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Journal de Nîmes Nº 12 THE NEW VINTAGE ISSUE

WINTER 2015/2016 Tenue de Nîmes THE GOOD THINGS IN LIFE

WWW.TENUEDENIMES.COM IN THIS ISSUE:

GOLDEN HANDSHAKE

LEVI STRAUSS & CO AND CONE DENIM

FOOD REVOLT NEW YORK & LOS ANGELES

DREAMERS LIVE FOREVER

AN INTERVIEW WITH ALBERTO ASPESI

10 QUESTIONS

TO LIBERTINE-LIBERTINE

DOUBLE RL

A PERSONAL STORY BY MR. RALPH LAUREN

PRINTED ISSUE € 10,-


COLOPHON

PUBLISHED BY

TENUE DE NÎMES

EDITOR IN CHIEF Menno van Meurs menno@tenuedenimes.com

Tenue de Nîmes info@tenuedenimes.com

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CREATIVE DIRECTION AND GRAPHIC DESIGN Joachim Baan joachim.baan@tenuedenimes.com

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www.tenuedenimes.com info@tenuedenimes.com WE ARE OPEN Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

12/18 10/18 10/18 10/20 10/18 10/18 12/18

SOME CONTRIBUTORS OLIVIER VAN DER HAGEN COPY DIRECTOR While initially looking to continue his corporate career, Olivier did some soul searching and left the bank he had been working for. During his self-imposed sabbatical, he met his neighbors, Tenue de Nîmes and a friendship was quickly struck up as he finally found people who were passionate about their jobs. Before long, he was editing the Journal de Nîmes no 3, 4, 6 and this issue, as well as writing several articles, his own passion. He is now a freelance writer, contributing written pieces to at least one other magazine besides this one at the time of going to press.

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RICARDO GOMES PHOTOGRAPHER Ricardo Gomes, born in Madeira island is a portrait and lifestyle/ photo documentary photographer based in Paris. After studying visual arts found photography as his main expression, support and interest. The black and white and the romantic lines are very explicit and inspiring on his work. www.ricardogomesphotography.com CHRIS VAN VEGHEL EDITOR Chris van Veghel is researcher and editor-in-chief of Another Something. Schooled as an academic film student, mentored by Joachim Baan into the world of elegant aesthetics beyond just the silver screen. Lover of authentic culture both low- and highbrow. www.another.so

JOY YOON WRITER Joy Yoon is a writer, editor, researcher, and creative consultant based in New York City. She is a regular contributor to various publications, and the author of The Best Things To Do In Los Angeles: 1001 Ideas published by Rizzoli. SOPHIE HEMELS PHOTOGRAPHER Sophie is a 22 year old photographer from Amsterdam. She's photographed artists, cool kids and anything that propels itself on a surf- or skateboard with her analog, duct-taped Nikon FM2 since 2013. You will find her work under he pseudonym Francis Morrison Morrison. www.sophiehemels.com

SOPHIE EBRARD PHOTOGRAPHER Born in the French Alps, Sophie is currently based in Amsterdam and London. Self-tought, Sophie chose photography after working for more than 10 years spent in advertising. As photographer and director, Sophie works mainly with analog processes and uses medium and 35mm format cameras to maintain her soft and natural visual style. Her photographs are as eclectic and full of life as she is. Sophie was first a beloved customer who became part of the Tenue de Nîmes family and thus began a collaboration for the launch of Tenue de Nîmes own line of male denim - Pablo Memphis II jeans. www.sophieebrard.com

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CULTURE

FEATURE

FOOD REVOLT

THE GOLDEN HANDSHAKE LEVI STRAUSS & CO AND CONE DENIM CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

P23

NIK CHRISTENSEN P30

SAN FRANCISCO P46

COCKTAIL P91

SOPHIE EBRARD P10

FADE P38

HANDCRAFTED MODERN P64

CALIFORNIA DREAM P68

TENUE DE NÎMES PLAYLIST P88

BRAND FEATURE

ORSLOW JAPAN P26

ALEXANDER WANG P32

100HANDS

P6

SAN FRANCISCO P48

LEVI’S ARCHIVE & EUREKA LAB P52

DOUBLE RL P 58

ACNE STUDIOS P80

HANCOCK VA X TENUE DE NÎMES P44

TENUE DE NÎMES PABLO MEMPHIS II JEANS P16

TOKYO'S HOPESMORE BOOT STORE P62

INTERVIEW

DREAMERS LIVE FOREVER ALBERTO ASPESI P18

ESSENTIALS ACCORDING TO ATELIER DE L'ARMEE

P34

P56

SIMON MILLER

TALKING NEW VINTAGE WITH GEERT BRULOOT

P36

NLST P42

CÔTE D’IVOIRE COTTON JEANS

P76

10 QUESTIONS TO LIBERTINE-LIBERTINE P84

P54

FABRIC BRAND & CO P72

CURRENT ELLIOTT P74

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Tenue de Nîmes Hand Crafted Leather Belts MADE IN UTRECHT BY JULIAN IMRIE SCANDINAVIAN HIDES TANNED IN BELGIUM BRITISH SOLID BRASS BUCKLES ORIGINAL COPPER RIVETS

TOOLS AND NATURAL BLUES BY JULIAN IMRIE

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INTRODUCTION / New Vintage

Introducing New Vintage

WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS PHOTOGRAPHY: RENÉ, MENNO AND JOACHIM AT THE LEVI’S EUREKA LAB

One of the very first memories I have involving vintage clothing is my dad’s old closet in the attic. When my brother and I were kids we used to sneak upstairs and dress ourselves in all of the amazing 60s and 70s pieces my dad never threw away. I remember one day finding a brown velour suit with only one button and well-tailored, slim pants. The suit was incredibly soft and although it had been stuffed away for at least 30 years it felt completely untouched to me. I could not stop myself from trying it on. When I went downstairs, my dad laughed and said I was actually wearing the suit he wore when he married my mother. In the years that followed this closet remained a true source of adventure to us. We found seventies leather jackets with those large, remarkable collars and leather biker boots in several colors as well as a suede bomber jacket with knitted arms and two incredible denim jackets. The first one was a 60s Wrangler jacket in an astonishing faded broken twill denim fabric. The second one was my personal favorite: a short, light blue Levi’s Big E Type III Trucker jacket with those characteristically wide arms. Although I never thought about it like that, looking back this was my first vintage ‘treasure hunting’ experience. That addictive sensation of going through an unknown pile of clothing, never knowing what beauty you might find, is probably the best part of searching for -and eventually collecting- vintage. This addiction stayed with me as I grew up and most probably formed the basis of our current Tenue de Nîmes archive that consists of a large amount of vintage sportswear and military clothing as well as a blue library full of vintage jeans and indigo artefacts. To explain why vintage product appeals to so many collectors around the world it is important to define the true value of these items. First and foremost vintage clothing is so attractive

