Issuu on Google+

Auction Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6pm

Important Irish Art Including Paintings From The Independent News and Media Art Collection


2


Important Irish Art AUCTION

Wednesday 26 th September 2012 at 6.00pm

VENUE

Adam’s Salerooms 26 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. Ireland

Viewing Highlights

September 12th - 16th

Full Sale Viewing

September 23rd - 26th

At The Ava Gallery, Clandeboye Estate, Bangor, Co. Down BT19 IRN Wednesday 12th - Saturday 15th 11.00am - 5.00pm Special Sunday opening 16th 2.00pm - 5.00pm At Adam’s, 26 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. Sunday 23rd 2.00pm - 5.00pm Monday 24th -Wednesday 26th 10.00am - 5.00pm


4


Specialists for this auction

David Britton BBS ACA

James O’Halloran BA FSCSI

Stuart Cole MSCSI

Managing Director j.ohalloran@adams.ie

Director s.cole@adams.ie

Eamon O’Connor BA

Nick Nicholson Consultant n.nicholson@adams.ie

Kieran O’Boyle BA Hdip ASCSI

Director e.oconnor@adams.ie

Caroline Kevany BA

Abigail Bernon BA

Karen Regan BA

Brian Coyle FSCSI FRICS Chairman

Fine Art Department abigail@adams.ie

Director d.britton@adams.ie

MRICS

Fine Art Department k.oboyle@adams.ie

Fine Art Department Karen@adams.ie

Est 1887

Fine Art Department caroline@adams.ie

FRICS

at Clandeboye

Est 1887

26 St. Stephen’s Green , Dublin 2. Tel +353 1 6760261 Fax +353 1 6624725 info@adams.ie www.adams.ie

The AVA Gallery Clandeboye Estate Bangor, Co. Down BT19 IRN (T) +44 (0)28 91852263 email: info@adams.ie

Please note Clandeboye open by appointment only outside exhibition times


IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR PURCHASERS 1.

Estimates and Reserves

2.

Artists Resale Rights (Droit de Suite) is NOT payable by purchasers

Estimates are shown below each lot in this sale. All amounts shown are in Euro. The figures shown are provided merely as a guide to prospective purchasers. They are approximate prices which are expected, are not definitive and are subject to revision. Reserves, if any, will not be any higher than the lower estimate.

3.

Paddle Bidding (In Person)

All intending purchasers must register for a paddle number before the auction. Please allow time for registration, we recommend reading “Buying at Adam's” for first time buyers available on our web site www.adams.ie. Please be aware that photographic identification by way of passport or driving licence will be required for new registrants together with a secure valid credit card. This is for security purposes only. Potential purchasers are recommended to register on viewing days.

4.

Buyer's Premium, Payment & Delivery

5.

VAT Regulations

All lots are sold within the Auctioneers VAT margin scheme unless advised to the contrary. Revenue Regulations require that the buyer's premium must be invoiced at a rate which is inclusive of VAT. This is not recoverable by any VAT registered buyer. The VAT on buyer's premium may be zero rated for lots exported outside of the EU. This facility is available to non-residents and has strict guidelines in re tion to availing of this scheme. Please contact a member of the accounts department to enquire further.

6.

Absentee/Telephone Bidding

Buyer's premium on purchases is charged at the rate of 20% (excl. of VAT). Delivery takes place Thursday 27th September 2012, from 10.00am - 5.00pm. Uncollected lots will be subject to storage and handling charges unless specific arrangements have been made with the department. It important to make contact with us in this regard to avoid any unnecessary charges. Payment Terms: Strictly cash, bankers draft or cheque vouched to the satisfaction of the Auctioneers prior to sale. Purchasers wishing to pay by CREDIT card may do so, however, it should be noted that such payments will be subject to an administrative fee of 1.5% on the invoice total. American Express is subject to a charge of 3.65% on the invoice total. DEBIT & LASER card payments are NOT subject to an administration fee, however LASER card payments are subject to daily limits as determined by your bank. All funds must clear our bank before collection & delivery. Bank transfer Details are available upon request. Please contact our accounts department prior to sale with your payment queries or by e-mail: accounts@adams.ie

We are happy to execute absentee or written bids for bidders who are unable to attend and can arrange for bidding to be conducted by telephone. Bid forms are available from our web site. Bidding by telephone may be booked on lots with a minimum estimate of €500. Early booking is advisable as availability of lines cannot be guaran teed.

7. Acknowledgments We would like to acknowledge with thanks the assistance of Dr S. B. Kennedy, Dr Éimear O Connor HRHA, Claudia Kinmonth, Dr Roy Johnston, Prof. Niamh

8

O’Sullivan and Dr Róisín Kennedy whose help and research were invaluable in compiling many of the catalogue enteries.

Condition Reports The property is sold "as is" therefore imperfections/defects are not stated in the catalogue description. It is up to the intending purchaser to satisfy themselves as to the condition of a lot(s) before bidding. Condition reports may be requested in advance of sale subject to our terms of business. The eport is an expression of opinion only and must not be treated as a statement of fact.

9. All lots are being sold under the Conditions of Sale as printed in the sale catalogue and on display in the salerooms or via our web site www.adams.ie


7

The Following eleven paintings were bought by the current owner in the 1970’s/Early 1980’s

1

Arthur Armstrong RHA (1924-1996)

Horizons

Oil on board 20 x 25cm (8 x 9¾”) Signed Provenance: “Arthur Armstrong Exhibition” The David Hendriks Gallery, Dublin October 1973, Catalogue No. 29, where purchased €400 - 600

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


8

2

Eric Patton RHA (1925 - 2004)

Coastline

Oil on board 36 x 45.6cm (14 x 18”) Signed, also signed, inscribed and dated 1964 verso Provenance: Ritchie Hendriks Gallery Dublin, where purchased in December 1964 €300 - 400

3

Maurice MacGonigal PRHA (1900-1979)

Rainy Day, Dingle Peninsula

Ink and watercolour 24 x 37cm (9½ x 14½”) Signed and dated 1973 Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin (label verso) €350 - 450


9

4

Camille Souter HRHA (b.1929)

The Canal Still Flows Beautiful near Ballyfermot Oil on paper 48 x 38cm (19 x 15”) Signed and dated 1970

Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin (label verso) €6,000 - 10,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


10

5

Tom Carr HRHA HRUA (1909-1999)

Dover Front (1937)

Watercolour 24 x 35 cm (9½ x 13¾”) Provenance: The Tom Caldwell Gallery, “Tom Carr Exhibition”, May 1980, Catalogue No. 29 where purchased €300 -400

6

Tom Carr HRHA HRUA (1909-1999)

Winter Landscape

Watercolour 37 x 56cm (14½ x 22”) Signed €500 - 700


11

7

Tom Carr HRHA HRUA (1909-1999)

Dover Cliffs (1938)

Watercolour 24.5 x 34cm (9¾ x 13½”) Signed and dated (19)’38 Provenance: The Tom Caldwell Gallery, “Tom Carr Exhibition”, May 1980,Catalogue No. 15 where purchased €500 - 700

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


12

8

Arthur Armstrong RHA (1924-1996)

Field Patterns

Lithograph 36 x 27cm (14¼ x 10¾”) Signed and numbered 1/10 Provenance: The David Hendriks Gallery, Dublin January 1972 awhere purchased €250 - 350

9

Anne Yeats RHA (1919-2001)

Talk Between Two

Oil on board 28 x 18cm (11 x 7¼”) Signed Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin, where purchased €300 - 500


13

10

Jack P. Hanlon RHA (1913 - 1968)

The Crib

Watercolour 12 x 15cm (4¾ x 6”) Signed and inscribed “rough for Christmas card design” on margin, under mount. Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin (label verso) €250 - 300

11

George Campbell RHA (1917-1974)

Couple with cat

Ink on paper 29 x 18cm (11½ x 7¼”) Signed €250 - 300

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


14

12

George Campbell RHA (1917-1979)

Memory of Toldeo

Pastel, 28 x 43cm (11 x 17”) Signed. Inscribed ‘Toledo’ and priced at 10,500 pesetas verso €800 - 1200

13

George Campbell RHA (1917-1979)

Roof Tops

Pastel on paper, 37 x 28cm (14.5 x 11”) Signed €600 - 800


15

14

George Campbell RHA (1917-1979)

Still Life by Window

Oil on board, 41.5 x 54cm (16.3 x 21”) Signed €2,000 - 4,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


16

15

Arthur Campbell (1909-1994)

Huband Bridge, on the canal, Dublin Watercolour, 37.4 x 26cm (14.7 x 10.25”) Signed €600 - 1000

16

George Campbell RHA (1917-1979)

Donegal Landscape

Watercolour, 11.5 x 16cm (4.5 x 6.3”) Signed €300 - 400


17

17

Gerard Dillon RHA RUA (1916-1971)

Cow and Hen, Connemara

Watercolour, 24 x 36cm (9.5 x 14.25”) Signed Provenance: Given by the artist’s sister to the present owner, circa 1975 Exhibited: Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Dublin, “Gerard Dillon Retrospective”, 1973, Cat. No. 88 €1,500 - 2,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


18

18

Gerard Dillon RHA RUA (1916-1971)

Figures in a Currach, with a Cottage on the Shore Ink and watercolour, 6.5 x 8.5cm (2.5 x 3.5”) Signed with initials €300 - 500

19

Gerard Dillon RHA RUA (1916-1971)

Christmas Card with Figure in a West of Ireland Landscape

Linocut, 10.5 x 13.5cm (4.2 x 5.5”) Signed. Personal Christmas greeting inscribed inside €400 - 600


19

20

Gerard Dillon RHA RUA (1916-1971)

Cottages and Boulders

Watercolour, 27 x 36cm (10½ x 14½”) Signed Provenance: The Dawson Gallery where purchased by the current owner €3,000 - 5,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


20

21

Gerard Dillon RHA RUA (1916-1971)

Harvest

Mixed media on paper, 27 x 38cm (10.5 x 15”) Signed €400 - 600

209

An artist’s collection of literature and reference books, many signed by Gerard Dillon €200 - 300


21 24

Seán Keating PRHA (1889-1978)

The Tipperary Hurler

Pencil and charcoal on card, 51 x 34.2cm (20 x 13½”) Signed and inscribed with title This is a study for the iconic work “The Tipperary Hurler” which is in the Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane collection and is currently on exhibition at “Seán Keating: Contemporary Contexts” at The Crawford Gallery, Cork which runs until 27th October. Interestingly it is an amalgam of two Tipperary men, one being Hayes a star hurler of the super successful Tipperary team in the 1920’s and Ben O’Hickey who looked very like him and was a student at the Metropolitan School of Art. Keating attended Croke Park in 1925 where according to the Hayes family he sketched John Joe, the man from Ballerk, as he was coming off the field. Keating was involved in producing his series for “The Playboy of the Western World” at this time so did not return to those sketches for several years. In the meantime O’Hickey had joined the school and he was uncannily like Hayes even down to the mop of strong dark hair. O’Hickey had been a founder member of the Bansha Branch of the IRA and had served time in prison in England. He was also one of the subjects in another of Keating’s iconic works “The Race of the Gael”. “The Tipperary Hurler” is symbolic of the new Irish Free State and is one of the few depictions of our national sport in art at this time. Our thanks to Dr Éimear O’Connor for her help and research which were invaluable in cataloguing this lot. €1,000 - 2,000

25

Seán Keating PRHA (1889-1978)

Study for “Portrait of Father Michael O’Flanagan” (1936) Pencil and charcoal on card, 45 x 38cm (17.7 x 14.9”) Signed

This is a study for the “Portrait of Father Michael O’ Flanagan “ which was exhibited at the RHA in 1936 and is in the collection of The National Museum of Ireland.It is currently included in the exhibition “Seán Keating : Contemporary Contexts” at The Crawford Gallery Cork which runs until 27th October. Father Michael O’Flanagan (1876 - 1942) was born at Cloontower near Castlerea in Co. Roscommon. He was quite an interesting character - giving the oration at the lying in state of O’Donovan Rossa. He managed Count Plunkett’s successful campaign in the Roscommon by-election and was vicePresident of Sinn Fein from 1917 and was suspended from official religious duties many times because of his political activities in the 1920’s. He did not resume his clerical responsibilities until 1938 but in the meantime he served as President of Sinn Fein between 1933 - 35. During the Spanish Civil War Father O’ Flanagan defended the Spanish Republic which was not in line with Irish Catholic Church policy, but was in sympathy with that of Keating and his wife May. He toured America in support of the Spanish Republic in 1937. Our thanks to Dr Éimear O’Connor for her help and research which were invaluable in cataloguing this lot. €700 - 1,000 Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


22

Seán Keating PRHA (1889 - 1977)

26

The Port Authority Seán Keating was born in Limerick city in 1889. The eldest of the seven children of Joseph and Annie (née Hannon), he showed signs of artistic talent while still in junior school. He entered the Limerick Municipal Technical School of Science and Art in 1907 where he won many prizes for drawing and painting in oil. In the summer of 1911 Keating won a Scholarship to the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art to train as an artist and art teacher. He was elected an Associate of the RHA in 1918 and a full or constituent member in 1923. A life-long nationalist, early in his career Keating became wellknown for his portrayal of the heroes of the War of Independence. But the Civil War made him change his mind about violence in the cause of nationhood; he did not, for instance, paint images of ‘the Troubles’ in the 1970s. Keating was elected President of the RHA in March 1950 after the death of his friend and colleague James Sinton Sleator (PPRHA) in January that year. He resigned his position in 1962 so that he would have time to complete his last major mural commission which was installed on behalf of the Irish Government in the International Labour Offices, Geneva. Keating was, during his lifetime, a deliberately controversial figure, and is well-remembered for his televised performance during the ROSC exhibition of 1972. Although previously written into Irish art history as something of a bulwark against modernism in Ireland, recent research has revealed the nature and extent of his valuable contribution to the arts in Ireland and argues the case for Keating as a painter of the modern. While Keating’s paintings of the Aran Islands were and are perennially popular, from the 1930s onwards the artist was not interested in portraying prettified images; his project was to document contemporary history. The scene portrayed in The Port Authority is one that was typical of the working and living conditions on the Aran Islands. There are many examples of Irish paintings illustrating warm cottage interiors with huge burning fires; but the turf that fed those homely fireplaces was not indigenous to the islands. It had to be brought in from the mainland. The local waters were shallow, even in the small harbours; the heavy turf was off-loaded a mile or two offshore into vessels that looked like currachs, but were larger rowing boats called bád iomartha, a few of which are shown in The Port Authority. It was then brought in to the local harbour and unloaded onto the quay, an activity that provided a day’s work for several of the men resting in the foreground of Keating’s painting. They stacked the turf along the upper harbour wall, seen in the background, ready for collection by the locals. In this case, one man has piled his share into wicker baskets known as creels, which in turn, are carried by his donkey whose assured footing should guarantee its safe arrival across the stone-covered and rough-hewn pathways that crisscross the island landscape. A day such as the one represented offered the local men a chance to talk, to do business, and to catch up with news from the mainland. They were the ‘authorities’ to which Keating refers in his title; experts on the sea and carriers of the ancient rituals that originated though sheer necessity and the human will to survive. Keating’s acute observation of the weather conditions; the cloudy sky with rain in the distance, and the turbulent undercurrent in the sea water is striking. So too, his attention to detail in the individual portrayal of the men; some leaning, others looking, one or two resting after a hard day’s work. According to the shadows, the sun is beginning to set, and the day’s work is just about done. In the middle of the activity, a small puddle reflects the blue sky above; there were no rain clouds over Inisheer that evening in the late autumn of 1939. There is an atmosphere of authenticity to the scene that would have been nearly impossible without the use of modern technology, and which, in turn, makes The Port Authority an image that reflects the up to-date socio-economic conditions in 1940. Robert Flaherty, the film maker who lived and worked on the Aran Islands during the early 1930s while making the well-known socio-documentary Man of Aran, was a friend of Keating’s. It was Flaherty that introduced the artist to the world of the cine camera, and Keating purchased his own in the mid1930s. He took it to the islands on several occasions over the following few years and he used the footage taken in 1939 to compose a group of paintings in 1940 that he called his ‘Aran Series.’ One of those paintings was The Port Authority, made as a private commission in 1940, and framed by Victor Waddington in 1941. Having used the cine footage as a guide to the composition, Keating could not but help depict the reality of the scene he was aiming to portray. Unloading the turf was both a tradition and a reality of living on the islands, the veracity of which is clear in the painting. Yet, it is also of significance that although the sea is murmuring but relatively calm, and the rain is miles offshore, there are no fishing currachs to be seen in the water. Nor are the nets or the expected accoutrements of the fishing trade to been seen around the quay side. The reality was that the mackerel market, crucial to the economy of the islands, collapsed in the 1930s; the fishermen had little to do. In The Port Authority, along with many other of his pictures of Aran from the 1930s onwards, Keating painted, for posterity, a truthful account of life on the islands; contemporary history paintings, rather than beautified images of a folkloric past. Dr Éimear O’Connor HRHA


