Page 1


3

From the President Dear Friend, Welcome to the Ninth Annual Nyack Scholars Symposium: In Search of Accountability in Closing Educational Gaps. We are delighted to join with the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC) and to collaborate with the NHCLC’s Faith and Education Coalition to present their Eighth Annual National Hispanic Education Summit. A wealth of information awaits you—whether you are an administrator, community leader, educator or student. These two days of plenary sessions and presentations will expand our knowledge and best practices for recruiting, serving and retaining Hispanic evangelical students as well as validate our advocacy for education equity. We are especially delighted to have university and faith leaders gathering with us to present scholarly research that will contribute significantly to breakthroughs in how students are educated and equipped. It is our desire that students have empowering educational experiences on every grade level. Ultimately, young men and women who are prepared to enter the workforce with Christ-centered values can impact sectors of society as agents of change. My hope is that you will leave edified and inspired, having gained fresh perspective to continue the work that you are already doing to benefit future leaders. Enjoy your time on our campuses. May God bless your endeavors that glorify His name! With warm regards, Michael G. Scales, Ed.D. President


4

From the Faith and Education Coalition Executive Director Welcome to the 2017 National Hispanic Education Summit! The National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC)’s Faith and Education Coalition and the Alliance for Hispanic Education are grateful to Nyack College for their hospitality and leadership. It is a joy to gather in New York, where world-changing ideas are birthed. As leaders from the academy and the church share new research and best practices this week, we rally around one goal: to close educational gaps for Hispanic students by supporting their academic success across our nation. Ethnic minority students are now the majority within our nation’s public school classrooms – with Latino enrollment growing faster than any other segment. This next generation of Hispanic students is poised to profoundly impact the world. We can help equip these young people to fulfill their unique God-given potential by empowering high academic achievement rooted in understanding that we are called to love the Lord with the entirety of our minds. We are each contributors to this effort while some work to empower Hispanic parents as they guide their children’s academic careers, others conduct research into best practices and root causes so classrooms and institutions function most effectively, and some are distinctly committed to reducing barriers to low-income students who want to pursue higher education. May the Lord utilize each of these contributions during this dedicated time to spur on new collaborations and innovative approaches. May students be the beneficiaries of this time spent together. May eternity be impacted, Dr. Andrea R. Ramirez Faith and Education Coalition Executive Director


5

From the CSGE Director Dear Friends, It is a joy to welcome you to our joint Eighth National Hispanic Education Summit and Ninth Nyack Scholars Symposium (NSS). On behalf of the Center for Scholarship and Global Engagement (CSGE) Team and the NSS Faculty Committee at Nyack College, I’d like to express our deep gratitude and personal appreciation to Dr. Andrea Ramirez and Mr. Girien Salazar, Executive Director and Deputy Director of the Faith and Education Coalition, respectively, and their team, for their dedication to making this joint event a success. CSGE is intentional about fostering: Collaborative Initiatives: Looking for opportunities to initiate local, regional, and international partnerships and projects to promote research and global awareness, recognizing that everyone in the Nyack community has a role in this process. Scholarly Inquiry: Working to promote a culture of critical reflection and sound research in the context of Christ-centered ideals. Global Awareness: Seeking to raise consciousness on international issues and serve as a catalyst for effective involvement. Encouraging Community: Nurturing an engaged intellectual and welcoming community that fosters open, constructive, and respectful dialogue on complex issues, where differing views can be addressed with civility and integrity. As you will see on the following pages, this joint event features academic and faith leaders, researchers, professors, administrators and advocates from Nyack College as well as from several other distinguished Christian academic institutions and civil society organizations. We are very proud to also feature Nyack students and alumni, some of whom will be presenting their research, while others will participate as musical performers during the plenary sessions. We also want to express our thankfulness to our plenary speakers, panelists, presenters, responders, moderators and musical performers, for sharing with us their passion and relevant ideas, research and reflections which we hope will motivate all of us to continue seeking to serve the Kingdom of God and His Justice in the field of education as in all other spheres of our lives. In peace, Dr, Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda CSGE Founding Director


6

Eighth Annual National Hispanic Education Summit and Ninth Annual Nyack Scholars Symposium IN SEARCH OF ACCOUNTABILITY IN CLOSING EDUCATIONAL GAPS New York City Campus November 7, 2017

6:00 pm—8:00 pm - AMEN Celebration/Hispanic Denominational Leaders Dinner Location: Lower Level Auditorium NHCLC Welcome and Prayer

Dr. Andrea Ramirez, Executive Director, Faith and Education Coalition-NHCLC

Nyack Welcome

Dr. Michael G. Scales, President, Nyack College

Musical Performance by the Nyack College Chorale Prof. Damien Sneed, Director Prayer for Food Faith and Education Coalition Video

Dr. Gus Reyes, Director, Christian Life CommissionBGCT

25th Anniversary of AMEN/“The Faith Leader’s Role in Improving Educational Outcomes for Hispanic Students”

Dr. Andrea Ramirez and Dr. Carlos Campo, President of Ashland University

“Raising the Standards” Show Segment Video

Girien Salazar, Deputy Director, Faith and Education Coalition-NHCLC

Pastors for Texas Children Announcement

Rev. Charles Johnson, Executive Director, Pastors of Texas Children

Introduction of Speaker

Girien Salazar, Deputy Director, Faith and Education Coalition-NHCLC

Keynote address: “The Pastor’s Pulpit and Academic Achievement”

Bishop Tony Garcia, Administrative Bishop of the Northeast Hispanic Region, Church of God

Education Sunday Video

Dr. Andrea Ramirez

University Presentations Summit/Symposium Agenda Overview

Girien Salazar & Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda, CSGE Founding Director

Closing Prayer

Rev. Charles Olmeda, Senior Pastor, 3rd Day Worship Center


7

Eighth Annual National Hispanic Education Summit and Ninth Annual Nyack Scholars Symposium IN SEARCH OF ACCOUNTABILITY IN CLOSING EDUCATIONAL GAPS New York City Campus November 8, 2017

Opening Session and Award Presentation: 8:00 am - 9:30 am Location: Room 2241 Welcome

Dr. Andrea Ramirez, Executive Director, Faith and Education Coalition and Dr. Michael G. Scales, President, Nyack College

Prayer Musical Performance: Spanish Songs, Manuel DeFalla

Ms. Christina Lamberti (mezzo soprano) and Dr. Lars Frandesen (guitar), Associate Professor of Music

The Nyack Story: More Than Numbers Faith and Education Coalition Video and Introduction of Speakers

Dr. David Turk, Provost, Nyack College Mr. Girien Salazar, FEC Deputy Director

Keynote address: Seeking Equity in Education as Part of Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda, Professor of Political Science and CSGE Founding Director the Biblical Imperative to Do Justice FEC-NHCLC Education Sponsor—University Partner Testimonial College Board: Resources for Recruiters When Approaching Hispanic Students Summit/Symposium Agenda and Announcements

Dr. Cory Hines, Vice President for Enrollment, Dallas Baptist University Ms. Maria Eugenia Alcon-Heraux, Director of Media Relations, The College Board Mr. Girien Salazar

Breakout Session One: 9:40 am - 10:40 am TOPIC

PRESENTER

LOCATION

Panel: Considerations in Student Support Services for Hispanic Students (Writing Center, Mental Health, Advising)

Ms. Esther Jhun Prof. Beverly Locke Mr. Aaron Guajardo

Room 2006

Workshop: Hispanic Students and College Graduation: A 4-year Game Plan

Dr. Gabe Veas

Room 2005

Workshop: Equipping Church Leaders: Raising Highly Capable Kids

Mr. Gabriel Cortes

Room 2037

Workshop: Destino Movement: Retaining Hispanic Students Through Ministry on Public University Campuses

Mr. Mark Vera

Room 2104

Moderator: Ms. Esmeralda Sanchez

Coffee Break: 10:40 am - 11:00 am

20th Floor


8

Breakout Session Two: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm TOPIC

PRESENTER

LOCATION

Teachers as Culturally Proactive Agents Through Cycles of Self-Regulation

Dr. Marie White Ms. Muriel Pelaez Ms. Yadilka Ramos

Room 2006

Latino Doctoral Students in Counseling Programs: Navigating Professional Identity Within a Predominantly White American Profession

Dr. Anna Flores Locke

Room 2005

With Liberty and Justice for All: The Education Connection

Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda Mr. Gregory Jack Mr. Edwin Omar Hernandez Mr. Carlos Daniel Hernandez

Room 2037

Do No Harm Trauma-Informed Lens for Trauma-Informed Ministry: A Study of the Impact of the Helping Churches in Trauma Awareness Workshop (HC-TAW) on Trauma Awareness

Dr. Carol Mills Kamara

Room 2207

Digital Media and Cultural Impact: Film, DVD and Streaming and Answering the Call to Be an Actress in Hollywood

Mr. Franklin Santagate Ms. April Hernandez-Castillo

Room 2241

Lunch Recess 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Breakout Session Three: 1:40 pm - 2:40 pm TOPIC

PRESENTER

LOCATION

Panel: Structural Constraints Limiting Latino Students: College Recruiting and Admissions

Ms. Jacqueline Ramos Dr. Abraham Jaquez

Room 2037

Prof. Miriam Velez Rev. Lance Meche

Room 2006

Workshop: The Role of “Institutional Agents” in the College Choice Process for Latino(a) Students

Dr. Robert Reyes

Room 2204

Workshop: Beyond Ganas: Equipping Latino(a) Students to Identify, Understand, and Navigate Different Cultural Epistemologies in the Academy

Dr. Tim Baldwin Mr. Martin Avila, Jr.