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 12 — THE NEW VINTAGE ISSUE

because of their timeless quality. So although a garment might be old, its quality and functionality have not diminished a single bit because it was made to last. Second of all these products remind us of a time when people actually took time to make something. There was no such thing as mass production. After all: why would one mass produce stuff if something lasts forever and you only need to buy it once? In addition to that, vintage stuff stands out because it was made with the best materials available, so it makes sense to refer to it as ‘real’ products as opposed to the tons of mass produced rubbish that simply show we don’t take the time to make something. Nor do we make it to last. When we first played with the idea of doing a ‘New Vintage’ issue of Journal de Nîmes we basically asked ourselves: which brands or products will our kids be collecting? What type of brands still make ‘real stuff’ these days and may be considered the ‘New Vintage’ soon? Therefore this twelfth issue presents brands that will become the next generation’s ticket to L.A.’s Rose Bowl Flea Market. One of the brands that we at Tenue de Nîmes believe already has unquestionable value amongst (vintage) collectors is Double RL by Ralph Lauren. Mr. Ralph Lauren founded the ‘RRL’ brand 1993 on the iconic building blocks of men’s style after being the first rebel to sell vintage next to his ‘new’ clothing in New York City. This issue introduces you to Mr. Ralph Lauren’s most personal achievement that he uses to show his deep love for the rugged spirit of the American West. We will also highlight some of the most inspiring brands that successfully used their inspiration of the past into a contemporary collection. This summer we visited the American Headquarters of Levi’s Vintage Clothing in San Francisco where we were blown away by the world’s oldest Levi’s jeans at the

world famous Levi’s archive. In that same North Beach building we visited Levi’s' so called ‘Eureka Lab’ in which the brand tests its latest denim designs in terms of make, wash and fabric technology. We also came across new concepts which apply old rules to the new world. Take for instance Orslow designer Ichiro who started collecting Levi’s 501’s at a very young age and soon realized that no one ever made a jean better than that. This simple determination gave him his mission in life: to make a jean that would complement the legacy of a vintage Levi’s 'Big E' 501. We travelled extensively these past few months as we also went back-stage at Acne Studios’ Spring Summer 2016 Fashion Show to learn all about their expressive pieces of individuality that we believe will be staple items in our closets in 2026. And then there is the man who just celebrated his ten year anniversary in fashion at the age of 31: Alexander Wang. We introduce you to Boy Wonder’s special denim line in which he looks for successful connections between the present and the past. Of course we also brought back some of our favorite sections in this Journal, such as 10 Questions (to our friends at Libertine Libertine) and we are thrilled to welcome food-fetishist Joy Yoon to the team (currently based in The Big Apple) who wrote an essay on 'new vintage' food. Joy introduces you to six of the most inspiring chefs from New York and Los Angeles who present classic cuisine in a ’New Vintage' context. Lastly, we are happy to welcome back Tokyo based designer Luis Mendo who made a beautiful new Tenue de Nîmes ‘City Map’ which will show you every single must-see or -do in San Francisco in the blink of an eye. Enjoy! —

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FEATURE / Levi's and Cone

THE GOLDEN HANDSHAKE WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS / IMAGES BY LEVI’S VINTAGE CLOTHING

Levi Strauss & Co and Cone Denim Celebrating 100 Years San Francisco is a fascinating city that was, according to our friend Tony Patella at Tellason, absolutely unsuitable to become a city in the first place. San Francisco is surrounded by beautiful, flat nature that made for an outstanding location to create "The City of Fog. " San Francisco became the largest city on the West Coast of the United States thanks to the Gold Rush in the mid-1800s. It was in 1853 that a wholesale merchant in dry goods by the name of Levi Strauss arrived in San Francisco. Strauss soon developed a reputation for the quality of his work and so his business in the Bay Area flourished in the following two decades. In 1872 Levi Strauss received a letter from a tailor by the name of Jacob Davis who made riveted clothing for workers and had purchased supplies and fabric from Levi Strauss . Davis needed a business partner to get a patent on ‘riveted’ clothing. In 1873 Strauss & Co received a patent for ‘Improvement in Fastening Pocket-Openings’. "A great invention when you picture these men trying to stack pounds of gold that would normally rip their pockets to pieces " says Tony Patella at his Tellason Headquarters in Sausalito.

George Westmoreland, known as "Red ", loads yarn packages in the creel of a modern day warper at White Oak Mill.

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FEATURE / Levi's and Cone

Wayne Turner, Dyeing Overhauler, monitors waves of narrow selvage denim fall gracefully as they move through the finishing process.

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FEATURE / Levi's and Cone

In 1915 a historic agreement was struck granting Cone Mills the exclusive right to manufacture Levi’s proprietary Shrink-to-Fit denim for the production of all Levi’s Lot 501 Jeans. So besides running his wholesale business Levi Strauss was now head of a manufacturing company too. Besides duck material the company started using denim for its pants and overalls. In 1902 Mr. Strauss died, leaving his business to his four nephews, the Stern brothers. They rebuilt the company after the 1906 fire that nearly destroyed the entire city of San Francisco. The first denim fabric that Levi Strauss & Co. used was sourced from the Amoskeag Mill in New Hampshire on the East Coast of the United States. People appreciated the fabric because of its durability and because it softened after wear and wash. Denim production eventually moved south, closer to where cotton was grown. By the 1910s, Levi Strauss & Co. turned to Cone Mills from North Carolina, the centre of denim production at the turn of the century. Cone Denim was founded in 1891 when brothers Moses and Ceasar founded Cone Export & Commission Company in Greensboro, North Carolina, near the eastern foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. In 1905, they established the White Oak Mill, named after a 200-year old tree on its grounds. This mill would not

only set the global standard for quality denim, it would become the world’s most iconic denim mill. In 1915 a historic agreement was struck granting Cone Mills the exclusive right to manufacture Levi’s proprietary Shrink-to-Fit ® denim for the production of all Levi’s Lot 501® Jeans. This gentleman’s agreement became known as "The Golden Handshake." Today, exactly 100 years later, Levi Strauss & Co. still produces some of its 501 jeans using Shrink-to-Fit denim from the Cone Mills’ White Oak facility in Greensboro, and they continue unearthing archival details about the fabrics they developed through their history with Cone, reproducing them at White Oak. Each weave carries the secrets of the brand’s long history within its warp and weft. To commemorate this anniversary, Levi’s Vintage Clothing pays special tribute to Cone Mills, honoring the centennial of "The Golden Handshake, " the 1915 501 Jean, and the hardworking folks who joined hands to create it. —

Elbert "Frank " Williams, celebrated an unprecedented six decades at the company’s White Oak® Plant in Greensboro, North Carolina.

