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Nimi Einstein

NimiEinstein@gmail.com 503⋅866⋅4619


Contents 1 7 Benton Modern Display

Modern Baseball

Type specimen

Vinyl packaging

13

Editorial Illustrations

19

The Color Yellow

Portland State University Vanguard

Publication

25

31

Exhibit promotional material

Branding and space curating

37

43

Skateboard and sculptural type

Packaging and branding

49

55

Next Stop: Earth

Experimental & Expressive Typography

Press Play

Icebox Tea

Portland State Art Building & Art Building Annex

Northwest Coast Trails Coalition

Way-finding

Branding and brand Strategy


1


Benton Modern Display

Nimi Einstein

Intended Audience ×× Typeface aficionados; students, educators, professionals; ages 18–70

Project Goals ×× Marketing a typeface ×× Celebrating Benton Modern Display’s roots in print newspapers and magazines ×× Designing a printed piece that would not get thrown away

Solutions ×× Eight page, periodical proportioned, newsprint specimen book ×× History of display type & Benton Modern Display ×× Character list, headline type in use, style examples, body copy studies

1


Project 1 ⋅ Benton Modern Display

LIGHT

26 P TS

REGULAR

S E M I B O L D I TA L I C

BLACK

U LT R A

REGULAR 9 PTS

LIGHT

98 P TS U LT R A I TA L I C S 98 P TS

CHARAC TERS

Uppercase Letters, Lowercase Letters, Letter Accents, Numbers, Glyphs, Q uotes, Punctuation, Slashes, Brackets, Mo n e y S y m bo l s & Math Symbols, and Accents. Because printed papers are restricted by page count and very specific page sizes, typeface designers and graphic designers specializing in page layout have been interested with getting as many words in as possible. Newspapers and magazines rely on compact, tightly fitted seriffed text fonts specially designed for the task, which offer maximum flexibility, readability and efficient use of page space. Readability is primarily the concern of the typographer or information designer. It is the intended result of the complete process of presentation of textual material in order to communicate meaning as unambiguously as possible. A reader should be assisted in navigating around the information with ease, by optimal inter-letter, inter-word and particularly inter-line spacing, coupled with appropriate line length and position on the page, careful editorial “chunking” and choice of the text architecture of titles, folios, and reference links. Legibility is primarily the concern of the typeface designer, to ensure that each individual character or glyph is unambiguous and distinguishable from all other characters in the font. Legibility is also in part the concern of the typographer to select a typeface with appropriate clarity of design for the intended use at the intended size.

fi fl

SEMIBOLD

B O L D I TA L I C

B L A C K I TA L I C

U LT R A I TA L I C

AB C D E F G HI J KL MN O P Q R R S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f fi fl ffl ffi ff fj g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v wx y z # 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ! “ $ %& ‘ ( ) * + , - . / : ; ? @[ \ ] ^ _ ` { | } ~ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ ¥§ ¨ ©ª « ® ¯ ° ´ ² ³ ¶ ¸ · ¹ º » ¼ ½ ¾ ¿ À Á Â Ã Ä Å ÆÇ Ç ÈÉÊËÌ Í Î Ï ÐÑÒ ÓÔÕÖØÙÚÛÜÝÞß à á â ã ä å æç è é ê ë ì í î ï ð ñ ò ó ô õ ö ÷ ø ù ú û ü ý þ ÿ ı Ł ł × œŠ š ŸŽ ž ˆ ˇ ˘ ˚ ˜ ˝ Ω π – —‘ ’ ‚ “ ” „ † ‡ • … ‰ ‹ › € ™∏ ∑ √Œ

U LT R A I TA L I C 14.5 P T S

2 2

L I G H T I TA L I C


Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Excelsior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brilliant, 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareille, 6½ pt: Minionette (US), Emerald (Brit.,) 7 pt: Minion, 8 pt: Brevier, Petit or small text, 9 pt: Bourgeois or Galliard, 10 pt: Long Primer, Corpus or Garamond (c.f. Garamond,) 11 pt: Small Pica or Philosophy, 12 pt: Pica, 14 pt: English, Mittel or Augustin, 16 pt: Columbian (US), Two-line Brevier (Brit.,) 18 pt: Great Primer, 20 pt: Paragon, 21 pt: Double

