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FRESH IDEAS & BRILLIANT BUYS

RELAX & ENJOY YOUR GARDEN Garden makeovers

“I PACKED SO MUCH INTO ONE SMALL PLOT!”

Outdoor living

COSY NIGHTS BY AN OPEN-AIR FIRE

@ Magical summerhouses for laid-back living @ 8 easy ways to create privacy @ Make a glowing tower of fairy lights @ Create a raised bed garden in one day @ 5 plants you must have & 5 to avoid!

Upcycling

QUICK IDEAS AND MAKES FOR GARDEN GLAMPING


kew.org/broadwalk Friends of Kew go free Kew Gardens Kew Bridge

Image © RBG Kew/Jennie Tuffs

From July 2016


ou Ce td le oo br r l at iv e in g

Lying in a hamm ock Picking fresh ras pberries Big bunc hes of bright ch rysanths

Welcome, to Modern Gardens, the new magazine for people who want to spend more time enjoying their outside space and less time working in it. August is all about changing gear and relaxing – and what better place to do that than your own garden? We treasure sunny days in this country so, when they do come along, we want to help you get the most out of the season with loads of ideas for turning your plot into a sanctuary, somewhere you can chill with your family and friends. Late summer is the best time to sit back and appreciate your space, cooking and eating outside, and enjoying the still-light evenings after work. Instead of the usual barbecue, how about having a brunch party? We’ve got lots of easy and inspiring tips for creating a wonderful event, on page 98. If you fancy a spot of garden glamping (camping with all the home comforts), have a go at some of our clever ideas to make the experience even better. For a more permanent place to relax outside, we tell you all you need to know about building an outdoor ireplace, on page 104. With one of these, it doesn’t matter what the great British weather throws at you: there will always be a warm and cosy spot to wile away those laid-back days. We’ve been really impressed by the projects and plans that you’ve been sharing with us on Facebook and Instagram (@moderngardens). Please do keep them coming, and we’ll print as many as we can in the magazine.

Fiona Editor Fiona Cumberpatch

You can find us on www.moderngardensmagazine.co.uk Facebook Modern Gardens Magazine Twitter @Modern_Gardens and you can post us your modern garden pics on Instagram @ModernGardens

Simp pleasu le in Augures st


Inside this

14

MONTH...

48 Reader garden makeovers “Half an hour a month is all it takes” 14

A small, narrow g garden has been filled with smart features and striking g foliage g plants to cut down time spent on upkeep.

“Our space is perfect for socialising” g 26

89

Laid-back garden glamping

Free-spirited p ideas for creating g a magical outdoor festival vibe at home. 94

Lay-in-a-day path

Modernise yyour g garden with a low-cost and easy-install gravel walkway. 104

Create a cosy outdoor room

Add warmth, comfort and romance to your garden with a stylish fireplace.

How a summerhouse and decking g turned this garden into an ideal summer retreat.

Easy ideas

Simple makes & projects

Use acid greens, g cool greys, g y rich russets and icy blues to add colour and texture.

18

34

Make a pretty garden trellis

Create the perfect p frame to encourage easy-grow climbers to cover a wall.

23

Creating a place to hide

Make yyour ggarden a truly peaceful place with a private haven. 84

We love to make...

Ingenious g upcycling p y ideas for a relaxing summer garden. 87

Create a night glow

Add sparkle outside with our easy make.

Raise it up

Practical and stylish, y raised beds are an easy way to keep control of your borders. 54

38

Gorgeous grasses

Happy places

You share your outside spaces with us. 56

5 plants you mustt grow

Star performers p that will help make a little garden great.

Everything y g you y need to know about clematis 58

Choose, grow and make beautiful decorations with this colourful climber.

116


Regulars

SMALL GARDENS

Earthy pleasures

6

Top ideas for what to buy, make and do.

BIG IDEAS

Blooming lovely

12

Plants and shrubs to buy now!

Make summer last!

21

Create an ice bowl for outdoor eats.

What to do now

44

6

How to keep your plot looking good.

Upcycle with style

47

Make a simple, shiny tealight lantern.

Subscription ofer

64

Get six issues for just £9.99.

“I’m in the garden”

69 66

Plant a sunshine corner

Why reader Kelly Haworth loves her plot.

Q&A

77

Bright g yellow y and white flower combos for sunny, shady, damp and dry spots.

Got a question? We’ve got the answer.

70 5 new ways y to fall in love with sunflowers

Enjoying the garden with your pets.

Paws & whiskers

79

Fresh ideas for these golden giants.

We love outdoor living

82 72

Watering made easy

How to make a boring job less of a chore.

What you’re up to in your gardens.

Bedding plants ofer

122

Best buys 30

Choosing a summerhouse

Create a p personalised hideawayy so you y can enjoy your outdoor space even more. 36

87

Making a splash!

10 watering g cans to brighten g your y garden g and make giving your plants a drink a joy.

Free pansies worth £8.99.

Easy-care climbers ofer

124

Money off patio clematis.

Garden notebook

126

All you need to know to get started.

Our garden crush

130

‘Must-have gardens’ we love. 48

What’s your garden style?

Plants and accessories for a cool, classic look 98

Brunch outside

Ideas, makes and recipes p to layy on the ultimate weekend treat for guests. 114

64 SUBSCRIBE TODAY! TR YM

FRESH IDEAS & BRILLIANT BUYS

RELAX & ENJOY YOUR GARDEN

103

So EASY!

116

Grow your own lemon drops Plums

Create cakes, jams, sweet treats and smoothies with this juicy seasonal fruit.

Garden makeovers

“I PACKED SO MUCH INTO ONE SMALL PLOT!”

Grow & eat Sweet and tangy, gy cool citrus cubes with a lemony zing are quick and easy to make.

! E!

Pick a mini water feature

Tabletop fountains for tiny spaces.

r d!

NEW!

Outdoor living

COSY NIGHTS BY AN OPEN AIR FIRE

I @ Magical summerhouses for laid back living @ 8 easy ways to create privacy @ Make a glowing tower of fairy lights @ Create a raised bed garden in one day @ 5 plants you must have & 5 to avoid!

Upcycling

QUICK IDEAS AND MAKES FOR GARDEN GLAMPING

@Get six issues of Modern Gardens for just £9.99, delivered free to your door!


Earthy DREAM

PLANT

G ROW

PICK

MAKE

BUY


IINSTANT C R

Glow on What’s nicer than sitting outside on a summer night? These stylish stainless steel Luxform Solar RVS garden torches have a flickering candle effect, which adds atmosphere to your deck or patio. Easy to use and attractively styled, they measure 112cm high. £15.95 each from www.bakker.com

COMP ILED BY: FIONA CU MBERPATCH AND EMMA H OWCUTT MAIN IMAGE: GAP P HOTOS O

FT AND SPIKY nto this cool cacti cushion. £52 barnaby&co.com

HANGING OUT Relax and unwind in a hammock chair. £75 www.designvintage.co.uk

BRIGHT BIRDS These water resistant pots line up beautifully. From £18 www.lornasyson.co.uk

AUGUST 2016

MODERN GARDENS 7


Sound and vision

FRESH PERSPECTIVES A new way to grow: upside down pots have a reservoir for water and a grid to stop soil falling out £50 www. outthereinteriors.com

This clever aGlow design is a lamp, speaker and power sourc - all in one stylish multi-tasking package. It has a dimmer, so y can take the light down if preferred. The battery lasts for 20 hours and is powerful enough to charge a phone. Take this on laid-back picnic, and play your favourite tunes. £90 from www.theglamcampingcompany.com

WE LOVE THIS!

UNDER GLASS A terrarium in bright turquoise makes an on trend home for succulents,. £34.95 www. redcandy.co.uk

BAG ONE OF THESE Perfect for trips to the farmers’ market, this waxed cotton carrier costs £125 from www.botanyshop.co.uk

ICE COOL SCOOPS A treat on a hot day is a bowl of home made ice cream. For a superfast recipe, blend 300g of frozen raspberries with 100g of sugar, until the fruits are coarsely chopped. Add 150ml of double cream. Whizz until combined, then serve immediately in pretty ice cream cartons like these, which cost £3.49 for 10 from www.pipii.co.uk . Colourful ice cream scoops are included. 8 MODERN GARDENS AUGUST 2016


ANIMAL ANTICS

WWW WW W R HS O RG.UK

These assorted Japanese animal characters come with a choice of basil, mint, clover or wild strawberry plants. Just pop in heir back pack, fill the container with water and they’ll look after hemselves and present you with a crop. £9.95 each www.whatyousow.co.uk

OUT & A ABOUT

3 OF THE BEST GARDEN SHOWS

POP UP PLANTS A great gift for a houseplant lover, this set of four succulents is delivered to the door. £18 www.geo-fleur.com

BURNING BRIGHT With resusable pots, these candles add exotic coconut and floral scents £25 each www.whitestuff.com

FLOWER POWER Forget the chintz, these flower patterns are totally fresh. 1 Set of 4 Beatrix side plates, £24 www.oliverbonas.com 2 Bird patterned kneeler, £19.50, wwwmarksandspencer.com 3 Flower print trowel, £8, www.marksandspencer.com

2

The Bakewell Show 3-4 August A country show with a flowerfilled marquee, craft, food and animals to see. Avoid the queues by buying tickets online. Where? The Showground, Bakewell, Derbyshire DE45 1AH www.bakewellshow.org Ayr Flower Show 5-7 August A family festival of gardens, flowers, food and lots of shopping, set in parkland. Where? Rozelle Park, Alloway, Ayr KA7 4NQ www.ayrflowershow.org Shrewsbury Flower Show 12-13 August Be inspired by gorgeous hanging baskets, pot plants, cut blooms and show gardens, lus celebrity gardener Sarah Raven. Where? Quarry Lodge, Shrewsbury SY1 1RN www.shrewsburyflowershow. org

AUGUST 2016

MODERN GARDENS 9


FROM NATURE’S N L LARDER

Carrot and clover cake WHAT YOU NEED @150ml rapeseed oil @125g caster sugar @6 clover flowers, washed and segmented @2 large eggs @250g self raising flour @One heaped teaspoon baking powder @200g finely grated carrots @ 150g sifted icing sugar @ 50g unsalted butter @ 3 clover flowers, washed and segmented

HOTO: STUART WEST

WHAT TO DO 1 Preheat the oven to 350F, 180C, gas mark 4. 2 Line an 8” (20cm) round cake tin with parchment. 3 Measure the oil and sugar into a bowl, and add the grated carrot. Fold the flour and carrot mixture into the oil, sugar, clover and eggs. 4 Turn the mixture into the prepared tin and bake for 40-45 minutes, until the cake is firm and well risen (it will shrink away from the sides of the tin). Cool for five minutes, then invert on to a wire rack. 5 To make the frosting, sift the icing sugar into a bowl, and beat in the softened butter. Add the clover flowers, reserving a few. 6 Spread on top of the cold cake and sprinkle the reserved flower segments over the top.

@ Taken from

OUTDOOR ENTERTAINING PE UP ct for offering ests at a bbq. £24

CUTE COOK OUT This portable bbq is light and easy to use. £30 www.lauraashley.com

10 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

TYLISH SERVER ile up the grilled veggies on this retty heart shaped plate, £18, from ww.whitecompany.com

The Foragers Kitchen by Fiona Bird, published by CICO Books. £14.99. Photography by Stuart West @ CICO Books.

USING CLOVER FLOWERS These delicate blooms appear throughout the summer but only pick young flowers, where the segments are upturned (not down) and pick before the flowers turn brown. Segment the flowers before cooking with them, avoiding the use of any green bits. You’ll find red and white clovers in grassy places. When searching, avoid using any that is growing by the roadside, or near fields which might be heavily sprayed with pesticides. Always wash thoroughly before use, as clover is a favourite with small insects!


@ GO OS E HO ME A ND GA R D E N

INSTAGRAM INSPIRATION Quirky vintage finds bring personality to a garden, and the collection at Goose Home and Garden is a treat. French cafe tables, milk churns and zinc tubs feature on the feed and in the online store. Visit @goosehomeandgarden

GOOD FOR YOU! This glow in the dark hand screen printed carrot is £22, www. basilandford.com

HUNGRY PLANTERS

FUNKY SEATING The geomet ic shape o the is bang on trend. It co ts £399 from www.ma e.com

Keep hanging baskets and pots going this month by giving them a liquid feed every two weeks. Bedding plants need an extra boost, and it will encourage them to flower for longer. Most plant food is mixed with water in a can and then watered in. Read the pack instructions thoroughly before you go ahead. Socker enamel bucket planters are available for £4 from www.ikea.com

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 11


Blooming n lovely IN AU UST US ST T Our pick of the most beautiful plants and shrubs to buy now! OP VERBENA A £4.50 Ad der, this verbena has thin bra y mauve blooms that bob nts. It self seeds, so you’ll g reating drifts of colour. H m (16in)) www.sarahraven.c

EASY ANTS r late mmer

HYDRANGEA ‘ANNABELLE’ £14.99 One of the loveliest hydrangeas, ‘Annabelle’s ‘mophead’ flowers are as big as footballs with hundreds of dainty, creamy-white blooms making up each one. It’s best grown in partial shade but will also thrive in full sun as long as it has moist soil and shelter from drying winds. Height and Spread 1.5m (5ft) www.crocus.co.uk

BIG and beautiful

TUMN JOY ulent, common uces pretty p ch gradually d utumn. It’s h and less stra tuations. Heightt and S (18in) www.burncoose.co.uk

Three shrubs for colourful foliage

£17.99 INUS ‘GRACE’ rful ‘smokewood’ es hazy flowers with e and red leaves whose rs intensify in autumn. ht 5m (16ft 5in) Spread 3ft) www.rhsplants.co.uk

12 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

£4.99 PURPLE BERBERIS ‘Barberry’ is happy in most situations including diicult dry shade. Its spines make it a good barrier plant. Height and Spread 2m (6ft 6in) www.jacksonsnurseries.co.uk

£4.99 FORTUNE’S SPINDLE ‘EMERALD ‘N’ GOLD’ Low maintenance, euonymus’ golden-edged green leaves are tinged with pink in colder months. Height and Spread 1m (39in) www.jparkers.co.uk

Prices given are for one plant, unless otherwise stated.

WORDS: MELISSA MABBITT PHOTOS: ALAMY, GAP IMAGES, G ARDEN WORLD IMAGES, GETTY

BUDDLEIA ‘ KNIGHT’ £10. Dramatic deep p fragrant flowers at butterflies, making bush’ a worthy addi the back of any flow autumn the grey-gre turn a buttery yellow. and Spread 3m (9ft 1 www.thompson-morga


EARTHY PLEASURES

GIVE IT A TRY

CONEFLOWER £9.99 This classic pink daisy looks good in all garden styles. Height 90cm (36in) Spread 50cm (20in) www. thompson-morgan.com

PHLOX £12.99 These richly coloured blooms have a delicious evening scent. Height 90cm (36in) Spread 50cm (20in) www. thompson-morgan.com

SEA HOLLY £7.99 For a clear, crisp silver-white colour opt for a variety named ‘Silver Ghost’. Height 60cm (24in) Spread 40cm (16in) www. waitrosegarden.com

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 13


EXTREME

Makeover

“Half an hour a month is all it takes” JESS AND DAVID CHANELL have filled

their narrow plot with striking plants and clever features which need little upkeep

I

t’s almost impossible to believe that David and Jess Chanell’s town garden measures just 4m (13ft) wide and 14m (46ft) long. Triangular raised beds are packed with grasses and vibrant foliage, there’s a painted summerhouse, a trio of slender trees, a stylish rill water feature, and a vertical succulents garden. “Lawns aren’t my thing. I don’t like looking out on a solid slab of green,” says David, who lives here with his wife Jess, their dog Coco and two rabbits, Pearl and Dolly. “I love plants but my job is very busy and the last thing I want is to come home and work on the garden. I aim to spend no more than half an hour a month on it, the rest of the time we can just relax and enjoy it.” When the couple moved here in August 2013, the outside area had a lawn, two borders and a shed. “It was well maintained, but basic,” says David. “This was my first garden, and I couldn’t wait to get started. My dad was a good gardener. He owned a small plant nursery as well as doing a regular job. I’ve inherited his enthusiasm!” David worked out his design before touching the existing plot. “My aim was to expand the view, and make it look wider, with a path zig-zagging through the space. I was also keen to have small trees, to divide the garden into two halves. The other essential was a water feature, just because I love the sound.”

14 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

David removed the existing shed and built the foundations for the summerhouse (bought from local company, Millers, in St Albans) and the decking. Next, he removed the lawn, weed spraying it, then put down a membrane to suppress growth. He replaced the grass with three triangular raised beds, built using new softwood sleepers from a local builders’ merchant. “Reclaimed sleepers are tricky to work with as the wood is very hard, so it’s difficult to cut with a regular saw,“ explains David. The raised beds took two days to make. Once in place, he filled them with topsoil, ready for planting. He painted the wood with Cuprinol Shades Pale Jasmine, to make the plants pop against them. The most challenging part was the rill water feature. “That produced a few head-scratching moments. I wanted to place it in the middle of the garden as a focal point, but I’d never done anything like it before.” Powered by an electric pump, the water feeds into a reservoir at the end of the rill, before going around again. “It took two attempts to get it right. The rill was lined with bricks and breeze blocks, and then I applied a waterproof sealant. It didn’t work and leaked everywhere! So I lined it with pond liner. The L-shaped chrome strips at the sides conceal the edges.”

1


READER GARDEN

2

BEFORE

OUR GAR DEN PL AN

3

LOCATION “Our Edwardian terraced house in Chesham, Bucks has a long, narrow garden. We wanted to create a contemporary design, which expands the view.” THE LOOK A small space packed with modern features SITE & SOIL

4 AFTER

OUR BUDGET Water feature, including pump and fittings £395 Timber, sleepers, decking, summerhouse base, path edging £470 Summerhouse £1,555 Top soil, pebbles and membrane £350 Pots and fittings for vertical garden £75 Plants, including trees £1,030 Solar lighting and barbecue £450

TOTAL £4,325 HOW LONG IT TOOK Removing the lawn 1 hour Summerhouse base 3 hours Water feature and vertical garden 9 hours Raised beds and laying path 13 hours Planting and painting 13 hours TOTAL 39 HOURS

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 15

WORDS: FIONA CU MBERPATCH PHOTOS: JOSEPH RUSSELL

Size 4m x 14m (13 x 46ft) Faces South-east Soil Loamy/clay


the garden a contemporary yet relaxed look. “I put down a plastic membrane, then placed the gravel on top. Gravel paths need an edge to retain the stones. This was supplied by the raised beds.”

EASY-CARE PLANTS As a gardener (www.outdoorlivinggardening. co.uk), David knew exactly what he wanted in the beds, and what takes the least time to care for. “I like flowers but prefer foliage, such as ferns and grasses,” he says. The bed closest to the patio contains foliage plants called heucheras. “They come in an incredible range of colours, from maroon to lime green, and they’re very easy to grow.” Many grasses flower in late summer and autumn, so David was keen to include these for year-round interest. They are mixed with ferns, including a strikingly shaped Japanese holly fern. By the water feature are lush hostas, sedum, more heuchera and flowers such as dwarf asters, salvias, and geraniums. A pretty grass, the Fibre Optic plant (Scirpus cernuus) dances in the breeze. “Grasses provide a lot of movement, as well as coming in all sorts of colours. They look good in the low evening light with the sun coming through them.” The three birches create a natural division and were chosen for their small size and pure whiteness of the bark. “They can grow up to six metres, but no more. When the leaves drop in the autumn, the pale bark is very vivid.” Feather grasses are planted underneath. In summer, big purple pom pomheaded alliums contrast with the pale trunks. Outside the summerhouse, there’s a bed of plants that like acid soil, including azaleas, pieris and a Japanese maple. David bought ericaceous compost to create the right conditions for them.

A STYLISH RILL,

“One essential was a water feature because I love the sound” “It’s lovely to sit here at the end of the day when the sun hits this part of the garden,” he says. He and Jess use the patio by the back door to entertain. Here, there’s a vertical succulents garden. “I spent ages sourcing zinc pots that were large enough and designed for outdoor use. Luckily, I managed to buy 12 just before the company stopped making them.”

David drilled holes in the base of each pot then planted a variety of sempervivums and alpines in a soil-based compost mixed with grit (he suggests 50:50). The pots are hooked over a trellis of strong metal wire. “These plants are hardy, so they can stay outside all year. It makes a real focal point.” The couple spend most time in the garden in the evenings and so paid close attention to

FROM START TO FINISH

1

MAKE A PLAN As this was his first garden, David wanted to make sure he got everything right, so he drew it out on graph paper before starting work. The design takes into account where the sun hits the

16 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

garden at different times of day (the evening light touches the decking outside the shed, for example) and where he wanted to place the water feature and the line of trees. It also helped him to work out how many plants he needed.

2 UNDER CONSTRUCTION The triangular raised beds were built from wooden sleepers once the summerhouse was in place.


WTHREE BIRCH TREES create a natural division in the garden. Betula utilis jacquemontii is a slim variety that won’t grow any taller than 6m.

TFOLIAGE NOT FLOWERS is David’s preference. He used heucheras for their range of colours and varied shapes.

lighting. “I’ve used solar lighting throughout. I like the fact that it’s not permanent, so I can easily move things around,” says David. There are strings of solar-powered fairy lights along the fences and across the summerhouse. The tree trunks and the water feature are carefully lit with stake lights, placed in the ground. Panel lights have been screwed into the timber of the raised beds to illuminate the paths. “At night you can walk around safely, and it looks good too.” David and Jess are delighted with their garden. “We have close neighbours on three sides, but we never feel overlooked. It’s our own little haven.”

STHE RAISED BEDS have been created in a zig zag pattern to give the garden the illusion of being wider than it is. They were made from softwood sleepers, which are easy to cut to size.

3 1 2

3

4 5 8

7

6

12 FOCAL POINTS A rusting milk churn was drilled at the base and filled with polystyrene chips to the rim. David added a grit and soil mix, and planted a sedum.

10 9

11

AUGUST 2016

SUCCULENT SELECTION 1 Sempervivum ‘‘Jovibarba allionii’ 2 Delosperma (Yellow Ice plant) 3 Sempervivum ciliosum borisii 4 & 5 Sempervivum calcareum 6 Sempervivum ‘Noir’ 7 & 9 Sempervivum ‘ ‘Claerchen’ 8 Sempervivum arachnoideum 10 Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ 11 Sempervivum Red 12 Sempervivum ‘Grey Lady’

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 17


gras COMBINATIONS THAT WORK Most perennial grasses are deciduous – they lose their colour in autumn and re-emerge from the soil as new shoots in spring – and work well with other plants. Because they start small, they don’t compete too hard for space and they’ll look good later in the year when the flowers of high summer are starting to fizzle out. A medley of grasses mingling with Verbena bonariensis or late summer daisies, like coneflowers (echinacea) and black-eyed Susan

Keep them looking their best Grasses are easy to grow. There are varieties that are happy in cool moist conditions, while others thrive in poor, gritty soil where other plants struggle to grow. Whichever type you choose, giving them some TLC will keep them looking good. Feather grass, switch grass and Chinese silver grass are fantastic for adding shape and structure, even during the winter. They have pretty, decorative seed heads so wait until spring to tidy them up, just as the new green growth comes up. You can cut grasses back with secateurs, simply snip them to 10cm (4in) above soil level, but most respond best to combing as you’re less likely to damage the new, young growth. Simply run your fingers upwards

through the plants as if you are combing hair. It will pull out any dead leaves but leave the new growth intact. Wear gloves for this job as the edges of the leaves can be sharp.