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FEATURE / Levi's and Cone

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FEATURE / Tenue de Nîmes by Sophie Ebrard

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FEATURE / Tenue de Nîmes by Sophie Ebrard

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FEATURE / Tenue de Nîmes by Sophie Ebrard

Sophie Ebrard for Tenue de Nîmes PHOTOGRAPHY BY SOPHIE EBRARD WRITTEN BY KARYS MCEWEN

Sophie Ebrard was a long-time customer of Tenue de Nimes before she joined the family of artists that the brand has been nurturing since its inception. While browsing through the racks one afternoon, the French documentary photographer who works out of London and Amsterdam got to talking to Menno, one of the co-founders of the stores. They hit it off, and Sophie soon agreed to shoot the new range of Pablo Memphis II jeans in the beautiful Cape Verde countryside. Their pairing was a match made in heaven; Sophie and Menno have a shared respect for tried and trusted techniques. Tenue de Nimes uses centuries old technology to craft its jeans, embracing knowledge from the Italian masters of denim and sourcing fabric from a fabled denim mill in Japan. Comparably, Sophie is well known for her use of analogue cameras with either medium format or 35mm film. "It might be the uncertainty that makes shooting with film more exciting than digital," she says. "It is a completely different experience, and I feel the quality and beauty of the image bears no comparison." Sophie, much like the craftsmen at Tenue de Nîmes, does not rely solely on old technology to achieve the perfect texture and colors. While the film process allows a sense of anticipation that is surprising and creative, a little bit of modern magic ties her work together: she scans her negatives and works on the images digitally so she gets the best of both worlds.

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Sophie knows Cape Verde well; she has been holidaying there for over ten years. To her, the most spirited place on the island is the isolated and wild Monte Leone, so that was exactly the spot she pitched for the shoot. With nothing but two close friends, the jeans, her beloved Pentax 67 and the light hitting the rocks in just the right way, the campaign was born. Sophie shot digital Polaroid images with a Leica first, to see how the jeans reacted to the setting. Within minutes, her lens found what she was looking for, and she began shooting on film. "You can’t be too sloppy with analogue, as it takes time, effort and concentration," she says. "At this shoot, I loved capturing the movement, and chasing the perfect moment to press the shutter. I often feel like a hunter!" There’s no denying that there’s a certain charm to the tactility of a film photograph, and that thrill of not knowing what you’ll see through the viewfinder. What Sophie did see that day on Cape Verde was beauty in the simplicity of a really great pair of jeans, lit up by the cloudy light, and moving effortlessly against those magical cliffs by the sea. "I believe I possess a good eye for reality," she says. "I like to make everyday things special, and I like to make things appear the way I see them: beautiful."

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FEATURE / Tenue de Nîmes by Sophie Ebrard

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FEATURE / Tenue de Nîmes by Sophie Ebrard

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FEATURE / Tenue de Nîmes Pablo Memphis II Jeans

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FEATURE / Tenue de Nîmes Pablo Memphis II Jeans

Tenue de Nîmes Pablo Memphis II Jeans WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS / PHOTOGRAPHY JOACHIM BAAN

In August 2015 we released our latest Jean ‘Pablo’, made from a Japanese denim: 'Memphis blue'. The Tenue de Nîmes jeans are the first step within a collection of garments that are timeless and always based on the basic principle of quality. Rene and I chose Italy as the starting point of our first jeans collection because over the past decades the European country was an unquestionable authority in the make and development of denim. Therefore we decided to have the jeans made by by a small factory in Italy, an hour away from Veneto, owned by an Italian woman and her son. The Tenue de Nîmes Pablo jean serves a traditional denim aficionado. Where the first Tenue de Nîmes jean ‘Charles' is a contemporary fit with a tight leg, the Pablo is a straight jean with a slightly more relaxed topblock and a slim but easy leg. The Pablo jeans could be described as a more classic ‘Americana’ jean. From a fabric perspective we believe there are two countries that made fabric production into an art: The United States and Japan. This is why the first ‘Pablo’ jean is created with a 14,5 o.z. Memphis II fabric from the Rampuya denim mill in Kojima, Japan. Especially for this Tenue de Nîmes release we teamed up with French Photographer Sophie Ebrard who created a campaign in the beautiful landscapes of Cape Verde.

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FEATURE / Tenue de Nîmes Pablo Memphis II Jeans

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BRAND FEATURE / Aspesi

AN INTERVIEW WITH ALBERTO ASPESI There are few people in the business who have had the privilege of getting an interview with Alberto Aspesi, an Italian who became a legend over the course of the past 50 years. Mr. Aspesi doesn’t care for interviews, nor does he like to be photographed. He just wants to get on with work. But we at Tenue de Nîmes don’t take ‘no' for an answer, so we travelled to Milan to step into the world of a high quality sportswear brand that can rightfully be considered Italy’s best kept secret.

INTERVIEW & PHOTOGRAPHY BY MENNO VAN MEURS

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BRAND FEATURE / Aspesi

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BRAND FEATURE / Aspesi

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BRAND FEATURE / Aspesi

DIFFERENCE

We asked mister Aspesi why he never bothered about PR with big firms and instead simply opted to ‘be different’ which, by the way, led him to successful collaborations with Peter Lindbergh, Robert Frank and Paolo Roversi. When we asked him to reveal the secret to this approach he simply said: "We've never felt obliged to do PR, we don’t like the notion of doing PR for the sake of it. We only do it when we feel the need to do it or when a project impacts us positively. All the great photographers you listed met this criterium, and they have created very beautiful pictures for us that remain wonderful and very actual to this day, even after many years. "

PROGRESS

Simply calling those previous Aspesi campaigns ‘beautiful’ would not do them justice. The true magic of his work, such as his 1988 series of Linda Evangelista by Lindbergh in Palm Springs, is that it is still completely relevant nearly three decades on. And it seems to us that this reveals another crucial aspect of the Aspesi brand: the fact that you can never quite tell which garment belongs to what season. Every garment has this clean, timeless attitude. It’s enough to make you wonder why we need seasons at all if you own a piece of clothing you would like to wear every day, year in and year out. "We always try to make a clean, beautiful, comfortable and timeless product, with high quality fabrics. We update it constantly, keeping it separate from any brand image, symbol and fads. This is our basic concept, the starting point for the creation of all our collections. The fabric is always the foundation of all our work. Of course, the style is important and can affect the final result, but the choice of fabric is the part that I still like the most. I never buy materials that don’t convince me 100% and I know it remains the backbone of my work and it should remain so. I do not believe we particularly need fashion, it is hard, but we always aim for the perfect garment. A good piece stays beautiful; it stands the test of time. There are jackets in our collection that, with some little updates, are coming from styles we used in the 80s." Meeting mr Aspesi, we stepped into the world of a man who started the business in the 1960s as a shirt manufacturer and then became known for his stubborn desire to be different, but stayed true to his deepest brand heritage. "We started in 1969 and although the outerwear is definitely a significant part of our business, we always think in terms of the ‘total look’ and we pay the same attention to all categories of product, always trying to improve them".