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Excelsior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brilliant, 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareille, 6½ pt: Minionette (US), Emerald (Brit.,) 7 pt: Minion, 8 pt: Brevier, Petit or small text, 9 pt: Bourgeois or Galliard, 10 pt: Long Primer, Corpus or Garamond (c.f. Garamond,) 11 pt: Small Pica or Philosophy, 12 pt: Pica, 14 pt: English, Mittel or Augustin, 16 pt: Columbian

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Exc sior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brillia 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Aga (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareille, 6 pt: Minionette (US), Emerald (Brit.,) 7 Minion, 8 pt: Brevier, Petit or small te 9 pt: Bourgeois or Galliard, 10 pt: Lo Primer, Corpus or Garamond (c.f. G amond,) 11 pt: Small Pica or Philosop 12 pt: Pica, 14 pt: English, Mittel or A

7.5/9.5

8/10

8.5/10.5

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Excelsior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brilliant, 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareille, 6½ pt: Minionette (US), Emerald (Brit.,) 7 pt: Minion, 8 pt: Brevier, Petit or small text, 9 pt: Bourgeois or Galliard, 10 pt: Long Primer, Corpus or Garamond (c.f. Garamond,)

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Excelsior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brilliant, 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareille, 6½ pt: Minionette (US), Emerald (Brit.,) 7 pt: Minion, 8 pt: Brevier, Petit or small text, 9 pt: Bourgeois or Galliard, 10 pt: Long Primer, Corpus

Traditional point-size names; 3 p Excelsior (US), Minikin (Brit 4 pt: Brilliant, 4.5 pt: Diamon 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (U Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareil 6½ pt: Minionette (US), Em ald (Brit.,) 7 pt: Minion, 8 p Brevier, Petit or small text, 9 p

9/11

9.5/11.5

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Excelsior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brilliant, 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareille, 6½ pt: Minionette (US), Emerald (Brit.,) 7 pt: Minion, 8 pt: Brevier, Petit or small text, 9 pt: Bourgeois or Galliard, 10 pt: Long Primer, Corpus or Garamond (c.f. Garamond,) 11 pt: Small Pica or Philosophy, 12 pt: Pica, 14 pt:

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Excel or (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brilliant, 4.5 p Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (US), Rub (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareille, 6½ pt: Minionet (US), Emerald (Brit.,) 7 pt: Minion, 8 pt: Br vier, Petit or small text, 9 pt: Bourgeois or G liard, 10 pt: Long Primer, Corpus or Garamon (c.f. Garamond,) 11 pt: Small Pica or Philosoph

10/12

10.5/12.5

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Excelsior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brilliant, 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareille, 6½ pt: Minionette (US), Emerald (Brit.,) 7 pt: Minion, 8 pt: Brevier, Petit or small text, 9 pt: Bourgeois or Galliard, 10 pt: Long Primer,

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Exc sior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brillian 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: A ate (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareil 6½ pt: Minionette (US), Emerald (Brit 7 pt: Minion, 8 pt: Brevier, Petit or sma text, 9 pt: Bourgeois or Galliard, 10 p

11/13

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Excelsior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brillian 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareil 6½ pt: Minionette (US), Emerald (Brit.,) 7 pt: Minion, 8 pt: Brevier, Petit or sma 11.5/13.5

Traditional point-size names; 3 pt: Excelsior (US), Minikin (Brit.,) 4 pt: Brillian 4.5 pt: Diamond, 5 pt: Pearl, 5½ pt: Agate (US), Ruby (Brit.,) 6 pt: Nonpareill


Project 1 â‹… Benton Modern Display

4


2


Modern Baseball

Nimi Einstein

Intended audience ×× Modern baseball fans, vinyl collectors, music lovers; pop-punk community; ages 14–24

Project Goals ×× Creating an immersive, interactive celebration of Modern Baseball’s first full album ×× Connecting the physical–emotional world of vinyl record music listening experience ×× Bridging the gap between the personal album playing experience and the communal Modern Baseball fandom