Room 2005

Workshop: The Scared Sector Project and the Protection of Religious Freedom

Ms. Chelsea Langston Bombino

Room 2241

Workshop: Beyond Borders, Boundaries, and Documentation Statuses: Building Local Movements of Neighbor-Love

Mr. Jer Swigart Ms. Nohemi Hernandez

Room 2207

Moderator: Ms. Esmeralda Sanchez Panel: Structural Constraints Limiting Latino Students: Administration and Classroom Moderator: Dr. Gus Reyes


9

Plenary Session: 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm Location: Lower Level Auditorium Opening

Dr. Carlos Campo, President, Ashland University

Prayer

Dr. Ben Alicea-Lugo, Pastor, St. Paul’s Evangelical Reformed Church

Introduction of Speaker

Dr. Andrea Ramirez

Keynote Address: A Macro-View of Education Equity and Predictions of Hispanic Educational Outcomes

Dr. Irvin Scott, Senior Lecturer on Education, Harvard University

Musical Performance: “Paciencia y Fe” from In the Heights, Lin-Manuel Miranda

Nyack College Theatre Ensemble Ms. Francesca Martinez, Soloist Prof. Glauco Lima, Pianist and Vocal Director

NHCLC Directives and Videos When Faith Catches Fire

Dr. Robert Crosby, Professor of Practical Theology, Southeastern University

Lifetime Education Impact Award & NHCLC Scholars Recognition

Dr. Andrea Ramirez Dr. Carlos Campo

Summit Closing Remarks

Dr. Shirley Hoogstra, President, Council for Christian Colleges and Universities

Symposium Agenda and Announcements

Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda

2018 NHES Invite

Mr. Girien Salazar Dr. Carlos Campo

Musical Performance by Nyack College Gospel Choir

Dr. Sue Talley, Director

Closing and Prayer

Dr. Andrea Ramirez

Dinner Recess 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm 5:15 pm - 6:00 pm Beyond Borders: A Dialog on Immigration, Border Security *Special Session for Social Work Students

Mr. Jer Swigart Ms. Nohemi Hernandez

Room 2037


10

Breakout Session Four: 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm TOPIC

PRESENTER

LOCATION

Panel: The Therapeutic Power of Hispanic Hymnology

Dr. Sue Talley Dr. Marie Herseth Kenote Prof. Glauco Lima Prof. Eleazer Rodriguez

Room 2207

Technology-Infused & Data-Driven Lesson Planning in an Urban Classroom Setting

Ms. Alyssa Rice-Cruz

Room 2204

Embryonic Gene Editing, The Future Has Arrived: Implications for Youth Ministry

Dr. Leonard Kageler

Room 2005

Closing Gaps in Data and Education Access through Survey of Fishes of the Lower Hudson River

Dr. Peter Park Dr. Daniel Kaluka Mr. Ye Chan Sung Ms. Maridalia Lillis

Room 2006

Attitudes of Asian American Christians Towards the Ethnic Churches They Left

Dr. Ezra Sohn Dr. Frank Chan

Room 2037


11

Eighth Annual National Hispanic Education Summit and Ninth Annual Nyack Scholars Symposium IN SEARCH OF ACCOUNTABILITY IN CLOSING EDUCATIONAL GAPS Rockland Residential Campus November 9, 2017

Plenary Session: 9:30 am - 11:00 am Location: Pardington Hall Opening

Mr. Benjamin Tse, Nyack College Student

Welcome

Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda, Professor of Political Science and CSGE Founding Director

Faith and Education Coalition Greeting and Invocation:

Mr. Girien Salazar, Deputy Director, FEC, National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference

Musical performance: “96,000” from In the Heights, Lin-Manuel Miranda

Nyack College Theatre Ensemble Mr. Yahveh Calderon, Mr. PJ Barner, Mr. Matt Freitas, and Ms. Kathy Class, Soloists Prof. Glauco Lima, Pianist and Vocal Director

Introduction of Moderator

Mr. Benjamin Tse

Introduction of Guest Speakers

Prof. Jennifer Kimble, Assistant Professor and Chair, Criminal Justice

Keynote Presentation: Mending the Divides: Creative Love in a Conflicted World

Mr. Jer Swigart, Co-founding Director, The Global Immersion Project Ms. Nohemi Hernandez, College Student

Q&A Session with Audience

Prof. Jennifer Kimble

Announcements and Closing

Mr. Benjamin Tse

Breakout Session One: 11:15 am - 12:25 pm TOPIC

PRESENTER

LOCATION

The Role of “Institutional Agents” in the College Choice Process for Latino(a) Students

Dr. Robert Reyes

Pardington Hall

Embryonic Gene Editing, The Future Has Arrived: Implications for Youth Ministry

Ms. Celeste Gonzalez

Simpson 200

With Liberty and Justice for All: The Education Connection

Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda Mr. Gregory Jack Mr. Edwin Omar Hernandez Mr. Carlos Daniel Hernandez

President’s Hall

Responder: Mr. Alfredo Cid

Lunch Recess 12:25 pm - 1:30 pm


12

Breakout Session Two: 1:30 pm - 2:40 pm TOPIC

PRESENTER

LOCATION

Closing Gaps in Data and Education Access Through Survey of Fishes of the Lower Hudson River

Dr. Peter Park Dr. Daniel Kaluka Mr. Ye Chan Sung Ms. Maridalia Lillis

Simpson 200A

Teachers as Culturally Proactive Agents through Cycles of SelfRegulation

Dr. Marie White Ms. Muriel Pelaez Ms. Yadilka Ramos

Simpson 200B

How to be a Protégé: Equipping Students to Maximize Mentoring Dr. Gabe Veas Relationships

President’s Hall

Bela Bartok: Collector, Notator, Assimilator and Composer

Pardington Hall

Mr. Benjamin Riley

Breakout Session Three: 2:50 pm - 4:00 pm TOPIC

PRESENTER

LOCATION

Music as Mirror: Harmonic Practices as a Reflection of Societal Changes

Dr. Lars Frandsen

Pardington 104

Beyond Ganas: Equipping Latino(a) Students to Identify, Understand, and Navigate Different Cultural Epistemologies in the Academy

Dr. Tim Baldwin Mr. Martin Avila, Jr.

President’s Hall

The Quest for Historical Satan

Mr. Calvin Bushman

Hilltop Auditorium

The Role of Resistance to Change in Church Sustainability in Harlem, NY

Dr. Joan Williams

Boon 412


About Our Plenary Session Speakers Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda is a professor of political science and the founding director of the Center for Scholarship and Global Engagement at Nyack College. A former Fulbright scholar, Nina earned her law degree from the Pontifical Catholic University’s School of Law in Lima, Peru, and master degrees in International Peace Studies, and in Government and International Studies, and a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Notre Dame. She is the President of Peace and Hope International, an organization dedicated to mobilizing individuals and communities to be justice-seekers, advocating for issues affecting the poor, and educating communities on peace-building in South America. Nina also serves on the board of directors of the Association for a More Just Society, the Continental Community of Interdisciplinary Theological Studies (CETI Continental), and as a trustee of the Center for Public Justice.

Rev. Juan A. Garcia Rev. Juan A. Garcia is an ordained bishop of the Church of God (Cleveland, TN). During the last 30 years, Bishop Garcia has served as Church of God national evangelist, senior pastor (Bristol, PA), Regional Youth and Christian Education Director, and Music & Media Director (Church of God Northeastern Hispanic Region USA), and Administrative Bishop for the New England Hispanic and Northeast Hispanic regions. Today he is serving as a member of the Hispanic Ministerial & Education Board while also serving as the Chairman of the Hispanic Ministries for the Church of God. He has also served in numerous community and interdenominational boards and committees around the country such as the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC), National Latino Evangelical Coalition (NLEC) and The Lehigh Conference of Churches (Presently as Vice-President). The bulk of his ministry has been dedicated to prepare, equip, disciple, and mentor a generation for kingdom building. Personally he is furthering his training in the Doctor of Ministries Program at New York Theological Seminary with a Leadership emphasis. Rev. Garcia, alongside his wife Rev. Jennie Garcia, is presently serving in his fourth term as the Administrative Bishop for the Church of God Northeast Hispanic Region, while recently taking on and sharing the pastoral duties at Church of God Mission One Ministries in Allentown, PA.

Ms. Nohemi Hernandez Nohemi is from Tijuana, Baja California, but has lived in San Diego, California since age 5. She's a communications major and pursues photographic arts in her spare time.