23

Seán Keating PRHA (1889 - 1977)

The Port Authority

Oil on board, 92.7 x 115.6cm (39 x 46”) Signed Provenance: Commissioned directly from the artist by the current owners’ father c.1940/1 (Framing bill from Victor Waddington Galleries is dated 5/2/’41) and thence by descent. Exhibited: 1942 RHA Annual Exhibition Cat. No. 33 on loan from current owners’ father: 1989 RHA Gallery “Seán Keating Retrospective” Cat. No. 85; “Ireland her People & Landscape”, The AVA Gallery, Clandeboye, Summer 2012, cat. no. 23 Literature: Seán Keating, “James White, RHA 1989 (illustrated)”, “The Book of Aran”, published by Tír Eolas, 1994, illustrated p276 €150,000 - 250,000 Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


24

27

James Humbert Craig RHA RUA (1877-1944)

Murlough Bay (1939)

Oil on board, 31 x 43cm(12 x 16.75”) Inscribed Provenance: John Magee Belfast, label verso €1,500 - 2,500

28

George K.Gillespie RUA (1924 - 1995)

Field with farm yard in the distance Oil on canvas, 33 x 44cm (13 x 17.25”) Signed €1,000 - 1,500


25

29

William Crampton Gore RHA (1871-1946)

Achill, Dull Morning

Oil on board, 25.5 x 33.5cm (10 x 14”) Signed, inscribed and dated “Achill 1913”; original artist’s label and Fine Art Society label verso €2,000 - 3,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


26

30

Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

The Boat Builder, (1923)

Oil on board, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14”) Signed Provenance: Sold by the artist to Alfred R. De Lury, University of Toronto, August 1923; Private Collection, Ireland Exhibited: 1923 Dublin “Drawings and Pictures of Life in the West of Ireland”, Jack B. Yeats Exhibition, Stephen’s Green Gallery, Catalogue No. 5; 1930 Toronto “Paintings by Homer Watson and a Collection of Paintings by Contemporary Irish Artists”, Group Exhibition, Toronto Art Gallery, Catalogue No. 44 Literature: 1930 Exhibition Catalogue, Toronto Art Gallery, illustrated; “Jack B. Yeats - A Catalogue Raisonne of the Oil Paintings” by Hilary Pyle, London 1922, Catalogue No. 199

A man seated in a súgán chair watches two men building a boat. A young woman in a red skirt stands looking on. It is a bright summer’s day with views of the islands and coastlines of Connemara extending into the background. A traditional whitewashed cottage, evidently the home of the man and his companion, completes the scene. Yeats was fascinated by boats and boat building. In 1905 he visited Carna Co. Galway with the writer J.M. Synge when the two men collaborated on a series of articles for the Manchester Guardian. Synge was also interested in boats and sailing and he devoted a section of one of his articles to the subject of boat building in the West of Ireland. Yeats supplied an illustration depicting the boat yard at Carna with a similar scene of two men working on the hull of a traditional local boat. The Boat Builder painted nearly twenty years later clearly recalls part of that memorable visit. Synge describes the process of boat building in this remote region. The timber was purchased in Galway and brought by hooker to the commissioner’s homestead. A carpenter, a highly skilled craftsman, was employed to build the boat, a task that usually took six weeks to two months and for which he was paid two pounds. The carpenter or boat builder was assisted by a helper who ‘must stand holding boards and handing nails, and if he doesn’t do it smart enough you’ll hear the carpenter scolding him and making a row’.1 The boat builder in this painting is clearly not the one described by Synge and depicted in Yeats’s earlier drawing for he ‘was rather remarkable in appearance, with sharply formed features and an extraordinarily hairy chest showing through the open neck of his shirt’.2 The boat builder in this painting is nonetheless presented as absorbed in his work, planning a wooden plank of the hull. His masterful pose is contrasted by that of his companion who stands with a board at the ready. The intricacies and skill of their task is a source of great curiosity as Yeats shows through the engrossed expressions of their patron and the young woman. The painting is an intriguing vignette into the social structure of Connemara life which was already vanishing in the 1920s when the work was painted. The detail of landscape and the simplicity of the setting add to the poignancy of the subject. Dr. Róisín Kennedy 1. J. M. Synge, Complete works of J.M. Synge, Wordsworth edition, 2008, p.209. Dublin 2012 2. Ibid, p.210.

€70,000 - 100,000


27

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


28

31

Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

A Fully Loaded Side Car

Watercolour, 25 x 43cm (10 x 17½”) Signed Provenance: Bought at The Red Cross Sale, Dublin 1944, by Dr. Patrick McCartan and thence by decent to the previous owner and sold by him, De Veres 30th March 2004, Catalogue No. 50, where purchased by current owners Literature: “Jack B. Yeats, His Watercolours, Drawings, Pastels”, by Hilary Pyle, Catalogue No. 173 This early watercolour by Yeats depicts two travellers moving with speed on a side car through a barren landscape. They are seated on either side of a vast mound of luggage which separates them and whose sheer bulk suggests that one of them must be a commercial traveller or that their journey is of some significance. Hilary Pyle believes that the work could have originally been entitled ‘The Bag Man’ and that it belonged to Horace Plunkett.1 The horizontal composition adds to the sense of movement and to the idea of journeying forward. A note of drama is introduced by the near figure whose facial features are illuminated by his lighting of his pipe. His elongated body and dramatic black gloved hands and red hair are in stark contrast to the more conservative appearance of his companion who sits facing the opposite direction. While the subject of travelling is a central theme in the artist’s subsequent work, it usually shows figures meeting if fleetingly. Here each man remains lost in his own thoughts bound to the sky and landscape through a combination of purples and browns. Dr. Róisín Kennedy €10,000 - 15,000

1. Hilary Pyle, Jack B. Yeats. His Watercolours, Drawings and Pastels, Irish Academic Press, 1993, nos.172 & 173, pp.79-80.


29

32

Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

A Small Fair (1903) (aka ‘A Little Fair’)

Watercolour and gouache, 36 x 26cm (10¼ x 14”) Signed Provenance: Solomon Gallery Exhibition label verso Exhibited: 1903 London “Sketches of Life in the West of Ireland”, The Walker Art Gallery, Catalogue No. 17; 1903 Dublin “Sketches of Life in the West of Ireland”, The Central Hall, Catalogue No. 2; 1969 Montreal “Jack B. Yeats, Retrospective Exhibition”, Waddington Fine Arts, Catalogue No. 35 Literature: “Jack B. Yeats, His Watercolours, Drawings, Pastels”, by Hilary Pyle, Catalogue No. 440 This watercolour was first exhibited in Dublin and London in 1903 as part of one of Jack Yeats’s Sketches of Life in the West of Ireland one-man shows. These revelatory exhibitions established his reputation as one of the most innovative of Irish artists. The strongly coloured watercolours showing scenes based on Yeats’s travels through Galway, Mayo, Sligo and Donegal were warmly received by critics and admirers, especially those associated with the Cultural Revival. They provided refreshing visualisations of Irish rural life invested with humour and humanity. The fairground was a popular subject showing as this painting does different social groups coming together. Situated on a plain field in the middle of the countryside with a thatched cottage visible in the background, the usual scene has been transformed by the setting up of the colourful stalls of the fair. With an eye to advertising, Yeats humorously compares the competing signs of J. Nolan and P. Dolan’s stalls, each relying on a repertoire of nationalist motifs to attract customers. In the midst of the composition a policeman dressed in full uniform surveys the scene. His authority is subtly undermined by the unconventionality of his companions comprising a donkey, a young boy who gazes out of the painting and an old man setting up his rather complex gambling stall. Yeats’s knowledge of post-impressionist art and design is evident in his contrasting of deep green and purple hues and in the cut-off composition which adds to the strange mixture of figures and forms found in the scene. Yeats injects drama and excitement into an otherwise every-day event through his use of form and colour and through an innate sense of timing. Through it’s focus on the start of the day A Small Fair succeeds in conveying the sense of anticipation that such an event inspired. Dr. Róisín Kennedy €20,000 - 30,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


30

33

Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

Lough Owel from the Train (1923) Oil on board, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14”) Signed, inscribed with title verso

Provenance: Given by the artist to Dr. Foster, Dublin 1953; Private Collection, Ireland Literature: “ Jack B. Yeats - A Catalogue Raisonne of the Oil Paintings”, by Hilary Pyle, London 1992, Catalogue No. 185 Jack Yeats painted several scenes of trains and trams in the 1920s which allowed him to express the sensations of movement and travelling. In this work we see a view of Lough Owel, near Mullingar, as seen through the train window. The lake, a familiar landmark on the Dublin to Sligo railway line, is delicately framed by a wooden fence and two telegraph poles and their overhead wires. These, like the train, are markers of modernity and communication. Beneath them the islands and the waters of the lake appear calm and timeless. Nature is removed from the vagaries of modern life. Yeats uses combinations of opaque greens and blues to create a mood of tranquillity which is offset by the rakish angle of the telegraph poles and wires. With its strong colours and carefully constructed composition this is a consciously modern evocation of the Irish landscape. Dr. Róisín Kennedy August 2012 €35,000 - 50,000


31

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


32

34

Paul Henry RHA (1876-1858)

In the Wicklow Mountains (1933-4) Oil on canvas 15 x 20 in. (38.1 x 50.8 cm.) Signed Provenance: Private collection. Exhibited: “In Connemara”: Paintings by Paul Henry RHA, Fine Art Society, London, from 11 April 1934, catalogue number 25. Literature: S. B. Kennedy, “Paul Henry: Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations” p. 229, number 641 (where, in the light of new information, incorrectly catalogued and dated c. 1925-30). This picture shows clearly the brighter hues and easier mood associated with Henry’s work from the early 1930s and later, after a period of domestic turmoil in the late 1920s. The subject matter remains characteristic ‘Henry’ material, but the palette is lighter and the application of paint more fluid than hitherto. That the narrative is confined to the narrow strip of the foreground, which is rendered with considerable verisimilitude, is also characteristic of the artist’s work, as is the blueing of the hills in the middle distance-with their warm pinks-and the still lighter blue of the distant peak, all of which serve to give a clear sense of recession. Although Henry employed less artistic licence than one might expect, it is nevertheless impossible to identify the setting for this picture. By the late 1920s Henry had both defined and created a way of seeing the Irish landscape that was convincing and would endure and which helped to form a popular vision of Irish identity. Also, he had introduced a degree of Realism to Irish painting which was to prove influential on a number of followers - James Humbert Craig and Frank McKelvey come instantly to mind - who continued the process until the outbreak of war in 1939 and beyond. Such views, often depicting a rural world of people at ease with themselves and their surroundings, was widely projected in publications of the time, such as the Book of Dublin (1929) and the Irish Free State Official Handbook (1932). In the Wicklow Mountains is dated 1933-4 on stylistic grounds and on the assumption that it was recently painted when included in Henry’s 1934 exhibition at the Fine Art Society. Also, there is a label of the Fine Art Society on the reverse with the date (19)34. Dr S.B.Kennedy, 2012 €60,000 - 80,000


33

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


34

35

Paul Henry RHA (1876 - 1958)

A Cottage in Kerry (1933-5)

Oil on board, 29 x 39.5cm (11½ x 15½”) Signed Provenance: Private collection, Dublin Exhibited: “Recent Paintings of Kerry and Connemara” by Paul Henry, RHA, Combridge’s Gallery, Dublin, from 7 May 1935 (14); “Paul Henry: Retrospective Exhibition”, Ritchie Hendriks Gallery, Dublin, and Belfast Museum & Art Gallery, Belfast, May- July 1957 (57) Literature: S. B. Kennedy, “Paul Henry -Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations”, Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 2007, p. 267, catalogue number 843, reproduced. This is almost certainly a scene in Co. Kerry, where Paul Henry took a holiday in September 1934. Judged stylistically, too, it must date from around this time. Henry liked Kerry, which he had first visited only a year or eighteen months earlier. ‘Wherever one turns there is material for dozens of pictures,’ he wrote to a friend in the United States. Basing himself near Glenbeigh, he explored the Dingle Peninsula, which reminded him of Cape Cod. He was happy at the time and derived much stimulus from his Kerry trip. Later, painting in the studio from sketches done on the spot, he worked on pictures for his 1935 exhibition at the Combridge Gallery, his Dublin dealer at the time. The exhibition was a financial success and was well received by the Dublin newspapers, the Irish Press (7 May 1935), for example, commenting on the ‘paler key’ of these new pictures over much of his earlier work, a change that reflected the artist’s more settled domestic life at the time. These developments are clear to be seen in A Cottage in Kerry, in which the paint has lost much of its dryness of earlier years and has become more fluid. The palette, too, is brighter in tone and the umbers and darkish olive greens that characterise Henry’s work of the late 1920s and early 1930s have also gone. Here the artist is clearly at ease in himself and enjoying the very act of painting. Dr. S.B. Kennedy, 2012 €50,000 - 70,000


35

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


36

36

Paul Henry RHA RUA (1876-1958)

The Bog at Evening

Oil on Canvas, 76 x 91cm (30 x 36”) Signed Provenance: Combridge’s Fine Art Dublin, Henry Lee Shattuck, Boston; Private Collection, Ireland Exhibited: “Exhibition of Pictures by Paul and Grace Henry”, Magee’s Gallery Belfast, April, 1923; “Paul Henry”, NGI, Dublin, 19 February - 18 May 2003, Catalogue No. 71 Literature: S.B. Kennedy, “Paul Henry”, NGI, Dublin, 2003, pp. 100-2, illustrated; S.B. Kennedy, “Paul Henry - Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations”, Yale, 2007, Catalogue Raisonne No. 591 “I am of ireland “Illustrated, p27 illustrating W.B. Yeats famous poem “He wishes for the Clothes of Heaven” G&M 2010 As with many artists, a good number of Paul Henry’s paintings are known by more than one title. This often makes for difficulties in precisely identifying them, although contemporary press reviews (which are usually more detailed than those of today) of the artist’s exhibitions often help in this regard, Thus, for example, the “Northern Whig” (12 April 1923) in its review of Henry’s 1923 Exhibition at Magee’s Gallery, Belfast, commented on a composition called The Bog at Evening in a manner which exactly describes this picture: “the black peat-stacks”, it said, “stand out against the dim brown of the bog, and the curves of their shapes are repeated and magnified in the curves of the mountains, and of the clouds that tower above them”. It continued: “The repetition of these curves gives a sense of rhythm to the design, and the fine purple of the mountains is enriched by the contrast with the blacks and browns of the foreground”. Despite also being known as Evening on an Achill Bog (a label on the reverse of the frame, but not in the artist’s hand, bears this title), it seems likely that this picture is indeed The Bog at Evening which Henry exhibited in 1923. The first owner of the picture, H. L. Shattuck, who also owned another Henry painting, A Mountain Village (now in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston), almost certainly acquired it from the exhibition of “Contemporary Irish Art”, held at Grace Horne’s Gallery, Boston, in May 1929. At any rate, The Bog at Evening shows Henry at the height of his powers. There is an absence of all human activity, his attention is focused firmly on the landscape and his handling of paint and treatment of the scene have become slightly codified, with a suffuse sense of stillness, even of timelessness - in this respect compare, for example, his In the West of Ireland (National Gallery of Ireland), which also dates from the 1920’s - in a manner that typifies much of his oeuvre hereafter. Although one cannot be certain, the setting is most probably Connemara, and may be Achill Island. The size of the composition is unusual for Henry, as is the degree of impasto employed throughout, but these elements serve to illustrate confidence and vigour of the artist’s early years in Dublin. The handling of colour is particularly subtle, the pinks and warm creams in the cloud formations contrasting with the cooler cobalt blues elsewhere in the sky, while the juxtaposition of the purple mountains and the yellow cornfield in the middle distance is distinctly Post-Impressionist in concept and recalls the artist’s time in Paris. The foreground, too, despite, the predominance, of the umbers, browns and blacks of soft earth, is a myriad of pinks and other hues and the reflections in the foreground pool lead the eye back into the composition and ultimately splendour of the sky. A label on the reverse of the frame notes: ‘Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, T.L. 3682, H.L. Shattuck.’ Dr. S.B. Kennedy €150,000 - 250,000


37

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


38

37

Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980)

Heat

Oil on canvas, 29.5 x 59cm (11½ x 23¼”) Signed Exhibited: “Patrick Hennessy Exhibition”, Ritchie Hendriks Gallery, Dublin, November 1964; where purchased and thence by descent to the current owner €4,000 - 6,000