(rudbeckia) make a striking border. The grasses and the flowers like gritty, free-draining soil in a sunny spot. For a contemporary feature, try planting a block of one type of grass. Feather grass works well for this. Plant six to eight plants cheek-byjowl in a 1m x 1.5m (39 x 60in) space. You can interplant them with seasonal bulbs, or tightly clipped box balls, to give a wonderful contrast of texture and shape.

LOW-MAINTENANCE HEROES Because they grow quickly but spread slowly, grasses don’t need regular clipping like an evergreen hedge does. Some, such as golden oats, can be used to make a screen and are just the job for hiding the bins or the shed, or even creating a divide between one part of the garden and the next. 18 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

WORDS; LUCY BELLAMY PHOTOS: ALAMY, FLORA PRESS

I

to think again. David Chanell used a mixture of ornamental grasses in his Buckinghamshire garden to create a contemporary look. Tactile, sculptural and right on trend, they are hard to beat in a small space. Grasses come in fantastic shapes and colours. Fresh green fronds in spring are followed by gauzy summer flowers and then architectural seed heads that last throughout winter. They’re perfect for smaller plots and create interest whatever the season.

sets and our space


EASY IDEAS

Yarrow (Achillea)

(Festuca glauca)

(Deschampsia cespitosa) wooden e id w y b d te a r a TIP Sep lend s r e d r o b y s s a r g decking, low a small to e c a p s f o n io s an illu patio garden.

(Carex buchananii) TURN THE PAGE TO SEE MORE GREAT GRASSES


EASY IDEAS

Great grasses for small spaces @These grasses look best planted in groups, for bold, modern style. Use two to three plants per square metre of space.

MEXICAN FEATHER GRASS

HAKONECHLOA MACRA

CHINESE SILVER GRASS

Stipa tenuissima is wispy with bleached, feathery plumes later in the year. Self-seeding, one or two plants will fill a bigger space. Height 60cm (24in) Spread 30cm (12in) £5.99 waitrosegarden.com

Happy in sun or shade, hakonechloa makes a neat clump. Its leaves are lush and brilliant green. It likes cool, moist conditions. Height and Spread 30cm (12in) £9.99 thompson-morgan.com

Miscanthus sinensis has ramrod-straight stems and braids of pink, red and purple flowers. Plant two or three plants together for impact. Height 1.4m (55in) Spread 1m (39in) £8.99 crocus.com

Hero mixers

@These grasses will happily mingle with other flowers. Weave them in between your existing plants. They work well with late summer flowers like coneflowers and back-eyed Susan.

BLOOD GRASS

PHEASANT’S TAIL

FOUNTAIN GRASS

The red tips on green grass give Imperata ‘Red Baron’ real drama. Likes gritty, free-draining soil in sun or partial shade. Height 50cm (20in) Spread 30cm (12in) £7.99 suttons.co.uk

Anemanthele lessoniana has green, orange and red leaves that last throughout the year, with an orange and yellow stripe on every leaf. Height and Spread 1m (39in) £6.99 rhsplants.co.uk

Pennisetum alopecuroides offers up mounds of green, grassy foliage topped by pink bottlebrush flowers in summer. Height 1.2m (47in) Spread 80cm (31in) £9.99 vanmeuwen.com

Create a screen

@These plants are ideal for planting in drifts as garden dividers, or to hide dustbins behind. They can also be used to provide lush, living screening from neighbouring properties.

GOLDEN OATS

SWITCH GRASS

TUFTED HAIR GRASS

Stipa gigantea features thin stems topped with small, gauzy flowers. Golden in autumn, the seed heads catch the light. Height 2m (78in) Spread 1m (39in) £7.99 jacksonsnurseries.co.uk

Panicum virgatum has leafy green fronds from early summer, then a mass of tiny purplish flowers in autumn. Height 1m (39in) Spread 75cm (30in) £6.75 knollgardens.co.uk

Deschampsia cespitosa starts green and fades to gold and blonde in autumn. Grow it in sun or partial shade. Height 1.5m (59in) Spread 1m (39in) £8.99 rhsplants.co.uk

20 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

P HOTOS: ALAMY

Make a block


OUTDOOR LIVING

Make summer last, put it

ON ICE

LUCY BELLAMY grows things, makes things and

blogs about it. She’s full of resourceful, practical ideas inspired by her small town garden in Lincolnshire

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ugust days are filled with sunshine and friends. This weekend I’m planning a long summer lunch and a table of easy eats inspired by what grows in my garden. With good food and company, I don’t want to have to keep running back into the house for fresh supplies, so I’m making a DIY ice bowl to fill with cool, edible treats. It’s simple to make and good for fresh salads or strawberries or filled with water for a ready supply of cold drinks. It’s also an incredibly pretty centrepiece for the table that will last as the afternoon turns into night. You can use any flowers you have to hand. I’ve chosen edible blooms including roses, carnations and pelargoniums, plus my favourite summer berries and some herbs. I love roses in crimson shades and I’m using ‘Munstead Wood and ‘Falstaff’, as both grow in my garden. I’ll cut a flower from each one that’s fully in bloom and carefully pull off the petals to scatter among the other flowers. For smaller blooms, I’m using ‘Attar of Roses’ pelargonium and carnations in shades of pink. They’ll add a brighter colour, as well as a different shape. Purple sage and bronze fennel will pick up the deep colours of the blueberries and blackberries in my bowl. The sage is smoky plum-purple and fennel leaves can be almost black. It’s a good idea to make your ice bowl as big as possible so it doesn’t melt too quickly. Remember that it still needs to fit in your freezer. After everything’s been eaten pop a tealight inside to use during the evening. The ‘bowl’ wall is thick enough to resist melting for an hour or two. Use two nesting bowls, one larger than the other. Pour 2-3cm (1in) of water into the bigger bowl and float the smaller bowl inside. Use four pieces of tape to secure the small bowl in the centre of the big bowl, so it doesn’t bob about, and put the bowls in the freezer together for about an hour. When the water in the base has frozen solid, lift the bowls out and take off the tape. Use flowers and berries to fill the gap above the ice. You can

mix and match different flowers as I have, or kee things simple with just one or two different bloom Pack everything in quite tightly before topping up the larger bowl to halfway with cold water and returning the bowls to the freezer again. After an hour lift the bowls out and fill up th remaining space between the two with water. Adding it in two parts will stop the flowers fro all floating to the top. Put the bowl back in the freezer until just before you’re ready to use it, and for at least an hour. Before your guests arrive release the ice bowl from the mould. Fill the small container in the middle with warm water and let it sit for a few minutes before lifting out. Then, run warm water around the outside of the bigger bowl until it loosens and slides off. Summer in a bowl!

Lucy Twitter @lucy_bellamy

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 21


Hydrangea on trend and easy to grow

H

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rare | unusual | exciting


EASY IDEAS

Raise it up PRACTICAL AND STYLISH

WHAT SHAPE AND SIZE?

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about what is going to be the most rtable and practical when you’re ing. A good rule is to make sure that face is wide enough to reach across with m without having to step on the soil. usually up to 1m (3ft 3in). If you can cess the bed from one side, the um width for comfort is about 50cm The length of the bed is calculated by

GET THE LOOK

FILL IT UP

TURN OVER TO DISCOVER MORE RAISED BED IDEAS

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 23


TIP Give vin

tage boxes a co at o cl ea r wood pr es er vative to h f elp guard them ag ainst rot

SIMPLE STYLE

how much space you have and how big you want your bed to be. Shape-wise, you can opt for rectangles, squares or, like David Chanell, triangular beds, and the height of the structure depends on whether you like to sit, stand or kneel when you’re gardening. If you’re standing, aim to have your bed at about 90-100cm (36-39in) tall. For sitting, 69-76cm (27-30in) is optimum height, and for a wheelchair user, go for 61cm (24in). The depth should be at least 45cm (18in) so that plants can form deep roots. This means you don’t have to water them as often. If you have more than one raised bed with a path running between, make the gap at least 30cm (12in) wide for walking, or 45cm (18in) for wheelbarrow access.

mixture of 50 per cent garden soil or loam, 50 per cent compost and a slow-release fertiliser. If you use soil scooped out from existing beds, add some fertiliser to enrich it and boost your plants’ growth. The bed might need topping up with soil after a year. One drawback with raised beds is that they dry out fast, so need watering regularly. Top the soil with a bark or gravel mulch to retain moisture. This is effective and also looks attractive.

4 of the best raised beds to buy

WHICH MATERIAL TO CHOOSE? Match the material to the style of your garden. For a clean, modern look, softwood works well, and you can paint it to match your theme, like David has. It will need treating with preservative but, even then, it won’t last for more than a few years. If you want a more rustic look, reclaimed sleepers have a lovely warm patina and are longer lasting, but they are more expensive and the wood is hard to cut with a regular saw. For vintage style, try recycled wood, using old wooden advertising boxes (search eBay) Paving slabs are inexpensive and durable, but you’ll only be able to build rectangular or square designs. Slabs need to be installed with care or they will lean outwards, become unstable and could be dangerous, as well as unappealing to look at. Deep concrete raised beds with a rendered surface are stylish and contemporary, but you will need to employ a builder to construct these for you. Recycled plastic raised beds which are made to look like timber are also available.

ADDING SOIL The smaller the bed, the more likely it is to lose the nutrients that help your plants grow. Use a 24

MODERN GARDENS

AUGUST 2016

The Bradstone Stonewood Double Height Planter is made from reconstituted stone. Self assembly. 100 x 40cm. £75-£85 www.bradstone.com

This softwood Greena Triangular Raised Bed self-assembly kit measures 60cm long and 15cm high. £27.95 www.gardenstreet.co.uk

Simple to build, this softwood Caledonian Raised Bed can be painted any colour you like. 180 x 30 x 90cm £119.99 www.dobbies.com

Stylish cream beds in strong steel with a longlasting Colorbond coating. They measure 40cm high and are 1m square. £99 www.suttons.co.uk


EASY IDEAS ADD COLOUR

What to plant in raised beds

GO FOR VINTAGE CHIC

Apart from big trees and shrubs, you can treat your raised bed like any border. Herbs work well and look attractive. Try thyme, chives, rosemary, parsley and oregano. Trailing flowers, such as osteospermum ‘Falling Stars’ (£12.99, www.thompson-morgan.com) or nasturtium ‘Firebird’ (£2.99 for a pack of quick growing seeds, also from Thompson and Morgan) help t soften hard edges E salad l

MAKE IT!

CREATE YOUR OWN RAISED BED

£66.07

Build a simple softwood raised bed – measuring 1.4m long, 45cm high and 50cm deep – against a wall to form the fourth side. WHAT TO DO 1 Cut the batons into five length of 1m (3ft 3in). Save the ofcuts for other projects. 2 Cut the planks into three 1.4m (4ft 6in) lengths for the front and six 50cm (20in) lengths for the sides. 3 Mark out the 1.4m x 50cm area with string. Level the ground. Dig or tap in in the batons at each corner to an equal depth of 55cm (1ft 10in). Put a baton between the front two. Check they are level with each other, then affix the planks to them. Start at the bottom. Put two screws, top and bottom, at each end. Line the bed with plastic sheeting. Staple it in place to hold it firm while you fill the bed. Put rubble in the bottom for drainage, top with soil. 4 Paint, then allow to settle for a couple of days before planting up.

WORDS: W WW.THRIV E.ORG.U K

WHAT YOU NEED @ Three 20.5 x 169 x 2400mm (roughly 1 x 6 x 94in) pressure-treated, planed redwood timber planks (£13.82 each, www.diy.com). @Three 2400 x 47 x 50mm rough sawn treated timber batons (£3.94 each, www.diy.com) @ Thirty-six 40mm screws (£2.79 for 100, www.homebase.co.ukk) @ Plastic sheeting (compost bags) @ Soil (topsoil and compost mixed) @ Screwdriver, rake, spirit level, tape measure, string, hammer, saw, spade. @ Cuprinol Garden Shades paint (£10 a litre, www.wilko.com)

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 25


Reader AKEOVER

“Our space is perfect for socialising” Adding a summerhouse and decking has turned KERRY AND ROB QUAYLE’S garden into an ideal summer retreat

WORDS: PAULA WOODS PHOTOS: LIZZIE ORME

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n a warm summer’s day, Kerry and Rob Quayle love nothing more than relaxing in the garden, or enjoying a glass of wine and dining alfresco with family and friends. However, this wasn’t always the case. When they first moved into their Cheshire home, this sociable couple inherited nothing more than a badly rundown and unkempt plot. “The land had been used as a nursery for many years so, as well as being overgrown, it was littered with old sheds and greenhouse bases,” recalls Kerry. “We had our hands full renovating the equally neglected house so, initially, we simply opted to clear the rubbish and most of the planting, due to its age.” A year on, and with the house complete, the Quayles decided that the best way to make the most of their garden would be to create specific areas in which to entertain or unwind. “We felt this would not only add interest to what was essentially a large and featureless space, but also allow us to follow the sun throughout the day,” explains Kerry,

PERFECTING PLACEMENT The couple’s first addition was a large raised deck designed to rectify the problem of differing levels between house and garden, and also make the most of the afternoon sun and proximity to the kitchen. They chose tactile Scandinavian redwood as it was affordable, and the frame could simply be built over the existing ground. “It’s now the first port of call when ² 26 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

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READER GARDEN

METICULOUS PRUNING

2

CTAR-RICH

3


BEFORE

THAT’S CLEVE

MY GARDEN PLAN LOCATION “We’re very lucky as our three-bedroom, semi-detached, period home, in Chester, sits on a large plot. We were keen to ensure the garden not only looked good, in terms of planting, but also provided plenty of usable space, as we enjoy spending time there with family and friends,” says Kerry.

The homemade arch is made from trellis panels and fence posts

PAINTING THE

THE LOOK Modern country-style planting, with dedicated zones for eating, entertaining and relaxing. SITE & SOIL Size 17 x 27m (55 x 90ft) Faces East Soil Rich loam OUR BUDGET Summerhouse and base £2,800 Decking, planting and turf £2,750 Paint and decking oil £100 Slate and gravel £400 Trellis panels and fence posts £150 Sofa set £600 TOTAL £6,800 HOW LONG IT TOOK Clearing the garden 38 hours Building deck 35 hours Building summerhouse 40 hours Painting 16 hours Erecting arch and planting 38 hours Laying slate and gravel 24 hours TOTAL 191 HOURS

28 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

“The raised deck is the irst port of call when we are entertaining” entertaining. It’s also the perfect complement to our patio, which catches the early evening sun. This is a re-purposed greenhouse base, adjacent to the house,” says Kerry. In direct contrast, the couple’s pretty garden room at the bottom of the plot provides a welcome escape from the excesses of the sun’s rays and cooler evening breezes. “I’d always loved the idea of a summerhouse and, as the bottom of the garden tends to be shaded by a large tree, it seemed the ideal place to construct a secluded shelter,” says Kerry. The couple chose Rowlinson’s classic Kestrel corner design to make the most of the available space and wisely invested in a sturdy concrete base, complete with damp membrane. A few coats of Cuprinol’s Garden Shades Wild Thyme protects against the worst of winter weather. “We also employed a qualified electrician to

relay an electrical supply, which meant we could have a well-stocked fridge for entertaining, plus the addition of a TV and wifi. Now we have a genuine bonus room to our home,” points out Rob. And it’s the ideal spot to watch the sun go down on summer evenings.

INFORMAL PLANTING Despite having previously enlarged the existing borders and re-turfed strategic areas, the garden design didn’t really emerge until the hard landscaping had been decided. “We opted to keep the existing central path as it naturally linked the top patio areas with the new summerhouse and original brick store,” explains Kerry. However, the large beds were then gently curved to add definition and help soften the space, before being filled with a mix of heathers, roses, rhododendrons, hydrangeas, hebes and


READER GARDEN

LOW MAINTENANCE,

The plan explained... 1 HOUSE It faces east, so breakfast alfresco on the deck is a joy in the morning sunlight.

1

SUBTLE PAINT 2 DECKING At the rear of the house, it provides ample seating in the afternoon sun when entertaining friends and family. acers. A layer of blue slate chippings helps to reduce weeds and retain moisture. A paler, light-enhancing, practical gravel was used around the summerhouse and for the surrounding shady undulating gound. To ensure interest and structure throughout the year, the couple also planted lots of structural evergreens and introduced statement garden ornaments, alongside recycled furniture, painted to match the garden room. A trellis arch, entwined with wisteria, adds welcome height to the pathway, now lined with Kerry’s favourite lavenders. These also take centre stage in versatile and easily refreshed patio pots. However, Kerry readily admits that her favourite feature is the summerhouse. “I love how it offers a totally different persective on the garden, and my only real regret is we didn’t insulate it for winter use!”

2 3

3 SEATING AREA 1 Catching the early evening sun, it’s ideally placed for summer suppers. 4 ARCH Adds extra shape and interest to the lavender-lined path.

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5 SUMMERHOUSE The summerhouse is positioned to get the best view of the garden. 5 SEATING AREA 2 Painting the small wooden dining set in cream instantly brightens this shady corner.

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AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 29


RELAX IN STYLE

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HOUSE PERSONALISED HIDEAWAY

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envisage a magnificent structure in a grand garden. But it’s time to think again. Summerhouses are ‘in’ - and the good news is that there’s a vast choice to suit every budget, style and outdoor space, large or small. If you’ve always wanted an extra room to enjoy a new hobby, set up an office, library, or a haven away from daily life, your garden is the perfect spot and a summerhouse the perfect solution.  You can create a garden sanctuary, just like Kerry and Rob Quayle, whilst enjoying your outdoor space from a different perspective.

WHAT ARE THE OPTIONS? To choose the perfect summerhouse, think about the space you have available and where it’s best located to gain the best views without encroaching on your neighbours.

WORDS: RACHEL ANDREWS -INGRAM

SMALL BUT PERFECTLY FORMED If you’re short on space (or cash), then a small corner summerhouse is a great option. They come in various shapes from shed or shack-style options, classic octagonal styles to contemporary designs with a more modern feel. Prices for smaller summerhouses start at around £245, and the smallest options start at 1.5mx1.5m (5ftx5ft), such as the BillyOh Lucia Summerhouse for £245 (www. gardenbuildingdirect.co.uk). Corner summer houses like the contemporary-styled Waltons Corner Summer House (£495.95 www.waltons. co.uk) can be nestled into the corner of your 30 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

Windows and doors for smaller budget summerhouse options are usually made from styrene (a type of plastic resin) which is shatterproof but susceptible to scratches and can lose its clarity after a few years. If your budget can stretch, there are summerhouses with windows made from toughened glass. Try www. leisurebuildings.com with prices starting from £853. Most cheaper summerhouses will come with only a basic lock or catch, so if you’re going to keep valuables in your hideaway, you may need to invest in a better lock. Most low to mid-range priced houses are made of a tongue-and-groove outer shell made of softwood, often referred to as shiplap cladding. The cladding interlocks, making it sturdy, and will help keep the elements out. Most structures come with a mineral felt roof for extra weather-proofing. Make sure you check the quality of the felt being used before you buy – cheaper products may need replacing sooner. A good quality felt will feel thicker, and be less prone to tearing than cheaper ones. If you want to shop from environmentally friendly sources, ensure that it has been made from FSC® certified timber (it will have a logo and stamp). Some will come pressure treated against rot and with a 10-15 year guarantee. These may be a little more expensive than untreated wood. Some may be treated with a dipped basecoat. This process is when the surface of the wood is exposed to a preservative by immersion in an open tank or by deluge

GET AWAY FROM IT ALL

spray booth. This is not a long lasting rot-proof treatment, and the wood will need further protection. If it hasn’t been pre-treated then you’ll need to do it yourself annually with a water-based preservative such as Sadolin Quick Drying Wood Preservative (£32.95 for 2.5 litres).

GOING LARGER If you’re looking for something a bit more substantial or have a bigger budget, there’s plenty of choice, from log-cabin designs with verandas, sleek modern structures with curved or flat roofs to traditional styles with hipped roofs. Prices range from £750-£1600. Many mid-range options are also made with styrene doors and windows but may come with extras


BEST BUYS

TDOUBLE UP The dual-purpose softwood Rowlinson Connor cabin (H 220cm, W 260cm, D 230cm) has toughened glass and a felt roof, with a lockable storage area and open living space £1999.99 www homebase co uk www.homebase.co.uk

Assembly checklist TAKE A SPIN

Most structures will come flat-packed with manufacturer instructions. Unless your summerhouse comes with free installation, or you’ve bought this as an additional extra, then you’ll have to install it yourself. If you’re experienced at DIY then you should be able to do this following the product instructions. It’s usually a two-person job and should take around four hours from start to completion, depending on the size and type of summerhouse you choose. You’re likely to need:

@ Step ladder @ Spirit level @ Craft knife @ Nails @ Tape measure @ Power drill @ Claw hammer @ Power drill @ Wood preserver @ Gloves @ Safety goggles @ A good weather forecast!

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 31


SCREATE A COSY CORNER The Burghley summerhouse (W 300cm) with cedar shingle roof £9500, price includes delivery and assembly (within 150 miles of Thrapston) www.scottsofthrapston.co.uk like lock-and-key doors for added safety. Shop around if you want both lockable doors and glass windows, as they are available. Many companies will allow you to custom build your retreat for an extra cost. This includes choosing your roof material from a variety of felts and shingles, pre-treating with a paint or wood preservative and adding foundations and flooring. You can even add a personalised name plate if buying the Vantage 250 summerhouse (£1,549.99) from www.dunsterhouse.co.uk, which comes with toughened glass and locks. Many mid-range summerhouses will offer an installation service at an extra cost. Some companies do offer this service for free, such as www.uk-summerhouses.co.uk. Unless you are confident with DIY, installing a larger summerhouse can be awkward, and may be worth leaving to the experts. In this case you will need to factor in the extra cost of installation if it doesn’t come free with your purchase.

TOP OF THE RANGE If you want to splash out you can buy a lavish retreat ranging from £2,000-£19,000. In this bracket you can choose from such things as lead roofing which mellows to an attractive blue/grey colour over time, thatch or shingle roofs, various cladding options such as cedar cladding instead of softwood, double glazing, 32 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

BE BRIGHT

and casement windows. You can even add guttering and buy your summerhouse prepainted to ti ur colour scheme and save you ti g to the top end, you can construct your dream summerhouse to fit in with your lifestyle and exact design tastes. Try www.cranegardenbuildings.co.uk where there’s a useful online tool to help you create your own bespoke version.