13


14

About Our Plenary Session Speakers Dr. Andrea Ramirez Dr. Andrea Ramirez serves as the Executive Director of the Faith and Education Coalition for the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Coalition (NHCLC), America’s largest Hispanic Christian Evangelical organization. She oversees key education initiatives for the NHCLC throughout the United States and leads an advisory board of Evangelical leaders within the Faith & Education Coalition. Dr. Ramirez earned a Ph.D. from Regent University (Virginia) and was named the 2014 Outstanding Ph.D. Graduate Award recipient for her cohort. She completed a degree in Business Administration and an MBA at Dallas Baptist University (Texas). Andrea has been deeply involved in curriculum development since 2011. Dr. Ramirez lives in Texas where she has been engaged in community ministry and education initiatives across the state.

Dr. Irvin Scott Dr. Irvin Scott joined the faculty of Harvard Graduate School of Education during the summer of 2016. As a result of his personal commitment to spirituality and scholarship, Scott is launching and leading the formation of The Leaders Institute for Faith and Education (LIFE). The Institute seeks to explore the intersection of faith and education in the lives of students and communities in a way that leads to better outcomes for America’s most vulnerable youth. Before coming to Harvard, Scott served for five years as the deputy director for K-12 education at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, where he led the investment of $300 million in initiatives focused on transforming how teachers are recruited, developed and rewarded. In an effort to address educational inequities in the U.S., Scott also led an effort at the Foundation to build strong partnerships and deeper engagement between faith-based organizations that serve underrepresented students, families and communities. He holds a bachelor's degree from Millersville University; a master's degree in education from Temple University; and master's and doctoral degrees from Harvard University.

Mr. Jer Swigart Jer has been working in the field of peacemaking and conflict transformation since 2005 when he acted as the liaison between an international NGO, the faith community, the Pakistani military, and the United Nations in the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Northern Pakistan. He is the founder of The Global Immersion Project in an effort to form men and women into everyday peacemakers who are equipped and mobilized to reach across boundaries and seek human flourishing. Jer completed his undergrad work at The University of Northwestern-St. Paul and his M.Div. at Fuller Theological Seminary where he focused his studies on innovative leadership in peace and reconciliation. In addition to being a contributing author to several books, he’s the co-author of Mending the Divides: Creative Love in a Conflicted World (IVP, 2017). He currently resides with his family in Bend, OR.


15

About Our Presenters Considerations in Student Support Services for Hispanic Students Ms. Esther Jhun

Supervisor, Nyack College Counseling Center, NYC Campus

Ms. Beverley Locke

Director, Nyack College Writing Center, Professor of English, Rockland Campus

Mr. Aaron Guajardo

Assistant Dean of Students, Southwestern Assemblies of God University

Moderator: Ms. Esmeralda Sanchez

Ph.D. candidate, Sociology Department, Rice University

Esther Jhun is a New York State licensed mental health counselor (LMHC) who has been providing counseling services and supervision at Nyack College’s Manhattan campus since 2014. Her influences stem from Christian academia and a personal history of straddling between cultures as the daughter of Korean immigrants. With a B.A. in Biblical/Theological Studies from Wheaton College and an M.A. from Nyack's Alliance Graduate School of Counseling, Esther’s theoretical perspective centers on the integration of faith and counseling psychology. She has worked with children, youth and adults in both Korean and non-Korean churches. Previous clinical work includes working with the chronically mentally ill clients in Far Rockaway, NY.

Esmeralda Sanchez is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology at Rice University. She began her doctoral studies at Rice in fall 2016 to focus on urban, community and religion research impacting educational achievement. At Rice, she holds joint doctoral assistantships with the Religion and Public Life Program (RPLP) and the Houston Education Research Consortium (HERC). She previously served as deputy director of the Faith and Education Coalition for the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC), America’s largest Hispanic evangelical organization, where she led national, state, and local initiatives promoting civic engagement among faith communities in issues of educational equity. She holds a master’s degree from the University of Texas at Dallas and a bachelor’s degree from Southern Methodist University (SMU).


16

About Our Presenters Hispanic Students and College Graduation: A 4-Year Game Plan As the realities of globalization reverberate and technological breakthroughs forge ahead, the value of education will continue to rise as entire employment industries disappear. As students prepare for life after graduation, they are looking to academic institutions to help guide their educational journey in a more individualized and specialized manner. In an atmosphere of accountability with a strong reliance on high-stakes testing, educators are pressured to get through as much material as fast as possible. Unfortunately, the result of this is that the relational aspect of instruction falls by the wayside. Historically, the skills of being an effective instructor were measured in the classroom as demonstrated through teaching assessments. Yet, time is limited when one takes into account the research demands required of educators today as displayed by publishing articles and securing grants. While these activities are highly visible and have long been esteemed, mentoring has not received the prioritization and respect that it deserves. The apprenticeship model of education provides a foundation from which to understand how mentoring can be utilized by those interested in shaping the next generation of students in a more traditional pedagogical style, that of apprenticeship. Best practices, from both inside and outside of the classroom, will be discussed, which can be implemented to increase student retention and interaction with the subject matter and the teacher. Dr. Gabe Veas Dr. Charles Hammond

Assistant Director of Certificate Programs and Assistant Professor of Mentorship & Community Programs, Ashland University Dean of Students, Nyack College, NYC Campus

Recently relocated from Los Angeles, Dr. Gabe Veas plays a key role at the Cleveland Center of Ashland Theological Seminary as an associate director of certification programs. In addition to this, Veas is an associate professor of mentorship & community transformation, a position which is the first of its kind in the United States. The author of several research journal articles on the subject of mentoring, Veas has previously delved in deep on cutting edge areas such as protĂŠgĂŠ-initiated mentoring which combines research in the fields of youth mentoring and early career development. His latest two articles will be published this month through the premier academic mentoring conference in the country and convened by the University of New Mexico's Mentoring Institute. They will highlight the role that administrators and educators can play in incorporating mentoring in their contexts to engage students, develop community, and increase learning.


17

About Our Presenters Equipping Church Leaders: Raising Highly Capable Kids Raising Highly Capable Kids is a 13-week, evidence-based parenting program that helps provide churches with an opportunity to reach into their communities in a new and relevant way. This program is also values-based and allows churches to partner with their local school system to reach parents that may not even be interested in Jesus or the Gospel. This needsbased approach to evangelism provides churches a wonderful outreach that can introduce the truth of Scripture in a way that is accepted in organizations that may be hostile or hesitant regarding helpful tools for parenting presented from this worldview. This class will introduce you to Raising Highly Capable Kids and provide initial guidance in implementation. Rev. Gabriel Cortes

Director of Hispanic Education Imitative, Baptist General Convention of Texas

Rev. Gabriel Cortes is a native of Puerto Rico and has been active in Christian ministry since the age of 18. In 1996 he moved to Texas to study at Southwestern Seminary, where he earned his Master of Divinity, and worked as a pastor of Templo Bautista Emanuel for seven and a half years. Shortly after, the Lord called him to serve for four years at Baptist University of the Americas in San Antonio, and in August of 2008 he began his service as Hispanic Ministries Strategist for the Baptist General Convention of Texas. In April 2014, his role was expanded, as he began serving as Director of the Texas Baptist Hispanic Education Initiative. Gabriel is a candidate for the Doctor of Ministry from Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City. He’s been married to Maria for 21 years. Their children are Esteban (19) and AndrÊs (17).


18

About Our Presenters Destino Movement: Retaining Hispanic Students through Ministry on Public University Campuses According to the Barna group and many other polls and surveys, 94% of Christians become believers before age 18. So why do many other surveys also show 80% of youth leave the church after high school? The intentional focus and expertise of the Church towards college and single young adults is greatly diminished after high school. Sending students to Christian schools and universities is not a total solution or even a guarantee that they will continue maturing in their Christian values into young adulthood. The work and ministry on public universities is essential! Destino is the para-church, para-school and para-community ministry aimed at filling the gap for the Latino community. The Destino mission is to journey with students, faculty and others, to follow Jesus and to help fulfill their God-given destiny. Come hear how Destino can bring the expertise and training to reach and develop college students and young adults to your church or university. Mr. Mark Vera

Executive Director, Destino Movement

Mark Anthony Vera was born and raised in San Antonio, TX. He is a third generation Latino who attended the University of Texas in San Antonio where he was first introduced to a relationship with Jesus. Mark graduated in 1998 with a degree in computer science and worked as a network engineer for the first part of his career. In 2003, Mark joined the staff of Destino - the Latino ministry of Cru (formally Campus Crusade for Christ). In 2015 he graduated from Dallas Theological Seminary with a master’s degree in organizational and Christian leadership, and now serves as the Destino Executive Director.