39

38

Aloysius O’Kelly (1853 - 1936)

The Game of Chess

Oil on board, 21 x 32cm (8¼ x 12½) Signed Aloysius O’Kelly painted many versions of this subject, variously exhibited at the Royal Academy (1889); the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours (1892); the Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin (1896); the Royal Society of British Arts (1893); the Walker Art Gallery and Liverpool (1894). Two of these have previously been sold in these rooms, Lot 205 8th Dec 2009 and Lot 80 5th December 2011.A further version was painted in the name of Oakley, one of O’Kelly’s aliases, and submitted in 1893/4 to the Royal Society of British Arts.1 The number of paintings of this subject is significant. Directly after painting ‘Mass in a Connemara Cabin’ (1883) (National Gallery of Ireland), which O’Kelly consigned to the Communard, Henri Rochefort to submit to the Paris Salon on his behalf, he went to Egypt and Sudan, with his brother, the Fenian, gun-runner, journalist and Member of Parliament, James J. O’Kelly. There they mixed with a group of French Socialists and Egyptian nationalists, and took up the cause of the Mahdi in Sudan, in an effort to embroil the British in the colonies, so as to create opportunities for Irish insurrection back home. Ciaro became an increasing subject of anxiety to the colonial authorities and cafés were considered sites of political intrigue where the lower orders engaged in seditious behavior. According to a contemporary writer, there ‘the rabble gathers...in a space so confined that the occupants are almost overcome by the fumes that rise from the stoves and the smoke of the pipes and nargilehs...It is a source of numerous infections and diseases, and a refuge for the unemployed and indolent, particularly in those places known for the consumption of hashish’.2 The pipe thus came to symbolize reflection and pleasure, as well as trouble. Given the ban on alcohol, hashish was thought to calm the nervous system, sharpen the intellect and lead to a state of intoxication called ‘kayf ’ and in this state, the native was considered highly unstable indeed. During the decade in which O’Kelly’s café scenes were exhibited, the number of cafés where draughts/chess were played increased, a fact which was used to confirm the indolence of the Egyptians. Defining the defects of his character was considered the most effective way to accustom the native to his subordination. For these reasons, those who frequented cafés were considered suspect. But unlike most of his contemporaries, O’Kelly’s was emphatically on the Egyptian nationalist side. Although less detailed than the other versions, compositionally this painting is the prorotype for those that followed. The three figures seated on the floor are engrossed in their game, the various elements of Egyptian dress, interior design and still life are all present, although they are much expanded in the later versions. Undoubtedly, the painting is indicative of O’Kelly’s skills and interests, albeit in a preliminary form. Prof. Niamh O’Sullivan

1. See Niamh O’Sullivan, ‘Aloysius O’Kelly: Art, Nation, Empire’ (Field Day, 2010), passim. 2. Quoted in Timothy Mitchell, ‘Colonising Egypt’ (California, 1988),p. 117.

€5,000 - 8,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


40

39

William Magrath (1838-1918)

The Farewell

Oil on canvas, 28.5 x 33.5cm (11.25 x 13.25”) Signed €1,000 - 2,000 See note on Magrath opposite under Lot 41

40

William Magrath (1838-1918)

A Courting Couple, in a Pastoral Landscape Oil on canvas, 28.5 x 33.5cm (11.25 x 13.25”) Signed €1,000 - 2,000


41

41

William Magrath (1838-1918)

At the Cottage Door

Watercolour, 37 x 28cm (14.5 x 11”) Signed and dated 1875 William McGrath was born in Cork and was educated at the Blue Coat School before moving to the Cork School of Art. It is thought he stowed away on a ship to New York and gradually made a name for himself as a painter of genre and landscape subjects. He made several return trips to Ireland circa 1879 into the early 1880’s. There were three pictures included in the 1883 Cork exhibition - Thinking it Over (The Land Question), In the Green Fields of Erin and The Seaweed Girl, which was included in the ‘Whipping the Herring’ exhibition at The Crawford Gallery in 2006. Magrath is represented in several museums in the US, including the Metropolitan Museum in New York, while his portrait of fellow Cork painter Thomas Hovenden is in the Museum of Fine Arts in San Fransisco. There are nine works by McGrath in the Crawford Art Gallery including A Son of the Soil. €1,000 - 2,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


42

George Washington Brownlow (b.1835-1876).

Come Awa

Oil on canvas, 75 x 62.2 cms (29.5 x 24.5”). Signed with artist’s name lower right. Inscribed verso with title. Exhibited 1868 at The Royal Society of British Artists, no.523 for £94.10s. Born in Newcastle, this talented landscape, figure and genre painter’s work provides valuable insights into the lives of the working poor. The son of a cordwainer, he trained at Newcastle’s Government School of Design, and at the age of twenty won a gold medal for his work. Soon he was showing at London’s Royal Society of British Artists and Royal Academy, and later at Dublin’s Royal Hibernian Academy. We know from his surviving paintings and lists of titles that he showed, that he frequented Galway, as well as Northumberland, Aberdeenshire and Essex to paint. He was interested in painting families, especially the work of women and their children. Although this cottage interior shares many aspects that one might expect to find in an Irish fisherman’s house, such as the open hearth on an earthen floor, the mother with her skirts tucked up around her waist, and the double cruisie lamp for burning fish-oil, hung in the background, it seems more likely to be a scene in Scotland. The comparatively elaborate tripod tip-top table, on the far right, the family being so neatly clothed, and the father in his well-heeled working boots, suggest Scotland rather than Ireland as a location. Most of Brownlow’s Irish cottage scenes show barefoot or ragged families, in contrast. The central seated figure, looking directly at us as he prepares his fishing lines, is well dressed in the same blue clothes and red hat as a fisherman in Brownlow’s similarly informative painting Baptism from Stonehaven Gaol. That Scottish scene even includes an identical type of oval fish basket as seen here, with its integral carrying handles: the type that was used in the long lining boats, or Baulk Yawls as some were known. Long lining was a method of fishing that used these metre-long, hooked and hand-baited lines, which hung down from a long line in their hundreds, to catch cod from the sea bed. Several baskets are shown here, and in order to catch the cod, the fishermen had wickerwork pots to capture whelks for baiting each hook. Like other genre and narrative artists of his time, Brownlow incorporated deliberate clues amongst his paintings that the audience were invited to decode and discuss. The whelk shell under the child’s hand in the basket, is one such clue, above the scattered seaweed and starfish. Fish can be seen suspended on tenterhooks behind the father. They were traditionally preserved by salting and smoking, within the range of the smoky hearth. Close by is the distinctive round, flat griddle: which was hung over the fire to cook various meals such as oatcakes; a staple of both Scotland and the northerly counties of Ireland. The red headed bairn dressed in Tartan, is upsetting the painstaking arrangement of lines in the basket, and the mother’s outstretched arms, coaxing the child away, reflect the title’s narrative Come awa. The work of the long lining fishermen was arduous and dangerous, governed by the winter winds and tides. The individual hooked lines or ‘snoods’ were initially made from horses’ tail hairs, and later of tarred linen thread, which Brownlow probably shows here. Brownlow’s familiarity with his subject shows in many of his other paintings such as Findon Fishermen Mending their Nets, The Fisherman’s Cottage and The Galway Fish Market, delineating the work of fishermen and their families. It was often outsiders who focused their attention on the everyday occupations of the poor, rather than local painters. Predating Brownlow’s interest, other touring artists portrayed the frequently emotional culture of fishing including F.W. Burton’s The Aran Fisherman’s Drowned Child (1841), A.D. Fripp’s The Fisherfolk’s Home (1849) and F.W. Topham’s Making Nets (1849). As a socio realist portraying material culture and craftsmanship, Brownlow’s paintings are some of the most revealing in terms of understanding how poor working people lived and survived. Claudia Kinmonth MA(RCA) PhD, author of Irish Country Furniture 1700-1950 & Irish Rural Interiors in Art (both Yale University Press, 1993, 2006).


43

42

George Washington Brownlow (1835-1876)

Come Awa

Oil on canvas, 75 x 62cm (29½ x 24½”) Signed €10,000 - 15,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


44

43

Stanhope Alexander Forbes RA (1857-1947)

Dutch Quayside

Oil on canvas, 25 x 33.5cm (9¾ x 13¼”) Signed €5,000 - 8,000


45

44

Howard Helmick RI (1845-1907)

The Love Letter

Oil on canvas, 54 x 41cm (21¼ x 16”) Signed and dated (18)’80 Provenance: The Gorry Gallery, Dublin €4,000 - 6,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


46

45

Rose Maynard Barton RWS (1856-1929)

Still Life with Dead Bull Finch, Blue Finch & Coal Tit Watercolour, 18 x 35.5cm (7.2 x 14”) Signed and dated (18) ‘85 €1,200 - 1,600

46

Mary Georgina Barton (1861 - 1949)

Marys Lane, Kilkenny

Watercolour, 52.5 X 26 cm (20.75 X 10.25”) Signed Mary Barton is often overlooked in the annuals of Irish Art. She was born in Dundalk, the youngest of seven children and her mother died when she was only two. Her father went on to marry again and have another nine children and Molly, as Mary was known, went to London to look after them. While there she attended the Westminister School of Art. Hugh Lane included two of her works in the prestigious Irish Exhibition he organized in 1904 at the Guildhall London. She exhibited regularly with The Watercolour Society of Ireland and The Society of Women Artists and travelled extensively worldwide as well as coming home to Ireland. Mary’s Lane is in the heart of Kilkenny close to the City Hall “Tholsel” and is a busy pedestrian route. You can see the rear of the Shee Almhouse, now the tourist information office, in the distance on the right hand side of this picture. €800 - 1,200


47

47

Mildred Anne Butler RWS FRSA RUA (1858-1941)

Expectation

Watercolour, 36 x 51cm (18 x 20”) Signed Exhibited: The Watercolour Society of Ireland Exhibition, 1897, Cat. No. 18 (label verso) €7,000 - 10,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


48

48

Joseph Malachy Kavanagh RHA (1856-1919)

Fisherman by a falls, Autumn

Oil on canvas, 40 x 61cm (15¾ x 24”) Signed Provenance: Christies, Dublin 29th June 1994, Cat No 177 €2,000 - 4,000

49

Attributed to C.H. Cook (Irish School)

An Illicit Brew

Oil on board, 29 x 24cm, (11½ x 9½”) Bearing signature and inscription verso €600 - 800


49

50

Nathaniel Hone RHA (1831-1917)

Cattle Watering Near Trees

Oil on canvas 66 x 95cm (26 x 37.5�) Provenance: Through the Jameson family by descent. ₏10,000 - 15,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


50

51 William Bingham McGuinness RHA (1849- 1928)

Island Lough, Ross Shire

Watercolour, 44 x 70cm (17¼ x 27½) Period label with artists name and title of work attached €800 - 1,200

52

James Francis Danby (1816-1875)

Continental sunset view with farmer and horse laden with seaweed Watercolour, 30 x 48.5cm (12 x 19”) Signed and dated 1869 €800 - 1,200


51

53

Henry Jones Thaddeus (1859-1929)

Loading a Boat by Coastal Village; together with Wooded Coastal Outcrop A pair, watercolour and gouache, 24 x 34cm (9½ x 13½”) Signed and dated 1898 €3,000 - 5,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


52

54

Edwin Hayes RHA RI ROI (1819-1904)

Homeward Bound

Oil on canvas, 24.4 x 35cm (9½ x 13¾”) Signed and indisctinctly dated €1,800 - 2,500

55

Edwin Hayes RHA RI ROI (1819-1904)

Yarmouth Roads

Watercolour 32.5 x 47cm (12¾ x 15½”) Signed Provenance: David James, London, label verso; Gorry Gallery Dublin €1,500 - 2,500


53

56

Thomas Rose Miles RCA (fl.1869-1910)

Daybreak - A Signal of Distress in Deal Roads Oil on canvas, 45 x 68cm (17¾ x 26¾”) Signed, signed again and inscribed with title verso €2,000 - 3,000

57

Thomas Rose Miles RCA (fl.1869-1910)

Awaiting the Fishermen’s Return, West of Ireland Oil on canvas, 45.5 x 81cm (18 x 32”) Signed €1,500 - 2,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


54

58

Seán O’Sullivan RHA (1906-1964)

Contemplation

Oil on canvas board, 60 x 50cm (23.6 x 19.75”) Signed and dated June 1941 Provenance: The Artist’s Studio €1,500 - 2,500

59

Seán O’Sullivan RHA (1906-1964)

Portrait Study of a Young Man Coloured pencil and chalk on paper, 37 x 34cm (14.5 x 13.4”) €300 - 500

60 Attributed to Leo Whelan RHA (1892-1956)

Portrait of Minnie Finagan

Oil on canvas, 54.5 x 44.5cm (21½ x 17½”) Minnie Finagan was matron at Belfast City Hospital €600 - 800


55

61

RODERIC O’CONOR (1860-1940)

Portrait of a woman

Signed lower right front ‘O’Conor’ Oil on wooden panel 46 x 38cm (18.1x 15”) Atelier O’CONOR stamp verso Provenance: Hôtel Drouot, Paris, Vente O’Conor, 6 février 1956; Musée du Petit Palais, Genève, collection of Dr. Oscar Ghez; by descent to Dr. Ghez’s son and heir, Dr. Claude Ghez; with MarieFrancoise Robert, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, sale of 10 June 2005; private collection, Paris. €8,000 - 12,000 This work relates to the series of portraits of women who came to O’Conor’s rue du Cherche-Midi studio in the Montparnasse quartier of Paris to pose for him after he took up residence there in 1904 following a thirteen year period spent painting in Brittany. Most were hired as professional models and frequently posed nude, but they also included Renée Honta, a particular favourite who became his mistress and later his wife. He painted this model on at least three occasions, which might lead us to the conclusion that this could be a portrait of Renée Honta but close comparison with known portraits of Renée proved to be inconclusive and this woman’s identity remains uncertain. Of the three portraits mentioned above two are closely related and were probably painted on the same day. In a larger painting known as ‘Portrait of a Seated Woman’ or ‘Le Corsage Bleu’ she wears the same dress with its distinctive wide collar and uniformly repeated blue pattern motif, but takes up a pose in which she is more clearly seated deep in the studio interior, with her hands folded in her lap and a similar rather forlorn expression on her face. The similarity in viewing position and dress suggests that this work preceded the larger painting and its lively brushwork and sense of immediacy fairly clearly establishes it as a preliminary study for the work to follow. The elongation of the facial features here also suggests a possible influence from Amedeo Modigliani although O’Conor has avoided the full adoption of Modigliani’s schematic treatment of facial features which gave his portraits their distinctive character. Modigliani was a painter whom O’Conor is known to have admired and who was represented in his personal collection. ‘Portrait of a Woman’ was formerly in the collection of Dr. Oscar Ghez at the Musée du Petit Palais, Genève until his death in 1998. Subsequently his son and heir Dr. Claude Ghez rationalised the museum’s collection through making selective private donations and sales at auction. This work was in a MarieFrancoise Robert sale in Paris at Hôtel Drouot on 10 June, 2005 (Lot 89). Dr. Roy Johnston

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


56

62

Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

My River (1950)

Oil on board, 35.5 x 46cm (14 x 18”) Signed, inscribed with title verso Provenance: Previously in the collection of Mr. and Mrs. H. Merkin, New York; Private Collection, Ireland Exhibited: 1951 Dublin, “Jack B. Yeats Exhibition”, The Victor Waddington Galleries, Catalogue No. 1 Literature: “Jack B. Yeats - A Catalogue Raisonne of the Oil Paintings” by Hilary Pyle, London 1992, Catalogue No. 1017 The river in the title is Drumcliffe River which enters the sea north of Sligo town as part of a complex series of estuaries. Sharing its name with the village of Drumcliff the river had great personal significance for Jack Yeats. It features in another late painting, Low Tide, the Drumcliffe River Making its Way to the Sea, 1954 (Private Collection) and Yeats’s last workbook contains a sketch of it.1 The artist’s great grandfather had once been minister of the church of Drumcliff, while Jack had spent his childhood years with his maternal grandparents in nearby Sligo. More recently in 1948 the body of W.B. Yeats was re-interred in the cemetery at Drumcliff, a poignant event for his younger brother. In this painting the river - a deep blue meandering element in the left foreground - makes its way towards the ocean and becomes blended with the surrounding waters and rivers. Ben Bulben forms a dramatic backdrop to the scene, its cliff-like side silhouetted against a glowing sun. The reflected light is depicted in the golden flecks of colour on the shoreline and on the white waves in the right foreground which mirror the powerful chromatic effects of the sky. The small scale and light tonalities of My River is found in other works of this late period and like many of these the painting pays homage to Yeats’s deep attachment to Sligo. Filled with life and movement the landscape also acts as an analogy for human endeavour, painted by an artist who continued to develop his practice into old age. He was almost eighty when he completed this work. Dr. Roisin Kennedy 1. H. Pyle, Jack. B. Yeats, III, p. 1062. Dublin August 2012 €60,000 - 80,000