ADDING COLOUR Unless you’re opting for top of the range and bespoke, most come un-painted. If you don’t want the natural wooden look and prefer a more contemporary painted or vintage design, choose a good quality exterior wood paint. Try Dulux Trade Weathershield Quick Dry Exterior paints range with a six year all weather protection - from £20.87 (1 litre) www.dulux.co.uk or Autentico Esterno exterior chalk paint, £48.95 for 2.5 litres, www.honeysucklehome.co.uk.

GO HIGH END


BEST BUYS

PAINT IT!

SMAKE SPACE Mercia Insulated Garden Room (13ft 9in x 15ft) with rubber roof, safety glass and free installation £7699 www.homebase.co.uk

WCREATE A RETREAT Forest Kempsford summerhouse (H 237cm, W 242cm D 203cm) has doubleglazed doors. £499 www.screwfix.co.uk

What you need to know If you’re a novice at DIY, or short on time, it’s worth considering employing a handyman or carpenter to build your structure for you if the company you have bought it from does not offer installation. For a budget to mid-range summerhouse, this should cost between £60-£80, depending on where you live. 

DO YOU NEED PLANNING PERMISSION? The majority of summerhouses won’t need

planning permission. The rules are that a pitched roof must have an eaves height under 2.5 metres and be no higher than 3 metres overall. The structure should not occupy more than 50% of the total land around the original house and shouldn’t be a permanent sleeping location – which makes most summer houses exempt. There may be restrictions on what you can erect if you live in a listed building or conservation area, so it’s always best to check with your local council if you’re unsure.

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 33


a pretty EN TRELLIS This SUNBURST-SHAPED TRELLIS is the perfect frame to encourage easy grow clematis or rambling pink roses to cover a wall Done in 60 minutes

3 top trellis climbers ROSE ‘Crown Princess Margareta’ is a rich apricot-orange with a heady scent. Ideal for base planting. Height and Spread 1.3m (4ft 5in) £16.50 www. davidaustinroses.co.uk HONEYSUCKLE For cream and purple beauty and sweet scent, Lonicera periclymenum is hard to beat. Heightt to 7m (23ft) Spread 1m (3ft 3in) £12.99 www.rhsplants.co.uk PASSIONFLOWER has spectacular flowers and passion fruits in late summer. Vigorous and easy to grow for lush cover. Heightt grows to 10m (32ft) Spread 2m (6ft 6in) £14.99 www.thompsonmorgan.com

34 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

on a shed is ll e tr e th t n u o TIP M anised lv a g ) in (2 m m 0 wall with 5 corner braces


PROJECTS YOU WILL NEED @Five 25 x 50mm (1 x 2in) x 2.44m (8ft) k batons (£3.89 each, www.wickes.co.uk) @4 x 45mm (no. 8/1½in) deck screws (£6.99 for 200, www.screwfix.com) @Weatherproof wood glue @Plugs (optional; this is a piece designed to be viewed from a distance and covered in leaves, so screw holes can be left unplugged) @Paint or stain (optional) @Mitre saw @Tape measure @Speed square @Drill/driver @Quick-Flip drive with a no.8 11/64in countersink bit @Rubber mallet (if you’re using plugs)

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WHAT TO DO 1. Using a pencil, label the end of each piece 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Using a mitre saw, cut pieces 1 and 5 to 1.6m (64in). These pieces are two of the stiles of the trellis. Save the scrap. Cut pieces 2 and 4 to 2m (80in). These pieces are the other two stiles of the trellis. Save the scrap. The four pieces of scrap wood, two at 81cm (32in) and two at 41cm (16in), are the horizontal pieces, or rails. Use a tape measure to find and mark the center of each rail for pre-drilling one hole in each rail. Pre-drill one hole in each spot you marked. 2 Using a tape measure, mark 25cm (10in) up from the bottom of the longest piece, stile number 3. Using a speed square to ensure a 90-degree angle, place one 41cm rail with i lower edge on the line you have drawn. Using drill/driver, screw the rail into place. 3 Mark 41cm up from the top of the rail you just screwed in place. Screw the other 41cm rail in place with its lower edge on the new line you’ve drawn, double-checking the 90-degree angle with the speed square. Mark 41cm up from the top of the second rail. Screw the 81cm rail in place with its lower edge on the line you have drawn, double-checking the 90-degree angle with the speed square. Mark 41cm up from the top of the third rail and attach the remaining 81cm rail, double-checking the 90-degree angle with the speed square. 4 On the work surface, arrange stiles 1 and 5 so their bottom ends touch the end of stile 3. The ends should intersect with the outer edges of the third rail from the bottom. Place a speed square on the intersection of stile 3 and the lower rail to ensure the angle stays at 90 degrees when you attach the outer stile. Pre-drill and attach all four intersections between stiles 1 and 3 and the rails with screws. The assembly should now look like this. Slide stiles 2 and 4 under the rails all the way until their corners hit the other stiles. Position them halfway between the center stile 3 and the outer stiles.

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44 . 6 2 £ 5 eed square from stile 3 to the u tached rails, pre-drill and screw all intersections that haven’t yet been attached. The finished assembly will have five vertical stiles and four horizontal rails. If you’re using plugs, put a small drop of glue into each screw hole, insert a plug, and gently pound the plugs into the holes with a mallet. Sand the plugs so that they’re flush with the surface of the wood. Paint or stain. If the trellis is to be mounted to a fence or wall, mount it about 5cm (2in) above the ground to prevent rot, and seal the ends with extra coats of paint. To give plants enough room to climb, attach the trellis 5-7.5cm (2-3inch off a fence or wall using scrap wood or corner braces, or sturdily stake it in the ground so it’s freestanding. Depending on the plant, you may want to use additional horizontal rails or eyehooks every 7.5-15cm (3-6in)inches to make climbing easier.

BUY THE BOOK

@ Taken from Hand-Built Outdoor Furniture by Katie Jackson. Photographs: Ellen Blackmar. Copyright: Timber Press, 2016.

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 35


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10 buys...

ATERING

WORDS: RACH EL AN DREW S -IN GRAM

ADD A SPLASH OF COLOUR


BEST BUYS

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XBE BUDGET-WISE Made of galvanised steel with a solid birch handle the Salladskal Watering Can in dark grey has good looks and holds a generous amount of water, meaning fewer trips to the tap to fill up. £14 (9L) www.ikea.com

TCASCADE WITH COPPER The Haws Indoor Copper Watering Can has been carefully designed to make it easy to handle with a removable brass rose for a fine spray. £49.00 (1L) www.woodandmeadow.com

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GO RETRO This Zinc Watering Can comes in two sizes, £37.95 (4L) and £59.95 (9L) www.nordichouse.co.uk

4 SSPRAY WITH GLAMOUR Shower plants with this purple Flowers Betsy Watering Can a contrasting gold rose comp print tie. £49.95 (5L) www.li

6 SKEEP IT SIMPLE Traditional in style, the Bloomingville Watering Can in white metal is designed with a long narrow spout to avoid spills and comes with an amusing side slogan. £17 www.trouva.com

WFILL IT WITH FUN

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7 SKEEP IT PRACTICAL Clever design means this Colapz Watering Can twists down flat for easy storage. £29 (9L) www.

Add a kitsch twist to watering your flowers with this plastic Flamingo Watering Can. £8.95 (1.5L) www. dotcomgiftshop.co.uk

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POUR PRECISELY This Sophie Conran Greenhouse and Indoor Watering Can is available in four colours. A handsome addition to any window sill. £14.95 (1.7L) www. burgonandball.com

9 S SPRINKLE WITH DIAMONDS The angular shape of this Diamond Watering Can will add a contemporary touch to your plot. £79.95 (8L) www.amara.com

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 37


SAIL AWAY

PLACE TO HIDE creating privacy without blocking the view

WORDS: CLARE KELLY. PHOTOS: GAP PHOTOS, GRANGE FENCING, JO THOMPSON, LANDFORM

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our garden is a place to shut out the world and enjoy quiet time in your own space, hopefully without being overlooked by the neighbours. Conifers were once the screen of choice for homeowners seeking to make their gardens more private, but they caused all sorts of problems and today people seek better-looking solutions to a perennial problem. Mark Gregory and Catherine MacDonald from Surrey-based Landform Consultants are multi-award winning designers with experience of creating beautiful spaces for residential and commercial properties, as well as RHS gold medal-winning show gardens. “Creating privacy or a sense of refuge in a garden is incredibly important,” says Mark. “Humans have a basic need to feel secure so we always take this into consideration when designing and building a garden. The last thing anyone wants is to feel exposed.” If your plot is overlooked, here are four key ways you can create a private haven in your outside space.

PLANT A WALL OF TREES “Without vertical height in a garden we can sometimes feel a little vulnerable. Show gardens will often feature a specimen tree or trees that add that sense of refuge, proportion and balance. The right tree provides not just privacy but also year-round interest with spring blossom, beautiful summer foliage, autumn colour and bright winter berries,” says Mark. He recommends narrow and upright varieties for smaller gardens. These are 38 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

sometimes called fastigiate trees. Chonosuki i is a winner,” says crab apple (Malus tschonoskii) Mark. “Trees are also ideal for screening. Even deciduous varieties work because, although they become transparent after their leaves fall, planted along a boundary they still provide both a subconscious barrier to those overlooking the space and a sense of enclosure to those within it. A good variety is a multi-stemmed betula.” This Himalayan birch tree has slender branches and an attractive white, textured bark.

MAKE A SPLASH


PROJECTS

CATHERINE MACDONALD

HUES OF BLUE

BREATHING SPACE

LONG GRASSES

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 39


THINK DUA PURPOSE SACHIEVE A FAST FIX A box planter with a trellis attached is an instant way to create a screen. Choose quick climbers and add bushier plants at the base.

MAKE A NATURAL SHELTER Instant coverage is simple to achieve with a ready-made structure and this will form the framework of your privacy scheme. One of the quickest and most cost-effective solutions is a product that offers both space for ground level planting and height for vertical coverage. This dual effect can be achieved with, say, a box planter with attached trellis. For a small space, one with a trellis that reaches about a metre in height costs from £25 (www.shedstore.co.uk). The most common material for shop-bought structures is timber. Look for those which are made of FSC-certified timber as they will be from sustainable and well-managed forests. Buy a pre-treated structure if you wish to keep it natural or simply buy a couple of cans of outdoor paint. Ronseal’s range of garden paint is available in 28 colours, from the soft muted shades of Sapling Green and Warm Stone to zingy Lime Zest and bold Pink Jasmine. This dries in about an hour and acts as a waterproof covering, too, to add more protection. A 750ml tin of paint costs less than £10. You can purchase a ready-made pergola for as little as £100. For a sturdy model with a modern look, try www.shedstore.co.uk where a medium-priced one will cost approximately £450. Be sure to consider the size you require for the space you have. Initially, pergolas can look a little sparse so choose quick-climbing plants, such as clematis, which will be scaling the frame within no time. Wooden pergolas are a popular choice because they are easy to customise should you wish to co-ordinate with your planting scheme, 40 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

JO THOMPSON, DESIGNER


PROJECTS

A BALCONY RETREAT

NATURAL SCREENING

HIDE AWAY

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 41


PLANT EVERGREENS

GROW A GREEN SCREEN

MARK GREGORY

or simply wish to introduce a pop of colour into the garden. But for a real style statement, invest in a contemporary steel structure such as those created by Michael McGarr, of Warnes McGarr & Co Ltd in Wigan. “Pergolas are absolutely perfect for creating the illusion of privacy in a modern contemporary garden, without creating actual walls or blocking out any light. I love designing gardens with a pergola because it creates a sculptural focal point and can be used to create different zones for a garden, as well as a sense of privacy,” explains Michael.

SCREEN IT OFF Garden screens are growing in popularity. For an on-trend modern look, Grange Fencing offers horizontal panels which have slats that open and close, giving the effect of outdoor Venetian blinds. When they’re tilted, they allow the sun to shine through, and when closed, they offer the option of maximum privacy. The panels cost £419.99 for four from www.screwfix.com Materials for screening vary from bamboo with its Zen-like feel, perfect for Asian-themed 42 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

gardens, to willow, a cost-effective choice. Hazel is also available and comes in panels known as hurdles. Expect to pay a little more for this. Panels in most materials generally start in measurements of 1m (3ft 3in) long. Bamboo panels can cost as little as £10 but they are not long lasting or suitable for exposed spaces, as they will eventually rot. If you’d like a less structured screen, use carefully placed plants to provide an organic backdrop, advices designer Mark Gregory. “Privacy is not necessarily created by an impenetrable barrier. A transparent planting of a grass such as Stipa gigantea or a pergola with a translucent screen strung between beams would create a feeling of privacy without being completely solid.”

HIDE BEHIND A HEDGE “A pleached hedge is basically a hedge on stilts which cleverly creates an attractive screen in mid-air,” says Mark. “It provides vertical interest as well as blocking unwanted views or voyeurs! Hornbeam and beech are the most popular varieties because they both hang on to their

leaves through winter, providing an almost all-year-round screen.” Other options available include the flowering weeping silver pear, Pyrus salicifolia ‘Pendula’, which has scented white flowers in spring, followed by green or brown fruits. Or crab apple ‘Evereste’. This has white spring blossoms, which are red in bud, followed by blushed orange-yellow fruits. Before you make any decisions, research the type of hedging you want to create and consider the implications of spreading roots. This is especially important if you are in close proximity to your neighbours. If you use large shrubs instead of trees, you can remove the lower branches as they get bigger, allowing you to plant other plants beneath without starving them of the light they need to grow. This can also create texture and add real depth. Crepe myrtle is a hardy shrub that will live happily in a sunny spot producing flowers in hues of purple and pink. Try Thompson & Morgan’s ‘Rhapsody in Pink’ variety. A 3.6-litre potted plant costs from £17. Its bright flowers attract bees and, once your hedgerow is established, the wildlife may well be the only neighbours you see!


PROJECTS

Three ways to keep your privacy From the largest gardens to the smallest, there are a range of privacy solutions to suit all styles and budgets.

@ HAZEL HURDLES For a country-garden vibe, hazel hurdles are perfect. Not only do they look natural but they are also easy to erect and Primrose (www.primrose.co.uk) have a great selection starting from £47 for a 1.2m (4ft) panel. Hazel is an eco-friendly material too so is perfect for those with an interest in the environment. Available in panels, they can be overlapped or even staggered depending on the space you are working with. This is a solution that works particularly well for those with direct neighbours as it can give both sides privacy while looking stylish. If in doubt though, check out your property boundaries to avoid disputes. Visit www.gov.uk/your-property-boundaries for more information about this.

INVEST IN A WATER SHIELD

@ TRELLIS

COORDINATE

One of the cheapest options, which gives enormous flexibility in both material and usage. Wood is commonly used and for a 180 x 60cm trellis (6 x 2ft), you can expect to pay well under £5. Wilko (www. wilko.com) sells one for £3. These blend in well with the garden and are a good climbing frame for plants including honeysuckle which covers fast and smells glorious! If willow is a more preferable choice for your space, Homebase (www. homebase.co.uk) sells various sizes of expandable willow trellis from £7.99, while £20 buys a modern framed willow trellis which will provide instant coverage.

@ ORNAMENTAL GRASSES

ainst a g a ts u tr s n e d o o TIP W rance a e p p a e th e iv g ll painted wa s ed space lo c n e n a in s s e n of open

For calming, Zen-like appeal, grass is an natural choice Thompson & Morgan have a wide selection of seeds – Stipa tenuissima ‘Angel Hair’ being just one – for 99p, you can get 60 seeds. Plug plants (small young plants) including Pennisetum setaceum ‘Fireworks’ and fountain grass Pennisetum rueppellii (three for £16.99, www.thompsonmorgan.com), give an instant colour boost of red, pink and green and are very straightforward to grow and look after.

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M O D E R N G A R D E N S 43


What to do in your

G R EN NOW... Simple steps to keep your plot looking good this month

44 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6


Water your tomatoes Don’t neglect tomato plants if you want to keep enjoying their tasty red fruits. They’ll need watering every day in August, early morning or e evening, or both, when it’s really hot

Plant a win Anemones are b small gardens. to one now and blooms until O produce lots of l don’t take up m Anemone ‘Hon has bright, wh soar to head he grow happily i

Boost autumn colour Autumn-flowering crocus (Crocus speciosus) flower in September and will add colour and cover in tricky spots under shady trees and shrubs. You can put the corms in the soil now, planting them 10cm (4in) deep like bulbs. Or buy them as growing plants in pots in a few weeks time to add an instant boost of greenery and colour to your autumn outdoor space.

Save raspberries Pick raspberries when they ripen, before the birds get to them. If there are too many to eat in one go, stand the fruit on trays and pop in the freezer for a few hours, before bagging to store in the freezer. They keep up to a year.

Watch out for lily beetles y beetles are bright red bugs that love eating lilies nd will seriously decimate your flowers. If you pot them, pick them off and squish as there’s no chemical treatment available to buy.

Grow last-chance lettuce Sow corn salad (lamb’s lettuce) now, while the soil is warm, to pick later in the year. If you’ve an empty patch of soil, scatter the seeds on top of the soil (use multi-purpose compost in a pot) and gently water in, using a watering can fitted with a rose. They’ll germinate fast and be ready to pick in 50 days or so to see you through the winter months with some welcome greens for dinner.

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 45


EASY IDEAS

Support dahlias

46 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

Trim firethorn Use secateurs to cut back new, long growth on wall-trained pyracantha to stop it getting too big. Stick to snipping off the new branches (their stems are softer and not as woody as older growth) and you won’t lose any of the bright orange or yellow berries that will appear soon. You’ll need gloves, though, as firethorn has very sharp spikes!

Enjoy more roses Roses flower for longer if you cut off their fading blooms, which encourages new buds to form. Cut back to the leaf stalk below the finished flowers, and new flowering sideshoots will grow.

WORDS: LUCY BELLAMY P HOTOS: ALAMY, GAP PHOTOS, GETTY,

Hang a ladybird house for these little beetles to hibernate in this winter and encourage them to take up residence on your plot. Ladybirds are the gardener’s friend. A single one will gobble up 5,000 aphids in its lifetime and keep them from attacking your flowers. Like the idea? See next issue for how to make this living roof bug hut.

Dahlias are growing taller by the day and they’ll soon need support. Get in early with canes and string as plants that are staked too late always look ‘trussed up’. Push a circle of six sticks into the soil around each plant, 40cm (16in) high, and weave twine between them to make a grid. The plants will grow through it.


OUTDOOR LIVING

Upcycle with HEATHERYOUNG’S decoratingideasandeasyDIYfillher

homeandgardenandinspireherblog,www.growingspaces.net Sheshareshersimpletipsandmakes with us each month MAKE IT!

I

love the longer summer evenings, when I can sit outside in the garden with my husband Ben, cool glass of wine in hand. When the light starts to fade, I like to light a few candles – often citronella tealights to avoid getting eating alive by insects! Usually I’ll just pop the tealights into jam jars on the table but I wanted to create a bit more of a glow around the whole garden, so I decided to knock up some lanterns that we can hang from the trees and shrubs. I love the way candlelight can make any space feel twinkly and magical, and how it hides a multitude of sins, such as a lawn that needs mowing, and borders being taken over by weeds. Rather than going out and buying new, I had a rummage through our recycling box, and found a few empty drinks cans including a couple of taller, pint-sized beer cans, and a standard, 330ml fizzy drink one. I thought these would be perfect, as I was after something that could take real tealights or candles rather than having to use battery-powered ones. I gave them a good rinse and left them to dry before getting started. I could have left the cans as they were (which is quite good for an eclectic, rustic look), but opted for a slightly smarter finish and used paint to cover the cans’ surfaces. I have a collection of partly-used cans of spray paint in my craft cupboard, so I picked out a couple of these to use on my lanterns. I’m pleased I used metallic paint. It adds a richness to the night-time glow and a sense of occasion to any get-together.

WHAT YOU NEED

@ @ Spray paint (I used PlastiKote Metallic Gold, £8 from Amazon)

@ Stanley knife @ Scissors @ Single hole punch (as used for paper) @ Split pin (also known as a paper fastener) @ String or twine for hanging @ Tealight @ TOTAL £8

Heather

Twitter @HeatheryoungUk

TIME TAKEN 15 minutes 1 Spray the exterior of the can with the paint. Apply a couple of thin layers (allowing it to dry between applications) so that the paint doesn’t run. Leave to dry for at least five minutes. It should look shiny and smooth.

2 Cut the top off the can with a Stanley knife, and use scissors to cut strips down the can, about 2.5cm (1in) wide, stopping about 5cm (2in) from the bottom of the can. You want to end up with an odd number of strips (I had seven), because then you cut alternate strips off entirely so there are gaps between the remaining ones. Make sure they are big enough to insert a tealight through and handle carefully as the edges can be a little sharp. Leave to cool before removing the tealight. 3 Punch a hole at the top of each strip, then position the strips on top of each other, lining up the holes, and secure in place with a paper fastener (split pin). Wind some string or twine around the top of the fastener to hang the lantern. You can add extra decoration by punching holes down each strip or leave them plain. Pop in a tealight and find a safe spot to hang them. Not too low!

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 47


Part Four

WHAT’S YOUR

GLOBAL

URBAN CHIC

IC COOL & CLASS

48 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

NTRY

MODERN COU


BEST BUYS

GARDEN STYLE? Our series explores four modern looks for your garden. H Here we suggest clever design ideas, plants and accessories for COOL CLASSIC style PLANT THE LOOK

grass

Salvia

WORDS: LUCY BELLAMY PHOTOS: B&Q, DEBENHAMS, IKEA, WWW.URBANSCAPING.COM, EMMA LYNE

EMMA LYNE

ust as we decorate our home interiors according to our personalities, we can also stamp that personal style on our outside space. From the romantic and blowsy mix-and-match planting of a modern cottage garden, to the sharp angles and industrial influence of urban chic, or a zingy-bright taste of the tropics, carefully chosen plants, the right accessories and clever design ideas will help you make a space you love. For a cool, calm garden you can’t wait to spend time in, consider classic style. Natural materials like stone and wood, strong lines, striped cushions and a laid-back palette in

J

cool tones combine to create a calm oasis. It’s perfect for people who want to make a bold statement with stand-out plants that still has timeless style. Geometric furniture, sharply clipped topiary and a bold but understated layout create a stylish look using evergreen and easy-care plants.