19

About Our Presenters Teachers as Culturally Proactive Agents through Cycles of Self-Regulation Dr. Marie White

Professor of Education, Nyack College

Ms. Muriel Pelaez

Childhood Education, Nyack College Student

Ms. Yadilka Ramos

Adolescent Education, Nyack College Student

Marie C. White is a professor in the Urban Education Center at the Nyack College NYC campus. She maintains an active research agenda in self-regulation of learning with a focus on culturally proactive urban teaching and learning, specifically how to better prepare a diverse population of learners to engage in higher education. Most recently her publications include a book featuring case studies of four teacher candidates who entered Nyack underprepared and yet through training in help-seeking and other self-regulatory strategies successfully graduated, became New York State certified, went on to obtain master's degrees, and now serve in public and private school settings. The book, Developing Self-regulation of Learning and Teaching Skills Among Teacher Candidates is co-authored with Nyack colleague Miriam Velez, and Hefer Bembenutty, a noted researcher and scholar. Other current publications include her book, Self-regulation and the Common Core: Applications to ELA Standards, with practical applications of self-regulation of learning to standards-based instruction. Dr. White who obtained her doctorate from The City University of New York, Graduate Center in educational psychology maintains an active role in an AERA of a SIG (small interest group) to further international research in the area of self-regulated learning. Muriel Pelaez is a senior at Nyack College pursuing her B. S. degree in childhood education- TESOL. Last year she was awarded membership in Alpha Chi. Muriel is very creative and enjoys fashion and design. She serves the NYC education department as a student worker. Last summer, she spent time teaching literacy in the Philippines. Yadilka Ramos is a senior at Nyack College pursuing her B.S. degree in adolescence education- math. She was awarded membership in Alpha Chi. Yadilka is fully bilingual and has a passion for inner city students. She serves in the School of Education as a tutor and assists in the department with administrative tasks. Yadilka is the youth director at her church.


20

About Our Presenters Latino Doctoral Students in Counseling Programs: Navigating Professional Identity within a Predominantly White American Profession Using a basic qualitative research design, this author interviewed eight Latino doctoral students in counseling programs about their professional identity development experiences. The author analyzed the data from a Latino Critical Race theoretical perspective to explore the ways in which power and privilege played a role in the participants’ professional identity development as Latino doctoral students in a predominantly White American profession. The results supported that ethnicity played a central role in the participants’ experiences navigating professional identity within a predominantly White American profession. The three themes that emerged were: (1) being one of the few, (2) navigating professional identity development, and (3) becoming a Latino counselor educator. Further, the participants’ professional identity development was like a rollercoaster and proceeded in a less linear fashion than the current models explained. The implications for the counseling profession, counselor education, counseling doctoral programs, and Latino doctoral students included promoting inclusion, creating community and providing support.

Dr. Anna Flores Locke

Assistant Professor of Mental Health Counseling, Nyack College

Dr. Anna is a Latina counselor educator and supervisor with more than 10 years of experience in the field of mental health counseling. She identifies as a social justice counselor and is the president-elect of the American Counseling Association division of Counselors for Social Justice. Her research focuses on understanding the professional identity development of Latino counseling students from a Latino Critical Race perspective. Dr. Anna is passionate about equity, access, and inclusion for all of our brothers and sisters in Christ. She is also a mother of twins, a volunteer at her local hospital, and an owner of a counseling private practice.


21

About Our Presenters With Liberty and Justice for All: The Education Connection Access to higher education has historically been one of the most powerful factors enabling social mobility in the United States. Recent studies, however, indicate that the U.S. population suffers persistent educational achievement gaps along income levels and racial lines. While college graduation rates have increased for higher income students, graduation rates have deteriorated for lower income and minority student populations across the nation. Considering the American ideals of liberty and justice for all, this paper argues that the achievement gap in higher education, while complex, is not mostly an issue of aptitude, but one of insufficient access to resources and opportunities. The paper explores some relevant ways to confront this need by increasing fair access and appropriate support for underserved students. Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda Mr. Gregory Jack Mr. Edwin Omar Hernandez Mr. Carlos Daniel Hernandez

Professor of Political Science and Founding Director, Center for Scholarship and Global Engagement Criminal Justice, Nyack College Student Business Administration and Accounting, Nyack College Student Criminal Justice, Nyack College Student

Dr. Vilma “Nina” Balmaceda is a professor of political science and the founding director of the Center for Scholarship and Global Engagement (CSGE) at Nyack College. A former Fulbright scholar, Nina earned her law degree from the Pontifical Catholic University’s School of Law in Lima, Peru, and master’s degrees in International Peace Studies and in Government and International Studies, and a Ph.D. in Political Science all from the University of Notre Dame du Lac. In addition to serving as president of Peace and Hope International (PHI), a Christian human rights organization dedicated to promoting justice for individuals, families and communities in condition of poverty in South America. Nina serves on the board of directors of the Association for a More Just Society (AJS), the Center for Interdisciplinary Theological Studies (CETI Continental), and the Center for Public Justice (CPJ). She is happily married to Roberto W. Chia, and their son RA is 17 years old.

Gregory Jack is twenty years old, and is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice at Nyack College. He is involved in two clubs on campus, and is a part of the Resident Life staff. Gregory is an intern with the Center for Scholarship and Global Engagement at Nyack College, and was recently inducted into New York’s Alpha Chi Honors Society. He has completed an internship with the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office in his home state of Florida, and will be finishing up his final year at Nyack College in 2018. Omar Hernandez is an international student from Honduras. Omar is in his senior year at Nyack College, completing a double major in business administration and accounting. He is a member of the Sigma Beta Delta International Honor Society of Business and also the Nyack College’s Dean’s List. Currently, Omar works as an intern at the Center for Scholarship and Global Engagement. In the past, he has been enrolled on campus as part of the committees for the International Student Union and the Business Club. During the summer, Omar worked through an accounting internship in the New York State area and looks forward to gaining more knowledge in this field. Additionally, his volunteer work includes the creation of health-aid systems with a Harvard University program in some of the poorest towns of Honduras. Carlos Hernandez is a senior studying criminal justice at Nyack College. He is an international student from Honduras and part of the second division men’s soccer team at Nyack College. Currently the president of the International Student Club, and also works for the Center for Scholarship and Global Engagement. He has interned in several organizations such as the International Justice Mission, (ASJ) Association for a More Just Society in Honduras, and in the Grand Rapids Police Department in Michigan. He has also been a part of a multi-topic summer camp in Denmark called Oasis. He is now hoping to attend an international crime and law masters program in Turin, Italy. Some of his interests include traveling, spending time with friends, soccer, exercising, and any beach or water activity.


22

About Our Presenters Do No Harm Trauma-Informed Lens for Trauma-Informed Ministry: A Study of the Impact of the Helping Churches in Trauma Awareness Workshop (HC-TAW) on Trauma Awareness Do No Harm Trauma-Informed Lens for Trauma-Informed Ministry: A study of the Impact of the Helping Churches in Trauma Awareness Workshop (HC-TAW) on Trauma Awareness Among Predominantly African- and Caribbean-American leaders in Church of God 7th Day churches in the Bronx and Brooklyn, NY is an experimental study assessing whether HCTAW is an effective intervention to increase trauma awareness among participating leaders. The study used a trauma-informed quiz as a pretest to measure trauma awareness of 41 participants prior to their participation in HC-TAW. The same trauma-informed quiz was given to participants as a post-test to assess whether change in levels of trauma awareness occurred. A control group of 10 participants also completed the quiz but did not participate in HC-TAW. Chapter 1 developed the general scope of this study. Chapter 2 provided a review of germane literature related to the need for trauma awareness, impact of psychological trauma, healing trauma and elements of trauma-informed care ministry. Chapter 3 set forth the research methodology and description of instrument. Chapter 4 presented an analysis of the findings. Chapter 5 assessed the data and points to areas of further research of trauma awareness among leaders in the Church and other communities. Dr. Carol Mills Kamara, LCSW

New York State-licensed Social Worker President of ROCK, Inc.

Carol Mills Kamara, D.Min., LCSW is a New York State-licensed social worker and president of ROCK, Inc., a nonprofit that serves children impacted by poverty and violence. She has a passion for service to others especially to those who are underserved or disadvantaged. Her work focuses attachment and trauma, depression and anxiety, trauma-informed ministry. She has extensive training and experience in trauma studies and healing trauma treatment models.


23

About Our Presenters Digital Media and Cultural Impact: Film, DVD, and Streaming and Answering the Call to Be an Actress in Hollywood The presenters will discuss the impact of digital media on culture and issues and considerations related to the call of being an actor/actress in Hollywood.

Mr. Franklin Santagate Ms. April Hernandez-Castillo

Vice President of Global Strategic Alliances, Pure Flix Actress, Freedom Writers (2007), Feed the Beast (2016)

Franklin Santagate is an innovative and proficient leader in commerce and ministry. Franklin’s leadership has been noted by government leaders, resulting in invitations to various gatherings that include presidents, kings and leaders of nations. As a communicator, Franklin has presented keynote messages and presentations to leading companies such as Mercedes Benz, Microsoft and Frito Lay as well as a multitude of ministry conferences on every continent. Today, Franklin serves as the vice president of Global Strategic Alliances for Pure Flix Entertainment, whose vision is to influence global culture for Christ through media. Franklin is married to his wife, Lisa, who is the author of the TitusTouch Biblical Womanhood Series and the Perfecting the Heart Series, which is used across America and in a number of other nations. Together, they have a blended family of six children and two grandchildren.