57

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


58

63

Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

Falling Water (1943)

Oil on board, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14”) Signed, inscribed with title verso Provenance: Sold by The Victor Waddinton Galleries in 1943 to Captain C.S. Collinson, London, thereafter with Harold Diamond, New York, 1958. The Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection and presented by them to The Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, 17th May 1966, but later sold by the order of the Trustees of the Hirshhorn Museum, 1987; Private Collection, Ireland Exhibited: 1995 Dublin, “Jack B. Yeats Exhibition”, RHA Catalogue No. 26 Literature: “Jack B. Yeats - A Catalogue Raisonne of the Oil Paintings”, by Hilary Pyle, London 1992, Catalogue No. 552 Falling Water shows a view of a landscape framed by the branches of a tree and the cascade of a waterfall. Once part of the prestigious Joseph H. Hirschhorn collection in the United States, the work evokes oriental traditions of landscape painting through its unusual perspective of looking through the cascade and in the way that it suggests a continuous vista of nature carrying on beyond the perimeters of the painting. There is a dramatic break between the dark foreground elements of branches, water and rock and the distant greenery of the river and land beyond. Through a rich blending of blues, greens and white Yeats evokes the complex sensations provoked by this place. In particular the colours and textures suggest the rich, sodden terrain of Sligo and the West of Ireland. Dr. Roisin Kennedy August 2012 €30,000 - 50,000


59

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


60

64

Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)

Houses on the Bridge Road (1945) Oil on board, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14”) Signed, inscribed with title verso

Provenance: Sold by the artist to Dr. J.N. O’Reilly, Surrey, May 1945; Private Collection, Ireland Exhibited: 1987 London, “Jack B. Yeats Exhibition”, Waddington Galleries London, Catalogue No. 12 (illustrated); 1991 Dublin, “Ivon Hitchens and Jack B. Yeats Exhibition”, The Kerlin Gallery, Catalogue No. 18; 1995 Dublin, “Jack B. Yeats Exhibition”, RHA Catalogue No. 26 Literature: “Jack B. Yeats - A Catalogue Raisonne of the Oil Paintings”, by Hilary Pyle, London 1992, Catalogue No. 669 This unidentified view is probably of a Dublin scene. It depicts an unusual viewpoint of a bridge and an adjoining terrace of tall houses, from below street level. In the left foreground a large wooden structure stands erect, painted in blue and red impasto. Its vertical form synchronises with the gable end wall of the terrace diagonally behind it. Throughout the composition Yeats uses paint in a richly textured manner to create a complex sense of the buildings and the effects of light and shade upon them. In the lower centre around the arch of the bridge he has used the handle of the brush or a similar implement to score into the paint, exposing the raw surface of the canvas and highlighting the dark hallow space beyond. The resulting expressionist painting evokes the physical sensations of urban life, from an almost subterranean perspective looking upwards towards the sky and an unfamiliar view of the bridge and the streetscape. Dr. Roisin Kennedy August 2012 €25,000 - 35,000


61

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


62

65

John Butler Yeats RHA (1859-1922)

In a Gondola

Gouache, 33 x 47cm (13 x 18.5”) Signed and extensively inscribed on artist’s label verso Provenance: Inherited by the current owner Exhibited : 1901 Hone - Yeats Loan Exhibition in Dubin Literature: “The Prodigal Father” by William Murphy P116 and P232 This is one of two works that the poet Dr John Todhunter commissioned from John Butler Yeats based on Brownings series of narrative poems “Bells and pomegranates”. The first commission was given in 1870 “Pippa Passes” and is now in the Collection of The National Gallery of Ireland (Ref 3531). Brownings poems tell how a girl from A solo spends her New Years holiday passing through the lives of others ,passing through their lives,imagining herself into their situations and so influencing them. It took 2 years for the first commission to reach Todhunter. Yeats met and made a lifelong friendship with the John Todhunter while at Trinity College (1857 - 62) . Todhunter was a gifted dilettante who started life in a grocery firm but then decided to become a Doctor and through his interest in music,poetry and philosophy brought him into the company of John. At the time of painting this picture Yeats was sharing a studio with Edwin Ellis at. No. 74 Newman Strret,London near J.T. Nettleship - a member of the informal artistic brotherhood they had set up who recently published a collection of essays on Browning’s poetry. The brotherhood declared a common interest in Blake, Browning and the Pre-Raphaelite ideals as well as a belief in the solitary nature of the artist. Browning saw “Pippa Passes” at Todhunters and called on Yeats, who was out and never returned Brownings call. It had also been admired by Rossetti who invited Yeats to visit but again Yeats due to the awe in which he held Rossetti never took up the invitation. The model for Pippa in both this work and “Pippa Passes” has been identified as Nelly Whelan. This later work was also in Todhunters possession when Browning called and Todhunter lent both to the very successful 1901 Hone-Yeats exhibition that was organized by Sarah Purser and included 44 works by John Butler Yeats and 28 works by Hone. There is a label verso inscribed with a stanza from Robert Browning’s In a Gondola “Care no for the coward, care only to put aside thy beauteous hair, my blood will hurt” €2,000 - 4,000


63

66

Paul Henry RHA (1876-1958)

The Wild Sea

Oil on board, 17.5 x 24cm (6¾ x 9½”) Signed, original exhibition label verso Exhibited: “Paul Henry Retrospective Exhibition”, The Ritchie Hendriks Gallery May/June 1957; The Ulster Museum July 1957 and Shanon Airport August 1957, Catalogue No. 19. This may also be the work titled A Wild Sea, exhibited in Belfast and Dublin in 1918 Literature: Thought to be Catalogue No. 470 in Dr. S.B. Kennedy’s Catalogue Raissonne of the Artist’s Work, listed “Whereabouts Unknown”. It has been suggested this is the view towards Inisgloon Island which is fifty yards off the mainland at Keel, Achill €15,000 - 20,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


64

67

Paul Henry RHA RUA (1876-1958)

The Turf Bog (c.1941)

Oil on canvas, 35.5 x 41cm (14 x 16”) Signed, inscribed in the artist’s hand on a label on the original frame and framing label for Combridge’s Exhibited: Dublin, Combridge’s Gallery, Recent Paintings by Paul Henry, October 1941, Catalogue No. 3; London, Heal and Son, Pictures by Paul Henry RHA, January 1946, Catalogue No. 6 where purchased by the previous owner; whose family sold it in these rooms, 30th May 2007, Cat. No. 52; where purchased by the current owner Literature: S.B. Kennedy, Paul Henry-Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations, p.303, Ref No. 1031 The present work was almost certainly painted in the spring of 1941 when Henry stayed for a time in Killarney. €50,000 - 70,000


65

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


66

68

Wycliffe Egginton RI RCA (1875-1951)

Rowing Boats in Harbour

Watercolour, 36.5 x 55cm (14¼ x 21½”) Signed €500 - 700

69

Frank Egginton RCA, FIAL (1908-1990)

View from Howth

Watercolour, 53 x 74cm (20.75 x 29”) Signed and dated ‘79 €1,000 - 2,000


67

70

Frank Egginton RCA FIAL (1908-1990) A Turf Gatherer in Mountainous Landscape Watercolour, 37 x 53cm (14½ x 21”) Signed €800 - 1,200

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


68

The following nine pictures come from a collection formed over the last 20 years.

71

Rose Stapleton (20th/21st Century)

The Artist’s Kitchen

Oil on canvas, 61 x 50.5cm Signed ‘R. Stapleton Connolly’ and dated 1996 Exhibited: Jorgensen Fine Art, Dublin, May 1997, Interiors, Cat. No. 4 €2,000 - 3,000


69

72

Carey Clarke PRHA (b.1936)

Still Life with Donatello Angel (1990) Oil on canvas, 71 x 91.5cm (28 x 36”) Signed

Provenance: The Solomon Gallery, November 1990, Cat. No. 2, illustrated Exhibited: Irish Museum of Modern Art, November 2005-February 2006, SIAR 50:50 Years of Contemporary Irish Art Literature: Martello, 1991, illustrated p132; Miller’s Picture Price Guide, 1995, illustrated p526 €4,000 - 6,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


70

73

Conor Walton (b.1970)

Curtain Call

Acrylic and oil on canvas, 61.5 x 31cm (24.25 x 12.25”) Signed and dated 1997 Exhibited: Jorgensen Fine Art, Dublin, March 1999, Cat. No. 24 €1,500 - 2,000


71

74

Martin Gale RHA (b.1949)

August Storm

Oil on canvas, 91 x 119.5cm (35.8 x 47�) Signed; signed and dated 1989 verso Purchased from the artist as a special commission ₏5,000 - 8,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


72

75

Gemma Guihan (20th/21st Century)

Hallway Green

Oil on board, 90 x 49cm (35.5 x 19.25”) Signed and dated (20)‘01

76

Gemma Guihan (20th/21st Century)

Future Plans

Oil on canvas, 91 x 55.5cm (35.75 x 21.75”) Signed and dated (20)‘04

Exhibited: The Molesworth Gallery, Dublin, June 2002, Irish Georgian, Cat. No. 1, illustrated front cover

Exhibited: The Molesworth Gallery, Dublin, June 2004, Amid Great Chambers, Cat. No. 13, illustrated

€1,500 - 2,500

€1,500 - 2,500


73

77

Hilda van Stockum HRHA (1908-2006) Enchantment Lilies (1987) Oil on board, 77 x 58cm (30.3 x 22.8�) Signed with initials

Exhibited: Tom Caldwell Galleries, Dublin, 1988, Cat. No. 4, illustrated front cover of catalogue and where purchased by current owner â‚Ź3,000 - 5,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


74

78

Gigi Boyle (b.1961)

Ante-Room, Bruges Tempera, 39.5 x 29cm (15.5 x 11.5”) Signed with initials Provenance: The Solomon Gallery, Dublin €800 - 1,200


75

79

Francis Tansey (b.1959)

Linear Dialogue

Acrylic on canvas, 228.3 x 91cm (89.8 x 35.8”) Signed, dated ‘97 and inscribed with alternative title ‘Virtical (sic) Dialogue’ Provenance: Purchased from the artist as a special commission through The Solomon Gallery, Dublin, 1997 €4,000 - 6,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


76

80

John Dinan (20th Century)

Still Life with Ewer and Fruit Oil on canvas laid on board, 37.5 x 60cm (14.80 x 23.75”) Signed €800 - 1,200

81

Terese McAllister (20th Century)

Still Life with Peppers

Oil on canvas-board, 60 x 75cm (23.75 x 29.5”) Signed €1,000 - 2,000


77

82

Mark O’Neill (b.1963)

The Watering Can

Oil on board, 39 x 49cm (15¼ x 19¼”) Signed and dated 2001 Provenance: The Fredrick Gallery, Spring Exhibition, 2001; where purchased by the current owner €2,000 - 4,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


78

83

Mark O’Neill (b.1963)

Statue

Oil on board, 35 x 35cm (13¾ x 13¾”) Signed and dated 1997 €700 - 1,000

84

Mark O’Neill (b.1963)

Still life on plate

Oil on board, 15.5 x 26cm (16¼ x 10¼”) Signed and dated 1995 €500 - 700


79

85

Mark O’Neill (b.1963)

Still life with Garlic

Oil on board, 19 x 36.5cm (7½ x 14½”) Signed and dated 2001 €1,000 - 2,000

86

Mark O’Neill (b.1963)

White Roses

Watercolour and pencil, 19 x 26cm (7½ x 9”) Signed and dated 1994 €400 - 600

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


80 The following seven lots were a gift to the current owner from Lady Joyce Gunning Talbot de Malahide, his godmother.

87

Flora H. Mitchell (1890-1973)

The Guinness Barge, on the Liffey

Pen, ink and watercolour, 24.5 x 37.5cm (9.6 x 14.75”) Signed and inscribed ‘The River Liffey, Dublin’. Inscribed verso ‘Wet Afternoon, River Liffey’ and priced at 9 guineas Provenance:From the collection of Lady Joyce Gunning Talbot de Malahide; and a gift to the current owner, her godson There is an interesting note verso, probably in the artists’ hand about the prospect of producing a book. €800 - 1,200


81

88

Flora H. Mitchell (1890-1973)

College Green, Dublin

Pen, ink and watercolour, 23 x 29.5cm (9 x 11.6”) Signed, inscribed with title and dated ‘57 Provenance:From the collection of Lady Joyce Gunning Talbot de Malahide; and a gift to the current owner, her godson €1,000 - 1,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


82

89

Flora H. Mitchell (1890-1973)

College Street, Dublin

Pen, ink and watercolour, 24.5 x 34.5cm (9.6 x 13.6�) Signed and inscribed with title Provenance:From the collection of Lady Joyce Gunning Talbot de Malahide; and a gift to the current owner, her godson ₏800 - 1,200


83

90

Flora H. Mitchell (1890-1973)

The Bailey, Duke Street

Pen, ink and watercolour, 16 x 22cm (6.25 x 8.7”) Signed, inscribed ‘Duke Street, Dublin’ and dated ‘55 Provenance:From the collection of Lady Joyce Gunning Talbot de Malahide; and a gift to the current owner, her godson €1,000 - 1,500 Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


84

91

Flora H. Mitchell (1890-1973)

Kennan & Sons, Fishamble Street

Pen and ink, 24.5 x 18cm (9.6 x 7.1”) Signed and inscribed ‘No. 20 Fishamble St., Dublin, Handel’s “Messiah” produced here 1742’. Interesting inscribed label verso with the history of the street Provenance:From the collection of Lady Joyce Gunning Talbot de Malahide; and a gift to the current owner, her godson €500 - 700

92

Flora H. Mitchell (1890-1973)

Crampton Court, Dublin

Pen, ink and watercolour, 22 x 19cm (8.7 x 7.5”) Signed and inscribed with title Provenance:From the collection of Lady Joyce Gunning Talbot de Malahide; and a gift to the current owner, her godson €400 - 600


85

93

Flora Mitchell (1890-1973)

Wine Tavern Street, Dublin

Pen, ink and watercolour, 22.5 x 32.5cm (8.8 x 12.75�) Signed and inscribed with title Provenance:From the collection of Lady Joyce Gunning Talbot de Malahide; and a gift to the current owner, her godson ₏700 - 1,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


86

94

Flora H. Mitchell (1890-1973)

Crampton Court Dublin

Pen and ink, 28 x 24cm (11 x 9½”) Signed and inscribed, original extensively inscribed with title, label verso €800 - 1,200


87

95

James le Jeune RHA (1910-1983)

Capel Street from Grattan Bridge,Dublin Oil on canvas board, 51 x 61cm (20 x 24”) Signed. Artist’s studio label verso €2,000 - 4,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


88

96

Bob Richardson (1928-2005)

Bewleys, Grafton Street, Dublin Pastel, 36 x 44.5cm (14.25 x 17.5”)

Provenance: Solomon Gallery, Dublin, (exhibition label verso) €500 - 700

97

Peter Pearson (b.1955)

Sunlight Chamber

Oil on board, 31 x 39cm (12 x 15½”) Signed and dated ‘01 Exhibited: The Frederick Gallery, Peter Pearson Exhibition 2002, Catalogue No. 11; where purchased by the current owner €400 - 600


89

98

Patrick Leonard HRHA (1918-2005)

Waiting at Dollymount Bus Shelter, Evening Oil on canvas, 48.5 x 61cm (19 x 24”) Signed verso €3,000 - 4,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


90

99

John Doherty (b.1949)

‘In Passing’

Oil and acrylic on canvas, 30.5 x 30.5cm (12 x 12”) Signed, inscribed with title and dated ‘07 verso, also inscribed ‘part of ‘The War Horses of Old Court’ (1 of 5) series’ Provenance: Fenton Gallery, Cork, label verso €3,000 - 4,000


91

100

Kenneth Webb RWA FRSA RUA (b.1927)

Horse Fair, Ballinasloe

Oil on canvas, 66 x 101cm (26 x 39.75”) Signed €4,000 - 6,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