The plan A cool, classic garden says drinks on the patio or long summer lunches. It’s perfect for people who have limited time outside because after an initial investment – stone paving, wood and gravel are

key to the look – it’s as simple as watering the plants in pots during summer and clipping the topiary to keep it neat. The hard landscaping is the backbone of the space so a well-proportioned layout is essential. It’s important to plan seating areas big enough to comfortably accommodate tables and chairs but still maintain a feeling of luxurious space. Research has shown that we walk more slowly down a wide path than a narrower one. A straight wide path adds to the sense of tranquility. Placing it along the side of the garden also keeps the edges of the planting areas looking sharp. AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 49


LIGHT & WARMTH

Make your outside space an inviting place to be

GO MULTI-FUNCTIONAL

Detailed planning is key to creating a classic garden with wow-factor. Use graph paper to draw out a plan of your existing garden. Measure boundary walls and mark up any features that you want to keep, such as trees. Design the layout from the ground up. Start with the seating area. It’s best to plan a space 2m x 2m (6ft 7in x 6ft 7in) wide. When deciding where to put it, don’t assume it has to go right next to the house. Think about where the sun shines at the time of day you’ll want to use your garden most. In a smaller garden it might make sense to site seating at the end 50 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

softwood deck boards (B&Q, value softwood reversible deck boards, www.diy.com). Buy the longest lengths you can and lay the decking horizontally as you look out from the house, rather than from front to back, for a smarter look. Dark wood stains tidy up a less than perfect fence. Although it can feel like a brave choice, black works as a neutral outside. Give B&Q’s ‘Tudor Black’ a go. Rendered with a lick of paint, it’s easy to give older walls a classic look. Try Farrow & Ball masonry paint in ‘Wimbourne White’, or ‘Pointing’, which replicates the colour of lime pointing in traditional brickwork.

6 natural style ideas to steal @ Plant sharply clipped topiary evergreens like box, bay and yew

@ Use gravel in place of a lawn @ Choose traditional plants like lavender and rosemary

@ Stain fences darker @ Stick to a simple colour scheme of white, green, lime and royal purple plants

@ Add stripy cushions in natural fabrics, such as cotton or linen

PHOTOS: ALAMYY, B&Q, CROCUS, GAP PHOTOS, GETTY, NORD C HOUSE

BE ALL NATURAL

of the garden against a back wall if this is the sunniest spot. Next, mark in the area for plants. Box balls and lollipop bay trees (known as ‘standards’) will add instant structure so this is one instance where it works well to have planting along the fence. Look at the space left in the middle of your plan. If you have a bigger garden you might want to keep an existing lawn but, in small gardens, a tiny lawn can be hard work. An area of gravel works better. Finally, go outside and mark up your design using wooden stakes or canes and string. Seeing the structure of your plan in situ will flag up any adjustments needed. There’s nothing like looking at the plan mapped out on the ground to see if the space works practically. Cool, classic gardens celebrate natural materials. Near-whites, creams, greys and new neutrals like black, mean that different textures and finishes work in harmony. You can mix more expensive ‘hero’ buys, like stone paving, with less expensive choices, like fencing, and still create a coherent look. Paving for paths and terraces is available in a variety of finishes and prices, dependent on the source of the stone and the size of the slabs. MKM Building Supplies has stoneware packs from £221 (www.mkmbs.co.uk) . Its Millstone NextPave slabs can be laid straight onto a sand screed or mortar bed. There’s a handy interactive buying and installation guide online. Decking is a good alternative to stone. It’s less expensive, starting at £22.50 for a 5-pack of


BEST BUYS

Our cool & classic plant edit Colour theming is an easy way to unify a palette of mixed plants for cool, classic style. Lavender, rosemary and smartly clipped box spheres create a timeless-looking garden. Limit yourself to a scheme of white, green,

lime and royal purple. These traditional favourites are popular because many of them stay evergreen, and they don’t grow too quickly so they are less likely to compete with each other for space.

1

Add instant hape

1 BOX BALL Left to its own devices box will grow to about 5m x 5m (16ft x 16ft) but it tends to be used for topiary and low hedging, due to its slow growth. Box balls are neat, round globes that stay evergreen and add shape and structure. Diameter 30cm (12in) £18.95 www.bentleys.me 2

LADY’S MANTLE ‘THRILLER’ With soft, green scalloped edges and a froth of lime flowers, the leaves of Alchemilla mollis catch the drops when it rains and they sparkle like jewels. It’s happy in a shady spot. Height and Spread 50cm (20in) £9.99 www.thompson-morgan.com 3

ROSEMARY ‘ROMAN BEAUTY’

2 5

This aromatic, evergreen herb makes a decorative garden plant with rich green foliage and small purple flowers. Nectar-rich blooms attract bees and butterflies, and it’s also very useful to flavour lamb and other meat dishes.Height and Spread 1m (39in) £9.99 www.dobies.co.uk 4 LAVENDER ‘HIDCOTE’ With fragrant spikes of deep violet-blue flowers, lavender loves a sunny spot and sharp drainage . It grows well in raised planters or at the base of a wall where the soil is often poor. Height 60cm (24in) Spread 75cm (30in) £8.95 www.gardens4you.co.uk

3

5

SALVIA ‘OSTFRIESLAND’ Balkan clary’s wands of tiny purple flowers on vertical flower spikes reach about knee high. They can be cut back in mid-summer to encourage a second flush of flowers. Height 45cm (18in) Spread 60cm (24in) £5.99 www.waitrosegarden.com 6 BAY LAUREL Glossy, aromatic dark green leaves on this evergreen plant makes it an excellent choice for topiary. Grown as a half-standard, with a round head on a straight trunk like a lollipop, it makes an elegant focal point. Height 1.5m (60in) Spread 30cm (12in) (clipped) £59.99 www.crocus.co.uk

4 6

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M O D E R N G A R D E N S 51


GO NEUTRAL AND NATURAL

LOW KEY

A colour palette of grey and sage in subtle shades creates cool style

Key ideas for c ol and classic style @ Choose natural materials that look elegant rather than rustic

@ Go for a timeless soft colour palette – grey, sage and duck-egg blue all work l@ Stripes and spots in muted colours create the look @ Knit your look together by grouping accessories and repeating themes


BEST BUYS

MAKE ROOM

S FAKE IT! The faux cool concrete finish hides a lightweight,

1 2

PHOTOS: COX & COX, DES GN V NTAGE, JOHN LEW S

Classic accents Beautiful natural materials in a soft colour palette create a look that will last. Opt for elegant rattan polished or painted wood and pale fabrics for a fuss-free style that combines elegance and practicality. Neutral doesn’t have to mean bland. Choose wooden chairs with a rich, warm stain or a traditional style garden bench in grey, duck-egg or soft sage. Adirondack chairs and wooden sun loungers capture that laid-back summer-in-theHamptons style perfectly. Find them for £129.99 at www.suttons.co.uk Tongue-and-groove planters in pairs or a row of three look more sophisticated than single pots. Use the same plants in each. Try www.heritagegardens. co.uk for a selection, from £65 each. Colourful tableware is fantastic for a long lunch outside. It’s available in lightweight melamine, so buy a big bowl and fill it with freshly picked salad or a mix of bright summer berries. A polka dot salad

linens with smart button fastenings look inviting. Fresh ticking stripes, taupe striped linen and neutral grey are good choices. Neptune’s Docking and Sheringham designs encapsulate the look (£45), or Next offers subtle checks and textured greys from as little as £12. British summer nights can be chilly even when the days are warmer, so wrap up in a classic rug as the sun goes down. The National Trust has a wide selection of natural fine woollen throws in French greys, light green and cream, and warm cream, with herringbone and diagonal weaves for a contemporary look.

3

CHOOSE STRIPES looks cool, will keep you cool, and it’s showerproof too £99 www.johnlewis.com 2 Leave these large (56cm x 56cm) Dash & Albert cushions out in all weathers £55 www.designvintage.co.uk 3 Multi-stripe melamine tableware makes lunchtime easy AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 53


YOURNS GARDE YOUR W

H PLACES PLAC A

We asked you to share photos of your own special OUTSIDE SPACES and here’s what you sent us

SSCENT AND STYLE I had a vision to convert a bare patch of weeds into an English cottage garden inspired by the street café in Savigny- LesBeaune and the restaurant in ‘Centre Ville’, Gordes, Provence. The aroma of my lavender plants now fills the summer air with scent. Catharine Naismith, Calverley

YOUR WI ! SHARE #MGH PPYPLACE We want to see your gardens and hear why they're special. You can post your pictures on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, using #MGHappyPlace and tell us a little bit about your plot. Every reader's garden we feature on this page will receive a £10 National Garden Gift Voucher (www. thevouchergarden.co.uk). For a chance to win a fabulous star prize of £300 of garden vouchers and the title of MG Happy Place 2016, visit our website, www. moderngardensmagazine.co.uk. The winner will be announced in December.

MEET US AT

S OUR PLACE TO CHILL We had our small garden cleared of gravel and decked, and then we did everything else, including upcycling old orange crates, painting the fence in Cuprinol's Beach Hut Blue, re-planting and buying a new table and chairs. We finally have a proper area to enjoy all year round! Matt Darley-Dawson, London

ModernGardensMagazine

54 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

@Modern_Gardens

#ModernGardens


EASY IDEAS

A HIGHER LEVEL S LIVING OUTSIDE My inspiration for my garden was a holiday I had in Morocco. I wanted my outdoor space to have a similar feel, with rich colours and textures. I also wanted the outside space to feel like an outdoor room. It's a pleasure being out there. Christina Bray, via Facebook

T A HAPPY ACCIDENT This raised bed wasn’t in my original plan. It's shady, but I had allium bulbs I needed to plant so that’s where they went. It’s now my favourite part of the garden. Jill McGrath, Penwortham, Lancs

S HIS AND HERS RELAXATION ZONE I wanted a outdoor man cave where I could enjoy watching sport while in the hot tub. The I created the woman cave for my wife and her friends to chil Craig Haggerty, Facebook

X OLD WITH NEW Our modern garden in Lincoln is mixed with informal cottage planting. We created spots that would work for gatherings, including an outside kitchen. Sarah Richardson, Lincoln

EMAIL YOUR PHOTOS TO US AT moderngardens@bauermedia.co.uk and share the love! AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 55


5PLA TS you must

When time and space are tight these STAR PERFORMERS will help make a little garden great

W

ith many plants at the peak of their flowering season, now’s the time to look around your plot and see which ones are earning their keep. Most of us want plants that are easy to look after, which have a long flowering season or add seasonal interest. Are yours ticking the right boxes? If not,

1

there are plenty more to choose from and we’ve got five suggestions for you to try. Not all plants make good garden guests. Some are tricky to grow and not worth the effort, and others don’t know when to stop growing, perhaps upsetting your neighbours. Here’s our guide to five star perfprmers and five you may like to avoid.

CLEMATIS Clematis ‘Prince George’ is an ideal climber for training up a trellis or over an arbour because it’s fast growing and not unruly, like some clematis. It has pretty, crumpled white flowers with a yellow centre. To encourage fresh growth each year, cut back the stems in spring to just above a pair of leaf buds, about 15-20cm (6-8in) above the ground, and add some compost around the soil to feed the plant. NEED TO KNOW @ Sun or shade: Sun or part shade @ Flowers: June to September @ Plant: Spring to autumn @ Height: 2m (6ft 7in) @ Spread: 1m (39in) Clematis ‘Prince George’, £9.99 www.vanmeuwen.com

2 MILLION BELLS Calibrachoa is a long-flowering, compact, trailing plant, perfect for hanging baskets. It’s fast-growing, so creates an impact quickly and there’s a fantastic array of colours to choose from. Also try growing it in containers or at the edge of raised beds. NEED TO KNOW @Sun or shade: Sun @Flowers: May to September @Plant: Spring to summer @Trails: 40cm (16in) @Spread: 30cm (12in) Calibrachoa, £9.99 for 6 plug plants www.jparkers.co.uk

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MODERN GARDENS

AUGUST 2016


EASY IDEAS

5

TO AVOID These plants are more trouble than they’re worth and could take over.

LEYLAND CYPRESS The cause of many a neighbourhood dispute, leylandii were once popular because they grew quickly, creating privacy. Unfortunately they just keep on growing. The tallest leylandii in the UK is 40m (130ft) tall and still going. They cast a huge amount of shade and are hungry, thirsty plants, so little thrives near them.

4 SCABIOUS ‘Butterfly Blue’ produces lots of pretty lavenderblue, pincushion-like flowers held on wiry stems, year after year. It’s perfect for a sunny, well-drained spot and loved by bees, butterflies and hoverflies. Deadhead any faded flowers to keep the plant looking tidy and to encourage more blooms. NEED TO KNOW @Sun or shade: Sun or part-shade @Flowers: May to first frosts @Plant: Spring to autumn @Height: 40cm (16in) @Spread: 40cm (16in) Scabiosa ‘Butterfly Blue’, £9.99 www.thompson-morgan.com

RUSSIAN VINE While this will cover an unsightly shed in the blink of an eye you’ll need to prune it weekly to contain it . Its vines can reach over 50m (164ft) and its weight can crumple fence panels. One of its other names is the mile-a-minute plant, which should be enough of a warning.

5

PERIWINKLE These low-growing plants provide groundcover and smother weeds. But they are vigorous and best avoided if you have a small garden. They can take over a space in a short time, creeping through your borders, stifling other plants. They can be tricky to get rid of, too, as you need to remove every bit of root to stop them re-growing.

3

DELPHINIUM Why is this classic country garden flower here? Because it’s not easy to grow, and if you do succeed, slugs love them. If you can manage to get them to flower (before they’re eaten), the flowers become top heavy, particularly if it rains. Each flower stem will need a bamboo stake and to be tied in as it grows.

CRAB APPLES

NEED TO KNOW

@ @ @ @ @

@ Sun or shade: Sun or part-shade @ Flowers: May to first frost @ Plant: Spring to summer @ Trails: 40cm(16in) @ Spread: 25cm (10in) Try Geranium ‘Best Red’, £12.99 36 plug plants, www.vernonplants.com

WORDS: LOUISE CURLEY PHOTOS: ALAMY, G ETTY, SHUTTERSTOCK

GERANIUMS Ideal for patio pots, they love warmth but cope with a little shade. Cut off dead blooms and feed weekly with fertiliser high in potash, such as Tomorite, for more flowers. Red blooms make a real splash in a mini display with a contrasting stand.

BAMBOO Exotic, with gently rustling leaves, what’s not to like about a bamboo? But choose carefully as several are demon spreaders, by means of underground stems called rhizomes. If your heart’s set on a bamboo choose a clump-forming variety such as Fargesia nitida or Fargesia murielae, and grow it in a large pot.

A

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 57


NEED UT…

Clematis COLOUR IN A SMALL GARDEN this flowers

C

sizes, there’s one for everyone to love. From dainty bells to whopping big bloomers with double layers of petals, a late summer clematis will reach the top of a wall the first year it’s planted but it will never get out of hand. They’re brilliant for adding a swirl of colour to summer’s last, long, lazy days. Late summer flowering clematis burst into bloom from July to September. They are just the job for fantastic flowers in the tricky gap between the abundance of mid-summer and autumn’s rich colours. The larger flowered varieties are wonderful for growing up a fence and adding a splash of bold, confident colour. Clematis J‘ ackmanii Superba’ is happy planted in sun or shade. It has bright purple flowers with pale yellow middles. Expect it to reach 2.5m (8ft) the first year it’s planted and it will flower non-stop for four months. J‘ ackmanii Purpurea’ is similar, and another good choice for both sunny or shady gardens. It has dusky red blooms. In a small garden or courtyard, a smaller flowered clematis is the best choice as it won’t overwhelm. Clematis florida ‘Plena’ has white flowers packed with layers of petals that are delicately tinged with green. It likes a slightly sheltered spot away from the wind, where it will flower for five months. For small red blooms with a velvety touch, ‘Princess Diana’ is hard to beat, with its tulip-shaped flowers. This plant will thrive in sun or part shade and reach 2.5m (8ft). Clematis that flower after June grow a network of stems and branches in the first six months of the year which then produce flowers. They’ll reach the top of a tall wall the same year they are planted, but will never get too big if cut back to ankle height each spring.

58 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

3 of the best for a smaller garden These varieties never grow too big

‘ROMANTIKA’ Rich, deep purple, almost black blooms with yellow anthers. £14.99 www.crocus.co.uk

Happy in sun, shade or a windy spot TRICKY SPOTS Viticella clematis grows in difficult spaces where other plants struggle to thrive, and are good for growing through trees and bushes.

‘BETTY CORNING’ Bell-shaped, pinky-mauve flowers that have a sweet scent. £10 www.taylorsclematis.co.uk

‘ÉTOILE VIOLETTE’ Known as ‘Old Man’s Beard’, it has bright purple-violet flowers. £14.99 www.thompson-morgan.com


EASY IDEAS

BE DIFFERENT...

MAKE IT!

A SUMMERTIME PIN-ON POSY Make any day extraspecial with this livinglower clematis brooch

bottom e th t a s in a h c n te TIP Fas e wind th in g in g in w s to stop them

WORDS: LUCY BELLAMY PH OTOS: ALAMY, LU CY BELLAMY, GAP PHOTOS, G ETTY IMAGES

WHAT YOU NEED @ Florists’ tape, ribbon or twine @ Scissors @ Safety pin WHAT TO DO 1 Cut your clematis flowers the day before you need them and float them in a bucket of water overnight. 2 Choose one clematis flower, plus three or four different leaf or flower sprigs. The clematis is going to be the star of the show so look for colours and shapes that complement it. 3 Arrange your flowers and leaves to create a pretty bunch. Use florists’ tape (£2 from www.hobbycraft.co.uk) to bind the flowers together, then snip the stems to an equal length. Keeping the stems longer will make your brooch look delicate and airy, which works particularly well with clematis flowers. 4 Use ribbon or twine to cover the tape. Thread through a buttonhole or fasten to your outfit with the safety pin.

² AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 59


TRY A PARED-BACK LOOK

We LOVE this!

CRAFT ‘FENCE ART’

S MAKE FOCAL POINTS

HOW TO PLANT A CLEMATIS As a climbing plant, clematis is usually grown at the foot of a wall or fence where the soil is typically poor and dry. The bottom of a wall is in its ‘rain shadow’, so the soil never gets a good soaking even when it rains. It can also be rubbly, especially where the foundations of the wall or fence posts are. Clematis love rich, fertile soil so it’s a difficult spot for them to grow. It’s important therefore, to help them along at planting time by adding some extra compost to the soil. Plant your clematis 45cm (18in) away from where you want it to climb. Dig a wide, deep 60 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

hole and add a 12-litre bag of multipurpose compost to the soil. (Verve multipurpose compost £2.73, B&Q, www.diy.com). Use a spade to mix the compost and soil together. The planting hole needs to be deep enough so that the first 10-15cm (4-6in) of the clematis’ stems are buried below the top of the soil. Planted this deep it will produce new shoots from the base. Angle the plant in the hole at 45° so that the stems point towards the support. Backfill with soil and gently firm in around the rootball with your hands, before drenching it with a full can of water.

P HOTOS: ALAMY, FLORA P RESS, GAP PHOTOS, GETTY IMAGES

Training clematis up obelisks placed in your outside space adds height to borders and creates bright focal points.

ADD MORE COLOUR


EASY IDEAS CREATE THE ILLUSION OF SPACE Big-up a small plot with clever planting in tiered layers with trellising above. This highlights the drama of light colours against dark, and a bold, lush climber.

HOW TO...

USE TRELLIS TO SUPPORT CLIMBERS Giving plants something solid to cling to helps fast growth @ When fixing trellis to a wall, make it as tall and wide as the area you want your plant to climb up and cover. @ If there’s a wide space between the plant and the trellising, as pictured above, then hang lengths of chain (see page 59) from the trellis to the base of the plant for it to twine around, climb up and be supported as it bridges the gap. @ As the shoots grow, tuck them into the

bottom of the trellis. Once contact has been made, they’ll climb up the frame unaided. @ You can buy ready-made trellis in all shapes and sizes, and there’s usually a good selection to suit all pockets at garden centres. Choose from rectangular, square, fan- or diamond-shaped, and expanding. Material-wise, they come in iron, plastic, willow and wood. Prices start at only £3.99 www.ukgardensupplies.co.uk


Grow clematis up a tree You can grow a clematis up a tree if you’re short of wall space. The branches of the tree will support the clematis as it climbs and the flowers will decorate the canopy. Good host trees include crab apples (think about matching the colour of the clematis flowers with the late-summer fruits), apple trees and magnolias. Magnolias shine in spring but they can look a bit dull when their flowers fade and a clematis cheers them up. All these trees have big, open shapes that let in light and strong branches to support a climbing plant. @Dig a hole 45cm (18in) away from the trunk. The clematis will grow towards the light so it’s best to postion it on the shadiest side of the tree. You might need to use a trowel rather than a spade to get in between the tree’s roots. @Give the clematis a thorough soaking, then take it out of the pot but leave the supporting cane in. Stand the plant in the hole, positioning the cane in the direction of the tree and backfill. @Soak the soil around the roots with a full can of water. @Allow the stems to climb freely up the trunk and through the tree’s branches. @Prune the clematis every March to maintain abundant growth of leaves and blooms from the base upwards.

62 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

MIX ‘N’ MATCH

re ideal a s n e e r c s w lo il TIP W aps for g f o ts lo ’s e r e th s supports a etween b e in tw to s il r d ten

PERFECT IN A POT A pot full of clematis flowers makes a pretty feature for a terrace or deck, and ‘Amethyst Beauty’, for example, will flower in a container from early to late summer. You can add an obelisk to the top of the pot or use a wigwam of canes and string for the plant to climb up. Choose a pot at least 30cm (12in) wide and add crocks (pieces of an old terracotta pot, large pebbles or slate chippings) or grit to the base for drainage. Clematis are hungry plants so pot them in John Innes no. 3 compost (also called mature plant compost) for heavy-duty nutrition that lasts for the longer term. Plant the clematis in the pot with the tips of its stem below soil level. Fill in any gaps with extra compost and gently firm it in.

Clematis like their roots kept cool so it’s a good idea to add a layer of pebbles to the top of the pot. They will also act as mulch to retain moisture, so you can water less often. Watch out for clematis wilt. It’s a fungal disease that can cause leaves and stems to blacken and flop. It usually only affects plants with bigger, blowsier flowers. If you spot the symptoms, cut your plant back to healthy, green growth and remove the affected stems, putting them in the garden waste bin rather than on the compost heap. Planting your clematis deeper when you buy it means you can dig down below the soil surface to look for stems that haven’t been affected. Even a plant that has been cut back very low down will regrow and flourish again.


EASY IDEAS

BRING THE OUTSIDE IN

SHOULD I PRUNE MY PLANT? In the first year, late-summer flowering clematis bloom on shoots that have grown this spring and early summer so the good news is that you don’t need to prune it. Next March, to keep your plant in tip-top, verdant condition, cut every shoot back to ankle height, using a sharp pair of secateurs so you make clean cuts, rather than crushing the stems. The clematis will grow again from the base, and flower again at this time next year. If you forget to cut it back one year, don’t worry. Just wait until the following spring and pick up where you left off, cutting everything to ankle height again in March. Pruning your late-summer clematis like this removes the tangle of old branches and makes the plant flower at the right height, where you can see and enjoy the blooms. It’s not unusual to see a clematis that hasn’t been pruned full of flowers, but all too high up to see – or even on the neighbour’s side of the fence!

PHOTOS: FLORA P RESS, GAP PHOTOS, LIV ING 4 MEDIA

TAKE IT EASY

MAKE IT!