24

About Our Presenters Structural Constraints Limiting Latino Students: College Recruiting and Admissions Ms. Jacqueline Ramos Dr. Abraham Jaquez Moderator: Ms. Esmeralda Sanchez

Coordinator of Academic Support, East Texas Baptist University President, Baptist University of the America Ph.D. Candidate, Sociology Department Rice University

As the Coordinator of Academic Support at East Texas Baptist University, Jacqueline Ramos provides support to students through academic coaching, mentoring, and academic advising. Ramos encourages students in their academics by overseeing academic programs such as the Academic Center of Excellence, Supplemental Instruction, and accommodation testing. Previously, Jacqueline has served as a senior admissions counselor at ETBU, providing guidance for students and their families through the college admissions process. Jacqueline is a first-generation college graduate and has a passion for helping students from similar backgrounds to reach their academic goals. She earned her undergraduate degree in psychology from East Texas Baptist University and is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in counseling. Esmeralda Sanchez is a Ph.D. student in the department of sociology at Rice University. She began her doctoral studies during Fall 2016 to focus on urban, community, and religion research impacting educational achievement. At Rice, she holds joint doctoral assistantships with the Religion and Public Life Program (RPLP) and the Houston Education Research Consortium (HERC). She previously served as deputy director of the Faith and Education Coalition (FEC) for the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC), America’s largest Hispanic evangelical organization, where she led national, state, and local initiatives promoting civic engagement among faith communities in issues of educational equity. She holds a master’s degree from the University of Texas at Dallas and a bachelor’s degree from Southern Methodist University (SMU).


25

About Our Presenters Structural Constraints Limiting Latino Students: Administration and Classroom Prof. Miriam Velez Rev. Lance Meche Moderator: Dr. Gus Reyes

Professor for the School of Education Nyack College Dean of Students, Southwestern Assemblies of God University Director, Christian Life Commission-BGCT

Miriam Velez is the coordinator of student teaching for Nyack College Manhattan and a childhood education assistant professor for the Center for Urban Education. She is also the director of MSED inclusive education program. Professor Velez teaches Foundations of Education, Health Issues, Methods of Science, Methods of Social Studies and oversees student teaching and field experiences. She is certified by New York State in bilingual education (K-6), has thirty years of experience as an inner city public and private school instructor, and has been an education professor with Nyack College since 2000.She serves as the college representative for New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) Office of Recruitment and Selections Operations. She is committed to recruiting student teachers for placement in New York City public schools. She has focused her work on preparing teachers that reflect the diversity of the nation’s student body. Lance Meche earned a Bachelor of Science in counseling and Bible in 1998, a Master of Science in Bible and Theology in 2006, and a Master of Divinity in 2008 from Southwestern Assemblies of God University (SAGU). He has been married for nearly 20 years to Roxanne Ellison Meche and has three children, twin 7 year-old girls, Faith and Anna, and a 4 year-old boy named Jase. Rev. Meche is an ordained minister with the Assemblies of God and has been involved in ministry for 20 years; six years as a Youth Minister at Freedom Church Assembly of God in Tallahassee, Florida, and 14 as a resident director, assistant dean of students, and now dean of students and adjunct professor at SAGU. Rev. Meche’s mission in life is to cultivate leaders and disciple them according to Biblical leadership principles for the marketplace and the church. Dr. Gus Reyes serves as the director of the Christian Life Commission for Texas Baptists. Before moving to his current position, Reyes served as the Director of Hispanic Education Initiative/Affinity Ministries for Texas Baptists. Previously he also served as Director of Service Center and Ethnic Consultant for the Center of Strategic Evangelism. A 25-year youth ministry veteran, Dr. Reyes is the co-writer with Dr. Richard Ross of “30 Days, Turning the Hearts of Parents and Teens Towards Each Other.” He served as Youth Ministry Consultant, Director of Church Growth Group Sales, Marketing, and Customer Service Departments at LifeWay Christian Resources in Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. Reyes holds a BBA from University of Texas—Austin, an MBA from Angelo State University, and MRE, Ph.D. degrees from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Gus and his wife Leticia of thirty plus years have three children, Andrea, Agustin II, and Samuel. Gus and Leticia are also proud grandparents.


26

About Our Presenters The Role of “Institutional Agents” in the College Choice Process for Latino(a) Students This presentation examines the current theoretical stages associated with the process of students’ preparation and decision to go to college (i.e., pre-disposition, search and choice stages), as well as its implications for Latino(a) students and their families. To do so it considers the findings of a qualitative study conducted in North Central Indiana with Mexican immigrant and Mexican American high school students. In particular, it draws from social capital theory to explain the role that “institutional agents” may play in advancing Latino(a) student access and retention in college. In addition to discussing the findings of the study, participants will have the opportunity to identify strategies to better support Latino(a) students at each stage of the process. Dr. Robert Reyes Moderator: Mr. Alfredo Cid

Professor of Human Development; Family Science, Messiah College Founder and President Cid Solutions, LLC

Dr. Robert Reyes serves as professor of human development and family science at Messiah College. He is a Certified Family Life Educator and Clinical Fellow of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy. From 2007 to 2012 he served as research director for the Center for Intercultural Teaching and Learning (CITL) and professor of sociology at Goshen College (Goshen, Indiana). Prior to moving to Indiana, he served for 11 years at Messiah College as a faculty member in human development and family science and director of the Latino Partnership program. His research interests include: the study of acculturative stress and coping among Latino families; the study of moral/social capital among immigrant parents and its impact on educational involvement; and the study of community-based learning methods and its impact on student learning outcomes.


27

About Our Presenters Beyond Ganas: Equipping Latino(a) Students to Identify, Understand, and Navigate Different Cultural Epistemologies in the Academy Dr. Tim Baldwin Mr. Martin Avila, Jr.

Adjunct Professor of Educational Ministries, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (NHCLC SCHOLARS) Program Coordination Calvin College’s Multicultural Student Development Office

Dr. Timothy Baldwin is a career educator with over thirty years of experience in classroom instruction, curriculum development, and teacher training. He has served as a middle and high school teacher, director of a non-profit organization that walked alongside refugees and immigrants, and an education professor in multiple contexts and institutions. Currently, Tim is serving as the interim pastor of an English-speaking church in Tegucigalpa, and providing intercultural education, training, and consulting in Honduras and the U.S. His primary research focus is Latino(a) undergraduate classroom learning experiences in predominantly white Christian institutions (PWI’s). Martin Avila currently serves as the program coordinator for the Multicultural Student Development Office at Calvin College. He is a graduate of Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI) and is an M.Ed. student at Michigan State University.


28

About Our Presenters The Sacred Sector Project and the Protection of Religious Freedom Have you wondered how the public policy environment impacts the faith community of which you are a part? Have you ever wondered how your faith community could increase its impact in the public square? Join us for an interactive session exploring how to equip students and faith leaders to gain the skills necessary to guide a church or faith-based nonprofit to integrate its faith-based mission into every aspect of its organizational life. This session will address the question: Where can I go to engage in a learning community that is representative of organizations and individuals with different missions from across the faithbased sector? We will explore how to cultivate a community of diverse faith-based organizations and leaders, across differences, in a learning community where each participant will be empowered as a student and a teacher. This learning community will focus on how faithbased organizations can adopt a holistic framework, called the Three P’s, to integrate and fully embody their sacred missions in every element of organizational life. How they engage in public policy, adopt organizational best practices and implement strategic public positioning. We will explore together how to apply this framework in six key areas through an equipping toolbox: religious staffing, government partnerships, positive engagement in the public square, nondiscrimination laws, advocacy and lobbying, and family supportive policies. By the conclusion of this session, you will be equipped with a framework that you will be able to teach to others about how a faith-based organization can connect everything it does to the advancement of its sacred mission. Chelsea Langston Bombino, J.D.

The Center for Public Justice Initiative, Sacred Sector

Chelsea Langston Bombino joined the Center for Public Justice (CPJ) as the Director of Membership and Equipping for the Institutional Religious Freedom Alliance (IRFA) in January 2015. She now is directing a new CPJ initiative, Sacred Sector. This initiative empowers faith-based organizations and emerging faith-leaders to live out their faith-based missions in every aspect of their organizational lives. In this role, Chelsea focuses on equipping faith-based organizations to advance their religious freedom by living out their faith-based missions, in their public policy engagement, their organizational practices, and through public positioning. Before joining CPJ, Chelsea served as Learning Director for Maryland Nonprofits where she was responsible for collaborating with staff, members and key community stakeholders to facilitate educational and capacity-building opportunities and collaboration across Maryland Nonprofits’ diverse membership. Chelsea currently serves as an adjunct professor at Pepperdine's D.C. campus teaching Nonprofit Management and is also the Early Childhood Ministry Coordinator for Potomac Valley Assembly Church. Chelsea holds a B.A and a J.D from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and is a member of the State of Michigan Bar Association. She is married to Josh and lives in Maryland.