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SUCCESS

The success of the Aspesi brand is not only due to his designs for men. Tenue de Nîmes is proud to announce we will sell the Aspesi women’s line too, as of January 2016. Although both lines share a lot of similarities, there are in fact some crucial differences. "In our case, for the man we imagined a transversal product, basic and continuously updated. For women, we designed a line with a masculine bias, but also revisited, keeping feminine lines but always clean." During our visit to Aspesi headquarters we ran into Lawrence Steel who allowed us to take a picture of him, as long as we did not capture the creative chaos on his desk. Steel has been part of the Aspesi team since 1990. He was brought aboard for a single collaboration with Aspesi, but their partnership continues 25 years on. Although Alberto Aspesi has an opinion about literally everything that happens within the confines of his facility’s walls, he also emphasizes how important a great creative team is to him. "Our creative department is led by a group of four talented designers. I worked with them for a very long time. Each of them has a role, an objective and they have the design responsibility of part of the collections. Success comes from here, from the comparison from them, and from the mix and fusion of their work inside our production".

ART

It doesn’t matter which part of the Headquarters you visit or which store you come across, every Aspesi building is fitted with a mind-blowing selection of art and design furniture. "I don’t know if art is connected to fashion, but what I do know is that I like art a lot, especially the "Arte Povera", an artistic movement that, by rejecting the artificial, recovers the natural as a daily experience, and revaluates common objects. Some of these works can be seen in our stores. Aspesi infuses its products with this philosophy: no status symbol, almost all natural fabrics and understatement of the product."

FUTURE

The success story of the Aspesi brand has been developing for many years, yet still it seems impossible for Mr. Aspesi to pick one period of the brand’s history that he thinks stands out. Maybe it is because he really prefers to secure his legacy rather than enjoying individual moments too much. But we are proud to have caught a glimpse of the life of a clothing designer that embodies all the reasons why we started Tenue de Nîmes. It is someone who singlehandedly looks after (re)creating The Good Things in Life. "There were several moments that made me proud, I cannot deny it, but I'm not the kind of person that likes to tell these stories. I prefer to spend my time working and thinking about the future. Aspesi will always be linked to the basic concept from which we started: understatement, clean design, simple lines, and high quality fabric. Even in a world that is changing so quickly we will adjust the rest and we will keep our basic concept fixed." — 21


FEATURE / Food Revolt

FOOD WRITTEN BY JOY YOON ILLUSTRATIONS BASED ON PHOTOGRAPHY BY SIERRA PRESCOTT, LAURE JOLIET A.O.

Since decades, "out with the old, in with the new, " has become the go-to phrase when ushering in a fresh phase into our lives. It is the mantra we apply to almost anything associated with change, such as relationships, jobs, goals and possessions, making it the original KonMari method when dealing with personal clutter. However, the idea of moving forward is never really just about the new, but rather us following the cyclical nature of all things. Whether we realize it or not, old is always in vogue. Regardless of advancements in technology and science, and no matter how much we’ve evolved beyond our Homo genus ancestors, we inherently yearn for the past. This notion, best illustrated through fashion’s repetition or reimagining of trends, demonstrates our desire to connect with history as we continuously look back for inspiration. So what exactly is new? For me, the idea of new is rarely original, unless you happened to harness the power of fire or invented the Antikythera mechanism, the first analog computer created in the 2nd century BC. Instead, the idea of

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new exists somewhere in the middle, in a place called "new vintage," where the majority of history resides. Here, the idea of original, advanced and modern lives alongside improved, redesigned and altered. It’s the same place where "new and improved " is annoyingly redundant but acceptable. When it comes to food it is hard to make something new unless you’re Willy Wonka. You can make up your interpretation - like how to prepare potatoes - but to declare your method as original is to go against millions of years, billions of people and trillions of potatoes. That is a lot of carbs. In the past, food and those who consumed it were separated into four distinct categories: edible vs. inedible and eat to live vs. live to eat. However diets, palates, access and availability have changed all that. It is no longer what we have to eat but rather what we want to eat. Sushi for example— technically invented by the Chinese—became widely available in the mid1970s thanks to Akira Okazaki. Okazaki discovered how to ship tuna around the world successfully while working at JAL, which kickstarted the global hunger for raw fish.

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FEATURE / Food Revolt

REVOLT Even with all the choices we have now, nothing is ever enough and the need to find something different to devour has manifested into unexpected outcomes. There are strange diets (the blood type and Atkins diets), unsavory trends (kale of any variety and drinking one’s own urine) and sub-categories (fruitarians and flexitarians) in almost every arena of food. But my favorite is faux-hip allergies. Do you claim gluten intolerance, but don’t suffer from celiac? We can’t be friends, ever. Even Paleo, the diet of hunter-gatherers, is trendy. Although I’m reasonably sure hunting-gathering didn’t involve going to your nearest Whole Foods or Marqt to hunt down artisanal smoked salmon 2.5 million years ago. Though new rarely warrants more than a lingering gaze, revisions have my full attention. They can be incredibly poignant and personal, especially when they pertain to food and are done well: flavors, drawn out to engulf our taste buds pull on hidden memories. The feeling of euphoria after the first sip, bite or swirl can be otherworldly. A particular combination of ingredients can throw you into a mental frenzy as you search the depths of your brain in an attempt to recall how things tasted before this precise moment. Did you ever imagine

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the hidden pleasures locked away in sweet potato or a piece of corn? Neither did I, but they are there. The ability to transform familiar and simple ingredients into somewhat symbolic moments is what a good chef can do. If you’re lucky, just one meal crafted by their hands can change your perspective on food forever. Even though moments like this can be hard to come by as chefs nowadays are more preoccupied with promoting mediocre microwavable meals than making quality food, there is hope. Out there are those who embody the spirit of new vintage and, through their passion and innovation, are creating a revolution for the senses we can all enjoy. Bon appétit.

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FEATURE / Food Revolt

LA TROIS MEC

For as long as I’ve known him, Ludovic Lefebvre has always been a chef’s chef. It may be because he has more experience in Michelin three-stars than every chef in Los Angeles, but there is a simpler answer. Lefebvre loves good food. He cooks not only to excite your palate but his own. He finds new ways to tap into our preconceived notions of it and makes us reanalyze our approach. But the hesitation only lasts a second as we eagerly dive into his crunchy, silky, intense, delicate and unexpected concoctions. Although haute cuisine is in Lefebvre’s blood—he trained at Pierre Gagnaire and Alain Passard and spent time under Joël Robuchon’s obsessive watch—he’s a culinary free spirit, and there’s no containing him to just one genre. At Trois Mec, Lefebvre has found a way to channel the different nuances of his cooking style under one roof with the help of talented chefs, Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo of Animal. The threesome, which almost makes you want to rename the restaurant, Ménage à Trois Mec, is a culinary tour de force. Housed in a repurposed Raffalo’s Pizza in a mini-mall, Trois Mec does not take reservations. The only way to secure one of their 24 coveted seats is to try to buy a ticket online. As for the menu, it is constantly evolving. There is one set menu per night, a multi-course tasting menu for $75 that will take you on a taste exploration. Address: 716 N. Highland Avenue, Los Angeles, troismec.com Details: Pre-paid online tickets only for dinner Mondays to Fridays. Non-refundable.