Solutions ×× 7" & 12" records ×× Labels, sleeves, jackets ×× Trading cards, trading card packaging ×× Buttons ×× Stickers ×× Multi-layered, home-base shaped packaging

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Project 2 â‹… Modern Baseball

8


Nimi Einstein

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3


Editorial Illustrations

Nimi Einstein

Intended audience ×× Portland State University Vanguard readers; students, faculty, Portlanders; ages 18–50

Project Goals ×× Creating eye-grabbing images, drawing readers to read articles ×× Using an editorial format to explore illustration style, text-image relationships, and content dictated subject matter ×× Trusting intuitions for short deadlines

Solutions ×× Cover and in-text illustrations

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Project 3 â‹… Editorial Illustrations

14


Nimi Einstein

15


Mona Lisa 40 ha Nimi Einstein, 2015

High Life, Mickeys, d Mona Lisa


Nimi Einstein

ands,

duct tape,

17


4


The Color Yellow

Nimi Einstein

Intended audience ×× Design-minded individuals, color lovers, yellow enthusiasts; ages 20–50

Project Goals ×× Exploring and incubating excitement for the color yellow by creating a diverse, interactive filled reading experience ×× Designing a flexible grid system to maintain large amount of text, differing page sizes, and varying content

Solutions ×× 16 page, dynamic page size publication ×× Mix of black & white, full color, and yellow

19


2

Project 4 ⋅ The Color Yellow

The Middle Ages and Renaissance

The 18th and 19th centuries

During the Middle Ages and Renaissance, yellow became firmly established as the color of Judas Iscariot, the disciple who betrayed Christ, even though the Bible never describes his clothing. From this connection, yellow also took on associations with envy, jealousy and duplicity.

The 18th and 19th century saw the discovery and manufacture of synthetic pigments and dyes, which quickly replaced the traditional yellows made from arsenic, cow urine, and other substances.

The tradition began in the Renaissance of marking non-Christian outsiders, such as Jews, with the color yellow. In 16th century Spain, those accused of heresy and who refused to renounce their views were compelled to come before the Spanish Inquisition dressed in a yellow cape. Some examples include: • The Kiss of Judas, (1304–06) by Giotto di Bondone, followed the Medieval tradition of clothing Judas Iscariot in a yellow toga. • The Milkmaid, by Johannes Vermeer. (c. 1658)

IN HISTORY AND ART

20

Circa 1776 Jean-Honoré Fragonard painted A Young Girl Reading. She is dressed in a bright saffron yellow dress. This painting is “considered by many critics to be among Fragonard’s most appealing and masterly.”

The 19th-century British painter J.M.W. Turner was one of the first in that century to use yellow to create moods and emotions, the way romantic composers were using music. His painting Rain, Steam, and Speed—the Great Central Railway was dominated by glowing yellow clouds. Georges Seurat use the new synthetic colors in his experimental paintings composed of tiny points of primary colors. particularly in his famous Sunday Afternoon on the Isle de la Grand jatte (1884–86). He did not know that the new synthetic yellow pigment, zinc yellow or zinc chromate, which he used in the light green lawns, was highly unstable and would quickly turn brown. ››› THE COLOR YELLOW

2


Nimi Einstein

The Color Yellow is the color of gold, butter, and ripe lemons.1 In the spectrum of visible light, and in the traditional color wheel used by painters, yellow is found between green and orange. It is a primary color in subtractive color. Yellow is commonly associated with gold, wealth, sunshine, reason, happiness, optimism and pleasure, but also with envy, jealousy and betrayal. It plays an important role in Asian culture, particularly in China.

tab le o f co n te n ts etymolo gy and d ef i ni ti o ns

i n hi stor y and art

1 Prehistory and Antiquity

2 The Middle Ages and Renaissance The 18Th and 19Th Centuries

4 20Th and 21St Centuries

symboli sm and asso ci ati o ns 5 In China

6 Gold and Blond

The Color of Visibility and Caution

7 Yellow in Diferent Languages 9 Music

Politics

10 Religion

11 Metaphysics 12 Sports

1 1 Of the color of gold, butter, or ripe lemons, 2 Changed to a yellowish color as by age, as old paper, 3 Having a yellowish pigmentation of the skin, 4 [Informal] cowardly; craven. “Of the Color of Gold, Butter or Ripe Lemons”, Webster’s New World Dictionary of the American Language, The World Publishing Company, New York, 1964.