SUMMER TABLE DECORATION Cut clematis will lower for two weeks in a vase WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

@ Clematis flowers @ Scissors @ Vase, glass bottle or jar WHAT TO DO 1 Look for flowers that are just about to open, early in the morning or in the evening, when the water content of the flowers is at its highest. 2 Cut the flowers with their stems as long as possible and gently pull off any leaves that will be below the waterline in the container you plan to use. 3 Fill your vase with cold water to make your flowers last as long as possible, or use tepid water if you want to hurry the blooms along. TIP Angle the stem cuts to provide a larger area for water uptake, and add sugar (one tablespoon to one litre of water) to feed the flowers and make them last longer.

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 63


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SUNSHINE CORNER Every month we give you easy ideas for creating a special corner in your garden

Plant list

1 X DAHLIA ‘HONKA YELLOW’ £3.99 sunny yellow dahlia have unusual rolled petals. Height 60cm (24in) Spread 40cm (16in) www.crocus.co.uk

66 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

3 X FLOWERING TOBACCO £9.95 each A tall, sweetly scented annual that has white trumpet flowers from June to October above limey foliage. A speedy grower, reaching 60-90cm (2-3ft) in two to three months. Height 1.2m (48in) Spread 45cm (18in) www.woolmans.com

3 X BISHOP’S FLOWER £8.95 each Delicate, lacy flower heads and fine feathery foliage add airy brightness to the mix, and this plant is a spectacular, cloud-like, filler-foliage choice. Height 90cm (35in) Spread 50cm (20in) www.sarahraven.com


EASY IDEAS

More sunshine corner combinations Easy SHADE OVERS

1 X JAPANESE FOREST GRASS (HAKONECHLOA MACRA) £9.99 A mane of golden-green cascading grass adds bright and breezy movement. Looks great in pots or gravel gardens. Height 45cm (18in) Spread 50cm (20in) www.thompson-morgan.com

3 X JAPANESE ANEMONE £5.95 each ‘Whirlwind’ is a compact, double white windflower variety that illuminates a shady patch. Bees love it, too, and it provides a welcome food source for insects late in the season. Height 60cm (24in) Spread 45cm (18in) www.plantsforshade.co.uk

2 X RUDBECKIA £4.99 each Sunny and easy-going, these bright, upright daisies, commonly called black-eyed Susans, don’t need staking and look fantastic planted with ornamental grasses. Height and Spread 50cm (20in) www.waitrosegarden.com

3 X HESPERANTHA ‘GOOD WHITE’ £5.99 each These small and delicately formed lilies enjoy wet soils and keep on blooming well into autumn. They make good cut flowers too. Height 60cm (24in) Spread 30cm (12in) www.farmyardnurseries.co.uk

2 X SNEEZEWEED ‘SOMBRERO’ £6.99 each Quirky, luminous yellow shuttlecock flowers on tall waving stems make this plant a cheerful border addition, and pollinators love them too. Height 60cm (24in) Spread 30cm (12in) www.crocus.co.uk

1 X EVENING PRIMROSE ‘AFRICAN SUN’ £9.99 Perfect for a warm summer evening, the flowers open and give of a sweet scent as the evening draws in. Height 90cm (35in) Spread 30cm (12in) www.thomspon-morgan.com

3 X YARROW ‘MOONSHINE’ £17.97 for 3 Silvery foliage shines out with flat-topped pale yellow flowers as a bright bonus, bringing a strong outline to your border display. Very in-vogue, yarrow comes in a choice of colours. Heightt and Spread 60cm (24in) www.rhsplants.co.uk

Best for

2 X ASTILBE ‘WEISSE GLORIA’ £4.99 each With blooms like feathery pufs of cloud, this plant is a breath of fresh air for a sunny-themed corner. Height 50cm (20in) Spread 40cm (16in) www.ballyrobertgardens.com

Best for DRY SOIL

2 X BABY’S BREATH £6.99 each Gypsophila is a favourite of florists. This tiny, light flower can tie a whole arrangement together with its cloud-like profusion, and it works equally well in a border too. Height 1m (39in) Spread 60cm (24in) www.jacksonsnurseries.co.uk

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 67

WORDS: MELISSA MABBITT PH OTOS: ALAMY, GAP PH OTOS, SHU TTERSTOCK

DAMP SOIL


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OUTDOOR LIVING

” n e d r a g e h t I’m in

f

, Mediterranean style

Every month we have a peek over a reader’s garden fence. This month it’s Kelly Haworth from Bury, Lancashire @ My

p f

th for a cupp ppa

garden is…

quite small! It measures 8m by 5m (26ft x 16ft). When we first bought the house eight years ago, the walls were painted a dark terracotta and the garden was completely bare with no plants at all. We built a raised terrace area for a sofa and chairs, and my dad made us two benches which were originally old bed frames. I added lots of flowers and painted the walls in Cool Grey Masonry, from Wickes. I wanted my garden to be pretty, welcoming and to feel like another room.

@I

share my garden with…

my husband Derrick, our four children – Isabelle, Jack, Sam and Leo, and two dogs called Maddie and Reggie.

@ My

inspiration is…

a holiday that I had in Spain. I loved all the white houses with bright coloured hanging baskets and I thought I’d like to recreate the Mediterranean look at home.

@ Best

m with colo colourful ful su ffinias

garden moments

are just beautiful and I adore the large blooms on hydrangeas. I have lots of both in my garden.

Top tip

@ When I go to the garden centre I always go to the sale section first. You’ll find the discounted or neglected plants there. Most of the time they just need some attention and watering and you can pick them up for pennies. I have shasta daisies, hydrangeas, rhododendrons and skimmia which once were destined for the bin and are now thriving in my garden. @ Latest

project

My upcycled pink lady. I picked up this old wire mannequin for £20, lined the skirt, filled it with compost and then planted it with lobelia and petunias. My mannequin now has a beautiful trailing skirt made of blue and pink flowers. Kelly’s blog www.homewiththehaworths. com On Instagram @Home.with.the.haworths Want to tell us about your garden? Get in touch at moderngardens@bauermedia.co.uk

My childrens’ parties. Two have their birthdays in th summer holidays and we always have a garden celebration, with lots of balloons and music.

Favourite area

@ The large bench that my dad made for us. I sit out there in the morning with a cup of tea and when anyone visits it’s usually where we go for a chat. It’s lovely in the evening, too, with a glass of wine, weather permitting of course! @ My

current obsession is…

fabric bunting in the garden. In my view, you can’t have too much!

@ Best

buy

The arch and picket fence. We bought both from B&M Stores for £130. I painted them white and it has created a lovely entrance into the garden.

@ Favourite

plant

I can’t just choose one! The trailing flowers on surfinia petunias

off the white patio p set

t AUGUST 2016

nequin in M O D E R N G A R D E N S 69


5 NEW WAYS to fall in love with

SUNFLOWERS Who doesn’t love these golden giants? They BRING SUNSHINE to any space and make bright, bold decorations WE LOVE THIS

1

ARRANGE A TRAY DISPLAY Cut ripe, multi-coloured sunflower heads and spread them out on a wooden tray for instant impact, outdoors or in. The display will last a day before it looks tired, especially in a shady place. 70 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

2


EASY IDEAS

So EASY!

4 Tie kindling sticks around a

MATCH ACCESSORIES

3

Sunlowers for every spot

5

HOW TO GROW THEM @ Sunflowers thrive in full sun and all but very wet garden soils. They can also be grown in a container of multi-purpose compost. @ Tall varieties are hungry, so add slow-release fertiliser pellets to the area where they’re growing. @Buy as plug plants from garden centres or online, or grow them from seed. Simply fill a small pot with compost and push two seeds just under the surface and water them in. If both germinate, remove the smallest one. Keep watering and when the seedling has become a small plant roughly 10cm (4in) high, it can be planted out into a sunny spot. It will take about 10 weeks to reach full height.

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 71

WORDS: MELISSA MABBITTPH OTOS: GETTY, FLOWER COUNCIL OF HOLLAND, GAP, STOCKFOOD

T

he classic sunflower of our imaginations has a towering stem topped by a single mustard-yellow bloom, but the group also includes dwarf and multi-headed varieties. Colours range from cream and pale lemon-yellow to deep, rusty reds and browns, so you can find a sunflower to complement almost any style of garden. These bright and cheerful, long-lasting flowers appear from July to October and are ideal for cutting. The long, chunky stems can be used in tall floral arrangements, or cut shorter for small bright posies. If you let the flowers ripen, you’ll enjoy an extra dimension as birds feast on the tasty seeds.


Watering PLANTS MOIST

The roots of established plants growing in the ground can search out and grow deep in the soil to get at the essential water they need. Many plants have developed numerous characteristics to help them keep going when water is scarce, and are regarded as ‘drought resisting’ – but there’s really no such thing as a totally droughtresistant plant. Plants growing in containers, most vegetables and anything newly planted will cry out for top-ups to what they can get through their own resources. This is where you come in, armed with hosepipes, watering cans, soaker hoses, drip and automatic watering systems! Which ones you use depends very much on the situation, how much time and effort you want to spend on watering your plants and, of course, your bank balance!

TALL IN ONE

72

MODERN GARDENS

AUGUST 2016

BE ALWAYS LOOMING


EASY IDEAS

TAVOID THE KINKS!

CHOOSE YOUR TOOL

Gardena’s Premium Metal Adjustable Sprayer has three spray patterns and flow adjustment. £21.99, www.gardena.com

Did you know...

TROLL IT UP

@

@

@

@

WHEN TO WATER While you could dig a hole in the ground to see if the soil is damp or not, this isn’t really practical. You can test the compost around plants in containers, however, by simply sticking your finger in and watering if it feels dry. Obviously, if your plants are wilting they are in need of a soaking, but a lack of moisture at the roots can also be preceded by darkening and drooping of the leaves.

The Claber Ergo Spray Pistol has a quick-click connector and jet settings. £9.99, www.greenhousep

HOW TO WATER Depending on your soil type, well-established trees, shrubs and perennials growing in the ground may never need watering, but their growth can be improved by watering during very hot or dry spells. New plantings, on the other hand, will need watering during dry periods probably for the first three to six months to ensure they establish rapidly and produce a good root system. When you do water it is important to do it thoroughly. There’s no point watering plants growing in the ground little and often as it can do more harm than TPICK A COLOUR good. It results in the water sitting Hozelock’s Pi in the top few centimetres of the bright and tidy 9 99, www.garden4less.co.uk

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EASY IDEAS soil, rather than moving deeper through the soil, encouraging surface rooting and making plants more susceptible to drought. Instead, water thoroughly every seven to 10 days. It’s always best to water in the cool of the evening or the very early morning, so that less water is lost immediately to evaporation. Water the soil around the circumference of the plant, or around the edge of the canopy for trees and large shrubs. Watering over the leaves can be wasteful, and can lead to fungal diseases as most need a film of moisture on the leaves for disease spores to germinate. Containers are different as the compost can dry out quickly if the plants are large and growing quickly, the weather is hot or dry and the plants are becoming potbound. As a result, they need regular watering, possibly daily, even twice a day in the height of summer.

Drought resistant plants If you want to reduce the amount of time spent watering, plant up your beds and borders with drought-resisting plants. Leaves are good indicators of drought resistance so look out for fleshy, hairy, waxy, silvery, grey, thin grass-like and scented leaves. Water them in well after planting and that’s it...

CONVOLVULUS CNEORUM

LAVENDER (LAVANDULA)

Silvery-grey evergreen foliage topped with white flowers. Height 90cm (3ft).

Grey-green scented foliage and purple flowers all summer. Height 1.5m (5ft).

PINKS (DIANTHUS)

PHORMIUM

Silvery-green foliage and highly scented fl i H i ht 30 (12i )

Long, broad, pointed leaves, small tubular fl in summer. Height 1.5m (5ft).

TREACH UP

SEA HOLLY (ERYNGIUM)

ECHINACEA t perennial with white or deep pink . Height up to 70cm (2ft 3in).

UST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 75

WORDS: GEOFF HODGE PHOTOS: ALAMY, G AP, SHUTTERSTOCK

WHAT TO WATER WITH Using a watering can will generally take a lot of time but it is a good standby, useful for watering seedlings, and for applying liquid plant feeds. Even the smallest garden will benefit from having a hosepipe. It will make watering so much quicker and easier, so you can have more time to enjoy your garden. Tea a spray gun, such as Claber’s M Pistol, £17.99 (www..easygarde will make it more versatile and accurate. A long-handled spra as the Gardena Classic Lance, gardena.com/uk), will make wa baskets and wide borders easy But don’t leave it coiled up o where it can make the garden you up or get damaged. Invest a wall-mounted reel. Try the H Pico Reel, £29.99 (www.garden Seep hoses – hosepipes wit placed ‘leak’ holes – are very u large areas and to accurately w growing in rows. They can be h beneath the soil or covered wit Sprinklers are very wasteful useful for watering lawns quick


YOUR GARDENS

Q&A GOT A QUESTION?? We’ve got the answer,

whether it’s about a plant, a tricky spot or a product you need SUMMER EVENINGS are my favourite time in the garden, but I’m fed up with being bothered by mosquitos. Is there a natural way to discourage them? Karen Elland, Bermondsey

Q

Grow some more plants! Specifically aromatic, some might say pungent, herbs such as basil,

and rosemary and members of the mint family. Try catmint (nepeta), lemon balm (horsemint) and soothing peppermint. Not only do these plants help keep mosquitos at bay but you benefit from having herbs for cooking or to add to salads. Marigolds also help repel unwanted insects as well as bringing some instant sunshine to your garden.

Q

I WANT TO PUT some attractive edging around my borders. Are there any products that are maintenance free and quick and easy to install without tools? Marion Poole, Holbeach

WORDS: LY NNE MAXWELL

PHOTOS: ALAMY, GAP PHOTOS, SH UTTERSTOCK

Try low hazel hurdle borders. They are tough, durable and incredibly easy to install, or take out and reposition as required, as you just push them into soil wherever you want them. They are also useful for wind protection, to help stop plants lopping over the front of borders, for sectioning of specific areas, such as gravel garden beds, and for disguising the front of raised lower beds. They are also particularly suited to creating a kitchen herb area. A four-pack of 1.2m x 24cm (48 x 9½in) hazel borders costs £42.95 www.harrodhorticultural.com

Q THE POPPIES IN MY FLOWER BED are flopping. Is there an attractive way to support them? Joe Simpson, Birmingham

Q

Most poppies will need supporting as they get top heavy. You want a ring plant support that surrounds the clump. We like this steel one that comes in two blend-in colours – Rustic (unpainted) or Olive Drab – and can be wrapped around your poppies and hooked together. Allow 15-30cm (6-12in) of spike, depending on the height of your

plant, to go underground for stability, taking care not to damage bulbs as you push the support in. Next year you could position the support when you plant so the poppies grow through it. A pack of three 25cm x 70cm/ (9¾ x 27in) costs £7.15. www.plantsupports.co.uk

WHAT CAN I GROW NOW to brighten the garden and fill vases in autumn? Helen Rogers, by email

Annual bedding like primrose ‘Autumn Colours Mixed’ will flower a couple of weeks after planting, and again in spring. It’s also deliciously scented. When it comes to late-flowering perennials, which will come back year after year, you could grow wallflowers ‘Sunset Orange’ (right), Pennisetum setaceum ‘Fireworks’, sweet william ‘Festival Mixed’ and Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Early Bird Gold’, (all from www. thompson-morgan.com). Other autumn winners are chrysanthemums, dahlias and Peruvian lilies. Buy larger, stronger plants (1-litre plus) that can establish and flower before winter. AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 77


YOUR GARDENS I’M JUST BACK FROM HOLIDAY and my gerbera looks dead and dried out. Can I revive it? Sally Beeney, Falkirk

Q

leave it to drink its fill. Allow up to 30 minutes. If the container is heavy when you lift out the pot, the plant has drunk enough.

Sometimes appearance deceptive and a plant looks as if it is at deat door just needs a little TLC. Before you dash your watering can... st When the compost is water will just run off t What you need to do is with water and plunge th pot and all, into it. If the po it may float but the idea is to sink down gently into the tub a

Q

FLOWER PETALS WERE MIXED in with a salad I had in a café. It looked and tasted amazing. What lowers are safe to eat?

ASK THE DESIGNER HOW CAN WE HIDE AN UGLY OVERGROWN FENCE? It’s not ours so we can’t replace it. Adam Lomas, Chichester

Chloe Harcourt, Bedford

You’ll be impressed at the variety of lowers that can be eaten. Some may be lowering in your garden now or can easily be bought. Carnations and pinks (dianthus) add a duo of marshmallow colours but check each lower before using its petals in your salad as some can be bitter. Try clove-scented dianthus ‘Gran’s Favourite’. Nasturtiums and pot marigolds bring a splash of yellow through to burnished bronze. Both the leaves and blooms of nasturtiums are edible, with a peppery tang. Borage is not a new ingredient, it was a favourite of the Elizabethans. Its young leaves have a light cucumber lavour and the blue lowers bring both colour and a honey taste. Always thoroughly wash the parts of the plant you are going to eat, and use when as fresh as possible.

“Here’s a garden in Putney, which had an ivy-covered fence and a dog leg. We squared everything up with a better pergola and a concrete block raised TOM HOWARD bed. Three posts were bolted into Tom Howard Garden Design the back of the bed and the ends waterproofed with bitumen paint. A large panel was screwed into them. It was a 10mm thick sheet of aluminium, 2.5m (8ft) wide and 1.2m (4ft) high, so very heavy. We gave it 10 coats of Farrow and Ball’s deep orange Charlotte’s Locks exterior eggshell paint, using a foam roller to ensure a perfectly smooth finish. The old fence is hidden behind it. “The client had done a mood board with zingy purple, lime-green, white a plants. I kept the other colours ut the panel was begging o be painted orange! What was intended as a disguise has become a real feature.” Tom Howard offers a full garden design and landscaping service, based in south-west London. tomhowardgardens.co.uk

CONTACT www.moderngardensmagazine.co.uk Want some design inspiration or got a garden question you’d like answered? Get in touch, including a picture if you have one, by email at moderngardens@bauermedia.co.uk

78 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6


YOUR PETS

PAWS

& WHISKERS...

...FINS AND FEATHERS. Whatever your pet,

here’s how to enjoy your garden with them

Pet-proof your plot Now that the warmer months are here, your pets will be spending more time outdoors. Make sure they stay safe and healthy in your garden with this advice.

MAKE IT PERSONAL £40 www.johnlewis.com

@ Introducing pathways to your garden not only looks good but are practical if you have pets, too. A gravel path will dry off muddy paws and aromatic cedar chips are a natural way to ward off fleas. @ Non-toxic plants for most pets include jasmine, roses and daisies. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has published a list of harmful plants for dogs, cats and horses: www.aspca.org, so you can check before you buy. @ When choosing your outdoor furniture, consider waterproof materials, such as wood, wicker and wrought iron, as a wipe-clean option that will not harbour nasty bacteria.

Protect your plants!

WORDS: RACH EL AN DREWS -ING RAM PH OTOS: ALAM Y

@ Choose natural products such

Use plastic forks, planting them handle down, to deter small pets and wild animals from trampling over your borders or digging up precious blooms.

Top treats

as manure and seaweed compost to fertilise your garden as they are safe to use around animals.

@ Check that fencing is secure and cover any h l

1

or gaps to stop your eir escape.

Pet in a pot This is 2 year-old Springer Spaniel, Hattie, who lives with her owners Nicki and Dave in Peakirk, Peterborough. Hattie puts her dirty toys in the washing machine and acts as the family’s chief slipper locator.

WIN! Tweet a picture of your pet in a pot to @ Modern_Gardens #petinapot If your pet’s featured you’ll receive a kneeler worth £38 from www. plumandashby.co.uk

2

We LOVE this!

1. Hang up With ‘Please Feed Me!’ on one

side and ‘Already Fed!’ on the other, this slate sign is useful & pretty. £4.50 www. gardentrading.co.uk 2. Iced treat A refresh ice-cream made from fruit is perfect for ho dogs. £2.99 www.ocado.com 3. Feline Fancy Keep cat food fresh with an Alessi Mio Cat Bowl. £40 www.black-by-black-design.co.uk AUGUST 2016

3

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 79


CONTACT US Address: Modern Gardens, Bauer Media, Media House, Lynch Wood, Peterborough PE2 6EA Email: moderngardens@bauermedia.co.uk EDITORIAL Phone 01733 468000 Editor Fiona Cumberpatch Art Editor Emma Howcutt Gardening Editor Lucy Bellamy Editorial Assistant Rachel Andrews Ingram Production Editor Lynne Maxwell Head of Publishing Angela Kenny Contributors Melissa Mabbitt, Louise Curley, Melanie Whitehouse, Heather Young, Clare Kelly, Caroline Davis, Rachel Andrews Ingram Thanks to Darren Burge, Sarah Flitcroft, Clare Kelly, Caroline Davis, Jack Thorpe, Caroline Glynne Jones, Ruth Haddock ADVERTISING Phone 01733 395003 Group Commercial Director Charlie Brookes Commercial Director Iain Grundy Key Accounts Kayleigh Nicolaou Display/Classi Sales Lindsey Usher 01733 366392 MARKETING Phone 01733 468329 Brand Manager Charlotte Walsh Product Manager Lynne Fairburn Direct Marketing Manager Julie Spires Direct Marketing Executive Rebecca Lambert Head of Newstrade Marketing Leon Benoiton Newstrade Marketing Manager Samantha Tomblin PRODUCTION Phone 01733 468341 Advertising Production Helen Fulluck Printed by Southern Print Distributed byy Frontline Subscriptions and Back Issues To ensure that you don’t miss an issue and for the best subscription offers visit www.greatmagazines.co.uk For subscription or back issue enquiries, please contact CDS Global at bauer@subscription.co.uk Phone +44 (0)1858 438884 (UK and Overseas) BAUER CONSUMER MEDIA Managing Director – Leisure & Technologyy Kim Slaney Editorial Director June Smith-Sheppard Head of Digital Charlie Calton-Watson Group Direct Marketing Director Chris Gadsby Finance Director Lisa Hayden Group Managing Director Rob Munro-Hall CEO Paul Keenan Modern Gardens magazine is published 12 times a year by Bauer Consumer Media Ltd, registered address: Media House, Lynch Wood, Peterborough PE2 6EA. Registered number 01176085. No part of the magazine may be reproduced in any form in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publisher. All material published remains the copyright of Bauer Consumer Media Ltd. We reserve the right to edit letters, copy or images submitted to the magazine without further consent. The submission of material to Bauer Media whether unsolicited or requested, is taken as permission to publish in the magazine, including any licensed editions throughout the world. Any fees paid in the UK include remuneration for any use in any other licensed editions. We cannot accept any responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, images or materials lost or damaged in the post. Whilst every reasonable care is taken to ensure accuracy, the publisher is not responsible for any errors or omissions nor do we accept any liability for any loss or damage, howsoever caused, resulting from the use of the magazine. COMPLAINTS: Bauer Consumer Media is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (www.ipso.co.uk) and endeavours to respond to and resolve your concerns quickly. Our Editorial Complaints Policy (including full details of how to contact us about editorial complaints and IPSO’s contact details) can be found at www. bauermediacomplaints.co.uk. Our email address for editorial complaints covered by the Editorial Complaints Policy is complaints@bauermedia.co.uk

80 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

NEXT MONTH IN

Garden makeovers


NEXT MONTH

Create yyour pperfect f outside space p e - no green fingers required! ON SALE

24th August

Grow and Eat

Easy Ideas A SUPPER CLUB UNDER THE STAR

Simple makes

PLUS THE 10 BEST BIRD FEEDERS, BUILT IN SEATING & MUCH MORE! AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 81


W g, g, p y g SIMPLY ENJOYING We love to see what you’re up to in your gardens

We love this ..