BESTIA

Chef Ori Menashe’s take on Italian is an excercise in purity. By cutting out the bullshit, you’re left with simplicity at its finest. Nothing is perfect and what you see is what you get. The pasta, mostly handmade, is rustic, extra al dente and assorted. The most popular being chocolate agnolotti, stuffed with braised oxtail and served with currants and pine nuts. The house-cured meats stored in glass refrigerators are full of rich and earthy flavors. Mortadella with pistachio, coppa di testa (head cheese), salame with fennel and orange zest, spicy soppressata, and wild boar are all ready to be sliced and served with tart green mostarda. Menashe’s steamed mussels served with house made ‘nduja, fennel seeds, preserved lemon and grilled bread is right on the money. While his steak tartare made from fresh beef hearts, pine nuts, mint and champagne vinegar is reminiscent of a tasty meat bruschetta. To finish things off, Menashe’s wife Genevieve, the pastry chef, makes a fragrant saffron-tinged rice pudding layered with persimmon that is simply delectable and oh-so-satisfying. Address: 2121 E. 7th Place, Los Angeles, (213) 514-5724, BestiaLA.com.

NIGHT + MARKET SONG

Blood soup is a grim proposition for even the most seasoned eaters. However at Night + Market Song, Kris Yenbamroong's Thai restaurant in Silver Lake, it’s just a regular menu item. Luu suk is warm pig blood, strewn with fresh and fragrant Southeast Asian herbs, and topped with crunchy pork rinds, toasted noodles and served with a side of sweet, honey-colored sauce. This goopy mixture, once blended, is scooped up and eaten with sticky balls of rice. Yum… And nothing says delicious like bitter chopped beef larb, enhanced with raw liver and cow bile. Nothing. However, all jokes aside, what Yenbamroong is doing is opening our eyes to a different side to Thai food—one that is stinky, oozy and slightly repugnant, but nonetheless exciting. It is mind-blowing, a shock to our palates and a lesson in cultural tolerance. How else could we appreciate the vivid and intense flavors of his herbal catfish "tamales " baked in banana leaves, spicy jungle curry or fermented Isaan sausage? Let’s not overlook the crispy rice salad with their house-cured "Spam. " Or their traditional papaya salad redesigned to be battered and fried instead of pounded, fatty bits of grilled pig neck lovingly referred to as pork "toro, " and the "startled pig " grilled pork salad. And though the safest option is garlicky fried chicken thighs that are crunchy and served with roasted green chilies and steamed water bugs, why settle for safe? At Night + Market Song, eyeopening, mind and mouth numbing memories await you. Address: 3322 W. Sunset Blvd., Silver Lake, (323) 665-5899, nightmarketla.com

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FEATURE / Food Revolt

NYC MORGENSTERN’S NYC

If you’re a fan of emulsification like Nicholas Morgenstern, then ice cream is likely your holy grail. If not, you’d do well to go visit Morgenstern’s Finest Ice Cream where you’ll get to taste his 16year obsession first hand and understand why it’s widely seen as one of New York City’s best parlors. Ice cream may just be sugar and fat molecules suspended in frozen water and surrounded by air, but at Morgenstern’s it’s a little different. His is eggless and relatively low in sugar and butterfat, but not for obvious reasons. Instead, Morgenstern’s decisions are based on mouthfeel. Too much butterfat coats your palate and blocks the tongue’s ability to detect flavor so the less, the better. The same applies to sugar. However, beyond the science, ice cream is just addictively delicious. And with flavors like Black Ass Licorice, Burnt Honey Vanilla, Green Tea Pistachio, Durian Banana, Salted Pretzel Caramel, Vietnamese Coffee, Salt & Pepper Pine nut, how can you resist? Morgenstern’s also serves house-made sodas, perfect for sorbet coolers, an ice cream version of avocado toast that is unreal, and his take on an open-faced ice-cream sandwich called the New God Flow. Japanese milk bread drizzled with honey and blow torched like crème brûlée is topped with two scoops of raw milk ice cream and an extra drizzle and torching for good measure. Be sure to pick up a stamp card. Your tenth ice cream is free. Address: 2 Rivington Street (Bowery) in the Lower East Side, morgensternsnyc.com.

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RUSS & DAUGHTERS CAFÉ

What makes a classic? Is it through age, reputation or simply by association? Russ & Daughters Café is the latter, as the spinoff of the historical Houston storefront. But to become a true classic, it’ll have to stand on its own. So saddle up to the bar and get ready to nosh. But first, an egg cream or a fresh cucumber soda is an absolute must. After years of obsessing over every detail, like their backlit hand painted signs, Russ & Daughters Café finally opened its doors in May 2015. And though it offers many of the same items the store is famous for, the café has its own charm and dishes. My favorite is the hot and cold smoke salmon with homemade waffle cut potato chips and pickles. A classic. The helpings are mostly modest and perfect for snacking, like salmon roe and crème fraîche with latkes, the seafood chowder and the Pastrami Russ—salmon pastrami on a pretzel roll. Still, perfection is never guaranteed. The scrambled eggs are not fluffy enough for my liking, and the caviar service is overpriced. But for $90 you can get the Anne platter, which features Russ & Daughters’ famous sable, Western Nova smoked salmon, brook trout, wild salmon roe and private stock sturgeon. It comes with a basket of excellent rye that is made by Gordon Weissman, a baker transplanted from Massachusetts, as well as other breads and a crisp salad of thin-sliced potatoes, the house cream cheese and all the usual fixings: enough to feed three or four people. Now that’s more like it.

OIJI NYC

When it comes to cooking any ethnic cuisine, you run the risk of people who know their way around it. For instance, charging for kimchi, Korea’s most famous side dish/banchan is almost sacrilege, especially at a Korean establishment. But chefs Brian Kim and Tae Kyung Ku aren’t afraid to rock the boat. Instead, their approach to updating and translating modern Korean cuisine with just a touch of French influence is causing a big buzz. There is no denying that their modified yuk hwe, steak tartare, and their take on the classic jang-jo-rim, braised beef served with buttered rice and a soft-cooked egg are delicious. Their Korean fried chicken is making waves, the kind your taste buds will want to ride forever. However, what makes Kim and Ku’s interpretations even more enjoyable is their regard for context and history. If you know the originals, you’ll understand. So whether this is your first taste of Korean or your fiftieth, there is much to appreciate, even if you have to pay for the kimchi. Address: 119 First Avenue (East Seventh Street) in the East Village, oijinyc.com. —

Address: 127 Orchard Street (Delancey Street) in the Lower East Side.