Transportation

13 Vexillology

Idioms and Expressions

14 The Color of Optimism and Pleasure In Other Cultures

3

This year, Eliasson has had twelve solo shows around the world. His best-known work is “The Weather Project” (2003), an installation in the vast Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern, in London, which consisted of a gigantic half sun—made of hundreds of light bulbs— at the top of one wall, mirrors on the ceiling, and a mist machine. h t t p : / / w w w. n e w y o r k e r. c o m / m a g a z i n e / 2006/11/13/seeing-things-2#ixzz1FQvk1dMc

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Nimi Einstein


5


Next Stop: Earth

Nimi Einstein

Intended audience ×× Children and their families, attendees of the exhibit, OMSI members; Toddlers through elementary school, young parents, grandparents, teachers; ages 0–70

Project Goals ×× Creating illustration systems to promote a museum exhibit ×× Crafting a multi-layered platform to attract both young children and their families

Solutions ×× Promotional postcards ×× Billboard advertisements ×× Characters, colors, illustrations, and copy language

25


26


Nimi Einstein

Bloop.

Doink?

Meeep!

27


Project 5 â‹… Next Stop: Earth

B

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6


Press Play

Nimi Einstein

Intended audience ×× Musicians, producers, artists, diy-ers; makers; ages 14–60

Project Goals ×× Creating a missing landmark of Portland’s diy and youth culture scene ×× Portraying brand goals in accessible visual language

Solutions ×× Word mark & logo marks ×× Eight panel, accordion promotional piece ×× Gathering spacial and equipment materials to visualize the concept concretely

31


Project 6 ⋅ Press Play

+ PRESS 32

P L AY


e, 7281

mote

PRESS PLAY is a DIY space for producing, writing, playing, recording, and promoting music. We are all about DIY, street art, and Zine making, and our facilities are open and accessibile for everyone excited about music and art. There are thousands of DIY spaces that exist internationally, and Portland, Oregon is home to several dedicated both to music and publishing. This is Portland’s first all inclusive music publishing space and we are excited for you to come play.

Press Play is open for members Monday through Sunday with trained staff who are passionate about music and excited to help you with all of your DIY music production needs. Our facilities include the equiptment below but visit pressplay.org for full equipment list and open studio times. Printing & cutting 5 desktop computers Black & white and color 8.5"x11" 8.5"x14" 11"x17" 12" & 14" guillotines Preforming 400watt PA 250 person stage Ticket booth

Recording 12 channel mixer Microphones Amplifiers Mixing software Audio interfaces Promotion CD and cassete burning Packaging templates Wheat pasting Radio connections

Press

Play

Record

Pr o m


7


Experimental & Expressive Typography

Nimi Einstein

Intended audience ×× Experimentalists and explorers, intrigued and curious minds

Project Goals ×× Medium–connotation exploration ×× Word play exercise

Solutions ×× Wood-burned skateboard ×× 10 foot sculptural sign

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Nimi Einstein

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Nimi Einstein

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8


Icebox Tea

Nimi Einstein

Intended audience ×× Tea and coffee drinkers, sustainability minded individuals, hurried morning goers; students, young professionals; ages 16–35

Project Goals ×× Creating flexible systems ×× Designing eye grabbing packaging ×× Utilizing visual and written language to craft a platform which makes sustainability easier to engage

Solutions ×× Three illustrated cartons ×× Word mark ×× Copy writing ×× Advertisements

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L ADY GRE Y black tea, oil of bergamot, lemon peel, orange peel, lavender, and honey

8 FL OZ 250 ML

Hey! I’m not trashy! While cartons aren’t the easiest to recycle,

this one uses 95 percent recycled materials and acting as the inner waterproof lining is a ¾ beeswax, ¼ recycled polymer coating.