92

The Independent News and Media Art Collection Lots 101 - 167 This group of Irish paintings dates mainly from the 1980s and 1990s although there are several exceptions to this generalization. Joseph Malachy Kavanagh’s Flecked with Sunlight, for example, is from 1903; the George Russell (AE), Seated Figure by a Coastal Stream—the colours being unusually bright for Russell—probably dates from the 1910s or ’20s and Mainie Jellett’s Study of a Seated Woman surely belongs to the late 1920s or early ’30s. Tom Carr’s delightful watercolour, Returning Home, is dated 1960 and Martin Mooney’s View of the Four Courts, Dublin and View of the Customs House, Dublin were both painted as recently as 2001. The presence of these works illustrates the selective nature both of these particular pictures and of the nature of collecting itself. Yet, withal, it is the art of the 1980s and 1990s that clearly fascinated those who assembled the collection—the well known Sligo collector, Vincent Ferguson, was responsible for many of the acquisitions—which form its core. During the 1980s and 1990s the development of Irish art saw a consolidation of what one might term International Modernism. Modernism, since the 1920s or so, and notably after the establishment of the Irish Exhibition of Living art in 1943, had long influenced Irish artists, but always with some hesitancy. Now, however, Irish artists responded to Modernist influences directly, rather than merely adopting French or other continental idioms. In short, working in an Irish milieu, they produced Modernist works per se. Also at the time new forms of expression, such as Conceptualism, Minimalism and Performance Art, grew in importance. Moreover, unlike their predecessors, the new generation of artists showed little regard for national feelings or, as often, none at all. The result was to make Irish art highly eclectic and dominant trends of development became difficult to identify. Such evolution can be seen clearly in the present group of pictures which range from the soft, watery landscapes of T. P. Flanagan’s In Spring (Lot 103) or Sligo Sunset 1(Lot 104), the latter a study of Ben Bulben, to the bold Expressionism of Basil Blackshaw’s diptych, Two Trees, (Lot 105) or David Crone’s splendid Street Carnival, Sean McSweeney’s Bogland,(Lot 157) with its feeling for local colour and light, and Cecily Brennan’s Rhododendron Semi-circle (Lot 112). The semi-naturalism of Eithne Carr’s splendid Annaghmakerrig July, (Lot 101, opposite) Maurice Henderson Fry’s Fushia, (Lot 102, opposite) with its fullness of life, and Brian Ballard’s Rocks and Sea, Donegal, (Lot 108) are all good examples of current trends, as is Nick Miller’s Waiting for the New South Africa (Lot 131), with its hint of symbolism which is set down in a thoroughly Modernist fashion. Indeed, after years of abstraction, representational painting in one form or another is again to the fore in Ireland, as it is elsewhere. But perhaps the ‘star’ of the collection is Louis Le Brocquy’s Procession with Lilies


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

101

93

Eithne Carr RHA (b.1941)

‘Annaghmakerrig July’

Mixed media on canvas, 101 x 102cm (39¾ x 40”) Signed; also signed, inscribed and dated 1984 verso Tom Caldwell Gallery label verso €1,000 - 2,000

102

Maurice Henderson (Fry) (b.1941)

Fuschia

Oil on canvas, 100 x 85cm (39½ x 33½”) Signed ‘Maurice’ and dated 1985 €800 - 1,200

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


94

which, nevertheless, pulsates to the movement of the thronging crowd. Le Brocquy, who lived in London and in France for many years, was an artist with a thoroughly international outlook. It is always invidious to pick out one or two artists from among a representation of recent paintings such as this. However, some figures, because of their dominance here, warrant closer attention. Louis Le Brocquy, who died earlier this year, was widely regarded as a major painter of the twentieth century. He came to prominence in Ireland in the early 1940s with The Spanish Shawl, 1941, a composition the rejection of which by the Royal Hibernian Academy was one of the events that contributed directly to the establishment of the Irish Exhibition of Living Art in 1943. In the mid-to-late 1940s Le Brocquy’s paintings of tinker folk firmly established his reputation. More recently he was celebrated for his ‘Presences’ of well known authors, such as Frederico Garcia Lorca, W. B. Yeats, Samuel Beckett, Seamus Heaney and others. But apart from his painting, he made a huge impact on the art scene in Ireland and was for many years an ambassador abroad for Irish painting. Le Brocquy’s view of the world was Cartesian. He saw humans as composite beings, part physical and part spiritual, and it is the latter, the incorporeal soul imprisoned within the body, that most fascinated him, from his early studies of the loneliness of the individual—such as the Degas-inspired A Picnic, 1940—to the later Presences which J. P. Wilhelm described as ‘the spirit made visible’. T. P. Flanagan was one of the most important landscape painters and, arguably, the finest watercolourist of his generation working in Ireland. Born in Enniskillen, as a youngster he spent a good deal of time at Lissadell House in Co. Sligo, where the wooded estate and well-stocked library had a lifelong effect on his artistic outlook. From the former he developed an interest in landscape itself and from the latter he derived a keen interest in literature. He worked essentially in a representational manner, seeking ‘a human identity’ in his painting, which he thought abstraction denied, although, as he once said, all painting contains an element of abstraction. By the 1960s, interested in the subtleties of refraction and reflection, he explored the interplay of sky and water, light and luminosity, his forms often suspended in a flux of light and merging imperceptibly with one another. In 1964 he held his first Dublin exhibition which was well received. ‘There is real painterlieness and delicacy about his work,’ commented the Irish Times, ‘for these pictures … work on you like good music.’ His often moody early works were succeeded by the ‘Gortahork’ and ‘River Through Sand’ themes—throughout his career he worked thematically—for Flanagan found the north Donegal landscape invigorating, notably the semi-barren grandeur of the Bloody Foreland. Several magisterial compositions resulted from the period and represent the maturing of Flanagan’s art. Also in the 1960s he worked on a series of pictures on the subject of ice which, prophetically, came to echo the ‘troubles’ in Ulster of a decade later. These pictures have their origin in the tragic story of the Rooney brothers who froze to death on Lough Erne during the severe winter of 1961-2, their boats trapped in ice on the lake. An Ulster Elegy, 1971 (Fermanagh County Museum), was Flanagan’s way of paying homage to the Rooneys while also referring to the ‘troubles’, with their entrenched or ‘frozen’ social attitudes. In 1968 Flanagan acquired a cottage in Co. Donegal, and for a time his painting became Expressionist, as the four Roughra


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

103

95

Terence P. Flanagan RHA PRUA (1929-2011)

‘In Spring’ (1982)

Watercolour, 54 x 75cm (21½ x 29½”) Signed Provenance: Tom Caldwell Galleries €1,200 - 1,600

104

Terence P. Flanagan RHA PRUA (1929-2011)

Sligo Sunset (1984)

Watercolour, 40 x 50cm (15¾ x 19¾”) Signed and dated 1984 Provenance: Hendriks Gallery, Dublin, where purchased by Mr. Vincent Ferguson, December 1984 €1,000 - 1,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


96

paintings in Fermanagh Museum testify. Watercolour also assumes more importance in his work from this time, the medium permitting, as he put it, ‘tints of colour of such subtlety as to appear merely glimpsed and saturations of a rich depth and luminosity.’ Throughout his career Flanagan returned to his native Fermanagh for inspiration, as his ‘Castle Coole’ and ‘Lough Erne’ themes—which he first embarked upon in the early 1970s—illustrate. The owner of Castle Coole, Lord Belmore, once commented that Flanagan’s watercolours ‘read their subject as if poetry.’ In the 1980s Flanagan developed the calligraphic brushwork for which he is celebrated. Working increasingly in watercolours, he became adept at recording a thicket of undergrowth with apparent ease. Even when working in oils he retained the watercolourist’s clear, luminous palette, the paint being briskly applied with little over-working. Basil Blackshaw was a contemporary of Flanagan at the Belfast College of Art in the early 1950s. An Expressionist at heart, the existential act of painting is of paramount importance to him. While his subject matter is wide ranging—landscapes, portraits, figure and nude paintings and studies of animals—Blackshaw is never interested in merely documenting images or events. There is much humour in his work, which at times can verge on the abstract, although a keen eye will always recognise the source of his imagery. One of Blackshaw’s earliest admirers was John Hewitt of the Belfast Museum and Art Gallery (later Ulster Museum), who in 1955 purchased The Field for the museum’s collection. The Field, painted at Boardmills in Co. Down where the artist grew up, is autobiographical in concept—Blackshaw told the present writer that he ‘loved it and lived in it and beagled in it after hares’—and that with The Field he first knew how his art would develop. This sense of intimacy with his subject characterizes Blackshaw’s complete oeuvre. As Kenneth Jamison noted, he is ‘sensitive to a wide range of physical experiences—the countryside where he lived; the horses which he exercised and groomed; the dogs he bred … the doggy-men, squat and hunched, who exercised them … his youthful romantic attachments;’ these experiences, said Jamison, transformed him into an artist. The early influences on Blackshaw were Giacometti and Cézanne. From the former he derived a feeling for subtle expression and a sense of tension; while Cézanne led him to an analytical search of form and structure. While the influence of Cézanne lingered in his work throughout the 1970s and into the 1980s, for much of that time he was preoccupied in painting horses, which have always been part of the fabric of his life. He is, one could say, the finest Irish painter of horses since Jack Yeats, having a canny ability to capture the gait and movement of the animals. His paintings of other animals—dogs especially, and cockerels—are also supremely observed and he has the ability to invest each subject—even a wayside shack or tumbled down farm building—with, as Mike Catto observed, ‘its own power, dignity and beauty’ so that it takes its place in the natural order of things. In more recent years Blackshaw has painted many fine studies of the female nude and also portraits—his study of Vincent Ferguson, 1989, is a good example—and he has the ability to penetrate appearances to reach the inner personality of his sitter. David Crone first studied sculpture but later turned to painting, in which he was greatly influenced by Tom Carr and Romeo Toogood, who taught him to trust his own responses to things and to reflect upon them before committing them to canvas. Crone’s work, which is semi-autobiographical, is based on empathy for and observation of those around him. He is difficult to classify and owes allegiance to no movement or school. Like James Humbert Craig before him, he is excited by the momentary flicker of ethereal images, of the sudden effect caught unawares. But there is a universality about his work that distinguishes him from many of his contemporaries. His method, broadly speaking, is Expressionist, with a strong malerisch feel to his use of paint


97

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

105

Basil Blackshaw RHA RUA (b.1932)

Two Trees (Diptych)

Mixed media on paper, 112 x 153cm (44 x 60) Signed, also signed verso â‚Ź3,000 - 5,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


98

and his principal subject matter is landscape. This he treats in a refreshingly different manner from that of previous generations of Irish artists, restricting his attention to details of the scene and probing the structure of the terrain. He often divides his compositions into a number of ‘windows’, which lends a sense of uncertainty to his work, everything being in flux. These windows do not represent a series of individual vistas, as one might expect, but rather symbolize different ways in which we may view the world. In the early 1970s, like others in Northern Ireland, Crone was confronted with violence, which forced him to take stock anew. He had also come under the influence of the Scottish painter Alan Davie, whose expressive handling of paint excited him, although the sinister side of Francis Bacon also took on a relevance. Crone took an exploratory view of the landscape, which allowed him to develop a ‘stream of consciousness’ technique that became important to him. In particular, the process of making a painting dominanted—‘I paint primarily becauseI enjoy the business of painting’, he has said—rather than for content or narrative. Thus the way became clear for a more experimental use of colour, light, texture, atmosphere and drama. Slowly he became a painter of the urban scene, his studio in the heart of Belfast providing a vista of the street life around him. It is now that the idea of fusing layers of activity one upon another, as in Street (Lot 107) or Street Carnival (Lot 106), is employed, depicting, for example, people looking in a shop window, with its layers of reflections and actuality. As spectators, we are thus subsumed into the imagery overall so that the feeling of a ‘stream of consciousness’ is again present. In 1994 Crone settled in the country and the surrounding landscape soon exerted a power upon him that continues to the present. Colour is now more dominant than before, as are undergrowth and vegetation, and his handling of paint has grown more fluid as, like Monet, he explores his own garden. It is a fitting tribute to the optimism of the human spirit. Brian Ballard is a prolific painter who for some four decades has produced work of a very consistent quality. His style, as Marianne O’Kane Boal has written, is a blend of Post-Impressionism and Expressionism and his subject matter ranges over still life, landscape and figure painting. He is, too, a fine colourist as his Flowers in a Mirror 1985, (Lot 109) or White Lady and Mirror, 1987, (Lot 110) in this collection show. His brushwork is usually brisk and heavily laden with fluid colour, the spontaneity of execution always apparent, as in the Flowers in a Mirror (Lot 109) or Rocks and Sea, Donegal, 1984, (Lot 108) compositions. Eithne Carr’s Annaghmakerig July, 1984, (Lot 101) is a fine landscape, with its bold, semi-Expressionist brushwork and vibrant colours, yet the subject matter remains evident. Cicely Brennan’s Rhododendron Semi-circle (Lot 112) has also been treated in a loosely Expressionist manner, but conveys a flowing quality of rare intensity. In Across the Pond, Botanic Gardens,1988, (Lot 155) Victor Richardson records a splendid cacophony of colours set down in an almost Pointilliste manner.

S. B. Kennedy August 2012


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

106

99

David Crone RHA RUA (b.1937)

Street Carnival

Mixed media on paper, 85 x 108cm (33½ x 42½”) €1,000 - 1,500

107

David Crone RHA RUA (b.1937)

Street Mixed media on paper, 100 x 71cm (39¾ x 28½”) Provenance: Hendriks Gallery, Dublin €800 - 1,200

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


100

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

108

Brian Ballard RUA (b.1943)

Rocks and Sea, Donegal

Oil on canvas, 76 x 91cm (30 x 35¾) Signed and dated (19)’84 €3,000 - 5,v000


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

109

101

Brian Ballard RUA (b.1943)

Flowers in Mirror

Oil on canvas, 71 x 91cm (28 x 35½”) Signed and dated 1985 Provenance: Tom Caldwell Galleries €4,000 - 6,000

110

Brian Ballard RUA (b.1943)

White Lady and Mirror

Oil on canvas, 76 x 61cm (30 x 24”) Signed and dated (19)’87 €2,000 - 3,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


102

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

111

Cecily Brennan (b.1955)

Mountain Stream, July ‘86

Oil on paper, 66 x 97cm (26 x 38¼”) Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €1,000 - 1,500


103

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

112

Cecily Brennan (b.1955)

Rhododendron Semi-Circle

Pastel on paper, 80 x 103.5cm (31½ x 40¾”) Exhibited: “16th Festival International De La Peinyure”, Chateau Musée, Cagnes-sur-mer, France June - September 1984 €1,000 - 1,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


104

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

113

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Samuel Beckett (1981)

Lithograph, 32 x 27cm (12½ x 10½”) Signed and numbered 53/100 Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin (label verso incorrectly titled) €500 - 800

114

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

James Joyce (1981)

Lithograph, 32 x 27cm (12½ x 10½”) Signed and numbered 53/100 Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €500 - 800


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

115

105

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

William Butler Yeats (1981)

Lithograph, 32 x 27cm (12½ x 10½”) Signed and numbered 53/100 Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €500 - 800

116

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Seamus Heaney (1981)

Lithograph, 32 x 27cm (12½ x 10½”) Signed and numbered 53/100 Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €500 - 800

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


106

117

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Procession with Lilies

Oil on canvas, 115 x 147cm (45½ x 57¾”) Signed and dated (19)’84-85 verso; inscribed with title, dated 1984-85 and numbered ‘523’ on stretcher Literature: “Louis le Brocquy - Procession” Gandon Editions 1994, full page illustration p22 Exhibited: Japan - Kanagawa, Hyogo and Hiroshima, Jan - May 1991, ‘Louis le Brocquy, Images, Single and Multiple 1957-1990’, Cat. no. 57c, as Riverrun.Procession with Lilies II, Illus in colour p.78 Procession with Lilies is the second in a series of four major paintings by Louis le Brocquy. The catalyst for the subject was a photograph which appeared on 14th June 1939 in the Evening Herald and was sent to the artist, then living in France, by Robert Dobbyn, manager of the le Brocquy family oil business. It shows Dublin schoolgirls attired in white communion dresses, carrying bunches of lilies. They are returning from the Franciscan Church of Adam and Eve on Merchant Quay where they have taken part in the celebration of the feast of St. Anthony. The ceremonial aspect of the image appealed to the artist as well as the tension that it evoked between the playful innocence of childhood and the constraints of ritual and religion. Later the artist described its composition as evocative, ‘recalling even Botticelli... The whiteness of these girls holding their lilies, submerged in time, seemed to me to be equally mysterious’.1 While le Brocquy made some sketches based on the image in the 1940s and 1960s it was not until the mid 1980s that it inspired the series of Procession paintings. Whereas his earlier works such as the Presences and Heads series emphasised the isolation of the individual, the theme of the procession allowed le Brocquy to explore the dynamics of the group. The artist also connected the subject with the ideas of James Joyce, Bloomsday coinciding closely with the date of the photograph. He described the subject as ‘a Joycean charade, a conscious but fleeting actuality in a continuous progression of present thoughts’.2 This idea of the effect of memory on the passing moment is evoked in the painting through the use of fragmented forms which breaks up the sense of a specific historical instant frozen in time and space. Instead the resulting painting depicts the figures as elements integrated with their surrounding space and with each other through a cubist inspired flattening of perspective and faceting of form. The lack of solidity adds to the dynamism and fluidity of the composition. Le Brocquy emphasises the timeless aspects of the procession through the otherwordly appearance of the figures, the whiteness of whose costumes give them a ghostly air. The restricted palette of greys, green and whites, flecked by strong red and orange, and the darkened facial features similarly lend the subject a strange and perplexing quality. Ultimately however a sense of the joy and carefree attitude of childhood permeates the work with each figure expressing its individuality while remaining part of the procession. Dr. Roisin Kennedy August 2012 1. Louis le Brocquy. Procession, Gandon Editions, 1994, p.8. 2. Louis le Brocquy quoted in Louis le Brocquy Paintings 1939-1996, IMMA, 1996, p.83.