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BRAND FEATURE / Orslow

ORSLOW JAPAN

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BRAND FEATURE / Orslow

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BRAND FEATURE / Orslow

Ichiro’s interest in denim was sparked about 30 years ago when his mother bought him a denim overall. He recalls this moment as the day his passion for denim began.

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BRAND FEATURE / Orslow

WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS

We are proud to introduce you to a very gifted designer by the name of Ichiro, founder and Creative Director at Orslow. Ichiro likes to describe his brand as a ‘slow brand’, referring to its endless attention to detail and mostly slow, old school design and production methods. I clearly remember the first time I touched a pair of Orslow jeans two years ago, during Paris Fashion Week. My first reaction was: this is impossible! This feels like a vintage 501! The shade of the indigo as well as the touch really made us feel like we were holding a 1970s Levi’s jean. Therefore we are proud to present your Ichiro’s philosophy. The information below is taken from an interview we did with Ichiro for our blog at tenuedenimes.com. Ichiro’s interest in denim was sparked about 30 years ago when his mother bought him a denim overall. He recalls this moment as the day his passion for denim began. Washed denim was a rarity back in those days. Practically every jean was either rigid or rinsed. The overall Ichiro’s mother bought him was a one-washed one too. Ever since he received his present he wore the overall until it almost fell apart. He clearly remembers witnessing the very dark fabric fading to light and washed over time. Quite remarkable for a kid his age. Apart from the color, Ichiro became fascinated by the fact that the more he wore the garment, the jeans not only became lighter, but also more comfortable. During the 1980s the 'stone-wash virus’ infected the denim business. The thing that bothered Ichiro though was that the color that came out of the big laundry machines never seemed to match his old overalls. One day Ichiro and his friends came across an old selvage Levi’s 501in a vintage store in Tokyo. The shop assistants showed them the redline 501s that Levi’s used to make until the early 1980s. Back in those days these jeans would retail for approximately USD35. The price was not affected by whether the jeans were selvage or non-selvage. Ichiro and his friend both bought a selvage pair of 501s in the store that day. After a while they realised that though they had bought a Levi’s 501 from roughly the same era, the jeans faded differently. The jeans of Ichiro’s friend came close to the color of his beloved overall, whereas Ichiro’s jeans faded to a paler shade of blue.

who loved vintage as much as he did. He looked like a rock star and wore a pair of jeans in the exact same color as Ichiro’s jeans. When he asked the guy if he knew why this particular jean would turn out so beautifully he simply answered: Big E. He referred to the Capital E on the red tab of Levi’s’ famous back-pockets. Prior to 1971 every single red tab would show the word LEVI’S written with a capital ‘E’. After this period Levi’s switched to the 'small e’. According to Ichiro the 'new’ jeans from after 1971 were no longer identical to those that came before. Ichiro’s personal reference (his denim overall) and his friend’s jeans were both from 1966. Ichiro’s own pair of 501s however turned out to be early 1980s selvage denim. From then on, Ichiro decided he wanted to collect vintage 501s, which eventually led to his ultimate wish to make the perfect jean. Because he did not have any professional machinery and there was very little reference (internet was pretty rare back in those days) he decided to just start making jeans with his home machine. The stitching turned out to be very different from the desirable ‘vintage’ stitch, obviously. But this is how Ichiro learned about industrial sewing machines and he then decided he would start collecting those too! It took him until 2002 before he finished his first industrial pair of denim. Finally in 2005 he established Orslow. His vintage collection always remained the backbone of everything he stands for with the Orslow brand. When he designs clothing, his vintage pieces are always at the back of his mind as a reference. And of course his old machines allow him to replicate old details. His main objective with the Orslow brand is to be timeless. His clothes should always be relevant. No wonder he picks his classic 105 standard fit jean or the 107 slim fit jeans as his favorite Orslow piece. Interest in clothing seems to be the key to his success: the willingness to study clothing and to learn about every single detail of each piece. It will therefore hardly come as a surprise that Ichiro only wishes for one thing when it comes to the future of the Orslow label: He wants it to be eternal. ‘Slow' masterpieces that will survive time. —

The 1990s were well under way before Ichiro’s question on why the jeans would look so different after wear was answered. Ichiro ran into a guy at work

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ART / Nik Christensen

Expanding Time by Nik Christensen

WRITEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS PHOTO CREDITS: PETER TIJHUIS COPYRIGHT: NIK CHRISTENSEN / COURTESY OF GALERIE GABRIEL ROLT AMSTERDAM

When we started Tenue de Nîmes in 2008 at the Elandsgracht in Amsterdam the street was still in development. The Elandsgracht was home to many youngsters like us who could not afford to be in Amsterdam’s best streets and started a business in the heart of the Jordaan area. This is where we met our friend Gabriel Rolt, a Spanishborn Dutch gallery owner who represents established international artists such as Ryan McGinley, Nik Christensen, Jake and Dinos Chapman, Shezad Dawood and Peter Schuyff, as well as young artists such as Thomas van Linge and Adriana Arroyo. After nine years at our beloved 'Elandsgracht' Gabriel relocated his gallery into the ‘De Pijp’ area at the end of last year. It is now located in a humongous old school building close to the Amsterdam Museum District. Gabriel will soon (January 2016) host a solo exhibition by Nik Christensen in this new location. Nik Christensen is an artist from the United Kingdom who graduated from the Rietveld Academy in 2000. Christensen lives and works in Amsterdam and previously showed his work in major Dutch museums such as the Teylers in Haarlem and the Stedelijk Museum in Schiedam, as well as several international galleries. Nik works out of his studio at the top floor of a former Heineken factory, also in ‘de Pijp’area of the Dutch capital. Everything in the loft reminds you of the time that Holland’s most famous beer brand used the space to create their Heineken parasols on the two top floors of the building. When I entered his studio for the first time I was immediately attracted to a gathering of small works that covered one of the large walls of the characteristic building. When I asked Nik if those were part of the upcoming exhibition he explained that the small drawings with black ink on Japanese 30

white paper were his conceptual interlude of what he was about to make for his upcoming show. "These works could be seen as studies, but maybe some of them will eventually become part of an exhibition too. For now I use these small works to try things that I would normally not do. If you don’t put your thoughts on paper you will never be able to see them. Small work also allows me to see a lot of different things in a shorter period of time " Surprised, I asked him how he was not sure yet what to think of the work. "It sometimes takes time before I see something in a particular work. That takes a while. Sometimes one work turns out to be special to me although I have not appreciated it all before. " Nik Christensen made all of the works during his most recent stay in Kamiyama, on the Island of Shikoku in Japan. "The Island is known for its Pilgrim route of 88 temples and it’s in the middle of beautiful mountains and landscapes. I found out about it a long time ago because I flew over the area and I was amazed by all that green below me. A couple of years after I stayed on the island as Artist in Residency, I decided to go back every once in a while. It’s very special to me because I stay right at the heart of traditional Japanese agriculture and there is hardly any tourism, apart from some local ones. When I go there with my family I have everything around me that I need to get to work. Being in Kamiyama is being in Japan, the real Japan. Compare it with going to New York. It is amazing but it’s not that you have seen the United States yet. "The beautiful island provides me with this kind of energy. It’s hard to define, but although I love the city I feel so at home in Japan. I have lived in new York for many years and although I am addicted to the energy of that city I somehow feel more connected to Shikoku now. Maybe it is because you see everything grow around you. You are so close to something very small, that you suddenly