29

About Our Presenters Beyond Borders, Boundaries, and Documentation Statuses: Building Local Movements of Neighbor-Love With immigration's resurgence into the national spotlight, the country, our churches, our schools, our neighborhoods, and even our homes are drawing clear binaries between “us” and “them,” between “compassion” and “legality,” and between “right” and “wrong.” Yet we are followers of Jesus first and citizens of the United States second. The chronology matters. But how does our faith intersect with the phenomenon of human movement? How do the teachings of Jesus shape our citizenship and fuel us into action among and alongside our migrant neighbors? Ultimately, how do we move from acquaintances to allies who co-create a just, mutually beneficial future? Mr. Jer Swigart Ms. Nohemi Hernandez

Co-founding Director, The Global Immersion Project Communications, College Student

Jer Swigart has been working in the field of peacemaking and conflict transformation since 2005 when he acted as the liaison between an international NGO, the faith community, the Pakistani military, and the United Nations in the aftermath of a massive earthquake in Northern Pakistan. He is the founder of The Global Immersion Project, in an effort to form men and women into everyday peacemakers who are equipped and mobilized to reach across boundaries and seek human flourishing. Jer completed his undergrad work at the University of Northwestern-St. Paul and his M.Div. at Fuller Theological Seminary where he focused his studies on innovative leadership in peace and reconciliation. In addition to being a contributing author to several books, he is the co-author of Mending the Divides: Creative Love in a Conflicted World (IVP, 2017). He currently resides with his family in Bend, OR. Nohemi Hernandez is from Tijuana, Baja California but has lived in San Diego, California since age 5. She is a communications major and pursues photographic arts in her spare time.


30

About Our Presenters The Therapeutic Power of Hispanic Hymnology The students in the Nyack College School of Music seek creative ways in which to be globally engaged in the service of Christ and His people. Nyack College enjoys a large Hispanic population, whose heritage comes from many nations in Central America, the Caribbean, and several South American countries. Theirs is a beautiful heritage of hymns that are worthy of study and offer a special perspective for our consideration. This seminar will be led by Dr. Marie Kenote and by Dr. Sue Talley, joined by Prof. Eleazer Rodriguez and Prof. Glauco Lima. Resources will be drawn from both campuses, especially from students and faculty whose background is Latin American. This study is intended to stimulate further dialogue and consideration of the Hispanic heritage in Christian worship, particularly as observed in the hymns of several recent South American composers, such as Pablo Sosa and his colleagues. Such native hymn writers came to believe that because of the Incarnation, and because of God’s care for all strata of society, hymns should both glorify God and reflect the joys, concerns and struggles of the humans in their particular geopolitical milieu. Therefore, rather than simply using hymns from North America, translated into Spanish by missionaries, the native evangelizers have begun to use hymns which are deeply rooted in their native poetry and musically expressed with references to folk songs and dances that the people love. Musical examples will be provided by students and faculty. Through this project, we hope to stimulate broad-based questions such as, “How can hymns be used to effectively glorify God and minister to His people by providing a hospitable atmosphere for all strata of society?” We believe that Latin America and its Christians have much to teach us.

Dr. Sue Talley

Professor of Music, Nyack College

Dr. Marie Herseth Kenote

Professor of Music, Nyack College

Prof. Eleazer Rodriguez

Professor of Music, Nyack College

Prof. Glauco Lima

Professor of Music, Nyack College

Dr. Marie Herseth Kenote, flutist, is a tenured professor of music at Nyack College. Marie enjoys performing classical and sacred music for audiences in various venues, including at colleges, monasteries, nursing homes, rehab facilities, and in Churches. She also enjoys sharing the talents of Nyack College music students in performance off campus, bringing joy and hope to many. Marie performed as a substitute flutist with the New York Philharmonic for over 20 years (with whom she participated in radio and television broadcasts and recordings). Marie holds degrees in music from the New England Conservatory of Music (B.M.), the Juilliard School (M.M.), Rutgers University (D.M.A), and spent a year in Berlin as a Fulbright Scholar. She especially enjoys time with her three adult daughters, two sons-in- laws, and two granddaughters. In her spare time, she enjoys her two cats, golf and researching musicological and theological theories, Dr. Sue Lane Talley, Assistant Dean of the School of Music, has entered her seventeenth year at Nyack—a year she has dedicated to the healing power of music through Christ our Lord. The story of Pablo Sosa and his colleagues resonated with her as she contemplated “the healing of the nations,” in which she believes that music will have a large part. Dr. Sosa understands the importance of the folk hymn in uplifting and healing the people of Latin America. Dr. Sue is a pianist and recorderist, and cannot resist any musical instrument that comes her way, from the cello to the dulcimer, autoharp, and harmonica, not to mention the folk harp. She particularly enjoys teaching Music and Worship and playing with and for other instrumentalists and singers from our among our students and faculty. She thoroughly enjoyed taking the Chamber Singers to Puerto Rico a few years back and hopes that she may return one day with some more of our amazing and wonderful Nyack students and faculty—that the island and the musicians both may experience the loving and healing touch of Christ through song. Professor Eleazer Rodriguez currently teaches all levels of Spanish at Nyack College and is instructor of guitar at the Preparatory Center for the Arts of Brooklyn College. Formerly, he taught music for the School of Music at Nyack College. As a classical guitarist, Rodriguez has performed in Toronto, New York, New Jersey, Madrid, and Puerto Rico. He currently studies at Inter-American University of Puerto Rico, Manhattan School of Music and Toronto Guitar Institute. He has taken master classes with Ivan Rijos, Juan Mercadal and Roland Dyens. He holds a master’s degree from Brooklyn College at Dallas and a bachelor’s degree from Nyack College. Glauco Lima began exploring the musical world by himself at a very young age driven by his passion for music. After receiving some basic musical training he earned his first diploma in classical piano during his adolescence. Nowadays, Lima holds a Bachelor's degree in Piano Performance from the Nyack College School of Music and a master's degree in jazz studies from Queens College City University of New York, among several other music certificates. He has performed at other prestigious venues in North America, South America, and Europe including the Lincoln Center, the Blue Note Jazz New York, the Steinway Hall NYC, the Sala São Paulo, Brazil, and the Un Tubo Jazz, Italy. Currently professor Glauco Lima is a music faculty member at the Nyack College Manhattan campus and music director at the Faith Exchange Fellowship Church in Manhattan.


31

About Our Presenters Technology-Infused & Data Driven Lesson Planning in an Urban Classroom Setting This paper examines components necessary for technology-infused lesson planning that can be effective and powerful tools to engage students in self-monitoring using meaningful curriculum and data-driven instruction. The adaptive use of technology encourages students to self-evaluate while exploring content in a topical format with goals for developing higherorder thinking skills. Technology provides the opportunity to create an entirely new learning environment, in which computers can be used as tools in problem solving to foster conceptual development. Thus, students can take a more active role in their own learning, by asking their own questions and exploring various alternatives to solving them. Motivation to learn content increases along with content knowledge, when technology-infused lesson planning includes data-informed instructional events. Ms. Alyssa Rice-Cruz

Apple Award Receiver, Nyack College Alumna

Alyssa Rice-Cruz is a Nyack College alumna and Apple Award recipient. She earned her undergraduate degree in adolescent education with a concentration in social studies and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in education with a focus on K-12 literacy. Alyssa has been working at a charter school in the Bronx for the past two years, and her work within the urban classroom has allowed her to gather research sufficient enough to be presented at the Northeastern Education Research Association. Alyssa is married and has two children.


32

About Our Presenters Embryonic Gene Editing, The Future Has Arrived: Implications for Youth Ministry Since the complete mapping of the human genome in 2001 and the resultant identification of specific diseases and debilitating human conditions with specific gene mutations, scientists and the medical community have dreamed of the day when these gene mutations could be eliminated when the child is but a microscopic- sized embryo. A “gene editing” procedure (called CRISPR-CS9) recently received key support in the UK and the U.S. The question now has arisen, if gene editing can eliminate genetically linked disease, can it also be used to enhance positive traits? The answer is yes. It is now possible to modify a living embryo in such a way that the resultant child will be (choose one or more) stronger, smarter, more artistic, more beautiful or have a specific personality type. Regardless of ethical issues, some expect that parents will jump at the chance to give their offspring any advantage in a society built on meritocracy. The cost of gene editing has seen a spectacular drop in the last 12 months. After a brief historical recap of the gene editing quest, and the current status of embryonic gene editing, this paper explores possible implications for youth ministry when these “enhanced” young people are old enough to enter church based youth ministry programs. We have surveyed and interviewed the youth leaders of America’s largest churches (N=12, mean attendance 8,000) for their thinking on this issue. Dr. Leonard Kageler

Professor of Youth and Family Studies, Dean of the Center for Teaching Excellence & Faculty Resources, Nyack College

Dr. Kageler is Professor of Youth & Family Studies (YFS) and YFS Department Chair. He has authored 12 books for youth workers or parents. He speaks widely around the U.S. and beyond to groups of youth workers or youth ministry educators. This has included giving classroom lectures at both Oxford and Cambridge Universities in the UK on the subject of adolescent development.