€250,000 - 350,000


107

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


108

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

118

James Allen (b.1941)

River Shadows

Watercolour, 53 x 74cm (20¾ x 29”) €400 - 600

119

James Allen (b.1941)

Riverbank I

Pencil and watercolour, 56 x 76cm (sheet size) (22 x 30”) Signed Tom Caldwell Galleries label verso €400 - 600


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

120

109

Patrick Collins RHA (1911-1994)

Field Stones

Oil on board, 71 x 87cm (28 x 34¾”) Signed Exhibited: Vincent and Noeleen Ferguson Collection, The RHA Gallagher Gallery Jan - March 1993, Cat No. 37, illustrated page 32 in accompanying catalogue. €7,000 - 10,000 Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


110

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

121

Terence P. Flanagan RHA PRUA (1929-2011)

Many Islands

Oil on canvas, 40 x 75cm (15¾ x 29½”) Signed and dated (19)’87; also signed, inscribed and dated verso Provenance: Hendriks Gallery, Dublin, where purchased by Mr Vincent Ferguson, June 1987 €2,000 - 3,000


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

122

111

Terence P. Flanagan RHA PRUA (1929-2011)

A Sultry Day

Oil on canvas, 71 x 91cm (28 x 35¾”) Signed and dated (19)’87 Provenance: Hendriks Gallery, Dublin, where purchased by Mr Vincent Ferguson €3,000 - 5,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


112

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

123

Clare Cryan (b.1936)

Reeds, Clouds Passing

Watercolour, 73 x 51cm (28¾ x 20”) Signed and dated (19)’81 Provenance: The Blue Door Studio, Dublin €600 - 800

124

Tom Carr HRHA HRUA ARWS (1909-1999)

Water Grasses

Watercolour, 58 x 76cm (22¾ x 30”) €600 - 1,000


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

125

113

Tom Carr HRHA HRUA ARWS (1909-1999)

Returning Home (1960)

Watercolour, 37 x 57cm (14½ x 22½”) Signed Provenance: Tom Caldwell Gallery, Belfast €1,500 - 2,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


114

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

126

David Crone RHA RUA (b.1937)

Tryst

Mixed media on paper, 100 x 71cm (39¾ x 28¼”) Provenance: Hendriks Gallery, Dublin €800 - 1,200

127

David Crone RHA RUA (b.1937)

Plants

Charcoal and acrylic, 73 x 52cm (28¾ x 20½) Exhibited: Tom Caldwell Galleries, 1982, Catalogue No. 10 €800 - 1,200


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

128

115

David Crone RHA RUA (b.1937)

Convivial Bar

Mixed media on paper, 54 x 74cm (21¾ x 29) €800 - 1,200

129

David Crone RHA RUA (b.1937)

After Rain

Watercolour and pastel, 75 x 100cm (29½ x 39¾”) Signed and dated 1984 Provenance: Tom Caldwell Galleries €800

-

1,

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


116

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

130

David Crone RHA RUA (b.1937)

Plant Pots

Acrylic on paper, 68 x 91cm (26¾ x 35¾”) Provenance: Tom Caldwell Galleries This work was awarded the silver medal at the 1982 Royal Ulster Academy annual exhibition €800 - 1,200


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

131

117

Nick Miller (b.1962)

‘Waiting for the New South Africa’

Composite monotype and black ink on paper mounted on canvas, 151 x 200cm (59½ x 78¾”) Signed; also signed, inscribed and dated 1992 verso €3,000 - 4,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


118

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

132

Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (b.1932)

Canal Bridge

Oil on paper, 60 x 60cm (23½ x 23½”) Provenance: Tom Caldwell Galleries Exhibited: Dublin, RHA Gallagher Gallery ‘The Vincent & Noleen Ferguson Collection’, January-March, 1993 €1,500 - 2,500


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

133

119

Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (b.1932)

“Looking West - Yellow and Grey”

Acrylic on paper, 100.5 x 67.5cm (39½ x 26½”) Signed and dated (19)’86 Provenance: Grant Fine Art, Newcastle, Co. Down €2,000 - 4,000 Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


120

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

134

Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (b.1932)

Reservoir Evening I

Acrylic on board, 62 x 76cm (24¼ x 30”) Signed Provenance: Tom Caldwell Galleries €1,500 - 2,500

135

Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (b.1932)

Reservoir Evening II

Acrylic on board, 62 x 76cm (24½ x 30”) Signed Provenance: Tom Caldwell Galleries €1,500 - 2,500


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

136

121

Michael Cullen RHA (b.1946)

Self Study IV (Annaghmakerrig)

Oil on paper, 62 x 86cm (24½ x 33¾”) Signed, inscribed with title and dated (19)’87 verso €1,500 - 2,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


122

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

137

Terence P. Flanagan PRUA (1929-2011)

‘Lough Coole, 2’

Oil on canvas, 61 x 99cm (24 x 40”) Signed Provenance: “T.P. Flanagan Exhibition” David Hendriks Gallery, Dublin, Sept/Oct 1981 Cat. No. 4 €2,000 - 4,000


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

138

123

Terence P. Flanagan RHA PRUA (1929-2011)

Spring

Oil on canvas, 96.5 x 117cm (38 x 46”) Signed Provenance: Hendriks Gallery, Dublin €3,000 - 5,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


124

139

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

Terence P. Flanagan RHA PRUA (1929-2011)

Lissadell Revisited (I)

Pastel, 83 x 59cm (32½ x 23¼) Signed, inscribed and dated (19)’83 Provenance: “T.P. Flanagan Exhibition” David Hendriks Gallery, Dublin, Nov/Dec 1983, Cat. No. 24, where purchased by Mr. Vincent Ferguson €1,000 - 1,500

140

Terence P. Flanagan RHA PRUA (1929-2011)

Above Lough Gill II

Watercolour, 100 x 79cm (39¾ x 31”) Signed and dated (19)’83 €2,000 - 3,000


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

141

125

Carey Clarke PRHA (b.1936)

The Small Chateau Oil on canvas, 51 x 61cm (20 x 24”) Signed €3,000 - 5,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


126

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

142

Martin Mooney (b.1960)

View of the Four Courts, Dublin

Oil on board (gesso, oil & liquin), 91 x 121cm (35¾ x 47½) Signed with initials and dated 2001; also signed, inscribed, dated and numbered ‘MM 0161’ verso Provenance: Solomon Gallery, Dublin €8,000 - 12,000


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

143

127

Martin Mooney (b.1960)

View of the Customs House, Dublin

Oil on board (gesso, oil & liquin), 91 x 121cm (35¾ x 47½”) Signed with initials and dated 2001; also signed, inscribed, dated and numbered ‘MM0162’ verso Provenance: Solomon Gallery, Dublin €8,000 - 12,000 Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


128

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

144

Joe Dunne RHA (b.1957)

‘Winning Waves’

Oil on board, 99 x 70cm (39 x 27½”) Signed and dated 1988 €600 - 1,000

145

Joe Dunne RHA (b.1957)

Sunlit Window

Oil on board, 88 x 60cm (34½ x 23½) Signed and dated 1984 and again verso €800 - 1,200


129

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

146

Richard Kingston RHA (1922-2003)

Last Bridge on the Dodder

Acrylic on board 59 x 62cm (23¼ x 24½”) Signed; also signed and inscribed verso €2,000 - 3,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


130

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

147

Joseph Malachy Kavanagh RHA (1856-1918)

Flecked with Sunlight

Oil on canvas, (lined) laid on board, 25 x 35.5cm (10 x 14”) Signed; also signed, inscribed and dated 1903 verso €1,000 - 1,500

148

Mainie Jellett (1897-1944)

Study of a Seated Woman

Gouache, 36 x 26cm (14 x 10¼”) €1,500 - 2,500


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

149

131

George Russell ‘Æ’ (1867-1935)

Seated Figure by a Coastal Stream Oil on canvas, 40 x 53cm (15¾ x 21”) Signed with monogram €4,000 - 6,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


132

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

150

Jacinta Feeney (b.1954)

The Garden reveals

Acrylic on paper, 64 x 89.5cm (25¼ x 35¼”) Provenance: Hendriks Gallery, Dublin €800 - 1,200

151

Sophie Aghajanian RUA (b.1943)

Freesias

Pastel and charcoal, 56 x 83cm (22 x 32¾”) Signed €600 - 800


133

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

152

Frank McKelvey RHA RUA (1895-1974)

West of Ireland Landscape with Thatched Farmstead Oil on board, 30 x 42cm (12 x 16½”) Signed €5,000 - 8,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


134

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

153

Marie Louise Martin (b.1960)

‘Mitzi’

Coloured etching, 73 x 46cm (sheet size) (28¾ x 18”) Signed, inscribed and numbered 22/25 Provenance: Jorgensen Fine Art, Dublin €200 - 300

154

Jeremy Henderson (1952 -2009)

‘On the Edge, No. 4’

Mixed media on paper, 55 x 76cm (21½ x 30”) Signed and dated (19)’87; also signed and inscribed verso €300 - 500


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

155

135

Victor Richardson (b.1952)

Across the Pond, Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin (1988) Pastel, 80 x 110cm (31½ x 43¾”) Signed

Provenance: The Solomon Gallery, Dublin €1,500 - 2,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


136

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

156

Gerald Davis (1938-2005)

Summer Bay

Oil on board, 56 x 75cm (22 x 29½) Signed and dated (19)’83; also signed, inscribed and dated verso €600 - 800

157

Sean McSweeney HRHA (b.1935)

Bogland

Oil on board, 24 x 29cm (9½ x 11½”) Signed; also signed and inscribed verso Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €1,000 - 1,500


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

158

137

Charles Brady HRHA (1926-1997)

Blue and White Palette on Paperbacks Oil on board, 21 x 27cm (8¼ x 10½”) Signed Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €1,500 - 2,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


138

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

159

Ken Donfield (b.1962)

Ha’penny Bridge, Dublin

Oil on board, 50 x 60cm (19¾ x 23½) Signed €400 - 600

160

Ken Donfield (b.1962)

View Towards Dun Laoghaire

Oil on canvas, 35 x 46cm (13¾ x 18”) Signed and dated (19)’89 €400 - 600

161

Ken Donfield (b.1962)

Lake and Mountain Landscape

Oil on board, 40 x 50cm (15¾ x 19¾”) Signed €200 - 400


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

162

139

Maurice Henderson (Fry) (b.1941)

White Anemone

Oil on canvas, 66 x 90cm (26 x 35½”) Signed ‘Maurice’ and ‘Fry 1988’; also signed and inscribed verso Provenance: Solomon Gallery, Dublin €800 - 1,200

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


140

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

163

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Thomas Kinsella (1981)

Lithograph, 32 x 27cm (12½ x 10½”) Signed and numbered 53/100 Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €500 - 800

164

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

John Millington Synge (1981)

Lithograph, 32 x 27cm (12½ x 10½”) Signed and numbered 53/100 Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €500 - 800


The Independent News and Media Art Collection

165

141

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

John Montague (1981)

Lithograph, 32 x 27cm (12½ x 10½”) Signed and numbered 53/100 Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €500 - 800

166

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Francis Stuart (1981)

Lithograph, 32 x 27cm (12½ x 10½”) Signed and numbered 53/100 Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin €500 - 800

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


142

The Independent News and Media Art Collection

167

Robert Janz (b.1932)

After Image / Rose (in 6 parts)

A set of six, acrylic on board, 56 x 35.8cm (22 x 14”) Each panel signed, inscribed and dated (19)’84 €600 - 800


143

168

Seán McSweeney HRHA (b.1935)

Rosskerragh (1988)

Oil on board 80 x 109cm (31½ x 43”) Signed, inscribed and dated ‘88 verso €6,000 - 8,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


144

169

Tony O’Malley HRHA (1913-2003)

Flowers on a Window-sill

Mixed media on paper, 39.5 x 27cm (15.55 x 10.6”) Signed with initials and dated 3/74 €700 - 1,000

170

Cecil King (1921-1985)

Traverse

Oil on paper, 18 x 18cm (7.1 x 7.1”) Signed Provenance: Oliver Dowling Galley, Dublin (original label verso) €400 - 600


145

171

Charles Brady HRHA (1926-1997)

Cashel Hill, Connemara

Oil on board, 43 x 45cm (16.75 x 17.25”) Signed and inscribed verso with title €2,000 - 4,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


146

172

Gerard Marjoram (20th/21st Century)

Connemara

Oil on canvas, 45 x 61cm (17¾ x 24”) Signed €500 - 800

173

Sarah Corner (20th/21st Century)

Deer at Muckross

Oil on board, 39.5 x 83cm (15.5 x 32.75”) Signed €500 - 700


147

174

Maurice MacGonigal PRHA (1900-1979)

Connemara Coast

Oil on canvas, 40 x 49.5cms (15.75 x 19.5”) Signed. Inscribed with title verso €3,000 - 5,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


148

175

Norman J. McCaig (1929-2001)

St. Stephen’s Green, Autumn

Oil on canvas, 23 x 29cm (9 x 11.5”) Signed €700 - 1000

176

Fergus O’Ryan RHA (1911-1989)

St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin

Oil on board, 27 x 39.5cm (10.5 x 15.5”) Signed €800 - 1,200


149

177

Fergus O’Ryan RHA (1911-1989)

Huband Bridge, Dublin

Oil on canvas, 75 x 101cm (29.5 x 39.75”) Signed €2,000 - 4,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


150

178

Fergus O’Ryan RHA (1911-1989)

Evening Light, near Cashel

Oil on board, 44 x 59cm (17.3 x 23.25”) Signed. Inscribed with title verso €600 - 1,000

179

Fergus O’Ryan RHA (1911-1989)

Reflections, Gap of Dunloe, Killarney Oil on board, 42.5 x 66cm (16.75 x 22”) Signed. Inscribed artist’s studio label verso €500 - 700

180

Fergus O’Ryan RHA (1911-1989)

The Twelve Pins, from Roundstone, Co. Galway Oil on canvas, 24 x 49cm (9.5 x 18.8”) Signed. Inscribed artist’s studio label verso (A.F.) €200 - 300


151

181

Brett McEntagart RHA (b.1939)

Summer Orchard

Oil on board, 39 x 60cm (15.25 x 23.75”) Signed, RHA exhibition label verso Exhibited: Royal Hibernian Academy, Annual Exhibition 1989 €700 - 1,000

182

Brett McEntagart RHA (b.1939)

Evening, DúnLaoghaire skyline

Oil on board, 30 x 45 cms (11.5x17.5”) Signed and dated (20) ‘07 €800 - 1,200

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


152

183

John Behan RHA (b.1938)

The Hound of Cúchulainn

Bronze on a white marble plinth, 20 cm high (not including plinth) 8” Signed, dated 1976 and numbered 1/6 €1,200 - 1,600


153

184

Krystina Pomeroy (20th/21st Century)

The Speckled Hen (unique)

Bronze, 44.5cm high Signed with the letter ‘K’ and 1/1 €1,500 - 2,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


154

185

Cynthia Moran (20th Century)

Seated Girl

Bronze, 37 x 32 x 15cm (14.5 x 10.5 x 6”) Signed €800 - 1200

186

Modern Irish School (20th Century)

Breton Girl Bronze on a polished stone base, 15cm high €400 - 600


155

187

Alwyn Gillespie (20th/21st Century)

Head of Catherine Fontaine (a friend of the artist)

Bronze on a black marble base, 33cm high (excluding base) (13”) One of two This piece was sculpted approximately fifteen years ago and was exhibited in the RHA annual exhibition at the time. Alwyn is a graduate of both the National College of Art & Design in Dublin and the Ulster College of Art & Design in Belfast. She works in both 2-D and 3-D. She has had several solo shows and has taken part in many group exhibitions throughout Ireland; in the Tom Caldwell Gallery, RHA and the Claremorris Open Show. She has sculpted many pieces including heads of well-known Irish personalities like the late Mick Lally and Rosaleen Linehan. €450 - 550