OPEN HERE!

L ADY GRE Y black tea, oil of bergamot, lemon peel, orange peel, lavender, and honey

8 FL OZ 250 ML

, IIIII, ----

, ,

-

Icebox tea is sustainibly brewed by Tom & Linda Holmes in conjunction with the Sustainability at Work initiative by The City ..... of Portland. FFFF

For example, I make a pretty darn good planting pot! In fact, cut my top off and plant your own tea tree!

8 FL OZ 250 ML

, ,

CHEERS! ENJOY!

Take me out before you dump me?

orange blossom water, star anise, crushed tamarind seed, sugar, and coconut milk

OOOOOOO OOOOOOO

OPEN HERE! MM, MM, MM!

THAI ICED TE A

Total Fat 0g 0% Saturated Fat 0g 0% Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 0mg 0% Sodium 10mg 0% Total Carbohydrate 15g 5% Dietary Fiber 0g 0% Sugars 15g Protein 0g Vitamin A 0% • Vitamin C 0% Iron 0% • Caffeine 30–45 mg**

Hey! I’m not trashy! While cartons aren’t the easiest to recycle, this one uses 95 percent recycled materials and acting as the inner waterproof lining is a ¾ beeswax, ¼ recycled polymer coating.

OPEN HERE!

THAI ICED TE A orange blossom water, star anise, crushed tamarind seed, sugar, and coconut milk

8 FL OZ 250 ML

Servings 1 Serving size (8 fl oz) Calories 60 Daily Value* Total Fat 0g 0% Saturated Fat 0g 0% Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 0mg 0% Sodium 10mg 0% Total Carbohydrate 15g 5% Dietary Fiber 0g 0% Sugars 15g Protein 0g Vitamin A 0% • Vitamin C 0% Iron 0% • Caffeine 30–45 mg**

IIIIIIIIIII:

OOOOOOO , II I --------,

, ,

,

, OOOOO-

OPEN HERE! MM, MM, MM!

CHEERS! ENJOY!

Take me out before you dump me? Sorry if I’m bragging, but I’m pretty good at holding pencils, so rinse me out, wipe me off, and fill me up!

Icebox tea is sustainibly brewed by Tom & Linda Holmes in conjunction with the Sustainability at Work initiative by The City ..... of Portland. FFFF Servings 1 Serving size (8 fl oz) Calories 60 Daily Value* Total Fat 0g 0%

IIIIIIIIIII: I IIIII OOOOOOO

,


Nimi Einstein

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Nimi Einstein

Take me out before you dump me? For example, I make a pretty darn good planting pot! In fact, cut my top off and plant your own tea tree! Icebox cartons use 95% recycled materials with a ž beeswax, Ÿ recycled polymer lining. Find out more at iceboxtea.com

Thai Iced Tea availible May, 2015 in 8oz, 16oz, and 32oz cartons.

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9


Portland State Art Building & Art Building Annex

Nimi Einstein

Intended audience ×× Portland State University art students, faculty, and visitors; ages 10–95

Project Goals ×× Creating a cohesive way-finding system to clarify and stop confusion inside the art buildings

Solutions ×× A set of four posters ×× Color coordinated floors ×× Iconography collection

49


Project 9 ⋅ Portland State Art Building & Art Building Annex

Art Building 2000 SW 5th Ave, Portland, OR 97201

FLOOR

!!!! :)

3

?

310g

310f

!!!! :) ?

310c 310b

310

310j ART OFFICE

310d

310e

310h

Art History Office

305

301

EXIT

Room 310

310a

ART OFFICE

Faculty Offices

304

Rooms 310 a–j

330 EXIT

Lecture Hall Room 320

Rooms 301 304 305

FLOOR

310 a–j 320 330

320

2

225e

225d

225c

225b

225a

215 210 200

225f

MK Gallery Room 210

Lecture Hall Room 200

EXIT

201

290

225g

205

225h

Rooms 200 201 205 210 215 225 a–h

FLOOR

ART OFFICE

!!!! :) ?