"It’s almost t a small wo difficult because th room to say s

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ART / Nik Christensen

realise everything moves around you." Nik Christensen mainly uses Japanese equipment for his art works. For instance he uses special Japanese brushes in various sizes which each demand a different approach. Secondly he makes all his work with traditional sumi-ink. This particular black Japanese ink has an "absolute blackness" to it.

that I believe ork is more to make here is less something. "

His works on paper have grown in size into monumental drawings, the works, sometimes several meters wide, show intricate details. Nik has stated that he started working on larger works to expand time". In addition to that he simply likes the physical aspects of creating a large work. "I can also bend a work in a certain direction. It’s almost that I believe a small work is more difficult to make because there is less room to say something ". In his work Nik often presents theatrical scenes imposing the stillness of filmic moments, showing either what has happened or is about to. His work creates moments of focus, letting the eye wander through the layers of the image, and the usage of ink that is applied by Japanese calligraphy brushes. "Japan inspires me. All my tools come from Japan. I have studied Japanese art for years and it fascinates me how Japanese people have translated their arts into daily aesthetics that you find (in) their packaging and for instance in food too. This all makes sense to me as I see myself as an aesthete too. " When I asked Nik about his appreciation for the Japanese ability to ‘master’ things and their continuous search for perfection he revealed a depressing secret. Nik explained that the downside of sumi ink is that when a line hits the paper it cannot be changed, nor can it be hidden. Where painters sometimes cover entire portraits underneath a new piece of art, Nik’s work does not

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allow him to make a single mistake. "I have done shows with some of the largest paintings I made and some of these pieces I did twice or sometimes even three times. " Consider a painting of 2 by 3 meters which is 90% finished and all of a sudden something hits the paper that doesn’t make him happy. It’s the moment he has to start all over. "If the white is gone, there is no way back. " It almost feels like Christensen enjoys this excitement in his work. He has to be in control, but also emphasises there is no hurry. "To me there is no such thing as retirement or something, so I might as well take time to do things that I need to do. I had to take out the rush. So although my work can sometimes be done quickly I go through several stages towards surprising myself. " Talking about challenges in work Nik reveals that new inspiration starts when he feels it is time to choose a different angle. When we ask him if that’s a moment when he feels he has mastered that side of his work he says that that’s something which is hard to say about his own work – he prefers to describe it as 'time to move on’. "There are many moments when I evaluate my work. But I stopped jumping from one subject to another. I am so inspired by those small noodle shops in Japan where they spend 20 years of their lives to get to the perfect noodle recipe. It feels like everybody seems to have a certain function in Japanese society and at least people are appreciated for what they do." Nik’s work is part of important private and corporate collections, including those of the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague, the Stedelijk Museum Schiedam, the Dutch central bank DNB, Gilissen Bankers and many international private collections. More information on his upcoming exhibition at Gallery Gabriel Rolt is available through: www.gabrielrolt.com — 31


BRAND FEATURE / Alexander Wang

Introducing Alexander Wang at Tenue de Nîmes WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS / IMAGES BY ALEXANDER WANG

"I'm not like most designers, who have to set sail on an exotic getaway to get inspired. Most of the time, it's on my walk to work, or sitting in the subway and seeing something random or out of context. "

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BRAND FEATURE / Alexander Wang

We are proud to announce we finally have the chance to work with one of the world’s most talented designers who just celebrated his ten year anniversary: Alexander Wang. Although Wang was born in San Francisco, California, he moved to New York at the age of 18. He attended several internships in the Big Apple but started designing his own collection too about a year later. Wang launched his first full women’s line in 2007. In the years that followed Alexander Wang was recognised with several awards, such as Women’s and Men’s Wear designer of the year.

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DENIM & ALEXANDER WANG Alexander Wang recently launched a denim line by the name of Denim x Alexander Wang. The collection is a tribute to authentic denim and consists of three wardrobe essentials (slim, relaxed and boy-friend), each in three basic washes. The Alexander Wang Denim line was supported by a special campaign by photographer Steven Klein featuring the fabulous Anna Ewers. Alexander Wang is always looking for the right balance between the authenticity of denim as well as re-contextualizing the ultimate urban uniform. Wang says about his love for denim: "Denim has always been very personal to me, as I - as well as a lot of other people around me - wear it as part of their daily wardrobe. A lot of my friends alter non-stretch vintage denim. We wanted to translate that genuine sensibility but evolve and tweak the fit, to make it more feminine. Especially for 'Wang 001’ we wanted to differentiate it by adding just minimal recovery and making the fit truly slim, not skinny."

Fabrication is key at Wang’s Denim collection because every single pair of jeans should show the right kind of patina. By using high end, cutting edge techniques combined with handcrafted elements, Denim x Alexander Wang features a nuanced marbling texture, closely replicating the look of natural aging and wear patterns. The classic indigo look is paired with subtle, modern all-black hardware. The tack button has a solid, clean, matte black profile, free of embellishments, discretely branded on the inside. One of the five belt loops is made of black leather, and the sewn-in custom coin pocket has a pure functional look. The matte black rivets have a classic washer-burr construction, in line with the jeans’ functional aesthetic.

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BRAND FEATURE / 100 Hands

100

100 years of textile heritage In a world where almost everything is produced mechanically, products lose authenticity and personality. Everything looks and feels alike and nothing is really special anymore. Now more than ever, craftsmanship and handwork can make the difference. We at Tenue de Nîmes care deeply about these frequently overlooked aspects, so we get especially excited when we discover brands that value them as much as we do. Even more so when they are based so close to home. Because we hope that you share this love as well, we would like to introduce you to the Amsterdam-based shirt brand 100Hands. In 2014 Akshat and Varvare, two former investment bankers from Amsterdam, took a bold risk. In an attempt to share their work and passion with others, they quit their jobs and started a new journey. For everyone who truly appreciates quality and traditional craftsmanship, they launched 100Hands – a brand specialized in unique handmade shirts. We labeled their adventure a ‘bold risk’ just now, but really their idea was not very far-fetched: not only did their families move into the shirt business several decades ago, they also have one hundred years of heritage in yarn production and trading. A solid basis to start out from, we would say.