188

Sophia Rosamund Praeger (1867-1954)

The Philosopher

Bronze on a wooden plinth, 28cm high (excluding plinth), (11”) Signed and inscribed with title €1,000 - 2,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


156

189

Stella Steyn (1907-1987)

Classical Nude Studies, a set of three Conte on paper, 19.5 x 24cm (7.5 x 9.5�) Each stamped with studio stamp (3) ₏600 - 800


157

190

Markey Robinson (1918-1999)

Waiting for the Return of the Fishing Boats Gouache, 50 x 60cm (19½ x 23½”) Signed €2,500 - 3,500

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


158

191

Anita Shelbourne RHA (b.1938)

Morning Glory

Gouache, 48 x 58cms (19 x 23.5”) Signed, labels verso €300 - 500

192

Barbara Warren RHA (b.1925)

Caladh Chúlaim, Lettermullen Gouache, 28.5 x 48cm (11 x 18”) Signed, RHA Label Verso

Exhibited, Dublin, RHA Annual Exhibition, 1998, Cat. No. 445 €400 - 600


159

193

Pauline Bewick RHA (b.1935)

Seán and the Giant in Kerry

Ink and watercolour, 80 x 111cms (31.5 x 43.7”) Signed and dated Jan 1974 €1,500 - 2,000

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


160

194

Hilda van Stockum HRHA (1908-2006)

Self-Portrait

Oil on board, 51 x 34cm (20 x 13.4”) €600 - 800

195

Hilda Van Stockum HRHA (1908-2006)

Trees by the Canal

Oil on board, 29 x 38cm (11.5 x 15”) Signed with initials €200 - 400


161

196

John Skelton (1924 - 2009)

Blessington Lake, Summer 1987 Watercolour, 29 x 39cm (11½ x 15½”) Signed €500 - 800

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


162

197

Mainie Jellett (1897-1944)

Abstract composition

Sepia wash, irregular form, 15 x 13.5 cms €300 - 500

198

Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)

Stained Glass Study with Manuscript Gouache and ink, 25 x 22cm (9.84 x 8.66”) €800 - 1200


163

199

Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)

Study for Stained Glass - Triptych Gouache, 41 x 46cm overall (16 x 18”)

Provenance: Jorgenson Fine Art, Dublin €1,500 - 2,500

200

Evie Hone HRHA (1894 - 1955)

Crucifixion

Ink and watercolour on paper , 27 x 17.5 cms (10.6 x 6.9”) Signed on mount €800 - 1,w200

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


164

201

Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Portrait of a Lady

Pastel, 50 x 35cm (19½ x 13¾”) Signed and dated 28-7-42, also inscribed “Mrs. Babs Kennedy” €400 - 600

202

Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Portrait of Peggy Manley

Pastel and chalks, 45 x 35cm (17¾ x 13¾”) Signed, inscribed and dated (19)’39 €400 - 600


165

203

Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Portrait of Jack Warren

Pastel, 51 x 37cm (20 x 14½”) Signed, inscribed and dated (19)’30 €400 - 600

204

Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Portrait of a Gentleman

Pastel, 36 x 27cm (14 x 10½”) Signed and dated (19)’35 €400 - 600

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


166

205

Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Portrait of Miss Siobhan Taylor

Oil pastel, 40 x 29cm (15¾ x 11½”) Signed and dated (19)’66, apparently inscribed verso with sitter’s name €400 - 600

206

Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Portrait of a Lady

Oil pastel, 39 x 30cm (15½ x 12”) Signed and dated (19)’68 €400 - 600


167

207

Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Portrait of a Young Bearded Gentleman Oil pastel, 36.5 x 27.5cm (14 x 11”) Signed and dated (19)’42 €400 - 600

208

Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Portrait of a Young Man

Pastel, 37 x 28cm, (14½ x 11”) Signed and dated (19)’53 €400 - 600

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


168

210

Maura Laverty Kind Cooking

With a section on diet by Sybil le Brocquy and decorations by Louis le Brocquy Published by The Kerryman Ltd. Tralee Signed by the authors Maura Laverty, Sybil le Brocquy and the illustrator Louis le Brocquy A rare copy featuring all three signatures. €200-400

211

Maura Laverty

Kind Cooking

With a section on diet by Sybil le Brocquy and decorations by Louis le Brocquy Published by The Kerryman Ltd. Tralee With a personal inscription dated Christmas 1945 from Maura Laverty to Ethel (a friend of the author) €120 - 160


169

The following ten lots come from the private collection of an Irish vendor, whose father Frank Bowers was a printer at The Dolmen Press in the 1970s. He was directly involved in the entire print making process from the original colour selection to the amount of copies that were produced. Each print is inscribed with handwritten instructions and notes fromBowers for the final draft.

212

Cuala Press

No. 1 Evening by Jack Butler Yeats Hand-coloured print, 20 x 30cm â‚Ź100 - 150

213

Cuala Press

No. 58 The Fiddler of Dooney, Poem by W.B. Yeats Hand-coloured print, 38 x 28cm â‚Ź100 - 150

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


170 214

Cuala Press

Six hand-coloured Cuala Press prints including:

No. 59 Silver Apples; No. 282 Heart’s Desire; No. 263 Road Rise; No. 60 Coole Park; No. 304 Christmas Hearth (2 copies, one uncoloured); No. 295. Various sizes, some inscribed with notes and instructions. (7) €200 - 300

215

Cuala Press

No. 245 St. Patrick and No. 268 St. Columba Two hand-coloured prints, 38 x 18cm each (2) €150 - 200

216

Cuala Press

No. 275 Half a Bap; No. 361 Weather-wise

Two hand-coloured prints, 27.5 x 19cm; 28 x 20.5cm (2) €100 - 150

215

216

217

Cuala Press

No. 2 The Post-Car by Jack Butler Yeats Hand-coloured print, 21.5 x 30.5cm €150 - 200


171 218

Cuala Press

No. 31 A Shop in Sailor Town by Jack Butler Yeats Hand-coloured print, 14 x 20cm €100 - 150

219

Cuala Press

A selection of uncoloured prints including:

No. 6 Mountain Farm; No. 283 The Turf Cart; No. 270 A Little House; No. 251 Be Glad of Life!; No. 60 Coole Park; No. 295; No. 262 A Blessing; No. 17 The Fiddler; No. 304 Christmas Hearth; No. 275 Half a Bap; St. Brigid; No. 59 Silver Apples Various sizes (12) (12) €200 - 300

220

Cuala Press

A collection of four hand-coloured prints including:

No. 57 Quotation from the Celtic Twilight; No. 54 The Lover Tells of the Rose; No. 55 Into the Twilight; No. 51 The Lover Pleads with his Friends 28 x 38cm each (4) €100 - 150

221

219

220

Cuala Press

A collection of uncoloured prints including:

No. 58 The Fiddler of Dooney; No. 1 Evening; No. 31 A Shop in Sailor Town; No. 2 The Post-Car; No. 54 The Lover Tells of the Rose; No. 55 Into the Twilight; No. 57 Quotation from The Celtic Twilight; No. 52 The Lake Isle of Innisfree; No. 230 Wise Small Birds; No. 56 The Pity of Love; No. 8 The Pookawn 28 x 38cm each (13) €200 - 300 Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


General Terms and Conditions of Business The Auctioneer carries on business on the following terms and conditions and on such other terms or conditions as may be expressly agreed with the Auctioneer or set out in any relevant Catalogue. Conditions 12-21 relate mainly to buyers and conditions 22-32 relate mainly to sellers. Words and phrases with special meanings are defined in condition 1. Buyers and sellers are requested to read carefully the Cataloguing Practice and Catalogue Explanation contained in condition 2.

DEFINITIONS AND GENERAL CONDITIONS Definitions 1. In these conditions the following words and expressions shall have the following meanings: ‘Auctioneer’ – James Adam & Sons. ‘Auctioneer’s Commission’ – The commission payable to the Auctioneer by the buyer and seller as specified in conditions 13 and 25. ‘Catalogue’ – Any advertisement, brochure, estimate, price list or other publication. ‘Forgery’ – A Lot which was made with the intention of deceiving with regard to authorship, culture, source, origin, date, age or period and which is not shown to be such in the description therefore in the Catalogue and the market value for which at the date of the auction was substantially less than it would have been had the Lot been in accordance with the Catalogue description. ‘Hammer Price’ – The price at which a Lot is knocked down by the Auctioneer to the buyer.

‘Attributed to’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer probably a work of the artist. ‘Studio of/Workshop of ’ In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work executed in the studio of the artist and possibly under his supervision. ‘Circle of ’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work of the period of the artist and showing his influence. ‘Follower of ’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work executed in the artist’s style yet not necessarily by a pupil. ‘Manner of ’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work executed in artist’s style but of a later date. ‘*’; None of the terms above are appropriate but in the Auctioneer’s opinion the work is a work by the artist named.

‘Lot’ – Any item which is deposited with the Auctioneer with a view to its sale at auction and, in particular, the item or items described against any Lot number in any Catalogue. ‘Proceeds of Sale’ – The net amount due to the seller being the Hammer Price of the Lot after deducting the Auctioneer’s Commission thereon under condition 25 the seller’s contribution towards insurance under condition 26, such VAT as is chargeable and any other amounts due by the seller to the Auctioneer in whatever capacity howsoever arising. ‘Registration Form or Register’ – The registration form (or, in the case of persons who have previously attended at auctions held by the Auctioneer and completed registration forms, the register maintained by the Auctioneer which is compiled from such registration forms) to be completed and signed by each prospective buyer or, where the Auctioneer has acknowledged pursuant to condition 12 that a bidder is acting as agent on behalf of a named principal, each such bidder prior to the commencement of an auction. ‘Sale Order Form’ – The sale order form to be completed and signed by each seller prior to the commencement of an auction. ‘Total Amount Due’ – The Hammer Price of the Lot sold, the Auctioneer’s Commission due thereon under condition 13, such VAT as is chargeable and any additional interest, expenses or charges due hereunder. ‘V.A.T.’ – Value Added Tax. Cataloguing Practice and Catalogue Explanations 2. Terms used in Catalogues have the following meanings and the Cataloguing Practice is as follows: The first name or names and surname of the artist; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work by the artist. The initials of the first name(s) and the surname of the artist; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work of the period of the artist and which may be in whole or in part the work of the artist. The surname only of the artist; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a work of the school or by one of the followers of the artist or in his style. The surname of the artist preceded by ‘after’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer a copy of the work of the artist. ‘Signed’/’Dated’/’lnscribed’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer the work has been signed/dated/inscribed by the artist. ‘With Signature’/’with date’/’with inscription’; In the opinion of the Auctioneer the work has been signed/dated/inscribed by a person other than the artist.

GENERAL CONDITIONS Auctioneer Acting as Agent 3. The Auctioneer is selling as agent for the seller unless it is specifically stated to the contrary. The Auctioneer as agent for the seller is not responsible for any default by the seller or the buyer. Auctioneer Bidding on behalf of Buyer 4. It is suggested that the interests of prospective buyers are best protected and served by the buyers attending at an auction. However, the Auctioneer will, if instructed, execute bids on behalf of a prospective buyer. Neither the Auctioneer nor its employees, servants or agents shall be responsible for any neglect or default in executing bids or failing to execute bids. Admission to Auctions 5. The Auctioneer shall have the right exercisable in its absolute discretion to refuse admission to its premises or attendance at its auctions by any person. Acceptance of Bids 6. The Auctioneer shall have the right exercisable in its absolute discretion to refuse any bids, advance the bidding in any manner it may decide, withdraw or divide any Lot, combine any two or more Lots and, in the case of a dispute, to put any Lot up for auction again. Indemnities 7. Any indemnity given under these conditions shall extend to all actions, proceedings, claims, demands, costs and expenses whatever and howsoever incurred or suffered by the person entitled to the benefit of the indemnity and the Auctioneer declares itself to be a trustee of the benefit of every such indemnity for its employees, servants or agents to the extent that such indemnity is expressed to be for their benefit. Representations in Catalogues 8. Representations or statements made by the Auctioneer in any Catalogue as to contribution, authorship, genuineness, source, origin, date, age, provenance, condition or estimated selling price or value is a statement of opinion only. Neither the Auctioneer nor its employees, servants or agents shall be responsible for the accuracy of any such opinions. Every person interested in a Lot must exercise and rely on their own judgment and opinion as to such matters. 9. The headings of the conditions herein contained are inserted for convenience of reference only and are not intended to be part of, or to effect, the meaning or interpretation thereof.


CONDITIONS WHICH MAINLY CONCERN THE BUYER The Buyer 12. The buyer shall be the highest bidder acceptable to the Auctioneer who buys at the Hammer Price. Any dispute which may arise with regard to bidding or the acceptance of bids shall be settled by the Auctioneer. Every bidder shall be deemed to act as principal unless the Auctioneer has prior to the auction, acknowledged in writing that a bidder is acting as agent on behalf of a named principal. Commission 13. The buyer shall pay the Auctioneer a commission at the rate of 20%, exclusive of vat, of the Hammer Price payable in respect of any Lot. Payment 14. Unless credit terms have been agreed with the Auctioneer before the auction the buyer of a Lot shall pay to the Auctioneer within one (1) day from the date of the auction the Total Amount Due. Notwithstanding this, the Auctioneer may, in its sole discretion, require a buyer to pay a deposit of 25% of the Total Amount Due at the conclusion of the auction. The Auctioneer may apply any payments received by a buyer towards any sums owing from that buyer to the Auctioneer on any account whatever regardless of any directions of the buyer or his agent in that regard whether express or implied.

(f )

To retain that Lot or any other Lot purchased by the buyer whether at the same or any other auction and release same to the buyer only after payment to the Auctioneer of the Total Amount Due.

(g)

To apply any sums which the Auctioneer received in respect of Lots being sold by the buyer towards settlement of the Total Amount Due. To exercise a lien on any property of the buyer in the possession of the Auctioneer or whatever reason.

(h)

Liability of Auctioneer and Seller 19. Prior to auction ample opportunity is given for the inspection of the Lots on sale and each buyer by making a bid acknowledges that he has, by exercising and relying on his own judgment, satisfied himself as to the physical condition, age and Catalogue description of each Lot (including but not restricted to whether the Lot is damaged or has been repaired or restored). All Lots are sold with all faults and imperfections and errors of description. None of the seller, the Auctioneer nor any of their employees, servants or agents shall be responsible for any error of description or for the condition or authenticity of any Lot. No warranty whatsoever is given by the seller or Auctioneer or by any of their employees, servants or agents in respect of any Lot and any condition or warranty express or implied by statute or otherwise is hereby specifically excluded. Forgeries 20. Any amount paid by a buyer in respect of a Lot which, if it is proved within three (3) years of the date of the auction at which it was purchased, to have been a Forgery shall be refunded to the seller subject to the provisions hereof, provided that:

The Auctioneer shall only accept payment from successful bidders in cash or by the bidder’s own cheque. Cheques drawn by third parties, whether in the Auctioneer’s favour or requiring endorsement, shall not be accepted.

(a)

The Lot has been returned by the buyer to the Auctioneer within three (3) years of the date of the auction in the same condition in which it was at the time of the auction together with evidence proving that it is a Forgery, the number of the Lot and the date of the auction at which it was purchased;

Reservation of Title 15. Notwithstanding delivery or passing of risk to the buyer the ownership of a Lot shall not pass to the buyer until he has paid to the Auctioneer the Total Amount Due.

(b)

The Auctioneer is satisfied that the Lot is a Forgery and that the buyer has and is able to transfer good and marketable title to the Lot free from any third party claims;

Collection of Purchases 16. The buyer shall at his own expense collect the Lot purchased not later than (2) days after the sale etc (2) days after the date of the auction but (unless credit terms have been agreed with the Auctioneer pursuant to condition 14) not before payment to the Auctioneer of the Total Amount Due. The buyer shall be responsible for any removal, storage and insurance charges in respect of any Lot which is not taken away within seven (2) days after the date of the auction. The purchased Lot shall be at the buyer’s risk in all respects from the earlier of the time of collection or the expiry of one (1) day from the date of the auction. Neither the Auctioneer nor its employees, servants or agents shall thereafter be liable for any loss or damage of any kind howsoever caused while a purchased Lot remains in its custody or control after such time. Packaging and Handling of Purchased Lots 17. Purchased Lots may be packed and handled by the Auctioneer, its employees, servants or agents. Where this is done it is undertaken solely as a courtesy to buyers and at the discretion of the Auctioneer. Under no circumstances shall the Auctioneer, its employees, servants or agents be liable for damage of any kind and howsoever caused to glass or frames nor shall the Auctioneer be liable for the errors or omissions of, or for any damage caused by, any packers or shippers which the Auctioneer has recommended.