Inspired by nature I love wild lowers and wildlife and I like free-lowing cottage garden mixes colours and textures as they would be in a natural setting. Lisa Lee, Blackpool

Tropicana IN THE ZONE We use our garden to entertain family and friends, and this is our new seating area completed this year. On cooler nights we light the fire pit and lanterns and toast marshmallows. It’s a nice cosy place that everyone gravitates to. Helen Evans, Dereham, Norfolk

YOUR PRIZE! @ Helen receives this Plum and Ashby Gardener’s Hand Scrub made with ground walnut shells and rosemary oil to help lift dirt and keep your hands moisturised after a bit of digging. Share a fun feature in your garden and next month you could win a set of charcoal National Trust Pots worth £100.

82 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

I love the jungle look, so there are plenty of hostas, huecheras, a fatsia japonica, tree fern and two massive New Zealand lax plants. Andrea Cook, Facebook


YOUR GARDENS

Watch the birdie! I know you usually feature pets in pots, but I wanted to show you our tortoiseshell cat Fizz checking out the bird life in our garden! Lynn Gidden, via Facebook We love Clare Fiddler’s upcycled bird cage -with sedums inside!

Looking great Since you featured my garden in the May issue of Modern Gardens, I’ve been adding more plants and features, so here’s a mini update for you. So glad summer’s finally here!. Kelly Millis, via email

“So it took a while but we finally finished our take on the lovely upcycled painted chest of drawer planters from your April issue. Just in time for the sunshine!” Kayleigh Coxhead, by email

Upcycle idea “A metal bin transformed with garage door paint!” Alison Eden, via Facebook

GET IN TOUCH Ways to share your modern gardens ideas and projects with us...

Facebook Modern Gardens Magazine Twitter @Modern_Gardens Instagram @ModernGardens

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 83


lovee LAID BA

R MER

5 4 . 4 £1

LOG SLICE SIGN

WHAT YOU NEED

@ @ @ hobbycraft.co.uk)

WORDS: FIONA CUMBERPATCH PH OTOS: LIV ING 4 MEDIA, FLORA PRESS, GAP

@Electric drill @String WHAT TO DO 1 Drill two holes at the top of the log so you can thread string through for hanging. Trace a circle slightly smaller than the size of the log on to the wood. Use a saucer or small plate to help you. 2 Carefully cover the inside of the circle with blackboard paint, taking care to create a neat border. Allow the paint to dry. 3 Add a message using the chalk marker. Practice your lettering beforehand and use a pencil outline to ensure a neat script. Other phrases we like include: Bloom Where You’re Planted. Never Enough Thyme, Weed it and Reap and You Grow Girls!

1

84 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

a piece n o n u r e ic ct ra p a e v TIP Ha your sign er tt le u o y re o ef b er p a of p

2

2


SUPERFAST MAKE FOR JUST £1!

£12.69

FLORAL TABLE DECORATION A simple yet striking way to emb a summer table. Wash and dry a old jam jar. Cut the head from one stem of Sweet William and place inside the jar. Take a thin piece of thread or twine, and tie round the rim. Cut some Lady’s Mantle and slide the stem underneath the thread, so you wrap it round the jar in a circular shape. Make several to group to for an even more attractive display.

PEBBLE POT PLANTERS

Embellished with natural stone, these pots make the perfect pairing for succulents WHAT YOU NEED @ Two terracotta plant pots (89p each, www.homebase.co.uk) @ Tub of ready mix tile adhesive and grouting (Unibond, £4.91 www.diy.com) @ Selection of pebbles @ Two succulents (such as crassula (rear) or echeveria (front), £3 each, www.simplysucculents.co.uk) @ An old knife

COLOURFUL CANE TOPS

These handy toppers add a splash of boho brights WHAT YOU NEED @ 3 bamboo canes (4.99 for 10 www.wickes. co.uk) @3 polystyrene balls (£2.50 each, www. hobbycraft.co.uk) @Coloured string, twine or wool (ofcuts are fine).

£12.49 WHAT TO DO p ystyrene ball. Slide the end of a 1 cane into each ball. 2 Select a length of twine or wool. Hold one end of the twine firmly with your finger, and wrap the length around the ball. 3 Repeat until you have covered all the white patches of polystyrene, and then extend along the cane. 4 Secure tightly with a knot. These toppers not only look good, they will protect your eyes from the sharp cane ends too.

WHAT TO DO 1 Open the pot of grouting/adhesive and give it a stir. Using an old knife, smooth it over the surface of each pot. 2 Press the pebbles into the grouting until the surface is evenly covered. You may need to wipe off the excess at the end of this process using a damp cloth. 3 Allow to dry overnight. 4 Plant each pot with a succulent, using a mixture of potting compost and grit.

its of b e s u n a c TIP You for a a n i h c n e pretty brok efect mosaic AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 85


Not all seaweed extracts are the same, or as effective.

Call us

Learn more

01296 481220

osmouk.com

, fruit, For vegetables wns flowers and la

NO MORE SLIP UPS!

AL ANIM E FRE

Produced through a unique, chemical free process, SM3 contains high le evels of ‘bioactive’ components to stimulate healthy, balan nced growth. A low application rate makes it economic to use so a little goes a long way. Beneficial for all crops. Try it and see for yourself why farmers worldwide put their trust iin Chase Ch SM3 S 3 Seaweed S d Extract. Approved for organic Produced in the UK.

ANTI-SLIP DECKING OIL: Highest quality top coat for wood decking

Available from The Organic Gardening Catalogue 01932 878570 www.organiccatalogue.com

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SIMPLE MAKES

B

attery-operated fairy lights are extremely versatile and make dark areas of the garden look magical. This simple sparkling obelisk requires minimal materials. Why not make a couple in different sizes and cluster them together as a display? It’s an imaginative alternative to single stake lights and will cast a flattering glow on your night time entertaining. WHAT YOU NEED @Bamboo garden canes @Battery-operated fairy lights @Garden twine @Batteries @Clear cable ties (optional)

it’s done!

NIGHT GLOW SPARKLE TO THE OUTDOORS

OUR BUDGET 6 large garden canes at 25p each (available from garden centres) 6 medium length canes at 20p each (cut in half) Connectable fairy lights (one set) £19.99 www.lights4fun. co.uk TOTAL £22.69

AUGUST 2016

WORDS & PHOTO: EMMA HOWCUTT

60 minutes and

WHAT TO DO 1 Arrange six canes evenly to form the obelisk frame work. This should look like a mini tipi. Secure them at the top with plenty of twine to ensure they don’t slip out. 2 Take some smaller canes or cut some longer ones down. You’ll need 12 in total – six smaller to sit at the top and six larger ones to sit towards the bottom of the structure. Position these horizontally between the canes and tie firmly using the twine. It doesn’t matter if they overlap just make sure that they stand firm without needing any support. 3 Start at the top and slowly wind the fairy lights around the outside of the structure. You can secure with clear cable ties if necessary but unless slippy this shouldn’t be essential. 4 When you get to the bottom, secure that battery box at the back to conceal from view.

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 87


EN S CE G

TAKE THE INSIDE OUT!

S ADD A SPLASH OF COLOUR

1

B Dramatic deep p fragrant flowers a butterflies making bush’ a worthy add the back of any flow autumn the grey gr turn a buttery ye low and Spread 3m (9ft www.thompson morga

HYDRANGEA ‘ANNABELLE’ £14 99 One of the lovel est hydrangeas ‘Annabe le’s ‘mophead’ flowers are as big as footballs with hundreds of dainty creamy wh te blooms making up each one It’s best grown n partial shade but wi l also thrive in full sun as long as it has moist so l and shelter from drying winds Height and Spread 1 5m (5ft) www crocus co uk

10 buys...

WATERING

uses for laid back livin e privacy er of fairy lights garden in one day ave & 5 to avoid!

attery o extreme of the g sparkl n mater als Why n sizes and cluster Its an maginat v lights and wi l ca night time enter

UMN JOY lent commo ces pretty p h gradually tumn It’s h nd less str ns Height and 18in) wwwburncooseco.uk

BIG and beautiful

WHAT TO DO 1 Arrange six ca frame work Thi Secu e them at

Three shrubs for colo

60 £17.99 NUS ‘GRACE rful ‘smokewood’ s hazy flowers with and red leaves whose s intensify in autumn t 5m (16ft 5in) Spread ft) www rhsplants co uk

12 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

WHAT YOU N @ Bamboo gar @ Battery ope @ Garden twin @ Batter es @ Clear cable t

£4.99 PURPLE BERBERIS Barberry’ is happy in most situations including difficult shade Its spines make it a good barrier plant Heigh and Spread 2m (6ft 6in) www jacksonsnurseries co uk Prices given are f

minutes and it’s done!

R

NIGHT GLOW SPARKLE TO THE OUTDOORS

using he tw ne just make sure h need ng any sup 3 Start at the to lights around the can secure with unless slippy th s 4 When you ge battery box at th

h DE TE EEKEND ome a major trend, r enjoyed in your ownn garden

OUR 6 la canes at 25p ga d 6 mediu at 20p e Connec (one set) £1 TOT

AUGUST 20

Download in seconds | Read oline anytime | Easy back issue storage and access

TRY BEFORE YOU BUY WITH A 30-DAY TRIAL AVAILABLE ON


SIMPLE MAKES

GLAMPING AM N FESTIVAL VIBE

WOR DS : CLA RE KELLY. PHOTOS: FLORA PRESS, GA P PH OTOS, GETTY, LIVING4M EDI A

EASY MAKE

MAKE A SHELTER

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 89


We LOVE this

PEG OUT A FL WASHING Informal swags of garden colourful decoration to han WHAT YOU NEED @Wooden pegs @Twine @Scissors @Seasonal flowers

99p TRANSFORM A CRATE

WHAT TO DO 1 String a length of twine between two trees. 2 Once you’ve chosen your flowers, snip them of with scissors leaving plenty of stem. 3 Lay out your flowers and work out what you want to go where. 4 When you’re happy, simply peg and enjoy!

MAKE A MAGIC LAMP

S REVAMP A TABLETOP If you’ve got an unloved table in the house, you can transform it into a beautiful piece of garden furniture in a matter of hours. Both Plasti-Kote and Rust-Oleum make spray paints that are easy to use on metal and suitable for outdoor use. There’s lots of colours to choose from. We used RustOleum Spa Blue Painter’s Touch multipurpose spray paint £9.49 www.amazon.co.uk 90 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6


SIMPLE MAKES

HANG UP A GAUZY TENT

SO ROMANTIC!


CREATE A COOKOUT ZONE

EAT OUT TONIGHT

£5

E A CHAIR Blossoms and Washi Tape turn a simple chair into a stylish garden statement piece. WHAT YOU NEED @ An old chair @ Selection of colourful Washi Tape (£5 for 4 x 5m (16ft 4in) rolls, www.hobbycraft.co.uk) @ Fake flowers (from £1 each, www.wilko.com) WHAT TO DO 1 If your chair is battered, simply rub it down with sandpaper if

92 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

needed to remove flaky paint or snags, and then paint it with an exterior paint in the colour of your choice (see Rust-Oleum Painter’s Touch spray paint on page 90). 2 Take some rolls of Washi Tape and wind lengths around diferent parts of the chair. Don’t forget the legs! Use as many combinations of colour and thickness as you wish. This look isn’t about holding back! 3 Snip the heads of some shop-bought plastic flowers and glue to the chair. 4 Add some pom poms or simply adorn with a favourite bag.


SIMPLE MAKES ADD SOME SHADE

SLIGHT UP THE GARDEN Frill-topped jars add a pretty touch to proceedings and they are so simple to make. Glue fabric offcuts to the rim of the jar and then wrap wire around the top before hanging on twine. You could also create a design with glass paints or stickers. Pop a battery-operated tea light inside so you don’t have to worry about watching over naked flames.

X MAKE A COLLECTION Create a feature of some old bottles. Cut out photographs from magazines, books or from pretty wrapping paper and apply them to the bottle with PVA glue to create decoupage effect. Pop in a candle or a few flowers and your display is complete Keep any burning candles attended at all times!

SSUSPEND A CHANDELIER Beach-combed treasures and forgotten trinkets are given a new lease of life with this pretty pastel chandelier. Use a glue gun to add artificial flowers to the top and embellish with ribbons and string to create a unique hanging decoration It’s the perfect way to upcycle broken jewellery. AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 93


LAY-IN-ADAY PATH GRAVEL WALKWAY

WORDS: CAROLINE DAVIS PHOTO: DANIEL KEELEY/WWW.DKDESIGNOUTDOOR.COM

MAKE A STATEMENT

P

leasing on the eye and very easy to lay and maintain, a gravel path is the simplest and most cost-effective solution to creating an interesting feature walkway in your garden. Decorative stone like this is small in size but big in impact, and an easy way to break up a space and modernise it. With the minimum of tools and effort, you can lay a path in a day, revamping your plot quickly. All you need is some gravel, weedsuppressing membrane and edging of your choice. Edging can be ‘soft’ ie plants or ‘hard’ ie bricks, wood, slate, concrete, natural stone, plastic, rubber or steel. Aftercare involves simply freshening up the path by raking it, and topping it up with more gravel when required, or even adding a contrasting shade for a more interesting look. There are lots of gravel types and sizes – choose from creamy-buff limestone chippings to dramatic blue-grey or green-hued slate, rich

94 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

red granite to warm golden weathered flint, and multi-toned marine or river gravel. Before you decide whether you want a straight or curved path, and what colour gravel to choose, look at your garden as a whole. Bear in mind that wet gravel takes on a darker shade than dry gravel, so choose a type and colour you like in both states, that will look good whatever the weather. Some aggregate outlets showcase sample boxes in-store so you can see what the stones look like, while others sell individual samples and sample boxes (such as www.stonewarehouse.co.uk) Saving money on a gravel path rather than spending on more expensive options, such as slate, stone or concrete slabs, means you’ll have more cash in hand to splash on plants and other garden features, so it’s a win-win option. For example, factor in a couple of statement trees in pots, such as olives, to mark the start of your path and a stylish bench at the end so the path has a destination.

USE CURVES


PROJECTS BEFORE

T ADD STYLE

Colour your path

Dense bamboo creates a tall green foil for this straight 10mm golden pea gravel path while evergreen phormium and yellow crocosmia brighten up the opposite border. Metal edging, along with subtle lighting for evenings, completes the sophisticated look.

Amber Pearl Decorative Stone comes in carry bags (covers 0.3m2 ) or a large delivered bag that will cover 9.6m2 at 3cm thick. £6.42 or £251 www.diy.com WARM Wickes 10mm gravel pea shingle looks equally good dry or wet. A 25kg carry bag covers 1m x 40cm at 5cm deep £3.09 www.wickes.co.uk

PHOTO: IVE HAUGELAND/WWW SHADESOFGREENLA COM

AFTER

BRIGHT Golden Corn gravel comes in 10mm or 14mm. From £77 for 200kg of 10mm, £79 for 14mm. Covers roughly 3m2. www. stonewarehouse.co.uk ROSY Cheshire Pink gravel is a 14mm mix of pink, lilac, brown and white flecks. From £87.54 for 850kg delivered. Covers roughly 3m2. www. decorativeaggregates.com

TURN OVER TO SEE HOW TO LAY A GRAVEL PATH AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 95


QUICK AND EASY

T

o be practical, a path needs to be wide enough for two people to walk side by side so, width-wise allow for at least 60cm (2ft), and 1.2m (4ft) if using soft edging as plants will spill onto the walkway. Also consider how easy it will be to walk on. Small gravel is easier to negotiate than large stones, but too small and you’ll sink into it. Size-wise, aim for no smaller than 10mm and no larger than 14mm. Depth-wise, it needs to be thick enough to prevent bald patches – about 5cm (2in) is usually just right. Gravel laid on sloping paths will gradually creep down, due to rainfall, footfall and its own weight, so you’ll need to rake it back in place when necessary. If the path abuts lawns, check the grass for stray stones before mowing to prevent blades throwing them up and catching you or causing damage to something else, such as windows. Finding out how much gravel you will need is easy. Many suppliers have calculation guides on their websites and you simply type in the path’s length, width and gravel depth for an instant

96 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

quantity, for example at www.stonewarehouse. co.uk/tools/calculator For minimum maintenance after laying, it pays to ensure you put in a good base course first by levelling the ground then laying a layer of good quality hard-wearing, weedsuppressing membrane, such as tear-resistant polypropylene GroundTex heavy duty 100g ground cover membrane (2 x 10m/6ft 6in x 33ft, £19.95 from www.groundcoversolutions.co.uk). This stops weeds growing through by blocking out light, while allowing rainwater to soak away through it. Laying a double layer ensures a longer-lasting weed suppressant. Before you lay the membrane, remove any weeds, roots and stones from the area. For tough, persistent and invasive weeds, such as docks, nettles and dandelions, use weedkiller first to ensure you clear the base area completely. Make sure the membrane goes right up to the edging, then you won’t get weeds popping up along the sides. Good ground preparation now will prolong the life of your membrane.

PHOTO: LISA COX/LISACOXDESIGNS CO UK

ravel is a lowmaintenance yet attractive way to add texture to paths

SOFTEN THE EDGES

BRIGHTEN UP A SHADY AREA


How to create a 5m (16ft) long path…

1

DIG OUT YOUR PATH Mark out the length and shape of your path with wooden pegs and string, chalk spray paint, or hosepipe. Then dig out the path to a depth of about 6cm (2½in).

2

TUMBLE PLANTS

PHOTO: WWW.STONEWAREHOUSE.CO.UK

LAY WEED MEMBRANE Roll out the weed control fabric and trim to fit the path with sharp, heavy-duty scissors. If you need to overlap the fabric, do so by at least 10cm (4in).

3 PUT DOWN THE GRAVEL Pour gravel to fill the path. If using two types or colours, put one of each in a pile next to each other, so it’s easy to mix when raked out.

RAKE THE SURFACE LEVEL Rake the gravel level. You may need to add more after a few weeks when the path has settled and the surface has dropped a little.

avel is easier to gr d ze si er ll a m S IP T bles, but go eb p er rg la n a th on walk et will sink in too small and your fe

WHAT IT COST 16 x 25kg bags gravel pea shingle £34.44 www.wickes .co.uk 1 roll GroundTex membrane, from £19.95 www.groundcoversolutions.co.uk TOTAL £54.39 Time taken: 8 hours

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 97

PHOTO: BIRGIT BRUNAR/JOHN STEUERNAGEL/WWW.SCULPTGARDENS.COM

4


TAKE THE INSIDE OUT! ADD EXTRA CUSHIONS Put seat pads on wooden chairs so guests will want to linger outside for lo

SCENTED POTS Place tubs of lavender or rosemary near the table for subtle wafts of aromatic sce

Brunch OUTSIDE The ULTIMATE WEEKEND TREAT has become a major trend, aand nd it’s even better enjoyed in your ownn back garden


BEST BUYS

N

For colour and taste, add strawberries to the table, or add some growing pots for guests to pick themselves.

TMILK & SUGAR? Keep it simple with this Lotta ash base duo. £26.89 www.idealforever.co.uk

TKEEP IT SWEET Glass honey pot and dibber £17.97 www. lakeland.co.uk

TAN APPETISING START Make crisp and hot waffles with a Cuisineart waffle maker. £59.99 www.lakeland.co.uk AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 99

WORDS: FIONA CU MBERPATCH PH OTOS LIV ING 4MEDIA, S TOCKFOOD , SH UTTE RSTOCK

FRESH BERRIES

othing says relaxation like eating a lazy breakfast outside in the sun. Britons have adopted brunch in the last couple of years with a 72 per cent increase in restaurant bookings, but it’s one of the best meals to host for friends at home. There’s less work and more flexibility than cooking dinner, and you can make the occasion last as long - or as short- as you like. Make your garden centre stage at your celebration. Strawberries are still just in season, so add some growing pots for guests to pick and add to their plates. Jewel-like raspberries fresh from the cane are another seasonal treat and they can be grown in containers. Warm from the sun, their flavour is hard to beat. Add tubs of flowers for instant colour: in season now are golden yellow rudbeckia, or for a more subtle palette, profuse geraniums including a pale pink version called ‘Mavis Simpson.’ If insects are rife, you can even add plants with repellent properties. Lavender, lemon balm, lemon thyme, marigolds and eucalyptus will all help to keep biters at bay in high summer. Easy edibles come into their own at brunch time and are available at garden centres now. Home grown pots of mint can be picked and added to cocktails, or used to make refreshing tea, and living parsley or chives can be snipped over eggs for extra flavour. With a table of help-yourself pastries, bowls of summer fruits, a simple hot dish such as scrambled eggs, washed down with a fruity cocktail or some pots of piping hot coffee or tea, you’ll take your weekend to the next level.


A little of what ou fancy

SET THE SCENE @ Stock up on small plates, teaspoons and napkins.

@ On the drinks station, offer tea bags, jugs of milk and a flask of boiling water, so guests can make a brew to their own liking.

@ If the weather is warm, freeze fruit and flowers in fruit juice to make a pretty alternative to plain ice cubes.

@ Cocktails such as a Bloody Mary, Mimosa or Bellini work well with brunch as the sharp taste complements the breakfast style food. Ensure that you have a good supply of the correct ingredients and a cocktail shaker to mix them in. Don’t for et

.

16

as pancakes or waffles, fresh fruit salad, and a selection of help yourself muffins or pastries.

in the oven or microwave, which makes them a convenient choice which never fails to impress.


BEST BUYS

Easy brunch recipes Quick and delicious light bites to tempt your guests MAKE IT!

MAKE IT! @ 1 large egg @ 5 tbsp milk @ Small bunch chives,

@ 20g baby spinach @ 75g cooked ham

chopped @ 2 tsp sunflower oil @ Knob of butter

POTATO AND CHIVE PANCAKES INGREDIENTS @ 140g floury potatoes, weighed after peeling, and cut into chunks @ 50g self raising flour @ Half a tsp bicarbonate of soda

WHAT TO DO 1 Boil the potatoes until tender. Mash and leave to cool completely. 2 Place the mash in a bowl with the flour and bicarb. Whisk the egg with the milk and tip into the bowl. Add seasoning to taste and whisk until smooth. Stir in the chopped chives. 3 In a non stick pan, heat half the oil and butter until it’s sizzling. Add half the pancake batter to make three pancakes. Cook until browned, then flip and cook the other side. 4 Keep warm while you make the rest. Serve with crispy bacon if liked.

