoroughly read the Academic Regulations section of the Undergraduate Catalog.

17 15 12 9 6

Student considering withdrawals should consult the webpage: www.niu.edu/withdrawals.

Schedule Changes

Schedule Change Process for 16-week courses (full-semester) — Undergraduate Students Action

From First Week…

Steps

Dropping ALL Courses

Prior to the first day of class Week 1 Week 2 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 through end of Week 8 Week 1 through Week 8 Week 9 through Week 12 (with academic jeopardy)

Self-Service—MyNIU

Adding a Course Dropping a Course Withdrawing from a Course Withdrawing from the University

Self-Service—MyNIU Contact Department of Course Self-Service—MyNIU Contact College Advising Office / Academic Advising Center Contact College Advising Office / Academic Advising Center Contact College Advising Office / Academic Advising Center Contact College Advising Office / Academic Advising Center

Schedule Change Process for 8-week sessions (first and last half semester) — Undergraduate Students Action

From First Week…

Steps

Dropping ALL Courses

Prior to the first day of semester Week 1 of session Week 1 of session Week 2 of session

Self-Service—MyNIU

Adding 8-week course Dropping 8-week course Dropping first half 8-week course Withdrawing from first half course Withdrawing from last half course Withdrawing from the University Withdrawing from the University

Self-Service—MyNIU Self-Service—MyNIU Contact major college or Academic Advising Center

Week 3 through end Contact major college or Academic Advising Center of Week 4 of session Week 2 through end Contact major college or Academic Advising Center of Week 4 of session Week 1 through end Contact major college or Academic Advising Center of Week 4 of session Week 5 through end of Week 6 Contact major college or Academic Advising Center of session (with academic jeopardy) Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook

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Opportunities Provided by the Academic Advising Center The Exploring Majors House is located on the second floor of Neptune West, which is conveniently located in the center of campus close to the majority of classrooms.

The Exploring Majors House is a residential living-learning community. As a resident you will have the opportunity to take part in experiences that provide opportunities to learn about a variety of careers and majors while having access to both academic and social programming events. The Exploring Majors House is open to freshmen who have not declared a major as well as students interested in exploring academic options. We are an excellent housing option for students who have a tentative idea about their major, students who have several different interests they want to explore, and students who don’t even know where to begin. The Exploring Majors Fair is designed for all students who want to find out more about majors, minors, and “other academic opportunities!” They have the opportunity to speak with faculty and staff from each of NIU’s academic units in a centralized location. Additionally, the program benefits departments by providing an opportunity to showcase particular majors, minors and programs to wide array of NIU students. This fall the Exploring Majors Fair is from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on September 23, 2014 in the Duke Ellington Ballroom in the Holmes Student Center. Midsemester Check is a workshop is designed as a MIDSEMESTER CHECK for the fall semester to help students self-evaluate their academic progress while giving tips on how to improve. This workshop will take place on two evenings to give students flexibility in attending. The program will be held on Tuesday, September 30 from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. and Wednesday, October 1 from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Barsema Alumni and Visitors Center.

Themed-Learning Communities (TLC) consists of two or three courses taken in conjunction in order to examine a common theme across disciplines. Faculty members create assignments that require students to draw on concepts from the other TLC classes for an enhanced, integrative learning experience. The AAC will be offering three TLCs this fall: Academic Opportunities TLC (for incoming freshmen)

(This TLC is for students who live in the Exploring Majors House) PSYC 102: Introduction to Psychology Section: T801 Instructor: Douglas Wallace Tu, Th 3:30-4:45 p.m. Psyc-Computer Science Building 156 UNIV 101: University Experience Section: T802 Instructor: Steven Barleen M, W 2:00-3:15 p.m. DuSable 176 For more information, please contact Steven Barleen at 815-753-2536 or sbarleen@niu.edu. Major Exploration TLC (for incoming freshmen) SOCI 170: Introduction to Sociology Section: T804 Instructor: TBA M, W 2:00-3:15 p.m. COMS 100: Fundamentals of Oral Communications Section: T805 Instructor: Madelyn Anderson MW 12:00-1:15 p.m., DuSable Hall 402 UNIV 101: University Experience Section: T806 Instructor: Colette Maher M, W 11:00 a.m.-11:50 a.m. Location: TBA For more information, please contact Colette Maher at 815-7535960 or cmaher@niu.edu. Career Exploration TLC (For continuing and incoming transfer students) CAHC 211: Career Exploration Section: T005 Instructor: TBA M, W 2:00-3:15 p.m., Gable Hall 333 SOCI 170: Introduction to Sociology Section: T006 Instructor: Jack King M, W 3:30-4:45 p.m., DuSable 461 For more information, please contact Michelle Pickett at 815-753-2533 or mpickett@niu.edu.

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Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook


How does the Major Selection Process Work?