FURTHER PROVIDED THAT the buyer shall have no rights hereunder if: (i) The description of the Lot in the Catalogue at the time of the auction was in accordance with the then generally accepted opinion of scholars or experts or fairly indicated that there was a conflict of such opinion; (ii)

The buyer’s sole entitlement under this condition is to a refund of the actual amount paid by him in respect of the Lot. Under no circumstances shall the Auctioneer be liable for any damage, loss (including consequential, indirect or economic loss) or expense suffered or incurred by the buyer by reason of the Lot being a Forgery. The benefit of this condition shall be solely and exclusively for the buyer and shall not be assignable. The buyer shall for the purpose of this condition be the person to whom the original invoice in respect of the sale of the Lot is made. Photographs 21. The buyer authorises the Auctioneer at any time to make use of any photographs or illustrations of the Lot purchased by the buyer for such purposes as the Auctioneer may require.

Non-Payment or Failure to Collect Purchased Lots 18. If a buyer fails to pay for and/or collect any purchased Lot by the dates herein specified for payment and collection the Auctioneer shall, in its absolute discretion and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies it may have, be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies without further notice to the buyer: (a)

To issue court proceedings for damages for breach of contract;

(b)

To rescind the sale of that Lot or any other Lots sold to the buyer whether at that or at any other auction;

(c)

To resell the Lot or cause it to be resold whether by public auction or private sale. In the event that there is a deficiency between the Total Amount Due by the buyer and the amount received by the Auctioneer on such resale after deduction of any necessary expenses the difference shall be paid to the Auctioneer by the buyer. Any surplus arising shall belong to the seller.

(d)

To store (whether at the Auctioneer’s premises or elsewhere) and insure the purchased Lot at the expense of the buyer.

(e)

To charge interest on the Total Amount Due at the rate of 2% over and above the base rate from time to time of Bank of Ireland or if there be no such rate, the nearest equivalent thereto as determined by the Auctioneer in its absolute discretion from the date on which payment is due hereunder to the date of actual payment.

The only method of establishing at the time of the auction in question that the Lot was a Forgery would have been by means of scientific processes which were not generally accepted for use until after the date of the auction or which were unreasonably expensive or impractical.

CONDITIONS WHICH MAINLY CONCERN THE SELLER Auctioneer’s Discretion 22. With regard to the sale of any Lot the Auctioneer shall have the following powers exercisable solely in the discretion of the Auctioneer: (i)

To decide whether to offer any Lot for sale or not;

(ii)

To decide whether a particular Lot is suitable for sale by the Auctioneer and, if so, to determine which auction, the place and date of sale, the conditions of sale and the manner in which such sale should be conducted;

(iii)

To determine the description of any Lot in a Catalogue.

(iv)

To decide whether the views of any expert shall be obtained and to submit Lots for examination by any such experts.

(v)

To determine what illustration of a Lot (if any) is to be included in the Catalogue.


23. The seller warrants to the Auctioneer and to the buyer that he is the true owner of the Lot or is legally authorised to sell the Lot on behalf of the true owner and can transfer good and marketable title to the Lot free from any third party claims. As regards Lots not held by the Auctioneer on its premises or under its control the seller warrants and undertakes to the Auctioneer and the buyer that the Lot will be available and in a deliverable state on demand by the Auctioneer or buyer. The seller shall indemnify the Auctioneer and the buyer or any of their respective employees, servants or agents against any loss or damage suffered by any of them in consequence of any breach of the above warranties or undertakings by the seller.

Reserves 24. Subject to the Auctioneer’s discretion, the seller shall be entitled prior to the auction to place a reserve on any Lot. All reserves must be agreed in advance by the Auctioneer and entered on the Sale Order Form or subsequently be confirmed in writing to the Auctioneer prior to auction. This also applies to changes in reserves. A reserve may not be placed upon any Lots under €500 in value. The reserve shall be the minimum Hammer Price at which the Lot may be sold by the Auctioneer. A reserve once in place may only be changed with the consent of the Auctioneer. A commission shall be charged on the ‘knock-down’ bid for Lots which fail to reach the reserve price. Such commission shall be 5% of the ‘knock-down’ bid. This commission and any VAT payable thereon must be paid before removal of the Lot after the auction. The minimum commission hereunder shall be €50. The Auctioneer may in its sole discretion sell a Lot at a Hammer Price below the reserve therefore but in such case the Proceeds of Sale to which the seller shall be entitled shall be the same as they would have been had the sale been at the reverse. Unless a reserve has been placed on a Lot in accordance with the provisions set out above such Lot shall be put up for sale without reserve. In the event that any reserve price is not reached at auction then for so long as the Lot remains with the Auctioneer and to the extent that the Lot has not been re-entered in another auction pursuant to condition 31 the seller authorises the Auctioneer to sell the Lot by private treaty at not less than the reserve price. The Auctioneer shall ensure that in such a case those conditions herein which concern mainly the buyer shall, with any necessary modification, apply to such sale.

Commission 25. The seller shall pay the Auctioneer commission at the rate of 10% on the Hammer Price of all Lots sold on behalf of the seller at Irish Art Sales and 17.5% on the Hammer Price of all Lots sold on behalf of the seller at Fine Art, Wine and Militaria Sales together with V.A.T. thereon at the applicable rate. The seller authorises the Auctioneer to deduct from the Hammer Price paid by the buyer the Auctioneer’s Commission under this condition; VAT payable at the applicable rates and any other amounts due by the seller to the Auctioneer in whatever capacity howsoever arising. The seller agrees that the Auctioneer may also receive commission from the buyer pursuant to condition 13.

Insurance 26. Unless otherwise instructed by the seller, all Lots (with the exception of motor vehicles) deposited with the Auctioneer or put under its control for sale shall automatically be insured by the Auctioneer under the Auctioneer’s own fine arts policy for such sum as the Auctioneer shall from time to time in its absolute discretion determine. The seller shall pay the Auctioneer a contribution towards such insurance at the rate of 1.5% of the Hammer Price plus VAT. If the seller instructs the Auctioneer not to insure a Lot then the Lot shall at all times remain at the risk of the seller who undertakes to indemnify the Auctioneer and hold the Auctioneer harmless against any and all claims made or proceedings brought against the Auctioneer of whatever nature and howsoever and wheresoever occurring for loss or damage to the Lot. The sum for which a Lot is covered for insurance under this condition shall not constitute and shall not be relied upon by the seller as a representation, warranty or guarantee as to the value of the Lot or that the Lot will, if sold by the Auctioneer, be sold for such amount. Such insurance shall subsist until such time as the Lot is paid for and collected by the buyer or, in the case of Lots sold which are not paid for or collected by the buyer by the due date hereunder for payment or collection such due date or, in the case of Lots which are not sold, on the expiry of seven (7) days from the date on which the Auctioneer has notified the seller to collect the Lots.

Recision of Sale 27. If before the Auctioneer has paid the Proceeds of Sale to the seller the buyer proves to the satisfaction of the Auctioneer that the Lot sold is a Forgery and the requirements of condition 20 are satisfied the Auctioneer shall rescind the sale and refund to the buyer any amount paid to the Auctioneer by the buyer in respect of the Lot.

Payment of Proceeds of Sale 28. The Auctioneer shall remit the Proceeds of Sale to the seller not later than thirty (30) days after the date of the auction, provided however that, if by that date, the Auctioneer has not received the Total Amount Due from the buyer then the Auctioneer shall remit the Proceeds of Sale within seven (7) working days after the date on which the Total Amount Due is received from the buyer. If credit terms have been agreed between the Auctioneer and the buyer the Auctioneer shall remit to the seller the Proceeds of Sale not later than thirty (30) days after the date of the auction unless otherwise agreed by the seller. If before the Total Amount Due is paid by the buyer the Auctioneer pays the seller an amount equal to the Proceeds of Sale then title to the Lot shall pass to the Auctioneer. If the buyer fails to pay the Auctioneer the Total Amount Due within fourteen (14) days after the date of the auction, the Auctioneer shall endeavour to notify the seller and take the seller’s instructions on the course of action to be taken and, to the extent that it is in the sole opinion of the Auctioneer feasible, shall endeavour to assist the seller to recover the Total Amount Due from the buyer provided that nothing herein shall oblige the Auctioneer to issue proceedings against the buyer in the Auctioneer’s own name. If circumstances do not permit the Auctioneer to take instructions from the seller or, if after notifying the seller, it does not receive instructions within seven (7) days, the Auctioneer reserves the right, and is hereby authorised by the seller at the seller’s expense, to agree special terms for payments of the Total Amount Due, to remove, store and insure the Lot sold, to settle claims made by or against the buyer on such terms as the Auctioneer shall in its absolute discretion think fit, to take such steps as are necessary to collect monies due by the buyer to the seller and, if necessary, to rescind the sale and refund money to the buyer.

Payment of Proceeds to Overseas Sellers 29. If the seller resides outside Ireland the Proceeds of Sale shall be paid to such seller in Euro unless it was agreed with the seller prior to the auction that the Proceeds of Sale would be paid in a currency (other than Euro) specified by the seller in which case the Proceeds of Sale shall be paid by the Auctioneer to the seller in such specified currency (provided that that currency is legally available to the Auctioneer in the amount required) calculated at the rate of exchange quoted to the Auctioneer by its bankers on the date of payment.

Charges for Withdrawn Lots 30. Once catalogued, Lots withdrawn from sale before proofing/publication of Catalogue will be subject to commission of 5% of the Auctioneer’s latest estimate of the auction price of the Lot withdrawn together with VAT thereon and any expenses incurred by the Auctioneer in relation to the Lot. If Lots are withdrawn after proofing or publication of Catalogue they will be subject to a commission of 10% of the Auctioneer’s latest estimate of the auction price of the Lot withdrawn together with VAT thereon and any expenses incurred by the Auctioneer in relation to the Lot. All commission hereunder must be paid for before Lots withdrawn may be removed.

Unsold Lots 31. Where any Lot fails to sell at auction the Auctioneer shall notify the seller accordingly and (in the absence of agreement between the seller and the Auctioneer to the contrary) such Lot may, in the absolute discretion of the Auctioneer, be re-entered in the next suitable auction unless instructions are received from the seller to the contrary, otherwise such Lots must be collected at the seller’s expense within the period of thirty (30) days of such notification from the Auctioneer. Upon the expiry of such period the Auctioneer shall have the right to sell such Lots by public auction or private sale and on such terms as the Auctioneer in its sole discretion may think fit. The Auctioneer shall be entitled to deduct from the price received for such Lots any sums owing to the Auctioneer in respect of such Lots including without limitation removal, storage and insurance expenses, any commission and expenses due in respect of the prior auction and commission and expenses in respect of the subsequent auction together with all reasonable expenses before remitting the balance to the seller. If the seller cannot be traced the balance shall be placed in a bank account in the name of the Auctioneer for the seller. Any deficit arising shall be due from the seller to the Auctioneer. Any Lots returned at the seller’s request shall be returned at the seller’s risk and expense and will not be insured in transit unless the Auctioneer is so instructed by the seller.

Auctioneer’s Right to Photographs and Illustrations 32. The seller authorises the Auctioneer to photograph and illustrate any Lot placed with if for sale and further authorises the Auctioneer to use such photographs and illustrations and any photographs and illustrations provided by the seller at any time in its absolute discretion (whether or not in connection with the auction).


175

Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


176


177

Est 1887

Country House Collections at Slane Castle Tuesday October 9th 2012 at 10.30am

Viewing at Slane Castle, Co. Meath Saturday 6th & Sunday 7th October 11.00am - 5.00pm Monday 8th October 9.30am - 4.00pm Catalogue will be available shortly. Please see www.adams.ie for more details Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012 at 6.00pm


178

Est 1887

Richard Thomas Moynan RHA “The Travelling Show” Est: €150,000-€250,000 Sean O’Sullivan RHA “The Old Couple” Est: €40,000-€60,000

Kathleen Fox “Ruins of the Four Courts” (1922) €15,000-€25,000

Henry Allan RHA “The Rag Pickers” Est: €30,000-€50,000


179

I M P ORTA N T I R I S H A RT Auction Wednesday 5th December 2012

Gerard Dillon RHA RUA (1916-1971) Bog Road Est: €30,000-€50,000

Frank McKelvey RHA RUA (1895-1974) Regatta Day, Holywood Est: €20,000-€30,000

William John Leech RHA (1881 - 1968) Lake Geneva, Winter (1911) Est: €20,000-€30,000

Highlights viewing in Belfast 14th - 23rd November The Ava Gallery, Clandeboye Full Sale viewing in Dublin 2nd - 5th December Adam’s, 26 St. Stephen’s Green Further entries are being accepted for this prestigious sale. Est 1887

Est 1887

at Clandeboye

The AVA Gallery Clandeboye Estate Bangor, Co. Down BT19 IRN (T) +44 (0)28 91852263 web: www.adamsatclandeboye.ie

26 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2 Tel +353 1 6760261 Fax +353 1 6624725 info@adams.ie Important Irish Art, Wednesday 26th September 2012www.adams.ie at 6.00pm


180

A Aghajanian, Sophie 151 Allen, James 118, 119 Armstrong, Arthur 1, 8 B Ballard, Brian 108-110 Barton, Mary Georgina 46 Barton, Rose Maynard 45 Behan, John 183 Bewick, Pauline 193 Blackshaw, Basil 105, 132-135 Boyle, Gigi 78 Brady, Charles 158, 171 Brennan, Cecily 112 Brownlow, George Washington 42 Butler, Mildred Anne C Campbell, Arthur 15 Campbell, George 11-14, 16 Carr, Eithne 101 Carr, Tom 5-7, 124, 125 Clarke, Carey 72, 141 Collins, Patrick Cook, C. H. 49 Corner, Sarah 173 Craig, James Humbert 27 Crone, David 106, 107, 126-130 Cryan, Claire 123 Cuala Press 212-221 Cullen, Michael 136 D Danby, James Francis 52 David, Gerald 156 Dillon, Gerard 17-22, Dinan, John 80 Doherty, John 99 Donfield, Ken 159-161 Dunne, Joe 144, 145 E Egginton, Frank 69, 70 Egginton, Wycliffe 68 F Feeney, Jacinta 150 Flanagan, Terence P. 103, 104, 121, 122, 137-140 Forbes, Stanhope Alexander

INDEX G Gale, Martin 74 Gillespie, Alwyn 187 Gillespie, George 28 Gore, William Crampton 29 Guihan, Gemma 75, 76 H Hanlon, Jack P. 10 Hayes, Edwin 54, 55 Helmick, Howard 44 Henderson, Jeremy 154 Henderson, Maurice 102, 162 Hennessy, Patrick 37 Henry, Paul 34-36, 66, 67 Hone, Evie 198-200 Hone, Nathaniel 50 I Irish School, Modern 186 J Janz, Robert 167 Jellett, Mainie 148, 197 K Kavanagh, Joseph Malachy 48, 147 Keating, Seán 24-26 Kernoff, Harry 201-208 King, Cecil 170 Kingston, Richard 146 L Laverty, Maura 211 Le Brocquy, Louis 113-117, 163-166 Le Jeune, James 95 Leonard, Patrick 98 M MacGonigle, Maurice 3, 174 Magrath, William 39-4 Marjoram, Gerard Martin, Mary Louise 153 McAllister, Teresa 81 McCraig, Norman J. 175 McEntagart, Brett 181, 182 McGuiness, William Bingham 51 McKelvey, Frank 152 McSweeney, Seán 157, 168 Miller, Nick 131

Mitchell, Flora 87-94 Mooney, Martin 142, 143 Moran, Cynthia 185 Miles, Thomas Rose 56, 57 O O’Connor, Roderick 61 O’Kelly, Aloysius 38 O’Malley, Tony 169 O’Neill, Mark 82-86 O’Ryan, Fergus 176-180 O’Sullivan, Seán 58, 59 P Patton, Eric 2 Pearson, Peter 97 Pomeroy, Krystyna 184 Praeger, Sophia Roamund 188 R Richardson, Bob 96 Richardson, Victor 155 Robinson, Markey 190 Russell, George 149 S Shelbourne, Anita Skelton, John 196 Souter, Camille 4 Stapleton, Rose 71 Steyn, Stella 189 T Tansey, Francis 79 Thaddeus, Henry Jones V Van Stockum, Hilda 77, 194, 195 W Walton, Conor 73 Warren, Barbara 192 Webb, Kenneth 100 Whelan, Leo 60 Y Yeats, Anne 9 Yeats, Jack Butler 30-33, 62-65


Important Irish Art