33

About Our Presenters Closing Gaps in Data and Education Access Through Survey of Fishes of the Lower Hudson River We evaluated common practices of seining, a fish capture technique that involves dragging a large net along a shoreline. A number of New York citizen science fish research programs, which annually serves thousands of students and members of the general public through the summer, regularly utilize seining but with slight differences in protocol. Our work aimed to validate common practices. Our data suggests that seining a site “completely” is challenging because captures will always include a spectrum of organisms that are resident (most easily revealed in first few hauls) to more ephemeral mobile visitors (often revealed in later hauls) which may skew assessments of diversity. For this reason, we speculate that coves are a better option than open beaches for seining; however, more work is needed. In summary, we suggest a general criterion for successful seining: six consecutive hauls or three consecutive hauls with fewer than five captures. In measuring “effort,” we offer suggestions to efficiently measure volume and time per haul. This project is presented in context with existing citizen science programs hosted by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO). This work was done in partnership with Brooklyn Bridge Park Environmental Education Center and Sarah Lawrence College Center for the Urban River at Beczak. This project was supported by a 2017 Nyack College Faculty Summer Research Grant and was accomplished in collaboration with the Nyack College Fishing Club. Dr. Peter Park

Associate Professor of Biology, Nyack College

Dr. Daniel Kaluka

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Nyack College

Mr. Ye Chan Sung

Nyack College Student

Ms. Maridalia Lillis

Nyack College Student

Dr. Peter J. Park is an associate professor of biology at Nyack College. His training is in evolutionary ichthyology having earned his Ph.D. in ecology and evolution from Stony Brook University. He specializes in fish brain and behavioral adaptation. He teaches a wide variety of courses at Nyack College, ranging from human biology to environmental science. Dr. Park has helped develop a number of nationally utilized educational tools, including the HHMI Stickleback Evolution Virtual Lab (http:// www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/stickleback-evolution-virtual-lab) and ABLE Aquaponics Lab (http:// www.ableweb.org/proceedings/SPT--FullRecord.php?ResourceId=1193). He also serves as a science content reviewer for Biol-O-Gee R.A.P. music videos. In spring 2015, Dr. Park started the Nyack College Fishing Club (www.facebook.com/nyackfishingclub) to expose students and friends to fishing and fish research. His students regularly participate in citizen-science research efforts (e.g., BioBlitzes, Fish Counts) and community service. Dr. Park was born and still lives in Queens, NY and attended the Bronx High School of Science. He earned a B.S. double-major in biology and psychology from Stony Brook University.


34

About Our Presenters Attitudes of Asian American Christians Towards the Ethnic Churches They Left Ethnic churches, such as Chinese-speaking and Korean-speaking churches in America have not been successful at retaining their English-speaking young people. One estimate places the attrition rate at 95%. A conspicuous aspect of this “Silent Exodus” (Helen Lee’s well term) is the large numbers of second-generation Chinese and Koreans who attend majorityculture churches in New York City, such as Redeemer Presbyterian Church (perhaps 40% Asian in the midtown Manhattan location) and Trinity Grace Church (perhaps 40% Asian in their midtown Manhattan location). The authors surveyed 165 Chinese-American and Korean-American Christians at six such churches in New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church, Trinity Grace Church, New Life Fellowship, Hope Church NYC, Time Square Church and Hillsong Church. All respondents had previously attended a Chinese church or a Korean church for at least three years and left. The 67-question survey inquired about eleven possible reasons they left their old church and are attending their current non-Asian church and sought to establish the strongest reason(s). The eleven reasons were associated with 1) circumstances, 2) the language barrier, 3) motivations, 4) acculturation, 5) collectivism, 6) conflicts, 7) hierarchy, 8) volunteer fatigue, 9) legalism, 10) excellence and 11) multicultural value. The authors discovered that out of these eleven, the same three emerged as the strongest reasons cited at each of the six locations (although the order of the three differed): legalism, excellence and multicultural value. The survey also offered respondents a chance to write in verbal comments to illuminate the survey findings, which allowed the authors to draw some conclusions about whether these three reasons should be interpreted as a “push out’ from the ethnic church or as a “pull in’ toward the non-Asian church. On this question of “push” vs. “pull,“ the findings offer a mixed picture. Recommendations for the ethnic church are offered at the end. Dr. Ezra Sohn Dr. Frank Chan

Alliance Theological Seminary Professor of Bible, Nyack College

Ezra Sohn is starting a new church called Disciples NYC in Little Neck, Queens. After receiving a Biblical and Theological Studies degree from Nyack College and a Master of Divinity degree from Biblical Seminary, he graduated from the Doctor of Ministry program at Alliance Theological Seminary with a dissertation entitled, “Attitudes of Asian American Christians who left their ethnic churches for non-ethnic churches.” Frank Chan has been a professor of Bible at Nyack College and Alliance Theological Seminary (ATS) since 1999. He is currently the coordinator of dissertations in the Doctor of Ministry program at ATS. He is a contributor to the textbook, What the New Testament Authors Really Cared About. He preaches and teaches in the English speaking ministries of several Chinese Churches in the NYC area. He is a licensed worker with The Christian and Missionary Alliance.


35

About Our Presenters *The Role of “Institutional Agents” in the College Choice Process for Latino(a) Students Dr. Robert Reyes Moderator: Mr. Alfredo Cid

Professor of Human Development; Family Science, Messiah College Founder and President Cid Solutions, LLC

*(Refer to page 24 for more detailed information, such as abstracts and biographies)

Embryonic Gene Editing, The Future Has Arrived: Implications for Youth Ministry Since the complete mapping of the human genome in 2001 and the resultant identification of specific diseases and debilitating human conditions with specific gene mutations, scientists and the medical community have dreamed of the day when these gene mutations could be eliminated when the child is but a microscopic- sized embryo. A “gene editing” procedure (called CRISPR-CS9) recently received key support in the UK and the U.S. The question now has arisen, if gene editing can eliminate genetically linked disease, can it also be used to enhance positive traits? The answer is yes. It is now possible to modify a living embryo in such a way that the resultant child will be (choose one or more) stronger, smarter, more artistic, more beautiful or have a specific personality type. Regardless of ethical issues, some expect that parents will jump at the chance to give their offspring any advantage in a society built on meritocracy. The cost of gene editing has seen a spectacular drop in the last 12 months. After a brief historical recap of the gene editing quest, and the current status of embryonic gene editing, this paper explores possible implications for youth ministry when these “enhanced” young people are old enough to enter church based youth ministry programs. We have surveyed and interviewed the youth leaders of America’s largest churches (N=12, mean attendance 8,000) for their thinking on this issue. Ms. Celeste Gonzalez

Youth & Family Studies, Nyack College

Celeste Gonzalez is a junior in the Youth & Family Studies Department. She is from North Bergen, New Jersey. Her interest in embryonic gene editing began in high school. Tackling the topic of gene editing and its potential negative and positive outcomes she researched, presented, and debated in a variety of settings. She, like Faith Argeroplos and Professor Kageler, has a particular interest in connecting research to Kingdom of God applications and implications.


36

About Our Presenters With Liberty and Justice for All: The Education Connection Dr. Vilma “Nina� Balmaceda Mr. Gregory Jack

Mr. Edwin Omar Hernandez Mr. Carlos Daniel Hernandez

Professor of Political Science and Founding Director, Center for Scholarship and Global Engagement Criminal Justice, Nyack College Student Business Administration and Accounting, Nyack College Student Criminal Justice, Nyack College Student

*(Refer to page 19 for more detailed information, such as abstracts and biographies)

Closing Gaps in Data and Education Access Through Survey of Fishes of the Lower Hudson River Dr. Peter Park

Associate Professor of Biology, Nyack College

Dr. Daniel Kaluka

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Nyack College

Mr. Ye Chan Sung

Nyack College Student

Ms. Maridalia Lillis

Nyack College Student

*(Refer to page 31 for more detailed information, such as abstracts and biographies)


37

About Our Presenters Teachers as Culturally Proactive Agents through Cycles of Self-Regulation Dr. Marie White

Professor of Education, Nyack College

Ms. Muriel Pelaez

Childhood Education, Nyack College Student

Ms. Yadilka Ramos

Adolescent Education, Nyack College Student

Marie C. White is a professor in the Urban Education Center at the Nyack College NYC campus. She maintains an active research agenda in self-regulation of learning with a focus on culturally proactive urban teaching and learning, specifically how to better prepare a diverse population of learners to engage in higher education. Most recently her publications include a book featuring case studies of four teacher candidates who entered Nyack underprepared and yet through training in help-seeking and other self-regulatory strategies successfully graduated, became New York State certified, went on to obtain master's degrees, and now serve in public and private school settings. The book, Developing Self-regulation of Learning and Teaching Skills Among Teacher Candidates is co-authored with Nyack colleague Miriam Velez, and Hefer Bembenutty, a noted researcher and scholar. Other current publications include her book, Self-regulation and the Common Core: Applications to ELA Standards, with practical applications of self-regulation of learning to standards-based instruction. Dr. White who obtained her doctorate from The City University of New York, Graduate Center in educational psychology maintains an active role in an AERA of a SIG (small interest group) to further international research in the area of self-regulated learning. Muriel Pelaez is a senior at Nyack College pursuing her B. S. degree in childhood education- TESOL. Last year she was awarded membership in Alpha Chi. Muriel is very creative and enjoys fashion and design. She serves the NYC education department as a student worker. Last summer, she spent time teaching literacy in the Philippines. Yadilka Ramos is a senior at Nyack College pursuing her B.S. degree in adolescence education- math. She was awarded membership in Alpha Chi. Yadilka is fully bilingual and has a passion for inner city students. She serves in the School of Education as a tutor and assists in the department with administrative tasks. Yadilka is the youth director at her church.