230 240 250 260 270 a–c 290

240

270a 260 270c

270b

1

230

250

Main Entrance 5th Ave

5th Ave

Art Office Room 110

122

121

110d

Faculty Offices Rooms 110 a–d 120–123, 125–128

110c

123

AB Lobby Gallery

120

110b

Looking for the Art Annex?

110a 100

!!!! :)

Rooms 150–180 are next door!

110

?

ART OFFICE

Room 100

Reuse Room!

Rooms 100 101 104 110 a–d 120 121 122

123 125 126 127 128 130 140

101 125 127

126 140

130

EXIT

You are here!

104

128

EXIT

This is the Art Annex!

Main Entrance

5th Ave

EXIT

5th Ave

Main Entrance

?

122

121

110c

110d

110b

110a 100

123

125

!!!! :)

You are here!!!!

ART OFFICE

Art Office

EXIT

?

Faculty Offices

Toilets

Elevator

Handicap Access

Emergency Exit

127

Gallery

Lecture Hall

Printers

Fountains

5th

110

120

160

155 150

126

P

140

130 128

151

104 165

Parking

152

153 154a

170

154

180 180a

Next door you will find:

FLOOR

50

1

!!!! :) ?

Faculty Offices

Rooms 150, 151, 155

Green Room

Room 154 + 154a

Rooms 150 151 152 153 154 + 154a

155 160 165 170 180 + 180a

FLOOR

B

BFA Studios 51 52 53

54 + 54a 60

Ave


Nimi Einstein

Art Building Annex 2000 SW 5th Ave, Portland, OR 97201

EXIT

EXIT

Main Entrance

Main Entrance

5th Ave

5th Ave

!!!! :) ?

160

54a

150

155

52

53

151

51

54 152

165

153 154a

60 Green Room

154

170

180

EXIT

Purchase print credits at Commerce.CashNet.com/ArtLab

180a EXIT

FLOOR

1

Faculty Offices

!!!! :)

Rooms 150, 151, 155

?

Green Room

Room 154 + 154a

Rooms 150 151 152 153 154 + 154a

155 160 165 170 180 + 180a

!!!! :)

You are here!!!!

ART OFFICE

Art Office

B

BFA Studios 51 52 53

Looking for the Art Building?

54 + 54a 60

That’s the 3 story building next door!

This is the Art Building!

Toilets

Elevator

Handicap Access

Emergency Exit

Gallery

Lecture Hall

You are here!

P

EXIT

?

Faculty Offices

FLOOR

Printers

Fountains

Main Entrance

Parking

5th Ave

ve th A

5

Main Entrance

150

155 160

151

ve th A

110c

5

100

110a

110b

152

?

110d

121

165

110

153

122

154a

104

120 123

140 125

126

154

170 130

128

127

180

180a

Next door you will find:

FLOOR

1

ART OFFICE

!!!! :) ?

Art Office Room 110

Faculty Offices Rooms 110 a–d 120–123, 125–128

AB Lobby Gallery Room 100

FLOOR

3

ART OFFICE

!!!! :) ?

Rooms 100 101 104 110 a–d 120 121 122

123 125 126 127 128 130 140

FLOOR

2

Art History Office Room 310

Faculty Offices Rooms 310 a–j

Lecture Hall Room 320

Rooms 301 304 305

310 a–j 320 330

FLOORS

1–3

MK Gallery Room 210

Lecture Hall Room 200

Rooms 200 201 205 210 215 225 a–h

230 240 250 260 270 a–c 290

All your favorite humans + classmates + teachers + artists

51


Project 9 â‹… Portland State Art Building & Art Building Annex

52


101

Next door you will find:

126

140

130 128 FLOOR

1

ART OFFICE

!!!! :) ?

Art Office

Rooms

Room 110

100 101 104 110 a–d 120 121 122

Faculty Offices Rooms 110 a–d 120–123, 125–128

AB Lobby Gallery Room 100

123 125 126 127 128 130 140

Art Building

FLOOR

104

2

FLOOR

3

!!!! :) ?