SPINACH AND HAM BAKED EGGS

WHAT TO DO 1 Turn the oven up as high as it will go. 2 Using vegetable oil, lightly grease two ramekins or small baking dishes. 3 Chop the spinach and ham finely and place in the oven proof dishes. 4 Crack two eggs on top of each one, season to taste. 5 Bake for 8 – 10 minutes, and serve straight away.

TIP For a spicy kick,

INGREDIENTS @ Vegetable oil @ 4 large eggs @ Salt and pepper

add some chilli

MAKE IT! @ Zest and juice of a lime @ 6 apricots, halved and

MAKE IT!

stoned @ 3 peaches, sliced into wedges and stoned @ 3 nectarines, quartered

INGREDIENTS @ 8 strawberries, hulled @ 110ml skimmed milk @ 120g plain yoghurt @ 3 tbsp demarara sugar @ 1 -2 tsp vanilla extract

and stoned

@ 6 ice cubes, crushed

STRAWBERRY SMOOTHIE

WHAT TO DO 1 Skin and cut the pineapple into a blender, combine the strawberries, yogurt, sugar and vanilla essence. Add the ice. 2 Blend until smooth and creamy. 3 Serve in tall glasses.

ROAST SUMMER FRUITS INGREDIENTS @ 175g golden caster sugar @ 1 vanilla pod

WHAT TO DO 1 Heat the oven to 220C, fan 200C, gas 8. Put the sugar, halved vanilla pod, lime zest and juice into a blender and give it a quick blitz. 2 Put the fruit into a baking dish and add the sugar mixture, coating the pieces. 3 Roast for about 20 minutes. Serve warm or cold with natural yoghurt or some crème fraiche.

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 101


EW

N

On sale

now WHAT’S THE ALTERNATIVE?

NON-DAIRY

MILKS EATING & DRINKING

IN SEASON

AVOCADO GREEK TAKEAWAY

AT HOME fresh from the oven Chocolate and Orange Puffs / Mascarpone Matchsticks / Chouquettes (sugar puffs)


EAT & DRINK HERBS

Grow your own

LEMON DROPS With the NOSTALGIC TASTE of old-fashioned sweets, these

Grow this...

EASY CARE!

...make this COOL CUBES WITH A LEMON ZING YOU WILL NEED @ Approx 50 lemon verbena leaves @ 200g white granulated sugar @ 3 teaspoons still lemonade (made from natural lemon juice) @ A food processor and a mini silicone ice cube or chocolate mould

WORDS: SUE SIMKINS. PHOTOS: ALAMY, SU E SIMKINS

WHAT TO DO 1 Whizz the leaves and sugar together in the food processor until uniformly green in colour with tiny green flecks. 2 Add the lemonade and blend until the sugar is the consistency of damp sand. 3 Using a teaspoon, press the mixture into the mould, firming each one down well. 4 Cover and freeze overnight. 5 Remove from the freezer, gently unmould and use immediately or store in an airtight box for a week or two. Alternatively, freeze for up to three use from frozen. makes 50-60 mini sugar lumps.

L

emon verbena prefers a sunny sheltered spot. Keep it handy for picking and to brus when you’ll release its vibrant citrus fragrance. Buy a young plant, which will thrive in bit of shade and likes light, free-draining compost. Water twice a week in summer ( let the roots get waterlogged) and give it some plant food once a month. Trim it re keep the plant compact. It’s fast growing and will reach almost 2m (6ft), not ideal for every Pick leaves at any time to use fresh or dried. They are at their most fragrant just before t pale pink or white flowers appear at the ends of the stems in late summer. Bring the plant u cover once frosts threaten, although the leaves tend to drop in winter, even if you keep it in Revive it in spring by pruning drooping and straggly growth, and misting with tepid water. Use the fresh or dried leaves to make lemon verbena tea or to flavour sugar, oil and vinegar. Try chopping and blending fresh leaves into butter or add a small handful of chopped leaves to a sponge cake mix. Use fresh in drinks and fruit salads. The frozen cubes are delicious in iced tea and cocktails.

These sweet citrus cubes make a mouth-watering decoration for cupcakes. AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 103


OUTDOOR

ROOM STYLISH FIREPLACE

I

perfect sense, given our unpredictable climate, because an outdoor fireplace can prolong the time you use your garden as an outdoor room. Award-winning garden designer Charlotte Rowe says, “People living in cities and towns generally want to use their garden as an outdoor room – an extra space with areas for entertaining, dining or playing all year round. A fireplace makes a garden usable in spring, autumn and winter, as well as summer, giving warmth and light, and providing a wonderful focal point.”

WORDS MELANIE WHITEHOU WORDS: WH ITEHOUSE SE. PHOTOS: PHOTOS MARIANNE MA JERUS GARDEN G ARDEN IMAGES

around a burning fire this autumn, snug and warm as the days get shorter: and nights get cooler. The flames are flickering, the embers are glowing, and the wine and the chat flows into the small hours. Everyone loves a chimenea, and a patio heater spreads a circle of warmth, but now you can go that bit further and replicate your indoor fireplace outdoors, with all the comfort and romance that goes with it. The whole concept of outdoor fireplaces is fairly new in the UK, coming across from the United

² 104 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6


PROJECTS

MAKE GOOD USE OF SPACE

CHARLOTTE ROWE


DECORATING AN OUTDOOR FIREPLACE

SEAN COCHRANE

mely o h t n ta s in n a d IDEA Ad wer va s es o l h s li ty s h it w touch ay

MAKE TO MEASURE

106 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

Tony Young, creative director of Urban Fires, says, “Few things are more fundamental or enjoyable than sitting around an open fire with family and friends. This is just as important in the UK as it is in warmer climes, perhaps more so. Home owners who want an outside entertainment area which will extend their usable home space already know that fire can bring a fantastic ambience to their garden.” He describes outdoor fireplaces as ‘vehicles for bringing people together’ and, says that what was once the preserve of the wealthy is now available to us all. “Investing in an outside fireplace allows you to make full use of a deck or patio area, as you won’t need to retreat indoors when the sun goes down or the evening turns a little chilly,’ he adds. ‘Most modern outside fireplaces are also intended as source of heat, although you’ll find some which are made almost solely for their decorative function. Choose wisely.”


PH OTOS: PAUL CRAIG WWW.PCRAIG.CO.UK

PROJECTS

WHAT’S ON OFFER? Many garden projects now focus on a modern or minimalist look, and the majority of outdoor fireplace installations available in the UK today reflect that trend. @ Whatever your style, you can build your dream outdoor fireplace to your own specification using Urban Fires’ Signature outside burners. They’re weatherproof and come in a range of designs that include double-sided burners, log stores and realistic ‘charred’ ceramic logs, £275. Just send in a drawing or visual of what you would like your fireplace to look like and Urban Fires’ design team will come up with the rest. From £1,599 from www.urbanfires.co.uk @ Urban Fires’ Escea EF500’s innovative design means no flue is needed, which can be very important in a small garden. You can even tailor-make your fireplace with your choice of AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 107


PHOTOS: GAP, GETTY

ature fe e r i r u o y g in d TIP Buil re helps tu c u tr s g n ti is x e into an it blend in stone, marble or granite inserts for the fascia. Burning gas, it doesn’t need a chimney and can be installed straight into any timber, brick or concrete wall or cavity. Prices start from £2,916, www.urbanfires.co.uk @Alfresco Fires designs to your exact specifications, and says its wood-burning fireplaces are virtually smoke-free and more eco-friendly than gas patio heaters. Storage for logs can be built in. From £3,000, www.alfrescofires.co.uk @Imagin Fires’ Marlow, in black or white, features a twin fuel box in a contemporary, elliptical design that can be wall-mounted. With no smoke and a litre of fuel burning for approximately 3.5 hours, it costs £599.99. Protect with a waterproof cover when not in use. www.imaginfires.co.uk @Primrose’s La Hacienda Ovalis Steel bioethanol fireplace is sleek, white and elegantly finished. Made of steel, it has glass panels to keep the flame from being blown about in the wind and is smokeless and odourless. It’s just £199.99 and can also be used indoors. www.primrose.co.uk @Even if you’ve only got a balcony, you can still have a small outdoor fire with Bio Fires’ Glass Cube II White bio-ethanol burner. It won’t throw out much heat but does offer the romance of a flickering flame for £65. www.biofires.com 108 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

WHERE TO SITE IT While there are serious practical considerations about where to site an outdoor fireplace, surprisingly, there is usually no need for planning permission. “If part of a larger landscapin project, the fireplace shou be indicated on the drawi for Building Control [at y local council] to approve,” Tony Young. In terms of safety, any appliance chosen should for use in Europe (CE sta Européene – European Conformity). A registered gas installer is not permitted to install a gas fireplace that is not CE-marked. Charlotte Rowe points out that outdoor fireplaces are a lot simpler to install and maintain than many water features. “Fire pits are also very popular but they are open to the elements and not as safe,” she adds. “For both fireplaces and fire pits, you will need to consider your neighbours and smoke.”

HOW TO DESIGN IT Choose a design that fits in with the scale of your house and garden, and also suits the

PL wall fi nd work smallest sp materials from which they’re constructed. It doesn’t need to match. For example, a stainless steel fireplace would perfectly complement a modern garden with a slate patio. Charlotte Rowe recently built an outdoor fireplace in a client’s garden, setting it against the 4m (13ft) high end wall. There are raised planting beds, seats and benches on either side and cream-coloured limestone is used for both paving and the fireplace, creating a seamless, streamlined feel that gives the illusion of space in this small, urban garden.


PROJECTS

4 smoke-free options Choose a style that suits your space

Bespoke fireplace that throws out heat www alfrescofires co uk

Marlow White bio-ethanol fireplace www.imaginfires.co.uk

Glass Cube II bio-ethanol burner in white www.biofires.com She says, “There’s an increasing trend for the garden to complement and reflect the rest of the property, inside and out, so we try to mirror some of the elements of the interior design and exterior architecture in our designs. “This includes materials as well as render and plastering styles. In keeping with our contemporary style, our fireplaces are built with clean lines and in lime-washed and polished concrete block, which is offset by abundant lush planting.” If you’re going to burn wood, bring in the experts. A properly designed and installed outdoor woodburner will draw properly and not smoke out revellers when it’s windy, but you will

need to build a chimney with a minimum height of 3m (9ft 10in). Any established fireplace company should be able to sort this out for you but, if you’re in any doubt, check your plans with your local council’s Building Control department. Once the fireplace is in hand, consider seating. The patio area next to the fireplace should be big enough to house comfy outdoor armchairs and/ or a sofa, plus a path to access this area. American website, The Concrete Network, recommends a patio area of a minimum 3.6m x3.6m (12ft x 12ft) and a maximum of 5.5m x 5.5m (18ft x 18ft). Softening the edges with greenery and pretty planting will help blend it into the garden.

La Hacienda Ovalis steel bio-ethanol fireplace www.primrose.co.uk

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 10 9


PROJECTS USE LIGHT

Remember to factor-in lighting. Fairy lights, solar lights, tealights in jam jars and lanterns, or proper electric lights installed by a qualified electrician can all play a part. You don’t want to be tripping over in the dark, and uplighting trees and shrubs will add to the romance of the night.

WHAT FUEL TO CHOOSE

110 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

“It is more expensive to use than gas, but is equally clean, and some would say, more green, as it is sourced from vegetable matter,” says Tony Young. Bio-ethanol fuel costs £5.99 per litre from www.imaginfires.co.uk “One thing to bear in mind when deciding on your fuel is that gas and bio-ethanol offer consistent heat throughout the evening,” says Tony. “Heat from burning wood varies as the logs burn out. In my experience, the deciding factor is often that a woodburning fireplace always needs a chimney, whereas gas or bioethanol fireplaces do not.” He adds that there are no legal restrictions about burning whatever you want in your back garden, only indoors. This is probably because it never occurred to the planners when smokeless zones were introduced in towns and cities that people would build outdoor fireplaces in the future. The main thing to bear in mind is whether smoke from your fireplace is likely to upset the neighbours and, if that is the case, keep the peace by opting for a gas or bioethanol fire.

Accessories @ Buy pebbles in black or white, £27.99, and ceramic firelogs and pinecones, £39.99, to smarten up your bio-ethanol fuel fire, from www.imaginfires.co.uk @ Hand sculpt Fibre Glow fine metal mesh to create a light net which you place over the flame of a bio-ethanol fire to give the impression of flickering embers. It costs £15 from www.biofires.com @ Garden Trading has an extensive selection of fireside products, ranging from large firescreens, £220, to cast-iron tool sets, from £80. Kindling and ash buckets start at £18. Keep your matches dry and usable in their useful Matches Box, £5, www.gardentrading.co.uk

PH OTOS: GAP PHOTOS

If it’s heat you want, nothing makes the grade or beats the romance of real logs crackling away on a woodburning fire, and if you burn seasoned, kiln-dried wood (which contains less moisture), it can be very efficient and should not smoke. Aaron Gaul of Alfresco Fires says, “With a masonry fireplace you’re getting a radiant heat from the firebricks themselves. They store the heat, so burning wood will produce more heat for your fuel consumption.” However, you will need a place to store logs, and have to be willing to clear out the grate and dispose of the ash (pure wood ash can be added to your compost bin). Bio-ethanol and gas fires are easier and less time consuming. “Gas is by far the most popular fuel for an outdoor fireplace,” reckons Tony Young. “It is clean and convenient. It can be supplied from the house (mains gas) or from cylinders (LPG).” Gas-fired fireplaces might feature faux logs or coal ‘burning’ with a gas flame. LPG (propane or butane) can be bought from Flogas. A 7kg butane gas cylinder costs £19.43. www.flogas.co.uk Bio-ethanol is a liquid fuel which doesn’t need a piped supply, you just fill the reservoir. However, it doesn’t always give out much heat.


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Welcome to Modern Gardens magazine. Our aim is to help you create a perfect outdoor space, without it costing the earth or requring green fingers! This summer, we’re helping you to enjoy chilling outside. Find out how to hold a relaxed summer brunch party, create a cool and classic style garden and to install an outdoor fireplace for the ultimate cosy evenings. Each issue is packed with reader gardens, makes and shopping. If you’d like to make the most of your space, subscribe today!

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AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 113


MINI WATER FEATURE

er TABLETOP FOUNTAIN

W

space theres room for a self contained, compact water feature so you can enjoy the relaxing, sensory benefits gently cascading water brings. There are sizes and styles to suit all tastes, and prices to please all pockets, from under £40, with a wide choice of battery, solar and mains power versions. The beauty of them is that everything is built into one unit. You simply pop it into position, fill with water, connect to its power source and enjoy!

running continuously. Lithium batteries provide up to 14 hours of continuous running or, if a feature has a timer function, up to a week on pre-planned settings of two, three or four hours a day. “All mains-powered water features suitable for outdoor use should be supplied with 10m of outdoor cable, but will not have a plug on the end,” says Jon Hart. This is because the cable needs to be wired into a suitable connection box which is protected by a modern circuit breaker. This needs a qualified electrician.” An outdoor feature can be used indoors too, but not vice versa. Some models come with a low-voltage transformer to reduce running costs.

“The biggest factors when buying a water feature are its appearance and compatibility with your space. But also consider how easy it is to install, what noise it makes and how to look after it,” says Jon Hart, customer services director at Water Gardening Direct Ltd. “Solar and battery-powered features are simple to install because you don’t need a mains cable. I call them ‘plug and play’ options. They are supplied with everything you need to get started, just add water. “The disadvantage is that they do not have continuous power – solar will only operate when the sunlight is strong enough, while batteries will need changing at some point.” Some solar-powered features can be converted to main power via a mains adapter plug, such as the Smart Solar 6V AC/DC (£6.98, www.watergardeningdirect.com), while some of the lithium battery-operated features can be upgraded to use with a solar panel for power while a battery is on charge. Chloe Penfold, from Liberty Mains Free Features, says, “A battery feature won’t run when the battery is on charge, but you can buy a solar panel upgrade for some models, which will run and recharge the feature, or opt for a spare lithium battery and alternate the two 1 14 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

PHOTO: WWW.SGPUK.COM

WORDS: CAROLINE DAVIS

WHICH TYPE?

POWERED BY THE SUN

ghts. Decide if this is something youd like. To check noise, head to your nearest stockist and listen to various models in action to get an idea of what to expect.

WHAT SIZE? This hinges on where you want to put your feature, and whether it’s for indoor or outdoor use. Products range from tiny features measuring about 20cm square (8in) that weigh less than 2kg (4.4lb), which are suitable for table tops and windowsills, to larger ones up to 1m (39in) high and weighing about 100kg (220lb) or more, which can be elevated on a table or pedestal, or positioned neatly in a corner. Bear in mind that they will be heavier when filled with water.


BEST BUYS

We LOVE this!

TAKE YOUR PICK

This mains-powered Aztec-style sandstone effect waterfall is lit by a low voltage light. £149.99 www.ukwaterfeatures.com

NATURALLY FAB

WHICH MATERIAL? Take your pick: slate, granite, stone, concrete, copper, steel, glass, resin, acrylic, fibreglass, plastic and ceramic. Natural materials, such as stone, slate and copper, will stand the test of time and age beautifully. Resin is usually much cheaper, lighter and often replicates natural counterparts well. However, over time, and depending on the quality and where they are sited, resin and plastic can fade and become brittle, especially in direct sunlight and hot conservatories. Whatever the material, features need regular water top-ups. “Water loss can be a result of evaporation, but it can also be caused by the wind catching and dispersing any cascading water in outdoor features,” explains Jon Hart. “If the feature runs out of water the pump will run dry and probably burn out. Check it every few days and top up if necessary.”

WHAT MAINTENANCE? After a while, water features, especially those in sunlight, suffer from algae growth which causes green water. To prevent this, use a treatment such as Fountain Fresh (£13.98 for 500ml, www. watergardening-direct.com). Add 25ml every fortnight between May and September, and every four weeks after that to keep water clear. “If limescale becomes an issue, soak it with white (clear) vinegar to enable simple removal without the need for scrubbing, which could damage the feature,” says Jon Hart. A common threat to outside features is when water freezes and expands, which can crack

them. Jon says, “Most are frost safe, so won’t be damaged in cold weather, but are not ice proof. When icy weather looms, drain, clean and store your water feature somewhere dry. If you leave it in place, drain, clean and cover it to prevent it from filling up with water.” Protective covers are available in all sizes from suppliers, for example, a small fountain winter protection cover costs £12.99 from www.ukwaterfeatures.com.

This stone-effect resin Rock Pool is Lithium battery powered – £139.99 upgrade to solar for an extra £34.99 www.libertyfeatures.co.uk

HOW TO STAY SAFE Keeping water clean is important, especially if there are children around. “Once the chlorine has evaporated, water starts to build up bacteria,” says Jon Hart. “This isn’t a threat to most people, or to wildlife, but youngsters can suffer upset tummies if they ingest dirty water. Depending on the size of the feature, use a few dops or a capful of Milton Sterilising Fluid (£2 for 500ml, www. tesco.com) to sterilise the water.” Used responsibly, mains-powered mini water features are safe, but it’s vitally important not to let children or pets interfere with them, since chewed wires or fingers poked into sockets may result in electrocution. Solar features are safe. Always follow the safety instructions provided with lithium batteries when using and recharging them. If you buy online directly from sources outside the UK you should be aware that the wiring and voltage may not be compatible, so the product cannot be considered safe to use until checked, and adapted if necessary, by a UK-qualified electrician.

Made from cast limestone, this striking Eclipse stone orb is mains powered and comes in various contemporary colours. £119 www.gardensite.co.uk

Enjoy this mains-powered Nautilus Pebble Bowl Fountain inside or out. £323 wwwgardensite.co.uk

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 115


FUSS FREE

PLUMS RIPE FOR PICKING

W

blossom in the spring, and plump, juicy fruits to pick and eat in the autumn, a plum tree is an asset to any garden. They grow easily and produce lots of fruit over a relatively long period. Don’t discount having one if your garden is small as you can buy patio plum trees which grow happily in a large pot and can be trained against a wall. Plum trees are less susceptible to diseases and pests than other fruit trees, which makes them an ideal choice if you’ve never grown your own before. Autumn is the best time to plant. The tree will have the chance to establish before a major growth spurt in the spring. There are many different varieties and colours to choose from. Cherry plums are small and round, with a delicious tang. ‘Ouillins Golden Gage’ are a golden yellow with flushed red streaks. ‘Old Green Gage’ are tart and full of flavour, while ‘Czar’ purple plums are perfect for

comes without any soil around its roots, which is known as bare root stock. This is the cheapest way to buy a plum tree and they are available from late autumn to late spring. The sooner you can plant your tree after you purchase it, the better for the health of the tree and the sooner it will start to bear fruit. Usually, it takes up to four years for a plum tree to start producing blossom and fruit. Once it has started, and provided you’ve put the tree in a sunny spot, it will provide you with a harvest for many years to come. Fruit is generally ready from August, and you could be picking it until as late as October. Plums develop the best flavour when they’re left to ripen on the tree. They’re ready when they feel soft when gently squeezed, and they will smell sweet and have a soft bloom on the skin. Pick them carefully so they don’t bruise and then either eat fresh, de-stone them and freeze, or create some of the delicious cakes, drinks and desserts shown over the page.

3 easy care patio plum trees

VICTORIA Price: £22.95 Height: 1m – 1.50cm Harvest: August/September Sweet and juicy, this is the UK’s most popular plum. www.marshalls-seeds.co.uk

BLACK AMBER Price: £14.95 Height: 1m Harvest: August/September This mini fruit tree produces a heavy crop of delicious rounded fruits. www.thompson-morgan.com

116 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

SHROPSHIRE PRUNE DAMSON Price: £22.95 Height: Up to 3m Harvest: September/October Especially tasty when cooked. www.marshalls-seeds.co.uk


GROW AND EAT

PLANT IT!

warm, a s m lu p e iv G TIP ep the soil e k d n a t o p s y n n su -logged r te a w t o n t u b t, mois

Choose the sunniest spot you can find for your plum tree, against a south facing wall if that’s possible. @ Fill the container with compost and make a hole that is big enough to fit the entire root system of your minitree without any roots being broken or bent. It needs to be planted to the same depth that it was growing in its plastic pot. @ Sprinkle in a couple of handfuls of granular fertiliser to give the planting hole a really good boost of nutrients. Place the tree into the planting hole, making sure it is straight. Fill in with compost. @ Firm the soil down well around the base of the tree with your hands. Give it a good watering straight after planting, using a couple of cans. @ Surround the tree with mulch. This will help to keep the roots moist. If temperatures plunge in winter, pop some outdoor fleece over the pot at night (available from Poundland) until the hard frosts have passed. @ Over the coming months, make sure that the compost does not dry out. Blossom will appear in mid-late April. When the blossom falls, and the tiny fruits start to form in late spring, give the soil a liquid feed every two weeks. This will help the plums to grow bigger and juicier.