The selection of the right major for you is a continuous, decision-making process. The best way to ensure the right choice is to do your homework. This process involves exploring in a number of different ways. First, be aware of all the major choices available to you here at NIU. (See the complete listing of colleges and majors/minors on page 8). Some important ways of exploring and confirming your choice may include: ✔ Using tools and information on the internet Academic Advising Center’s Webpage (www.aac.niu.edu) Four Year Degree Paths Webpage (www.niu.edu/osas/degreepaths) Career Services Webpage (www.niu.edu/careerservices) NIU Major Weblinks Career Job Fairs & Internship Fairs Career Counseling NIU’s Academic Colleges Webpage (www.niu.edu/academics) Occupational Outlook Handbook Webpage (www.bls.gov/oco) ✔ Attending the Exploring Majors Fair & Mid-Semester Check. ✔ Talking with your professors, especially in courses you enjoy. ✔ Talking with other students in majors you are considering. ✔ Talking with individuals in careers that interest you. Seek out Job Shadowing opportunities Interview extended family members on their career paths ✔ Working a part-time job related to a possible career goal. ✔ Volunteering in activities and organizations related to an area of interest. ✔ Living in the Exploring Majors House. ✔ Consider enrolling in a Themed Learning Community (TLC) to help assist with the major exploration process. See page 12 for TLCs offered from the Academic Advising Center.

Complete the exercise on the following pages.

Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook

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Things to Consider

Some students have particular skills or interests that they don’t automatically connect to specific majors/careers:

Some students have majors in mind that they want to explore:

“I am thinking about psychology or family and child studies.” “I am considering communication studies or marketing.”

Some students have careers in mind but don’t know what majors get them there:

“I really like sports/athletics.”

“I know that I want to be a high school counselor.”

“I want to work with people who have disabilities.”

“I’m really interested in becoming a lawyer.”

“I’m good at working with my hands.”

“I want to own my own business.”

“I want to learn more about physics or electrical engineering.” “I am looking at elementary or health education.”

Majors & Minors that I have considered or that others have suggested are:

Complete these sentences: People say I am good at…

If I had a million dollars, I would…

I am passionate about…

If I started a business or organization to solve a need or provide a service, it would be…

When choosing a major, ask yourself…

What will be the primary purpose of the major?

What kinds of skills will the major emphasize?

What careers might this major lead to in the future?

Is this a major field in which I think I can perform well?

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Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook


Exploratory Questionnaire

Yes

No

I think I might enjoy studying:

Yes No

I think I might enjoy doing the following types of work:

17.

providing assistance or services to help people

18.

mechanical, electrical, or computer technologies

19.

work with numbers or data

20.

criminal or legal work

21.

construction, facilities, or architecture

22.

creative arts or culinary arts

23.

managing or directing

24.

medicine, nursing, or health care

25.

teaching or education

26.

politics or advocating

27.

community services

28.

writing

29.

organization or planning

1.

writing or literature

2.

math

3.

science

4.

technology or computers

5.

art, design, or architecture

6.

music or performing arts

7.

business

8.

medical or health specialties

9.

teaching

10.

politics, law, or criminal justice

11.

philosophy, history, or classics

12.

languages or cultures

13.

communication

14.

social sciences and social service (psychology, sociology, etc.)

15.

engineering

30.

counseling

16.

construction or building trades

31.

designing systems or equipment

32. The following statement most represents what I’m thinking about CAREERS after college: A. B. C. D.

I’m very decided about what I would like to do for a career after college. I am interested in one career, but want to check out my other options as well. I am interested in multiple careers, but am having trouble choosing between them. I know exactly what I would like to do as a career, but haven’t identified a major yet.

33. The following statement most represents what I’m thinking about MAJORS of study: A. B. C. D.

I’m very undecided about what I would like to study. I am interested in one major, but want to check out my other options as well. I am interested in multiple majors, but am having trouble choosing between them. I know exactly what I would like to study, but have not yet been admitted to this program.

If you marked something other than “A” on questions 32 and 33, then please list any option(s) you are considering for majors or careers:

Adapted from the Center for Exploratory Studies and McMicken College of Arts & Sciences, University of Cincinnati

Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook

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Creating a “Short List”

Once you have spent some time reviewing the possible majors/minors, you are now in a much better position to identify some majors of interest and eliminate others. Knowing what you will not enjoy is just as important as knowing what you will enjoy! Majors/Minors MORE INFORMATION

Majors/Minors ELIMINATE

Academic Advising Center For Appointments: 815-753-2573 aac@niu.edu www.aac.niu.edu

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Academic Advising Center’s First Year Advising Handbook

Northern Illinois University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. Printed by authority of the State of Illinois. www.niu.edu F140 5/14

Majors/Minors VERY INTERESTED


The First Year Advising Handbook is a packet of valuable information in order to give you a better understanding of the role that academic advising plays in student success, an introduction to the new academic and personal responsibilities you have accepted, and more knowledge about how the major selection process works.

Academic Advising Center Northern Illinois University | DeKalb, Illinois 60115 | For Appointments: 815-753-2573 | aac@niu.edu

www.aac.niu.edu

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