38

About Our Presenters How to be a Protégé: Equipping Students to Maximize Mentoring Relationships The word, protégé, comes from the French language. It can be translated as “protected,” while in Latin it is described as “a shield where one is covered in the front.” In this analogy, a mentor serves as that shield, representing someone who is more experienced or knowledgeable helping to guide their protégés in terms of being successful and avoiding pitfalls in life. The phrase “being mentored” tends to suggest an older and wiser mentor reaching out to his or her mentee under formal conditions. This particular perspective relies heavily on the current methods advocated within youth mentorship programs. While this is admirable, research from career development field reveals that the majority of successful mentoring relationships were protégé initiated. Successful protégés acknowledge the significance of the interplay between busyness and self-interest when securing potential mentors. Thus, to ensure that protégés maximize their time with their mentor, they should exhibit intentionality and take the initiative to approach them. Essentially, rather than waiting on their mentor, they should learn to facilitate the actual mentoring relationship. A framework for those who are interested in facilitating protégé orientation trainings can be developed by modeling and adapting the behavior and learning styles of preceding successful protégés. The skill of self-awareness, as well as practical habits to become a more appealing candidate, will be elaborated on. Dr. Gabe Veas

Assistant Director of Certificate Programs and Assistant Professor of Mentorship and Community Programs Ashland University

Recently relocated from Los Angeles, Dr. Gabe Veas plays a key role at the Cleveland Center of Ashland Theological Seminary as an associate director of certification programs. In addition to this, Veas is an associate professor of mentorship & community transformation, a position which is the first of its kind in the United States. The author of several research journal articles on the subject of mentoring, Veas has previously delved in deep on cutting edge areas such as protégé-initiated mentoring which combines research in the fields of youth mentoring and early career development. His latest two articles will be published this month through the premier academic mentoring conference in the country convened by the University of New Mexico's Mentoring Institute. They will highlight the role that administrators and educators can play in incorporating mentoring in their contexts to engage students, develop community, and increase learning.


39

About Our Presenters Bela Bartok: Collector, Notator, Assimilator and Composer Acclaimed concert pianist, music educator, writer, composer, and ethnomusicologist Bela Bartok (1881-1945) was a man of many talents. While he is best known for his compositional prowess and singularly innovative style, he was also an early pioneer in the field of ethnomusicology. During a series of expeditions to rural areas throughout Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, North Africa, Slovakia, and Croatia, as well as several countries in central Europe, Bartok and his friend Zoltan Kodaly collected thousands of peasant folk songs using the technique of phonograph recording. Later, Bartok transcribed from the recordings, analyzed the music that they had recorded, and in many cases published the music in painstakingly detailed editions. In addition, Bartok also wrote several books and numerous articles on the topics of folk songs, composition, pedagogy, and ethnomusicology. For Bartok, this study was more than a purely academic exercise. Rather, he sought to assimilate the stylistic characteristics of the folk music that he studied into his compositions while also maintaining strong roots in both modern and classical traditions. By doing so “he drew a new vocabulary of rhythmic, melodic, and formal characteristics from peasant music and blended them with those of classical and modern music� (Burkholder et al 843).

Mr. Benjamin Riley

Instrumental Performance, Nyack College Student

Benjamin Riley is an accomplished classical and acoustic guitarist, singer/songwriter, and writer. Ben is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music online master guitar certificate program and is a first semester senior classical guitar performance major at Nyack College, where he currently holds a 3.96 cumulative GPA. Ben has performed as a solo classical guitarist at many venues throughout the Hudson Valley and beyond. He frequently performs at Nyack College School of Music concerts both as a solo performer and as an ensemble musician. In addition, Ben performs as a solo classical guitarist and plays rhythm guitar in the worship band at Rivervale Community Church. Ben is a published writer, having written three subject specific articles for encyclopedias published by Grey House Publishing.


40

About Our Presenters Music as Mirror: Harmonic Practices as a Reflection of Societal Changes This presentation will discuss how established harmonic practices in tonal music have been repurposed in jazz and contemporary worship music. It is our claim that centuries-old harmonic practices have transmigrated into current use as a reflection of changes in society. For example, the use by John Coltrane in the twentieth century of the altered dominant chord can be directly traced back to Beethoven’s use of the augmented sixth chord in the time leading up to, and beyond, the French Revolution. In both cases, groups of citizens within their respective contemporary society revolted against the station into which they had been placed at birth, and the music from either period reflects that revolt, particularly through the composers’ utilization of harmonic parameters. Dr. Lars Frandsen

Professor of Music, Nyack College, NYC

Lars Frandsen is professor of music at Nyack College in Manhattan, where he directs the music theory program. He is also a professor at the City University of New York, where he has directed the classical guitar program for twenty years. Dr. Frandsen received his education at the Royal Academy of Music in London, at Yale University and at the Eastman School of Music in New York, where he earned his doctorate. Lars has given presentations on music theory topics in England, Continental Europe and in the United States. Last year he was invited to lecture at the Royal Academy in London and delivered a lecture recital at the University of Surrey, England on the music of Hans Werner Henze.


41

About Our Presenters Beyond Ganas: Equipping Latino(a) Students to Identify, Understand, and Navigate Different Cultural Epistemologies in the Academy Dr. Tim Baldwin Mr. Martin Avila, Jr.

Adjunct Professor of Educational Ministries, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (NHCLC SCHOLARS) Program Coordination Calvin College’s Multicultural Student Development Office

*(Refer to page 25 for more detailed information, such as abstracts and biographies)

The Quest for Historical Satan The topic of Satan and his origins within the church is often one that is not at the heart of any sermon, but rather one that lies silently in the background. This is, of course, because the Bible has very little, if anything, to say about where and how Satan came into being. Thus, much of what is said to be known about who or what Satan is stems from extra biblical texts such as the Book of Enoch and even later publications such as Milton’s Paradise Lost which have pulled jumbled scriptural references into a cohesive story of a fallen angel. This has led to a view of Satan within the evangelical church that paints him as a concrete being in direct opposition to God. However, the definitive view of many evangelicals fails to take into account the biblical vagueness on the topic of Satan and the historical transformation of Satan between the Old and New Testaments caused by the influence of Zoroastrianism dualism. When this is taken into account, a vague and ambiguous picture of Satan is painted that teeters on the brink of metaphorical, in contrast to the tangible, evangelical Satan.

Mr. Calvin Bushman

Biblical and Theological Studies, Nyack College Student

Calvin Bushman is in his final semester as an undergraduate student on the Rockland campus of Nyack College. He is a Biblical and Theological Studies major who plans on pursuing graduate school, in order to obtain his M.Div. After graduate school, he plans on entering into full-time ministry as of a Navy Chaplain, although he is open to wherever God takes him. He is currently serving as Youth Ministry intern at Cornerstone Christian Church in Wyckoff, NJ where his ministry focuses on raising up a new generation through the gospel and comedy.


42

About Our Presenters The Role of Resistance to Change in Church Sustainability in Harlem, New York Churches in Harlem are in crisis. Many churches are dying and ultimately closing. At first glance, it may not appear to be so, as many signs of success and community revitalization abound. However, churches are failing in their efforts to sustain viable ministry as Harlem gentrifies. Several traditional neighborhood churches that for generations boasted strong memberships, built on and sustained by familial loyalty and neighborhood ties, are struggling to hold onto their congregations. Many have succumbed to the battle. This presentation, “The Role of Resistance to Change in Church Sustainability in Harlem, New York” will highlight the research into the role that resistance to change played in the sustainability of two local churches in Harlem, New York: Bethel Gospel Assembly, Inc. and Harlem Pentecostal Assembly, Inc. This presentation examines Regele’s (1996) foci of change and the constructs as a framework for understanding congregational change and recommendations for congregational change management. Though this presentation has emerged out of academic research into the dynamics of church growth and decline, gentrification, the historical significance of the church in the African American community, organizational change management and resistance to change, it is meant to spark critical conversations regarding church sustainability and inspire further research. Dr. Joan Williams

Executive Director, Beth-Hark Christian Counseling Center, Inc.

Affectionately known as Dr. J, Reverend Joan M. Williams, is passionate about organizational sustainability and capacity-building. An experienced human services professional and collaborative bridge-builder, Dr. J has over 32 years of community service in both the nonprofit and public sectors. She has served as the executive director of the Beth-Hark Christian Counseling Center, Inc., a faith-based community services organization in Harlem, New York since 2007. Since that time, she has worked tirelessly to increase organizational impact, expand client access to services, and position the organization for greater levels of financial solvency and overall effectiveness. Additionally, Dr. J. works with local community partners to advance human services, advocate for change in food insecurity, gun violence and economic development organization. Dr. Williams holds a Doctor of Ministry from Alliance Theological Seminary, Master of Social Work from Columbia University, Master of Science in Education, from SUNY Brockport and a bachelor’s degree from Colgate University.


2017 National Hispanic Education Summit and Nyack Scholars Symposium FEC & CSGE, Nyack College  

Program of the Eighth National Hispanic Education Summit and the Ninth Nyack Scholars Symposium joint event: "In Search of Accountability in...

2017 National Hispanic Education Summit and Nyack Scholars Symposium FEC & CSGE, Nyack College  

Program of the Eighth National Hispanic Education Summit and the Ninth Nyack Scholars Symposium joint event: "In Search of Accountability in...

Advertisement