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 117

WO RDS: FIONA CU MBERPATCH P HOTOS GAP, STOCKFOOD

HOW TO GROW


MAKE IT!

PLUM PAVLOVA INGREDIENTS For the pavlova @ 4 egg whites @ 250g caster sugar @ 1 teaspoon cornflour @ 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar @ 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract For the filling @ 300ml double cream @ 6 plums, stoned and cut into wedges

@ Handful of pistachio nuts

WHAT TO DO 1 Preheat oven to 150ยบc, gas mark 2. 2 Grease a baking tray and line with baking parchment. 3 In a spotlessly clean bowl, whisk the egg whites with an electric beater until soft peaks form. Add the sugar, spoonful by spoonful, until the egg whites look glossy. Add the cornflour, vanilla extract and vinegar. Spoon the mixture into a piping bag with nozzle. 4 Pipe into a rectangular shape. 5 Bake in the oven for one hour. Switch off the heat and allow to cool completely inside the oven. Remove and put on a flat plate. 6 To make the filling, whip the cream, arrange the plum slices on top and sprinkle with pistachios and a little extra demerara sugar, if liked.

asting the pistachio nuts in our a flav oven first for extr to TIP Tr y lightly


GROW AND EAT MAKE IT!

PLUM, BERRY AND HONEY SMOOTHIE

l berries a n o s a e s y n a ir a TIP P rries e b k c la b : s m lu p with the rk well o w s ie r r e b e lu b a nd

INGREDIENTS @ 4 plums @ 2 tbsp honey @ Handful of blackberries or raspberries

@ 250g natural yoghurt @ 120ml milk WHAT TO DO 1 Chop the plums into small pieces. Wash the berries, removing any stalks. 2 Place both fruits in a blender with the milk, yoghurt and honey. Adjust the quantity according to the natural sweetness of the type of plums you’re using. 3 Whizz until smooth and creamy. 4 Try varying the type of milk you use: almond, oat or soya milk are all suitable. Or for an indulgent treat, add a generous scoop of vanilla ice cream at the same time as the yoghurt and milk.

ferent if d e e r th r o o tw TIP Use for a m lu p f o s e ti ie r va colourful result

MAKE IT!

ROASTED PLUM CAKE INGREDIENTS @ 8 plums, any variety @ Small knob of butter @ 1 tbsp light muscovado sugar @ 150g butter, softened @ 150g golden caster sugar @ 75g plain flour @ 1 1/2 tsp baking powder @ 100g ground almonds

@ 3 large eggs WHAT TO DO 1 Preheat the oven to 180ºc, gas mark 4. Halve the plums, remove stones. Place on a baking tray, add butter and sprinkle with muscovado sugar. Roast until soft. Cool, retain the juice, then dice five plums. 2 Mix the butter, caster sugar, baking powder, flour, and ground almonds. Beat the eggs and add gradually to the mixture. Fold the plums and their juice into the mixture. 3 Place on a 20cm round tin. Top the cake with the remaining plums. Bake for 20 minutes.

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 119


MAKE IT!

HOME MADE PLUM JAM INGREDIENTS @ 1.5kg plums @ 1.5kg granulated sugar @ Knob of butter WHAT TO DO 1 Remove stalks and bruised parts of plums, halve them and remove the stones. Break open a couple of stones to get the edible kernels. Set these aside. 2 Put the fruit in a heavy bottomed pan with 450ml water. Cook with the lid on until the skins are soft (about 25 mins). 3 Remove lid, increase heat and cook for another 20 mins. Stir occasionally to stop the fruit sticking and burning. 4 Add sugar and plum kernels. Heat gently until the sugar has dissolved. Add the butter, turn up the heat, then bring to the boil for 15-20 mins. 5 To see if it has reached setting point, put a teaspoonful of jam on a cold saucer. If the surface wrinkles when you push it, cool for 10 mins, then put into clean jars.

MAKE IT!

ream in utes in m 0 2 r fo e g id the fr soften before serving to

c TIP Put the ice

PLUM ICE CREAM INGREDIENTS @ 225g plums @ 175g caster sugar @ Lemon juice, to taste @ 4 large eggs, separated @ 300ml double cream @ Lemon juice to taste WHAT TO DO 1 Put the water and 50g of the caster sugar into a pan. Add the plums and reduce heat to a gentle simmer. Cover and cook until the fruit feels tender. 2 Put a plastic sieve over a bowl. Push the fruit through it, discarding any skin or stones. Add lemon juice to taste, and a little more sugar. Cover and chill. 3 Put the egg whites into a bowl and whisk until soft and cloudy. Whisk in the sugar, a teaspoon at a time. Beat the egg yolks and fold them in. 4 Whisk the cream until thick, then fold into the egg mixture, followed by the plum puree. Pour into a shallow plastic freezer container. Freeze for 12 hours.

1 20 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6


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ASK THE EXPERT

can I protect my plants against QHow slug and snail damage in my garden?

A

Mulching is good gardening practice because the organic matter enriches the soil and improves structure and drainage over time. Mulching also stops weeds germinating and keeps moisture in the soil. Your expensive plants are given the best conditions to thrive. Dual Action Strulch does all this and acts as a deterrent to slugs and snails- the most annoying pests in the garden! The physical properties of Strulch together with the embedded minerals are unpleasant to them but harmless to other wildlife. Strulch has a neutral pH so can be used anywhere in the garden. Buy in bulk or in smaller quantities through our stockists. As used by the RHS and the Eden Project. www.strulch.co.uk 01943 863610

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ENJOY A RIOT OF SPRING

COLOUR

Brighten up your outside space this winter with our selection of vibrant BEDDING PLANTS that hat will bring b dull days alive with flowers FREE pansies worth £8.99

POTS PICTURED ARE NOT P ROVIDED

WE LOVE THESE GARDEN STARS!

1 22 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

P

lan ahead and put on your best-ever winter and spring shows by choosing what plants you want for your pots and flower beds now. Winter/spring bedding plants are invaluable in helping you create a colourful outside space when little else is in flower. @ Many of these are annuals, flowering for just one season, so you can create a fresh look each year. @ Some bedding plants are beautifully scented, such as our offer primrose ‘Rambo’ @ Bedding is versatile. Use it in beds, borders, baskets and pots @ It’s perfect for filling gaps between shrubs with quick and easy colour @ Our offer plants come as plugs, small plants ready to pop in a pot or the ground straightaway, giving them time to establish before winter


READER OFFER

Free pansies ‘F1 Select Mix’ Flowering from November until April, these pretty plants will bring winter and spring cheer to your plot, with bright colour pops of zesty orange and yellow through to violets, pinks and mauves. Take advantage of this great value offer of 15 plug plants for free when you use offer code MG816 – you don’t even have to make an order, just pay £4.99 postage! Heightt 15-20cm (6-8in). Delivered in September

HOW TO ORDER @ GO ONLINE www w

/MG816

@ CALL 0844 326 2200 quoting MG816. Calls cost 5p per minute, plu your network’s standard access charg

n

@ BY POST Simply fill in the form and post

and spring colour ,p

it to the address below with your payment by cheque (made payable to Suttons), or fill in your card details.

Bellis ‘Spring Star Mix’ This fabulous mix produces lots of lush pom-pom blooms in rich shades of red, rose, white and a rose bicolour. Flowering from February to April they rise above glossy green rosettes of leaves and make excellent edging plants because they are so compact and intensely colourful. Height 15cm (6in). Supplied as 15 garden-ready plug plants. Delivered in September.

Primrose ‘Rambo’ ‘Rambo’ by name and tough by nature, this is possibly the largest-flowered primrose in the world and, therefore, also one of the most strongly scented. It produces its flowers from late January until April in a wide range of peppy yellow, pink, purple, red and white shades, including some unique bicolours. Height 10-20cm (4-8in). Supplied as 15 gardenready plug plants. Delivered in September.

Code

Price

Qty

Total

711517

15 Pansyy p plants – ‘F1 Select Mix’

Description

FREE

1

FREE

711518

15 Bellis ‘Spring Star Mix’

£8.99

711520

15 Primrose ‘Rambo’

£9.99

711521

15 Viola ‘Pink Wing’

£8.99

711522

15 Polyanthus y ‘Spring Fever’

£8.99 1

£4.99

Postage (per order)

£4.99

OFFER: 15 free pansies – just pay postage! Total

£

ORDER FORM Please fill in using block capitals and send (with your payment) to: Modern Gardens, Reader Offer MG816, Suttons Seeds, Woodview Road, Paignton Devon TQ4 7NG Title ............................................................. Initial ................................. Surname ..................................................................................................

Viola ‘Pink Wing’ This dainty little viola produces masses of small flowers with ethereal pale pink ‘wings’ and white faces. It’s an outstanding performer and makes good ground cover in-between other plants. And you get bonus blooms. It flowers in October and November, and again in March and April. Height 10-20cm (4-8in). Supplied as 15 gardenready plug plants. Delivered in September.

Polyanthus ‘Spring Fever’ Hardy ‘Spring Fever’ always carries an impressively large number of blooms in a wide variety of rich and intensive colours. A perennial, it flowers from early February to April, putting on a beautiful display not just for one spring season but for many years to come, getting bigger and better every time it flowers. Height 30cm (1ft). Supplied as 15 garden-ready plug plants. Delivered in September.

Address ................................................................................................... ...................................................................................................................... ...................................................................................................................... ........................................ Postcode ........................................................ Email .......................................................Tel............................................. Payment details I enclose a cheque payable to Suttons for £............................. with my name and address on the back. Or debit my credit/debit card Q Master Card Q Visa Q Maestro Q Delta Q Card Number..................../..................../..................../....................... Start Date................/................ Expiry Date................/................... Security code............................. Maestro Issue No...................... Signature ................................................................................................. T&CS: Orders are shipped from September. Offer closes 31 August 2016 (or while stocks last). This offer is subject to availability and in the event that it is oversubscribed, we reserve the right to send suitable substitutes. The code cannot be used with any other offer code. Please note that your contract for supply of goods is with Suttons Seeds, Woodview Road, Paignton, Devon TQ4 7NG. Tel 0844 326 2200.

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 12 3


PERFECT FOR A SMALL GARDEN Enjoy towers of flowers for six months with these se miniature m EASY-CARE CLIMBERS

Save

POTS P ICTU RED ARE N OT PROV IDED

£5

WE LOVE CLUSTERS OF RICHLY COLOURED CLEMATIS

B

righten up your outside space this summer and autumn with a couple of clematis. Perfect for balconies, conservatories, patios and small corners outside, these winter-hardy plants provide massive colour impact in a limited space, and grow to just 1.2m (4ft) tall. They are incredibly easy to grow in containers and, even better, won’t take over your garden, so are are ideal for modern spaces where room is often at a premium. Add an obelisk or pot trellis for the torrent of contrasting large deep-purple and pale pink blooms to climb up, cling to and cascade over, heightening the deliciously romantic effect of these towers of flowers.


READER OFFER

Patio clematis ofer We’re offering a pair of Boulevard clematis in blue and pink. Bred by multiple Chelsea Flower Show winner Raymond Evison, both produce an avalanche of richly coloured, star-shaped blooms from May to October every year. They are supplied just coming into bud, on 50cm (1ft 8in) tripod supports in a two-litre pot. @Bred to be compact and produce lots of flowers @Will survive outside through winter @Easy care – simply cut all stems back to 15cm (6in) in February/March Pay £19.99, saving £5 on usual price

HOW TO ORDER @ GO ONLINE wwwYouGarden.com/RMG w 102

@ CALL 0844 6 569 569 quoting RMG102. Calls cost 5p per minute, plus your network’s standard access charge.

@ BY POST Simply fill in the form and post it to the address below with your payment by cheque (made payable to YouGarden), or fill in your card details.

More fantastic ofers!

Description

Conelower collection

550058

Boulevard patio p clematis pair

Popular coneflowers (echinacea) make a vibrant late summer display for years to come. The plants in this six-strong collection boast bigger, longerlasting flowers, with a delicate honey scent. They are great for cutting to bring the outdoors indoors. Supplied as garden-ready plants. The collection of one each of the six plants shown below is £19.99, saving £10.

480256

Coneflower collection, £19.99 six plants

200233

Pair of wicker effect planters

£19.99

£8.99 £6.99 £

ORDER FORM Please fill in and send (with your payment) to: Modern Gardens, Reader Offer RMG102, YouGarden, PO Box 637, Wetherby Road, York YO26 0DQ Title .......................................................... Initials .................................... ‘HOT PAPAYA’

Save

‘MARMALADE’

£10

Surname .................................................................................................... Address ..................................................................................................... ....................................................................................................................... ....................................................................................................................... ............................................... Postcode .................................................. Email ..........................................................................................................

‘MILKSHAKE’

‘SOUTHERN BELLE’

Tel................................................................................................................. Payment details I enclose a cheque for £.............................. made payable to YouGarden with my name and address on the back. Or debit my Visa Q Mastercard Q Maestro Q Delta Q Card Number...................../...................../...................../...................... Start Date................/............... Expiry Date................/................... Security code..................... Maestro Issue No...............................

‘GUAVA ICE’

‘PINEAPPLE SUNDAE’

Signature ..................................................................................................

Stylish planters These wicker effect planters are made from durable plastic and hand-wash painted in gold. Pair them with your patio clematis! Pay just £8.99.

Just

£8.99

T&CS: Orders are shipped within seven working days. Offer closes 31 August 2016 (or while stocks last). This offer is subject to availability and in the event that it is oversubscribed, we reserve the right to send suitable substitutes. The code cannot be used with any other offer code. Please note that your contract for supply of goods is with YouGarden Ltd, Eventus House, Sunderland Road, Market Deeping PE6 8FD. Tel 0844 656 9569. Full terms at www.YouGarden.com

for two

AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 12 5


GAR

OTEB OK

Our simple guide tells you all you need to know to get started outside

TYPES OF COMPOST If you scatter these seeds in spring they will lower by summer sweet peas love-in-a-mist snapdragons cosmos sunflowers nasturtiums zinnia

Multi-purpose compost: a generalpurpose compost for lots of jobs Mature plant compost: perfect for containers and adding to the planting hole of trees and bigger shrubs, it’s often called J‘ ohn Innes No. 3’ compost Potting on compost: perfect for potting small plants into larger containers, it's often called ‘John Innes No. 2’ compost Seed compost: gritty compost ideal for germinating seeds

Pests A well-grown plant will usually shrug off attacks, but young plants are more vulnerable. Trap slugs in jars half-filled with beer and sunk into the soil, or use environmentally friendly slug pellets. Aphids can be blasted away with a strong jet of water.

1 26 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

How to plant up a pot Use a ‘crock’ (a piece of old broken pot) to cover the hole in the base of the pot before illing it up with compost. Use your hands to make holes and drop the plants in. Pat down gently and drench the soil with water. It will run out of the hole in the bottom of the pot when the compost is completely saturated.

BULBS THAT NEED TO BE PLANTED IN AUTUMN

dafodils @ tulips @ alliums @ fritillaria @ muscari @ hyacinths @

Plug plants Small plants with small rootballs, less than 10cm high, that can be popped straight into the soil or a pot.


How much should I water?

OUTDOOR HERBS

IN THE SOIL flower with a Drench the soil around a immediately full watering can of water you should after planting. After this, is very hot er only water if the weath l can. ful r the ano and then use

ROSEMARY THYME MINT SAGE PARSLEY

IN A POT t (of any size) ly Soak a new planted po base hole. until water runs out of the use your w, gro to As the plants start is damp. st po com the if finger to check til you can see If it's not, water again un base. Smaller water escaping from the frequently. re mo pots need watering

Pruning Pruning is simply a way of keeping plants looking their best and removing any dead stems. It makes some plants produce more flowers or fruits. It also prevents them from outgrowing their space. Use sharp secateurs to make an easy and tidy job of cutting the stems back. Trees and woody shrubs can be trimmed back in winter when they are not growing. Prune flowering shrubs and plants in autumn or early spring.

How much compost will fill my pot?

A plant pot's diameter is marked on the base. A bag of compost will have its volume on it. POT SIZE

QUANTITY OF COMPOST

13CM

1LITRE

15CM

1.5L

17CM

2L

20CM

7.5L

26CM

15L

30CM

25L

Windowsill

herbs BASIL CORIANDER MARJORAM FRENCH TARRAGON

On the information label Perennial a plant that lives for more than two years (usually a lot more). Annual a plant that completes its whole life cycle in one year, germinating from seed, growing and lowering within 12 months. Biennial a plant that lives for two years, growing leaves in the irst year and lowering in the second. Hardy will survive temperatures below freezing. Half-hardy needs to be brought into a porch or put on a windowsill during very cold weather. Tender won’t survive temperatures below freezing.

How to plant in the soil Dig a hole twice as deep and wide as the plant’s rootball, and position the plant in the hole so the top of the compost is level with the garden soil. Backfill and drench with a full can of water.

DISCLAIMER: It is the sole responsibility of any person(s) using the information/advice contained within Modern Gardens that their level of competence is appropriate for the task they want to complete. Modern Gardens will not be held responsible for any injury due to the misuse or misunderstanding of any DIY project. AUGUST 2016

M O D E R N G A R D E N S 127


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EASY IDEAS

OUR GARDEN CRUSH Every issue we share a picture of a garden we love. Here’s a small outdoor space that incorporates clever design choices to create a stylish Ibiza vibe To create enough seating for entertaining, she designed two-tier raised beds, the lower of which doubles up as seating made from Ipe hardwood. She then designed a space for a bistro table and chairs with an elevated deck area in the sunniest corner of the garden. The areas were then dressed with bright fabric cushions and loungers. There’s lots of space under the BBQ to store garden paraphernalia and cushions, as well as to conceal the gas canisters. A stylish finishing touch is a herb wall planted with thyme, sage, oregano, mint, rosemary and tarragon for Ana’s foodie-loving clients to add zest to their outdoor cooking.

WORDS : RACHEL A NDREWS -INGR AM . GAR DEN DESIGN ER : AN A SAN CHEZ-MARTIN WWW.GERMI NATED ESIGN.COM

major), r Viburnum deamiii and Chilean iris (Libertia formosa) for all-year colour. I added seasonal accents with tulips and alliums for spring and geranium ‘Patricia’ for the summer,” says Ana. The wall to the rear gave a claustrophobic, boxy feel to the space, so Ana introduced curves to the design, bringing movement to the space and making corners ‘disappear’. A green wall filled with begonies and ferns, along with a commissioned mosaic that runs across the rear wall, anchors the view from the house, creating a spectacular focal point. “All these visual design devices make the garden feel larger and more spacious than it really is,” says Ana.

130 M O D E R N G A R D E N S A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

PHOTO: CLIVE NICHOLS

T

his tiny but funky garden in Notting Hill was created by garden designer Ana Sanchez-Martin (www. germinatedesign. com), a member of the Society of Garden Designers, who specialises in projects with a contemporary look and clean, flowing lines. Her clients love design and colour and opted for an overall pink theme. They wanted a creative and bespoke garden, inspired by their favourite holiday destination, Ibiza, with plenty of space for entertaining and outdoor cooking. “For this space I chose architectural, mostly evergreen, plants such as Australian laurel (Pittosporum tobira), honey bush (Melianthus


HARDY MEDITERRANEAN OLIVES –

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Hardy & Evergreen, These Beauties Live For Decades! Bring a warm Mediterranean feel to your garden this summer with these classic ‘Standard’ form Olive Trees! Well-established and professionallygrown, they have a neat ball of evergreen, grey-green foliage aloft a clear stem – making them the perfect centrepiece in stylish pots for any patio, terrace or conservatory. They are low maintenance and slow growing, so ideal for small gardens or busy gardeners, and what’s more, they’re even winter hardy to -8ºC – you may even get some tasty olives if we have a long, hot and dry summer! Normally very costly in garden centres, these gorgeous specimens are superb value for money. Order today whilst stocks last!

Tasty olives when the summer is long and dry... though plant them anyway for a touch of the exotic in your garden!

Hardy Standard Olive Trees 90-100cm ‘Standard’ Form Trees. £24.99 EACH

BUY 2 FOR £34.98 SAVE £15.00! Perfect for pots on your patio or terrace Easy to grow and low maintenance Wonderful ball of evergreen foliage Represents superb value for money – around half normal nursery prices

EXTRA BONUS OFFER Pair of Tulipa 11” Diameter Square Planters Classic square planters made from strong, durable plastic and hand-wash-painted in silver. Perfect for your Standard Oleander! 130152

Perfect for framing a door or gateway – and incredible value too!

6

NOW £ .99 SAVE £3.00! 3 EASY WAYS TO ORDER NOW! 1 Visit

YouGarden.com/MG104 2 Phone 0844 6 569 569 MG104 3 By post using coupon below USE CODE

Calls cost 5p per min plus your network’s access charge.

W

Offer MG104, YouGarden, PO Box 637, Wetherby Road, York YO26 0DQ

DY TO -8ºC

Offer available while stocks last. © YouGarden Ltd 2016

Clay pots for illustrative purposes only

Item 680067

Offer Description

Price

1m Tall ‘Standard’ Olive in a Large Pot

£24.99

Buy 2 - JUST £17.49 EACH! SAVE £15.00!

£34.98

Qty

Sub Total

Mr/Mrs/Ms/Miss

130152

Pair of Tulipa 11” Diameter Square Planters SAVE £3

£6.99

100046

Fish, Blood and Bone Organic Fertiliser - 1.5kg Tub

£6.99

820001

Join The YouGarden Club today and SAVE 10% ON EVERY ORDER! Was £20, Now £10. SAVE £10

£10.00

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These SPECIAL OFFERS go perfectly with your Patio Standard Olive Trees

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I enclose cheque/PO payable to YouGarden (name & address on back) for ———————————————— Or charge my Visa / Mastercard / Maestro card number:

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Please tick here if you would prefer not to receive offers other than from us. Yes, I would like to sign-up to the FREE YouGarden Newsletter. © YouGarden Limited 2016.

OUR DOUBLE GUARANTEE TO YOU

Deduct 10% (10p in every £1) if you joined the YouGarden Club Delivery to UK Mainland only. A £6.00 surcharge will apply t I S

YOUR PAYMENT DETAILS

YOUR DELIVERY DETAILS

YOUR ORDER DETAILS

1 If you’re not totally happy with your order, return it within £6.99

2 Should any hardy plants fail to thrive thereafter, we’ll replace free of charge. You just pay the P&P. Peter McDermott, Head Gardener

— AD CODE —

MG104


DOUBLE UP for £1

Meconopsis Grandis

£8

1 Potted Plant .99 2 Potted Plants £17.98

NOW

£9.99

DOUBLE UP for £1 HURRY OFFER MUST END AUGUST 10th

SAVE £4

YOUR SATISFACTION GUARANTEED or your money back

Email This will help you track your order online and receive regular updates

WAS 17.98 WA £35.96 SAVE* £4 WAS £7.99 + £5 Voucher FREE

Out Now!


august 2016