Room 310

Rooms

Faculty Offices

301 304 305

Rooms 310 a–j

310 a–j 320 330

Room 200

Room 310

Art Building Annex

Rooms 310 a–j

?

Emergency Exit

Room 320

Rooms 301 304 305

310 a–j 320 330

Gallery

Entrance

!!!! :)

FLOOR

?

160

Lecture Printers Hall Main EXIT

Entrance

5th Ave

2

5th Ave

225e

225d

53

151

MK Gallery

51

29

225g

152

Lecture Hall Room 200

EXIT

153

225h

Rooms 154a Green Room 154

170

EXIT

180

22

225f

52

54 210 Room

165

225c

54a

150

155

EXIT

Lecture Hall

2000 SW 5th Ave, Portland, OR 97201

EXIT

EXIT

Faculty Offices

!!!! :)

Handicap Access Main

1–3

All your favorite humans + classmates + teachers + artists

Art History Office

ART OFFICE

Room 320

Elevator

EXIT

3

FLOORS

Lecture Hall

EXIT

230 240 250 260 270 a–c 290

Lecture Hall 2000 SW 5th Ave, Portland, OR 9720

FLOOR

Art History Office

200 201 205 210 215 225 a–h

Room 210

EXIT

ART OFFICE

Rooms

MK Gallery

Purchase print credits at Commerce.CashNet.com/ArtLab

200 201 205 210 215 225 a–h

180a

FLOOR

230 240 250 260 270 a–c 290

1

60

270a

270b

EXIT 5th Ave

270c


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Northwest Coast Trails Coalition

Nimi Einstein

Intended audience ×× Active people of all ages in the lower Columbia region who seek to explore the Pacific NW coast. Volunteers, young adults, and middle ages folks who enjoy engaging with their community and being outdoors.

Project Goals ×× Creating a timeless, unique, long-lasting brand strategy as a way to give credibility to the nctc as an organization ×× Construct a more meaningful way for nctc to engage and become ingrained in their community.

Solutions ×× Tag-line and brand attributes ×× Brand marks ×× Brand typography ×× Brand colors ×× Brand map as a reference for brand strategy

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WHO WE ARE

nctc is an advocacy and trail maintenance group

who believes that access to nature is a fundamental right. BRAND MESSAGE

nctc’s strong core message has already

been translated into a beautifully robust yet concise mission statement. The mission statement, tag-line, and brand attributes are all intrinsically connected brand communications that are to be used in different cases.

MISSION STATEMENT

A mission statement is a short, formal written statement of an organization’s purpose, defining its scope and focus in plain, simple, descriptive terms.

TAG-LINE

A frequently repeated statement that captures the essence of a brand’s promise. An expression that conveys the most important attribute or benefit that the brand wishes to convey.

Mission

We cooperatively plan, build, maintain and advocate for a well-connected and accessible system of multi-use, non-motorized recreational trails for our communities. Tag-line

Communal Trails for Collective Health

BRAND ATTRIBUTES

A specific set of characteristics that identify the visual, verbal and behavioral traits of the brand, much in the same manner that personality attributes define the people we know. These key words should drive and be very apparent in every one of nctc’s actions.

Attributes

Accessible, active, authentic, & community.

GOALS

The nctc seeks a design system that symbolizes the overall message of the company and all the positive factors they represent. The following key terms can be used to describe the direction of our design philosophy: accessible, active, authentic, and community.

The stakeholders have a profound voice in this mission. Their goal is to plan, build, and maintain a recreational trail system that is accessible and connected within the Northwest Coast community. With the support of nctc, the stakeholders remain optimistic about having their goals met. By recruiting volunteers and permitting recreational use of visitors, these trails are kept active and healthy. The nctc carries a strong message of unifying the community for one, main cause. The coalition seeks to obtain its business presence through various mediums, including websites, social media, maps, sign-age, and various merchandise. The budget granted for this project is $1000-$2000.


C o m m un a l Tr ail s f o r C o ll e c t i v e H e a l t h

COMMUNAL TRAILS F O R C O L L E C T I V E H E A LT H

C O M M U N A L T R A I L S F O R C O L L E C T I V E H E A LT H


MAIN MARKS

SECONDARY MARK AND ELEMENTS Northwest Coast Trails Coalition’s mark was drafted out of a map, historically the single most important artifact of trail-goers. The map also references the initial need and solution of nctc’s formation.

LOCK-UPS

The secondary mark and additional elements are designed to be easily scalable for smaller applications and are to be used in places where the main marks are too large. Additional elements can also be used when denoting special organizational material; i.e. in front of the website on a poster and can be used for sign-age as backgrounds for other materials.

Without the black background, the mark can be seen as an abstracted wave and mountain range.

The secondary mark should never be placed on material that doesn’t either have “Northwest Coast Trails Coalition” spelled out.

C o mm un al Tr ail s fo r C o ll e c ti v e H e al t h

COMMUNAL TRAILS F O R C O L L EC T I V E H E A LT H

These marks should not be reproduced below the sizes below These marks should not be reproduced below the sizes below

1 inch

0.5"

TYPOGRAPHY The typefaces where chosen as a way to give the brand more cohesion and stability, and to reinforce the four attributes. Karla is available as a free download for print and is free to use on-line. Adobe Caslon comes with most computers. The headline font, Karla by Jonathan Pinhorn, is legible at far distances and can be easily translatable into 3D applications like sign-age. It has a very human attitude while looking fresh and updated for the 21 century. Adobe Caslon is a time tested, sophisticated typeface that has proven to be easily legible as body copy and beautiful in large formats.

KARLA BOLD by Jonathan Pinhorn abcdefghijklnopqrstuvwxyz ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890!,.?/@#$%^&*()_+[]{}\|;:’"<> Caslon Pro by Adobe abcdefghijklnopqrstuvwxyz ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1234567890!,.?/@#$%^&*()_+[]{}\|;:’"<>

0.3"

C O M M U N A L T R A I L S F O R C O L L E C T I V E H E A LT H

0.15"

COLOR

IMAGE TREATMENT

These brand colors are an updated version of typical visual language of trail signs and other public use wayfinding design. These bright colors command attention but are soft enough to be approachable and new.

Maidenhair Fern

Yellow Monkeyflower

Pantone Solid Coated 7731 C CMYK 87, 0, 43, 43 rgb 19, 145, 82 Hex 139152

Pantone Solid Coated 7405 C CMYK 0, 18, 94, 2 rgb 249, 203, 16 Hex f9cb10

Salmonberry

Summer Rain

Pantone Solid Coated 2033 C CMYK 0, 67, 67, 17 rgb 211, 70, 70 Hex d34646

Pantone Solid Coated Cool Gray 9 C CMYK 8, 10, 0, 48 rgb 121, 119, 132 Hex 797784

Images should reflect band attributes accessible, active, authentic, community. Pictures of people should be candid and show multiple people actively enjoying nature: hiking, swimming, biking, etc. Pictures of nature should be serene and celebratory of the authenticity of the Pacific Northwest. Pictures should not be heavily edited or look overly planned.

DELIVERABLES

Communal Trails for Collective Health

Steven Blakesley Board Chair SBlakesley@co.clatsop.or.us 503-338-3750 NWCoastTrails.org

Steven Blakesley Board Chair SBlakesley@co.clatsop.or.us 503-338-3750 NWCoastTrails.org

The Northwest Coast Trail Coalition


Benton Modern Display Modern Baseball Editorial Illustrations The Color Yellow Next Stop: Earth Press Play Experimental & Expressive Typography Icebox Tea Portland State Art Building & Art Building Annex Northwest Coast Trails Coalition

These ten projects are a selection of three years’ work at Portland State University. Thank you for your time. Winter 2016 ⋅ Portfolio 2 ⋅ Nimi Einstein

Nimi Einstein's Graphic Design Portfolio, February 2016  

Thank you for your time!

Nimi Einstein's Graphic Design Portfolio, February 2016  

Thank you for your time!

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