TEXT ROBIN VAN BEZOUW PHOTOGRAPHY 100HANDS

But what makes 100Hands extra special to us? Let’s start with the fact that every shirt is handmade from scratch – from designing the patterns and weaving the fabric to cutting all the pieces and sewing everything together. Some of the techniques used are over 100 years old and you’d be hard pressed to find them being used anywhere else. The creation of a single shirt takes a day and a half, during which it passes through 100 hands of highly passionate and expert artisans. This handwork not only ensures that every shirt is unique and has a character of its own, you also get the story of each person involved in its making woven into it. Isn't that something? To ensure that every procedure is carried out diligently and its quality can be guaranteed, the shirt is only allowed to leave the 100Hands factory once it is ready for its new owner. Before it is sent out into the world, the shirt has to be absolutely flawless. If not, it is unwrapped and taken back to be fixed until every little detail is on point. The result? A unique shirt with a perfect fit, almost invisible stitching and very precise finishing. And the cherry that tops this handmade cake is that a lot of the products are GOTS and Fair Trade certified. What else could we wish for? —

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BRAND FEATURE / 100 Hands

100

100 hands to sew one shirt

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BRAND FEATURE / Simon Miller

SIMON MILLER Exploring Modern American Craftsmanship

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BRAND FEATURE / Simon Miller

Wandering around Paris, René stumbled upon a brand that somehow felt connected to everything we embrace at Tenue de Nîmes. This brand was called Simon Miller. We discovered it was founded on the principles of Japanese fabrication and classic American construction, translated into contemporary patterns. This 'new vintage' framework is the basic assumption at the start of every Simon Miller collection. Think denim and indigo aged with advanced wash treatments, alongside ready-towear classics offering a sophisticated, natural ease. The Simon Miller brand draws inspiration from the city of Los Angeles and the minimalist landscapes of the American west. The brand strives for wellcrafted and timeless collections that are made to be ‘lived in'. In 2011, the Simon Miller brand came under the creative direction of Jake Sargent and Daniel Corrigan. Jake previously oversaw the retail and product collaboration arm of Monocle magazine, and Daniel’s background bridges denim manufacturing, merchandising, and graphic design. Since the arrival of the duo the Simon Miller collection has expanded into a full range of men’s and women’s ready-to-wear. The Simon Miller collection is developed in the brand’s two locations on the East and West Coast of the US. They have a New York showroom and a denim studio in L.A. Both spaces express the brand’s passion for raw material – juxtaposing industrial concrete with warm aged leathers and faded indigos. In 2014, the Simon Miller brand was selected as a finalist for the Vogue / CFDA Fashion Fund. —

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FEATURE / Faded Tenue de Nîmes

Tenue de Nîmes People often ask us why we love jeans so much. Or : what do we believe makes jeans so special. One of the answers we always get back to is the fact that jeans are, unlike any other piece of clothing, so personal. Miles Johnson, Creative Director at Patagonia, once said to us: "Jeans tell you everything about someone’s life. Finding a jean allows me to take a step into the life someone lived." A vintage jean reveals what kind of job someone had and testifies to some of the challenges that its wearer faced. So although jeans will never talk, they tell you more about someone's life in them than you might think right now. It follows that if you should ask us what the true secret is about jeans we would tell you that it is that personal essence which brings the pure magic. If you and I start wearing a new pair of (rigid) jeans and we meet in four years our jeans will look totally different. They will reveal our personal DNA. We at Tenue de Nîmes like to gather as much of those personal stories as possible so we started an archive with some of the best denim fades and stories we encountered at the Tenue de Nîmes stores. We take pride in showing that good products will last a life time - in fact they will only get better over time! To support that idea we will share with you some of the most astonishing denim ‘projects' we came across during the last couple of months. We will do so through our blog and Instagram. It would be great to see your jeans too! Share you pair with us by tagging it #FadeTenuedeNimes @tenuedenimes. Twice a year we will publish the very best in our Journal de Nîmes. Below you find two of the best we have seen in some time, as presented to us by Dutch publisher Peter van Rhoon and barista Trainer Keng Pereira. Name Peter van Rhoon Profession Owner/Creative Director CODE magazine & Owner/Creative Director Super Stories Jeans Max Raw by Acne Studios Appr. Date of Purchase February 2007 Treatment Never washed. Wear & air... Best memory wearing the jeans Buying this denim was to me -in those days- an outstanding retail experience. The girl who sold it to me was -I believe- Australian, intelligent and knew by looking at me what size I needed. I bought another pair of pants, I’ve never worn after. It’s still in my closet. She sold it really well. Wearing Wore it for a long time every day. It was part of my uniform for approximately 5 years. But best memory with it: The first big event we organised with CODE. It was called Off Schedule. Summer 2007. 1600 people in front of the Koepelkerk, only 800 could enter. That night turned into a psychedelically wild evening. Less wild was that we had forgotten to hire the cleaning crew. And spent till 9.30 cleaning up the train wreck of that party. At 10.00 I walked into tradeshow Modefabriek, in order to represent CODE to clients. No shower, same denim, pretending to be fresh. 38

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FEATURE / Faded Tenue de Nîmes

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FEATURE / Faded Tenue de Nîmes

Name Keng Pereira Profession Barista Trainer Jeans A.P.C. Petit Standard Appr. Date of Purchase July 3rd, 2014. Treatment Luke warm soak at month 10 and 14. Multiple crotch repairs. Best memory wearing the jeans Lots of good memories, most memorable is wearing it while receiving the 2nd place award at the Dutch Barista Championships. And being at the World Championships in Seattle!

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FEATURE / Faded Tenue de Nîmes

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BRAND FEATURE / NLST

NLST RESPECT THE PAST, CREATE THE FUTURE.

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BRAND FEATURE / NLST

'Conceived from a passion for the utility and authenticity of surplus and an endless quest for new proportions and silhouettes.'

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We are very excited to welcome another inspiring brand to our Tenue de Nîmes portfolio: NLST [‘Enlist’]. This contemporary American brand pays tribute to the classic US Military and Navy style. Every NLST garment is made with the most exclusive Japanese fabrics and its color board is characterized by lots of blue, army green and khaki tones. The combination of passion and appreciation for the utility and authenticity of surplus led to the establishment of this brand, coupled with the founders’ endless quest for new silhouettes. The way they go about creating every piece of their collections is to ensure that each piece can be added to, and mixed with, any existing modern wardrobe. NLST blends quality, innovation and authenticity in its designs. The resulting garments guarantee a pleasantly casual, almost irreverent look. To do that, and managing to exude understated sophistication at the same time is impressive – not to mention promising.

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FEATURE / Hancock VA x Tenue de Nîmes

Hancock VA X Tenue de Nîmes WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIAN ROBLING

British luxury outerwear brand, Hancock, collaborates with flagship retailer for the Netherlands, Tenue de Nîmes on an iconic article featuring the bespoke Hancock VA x Tenue de Nîmes label. Article 41 in Black/Taupe is the elegantly simple, single-breasted raincoat that comes with a concealed placket, an exposed top button, two front pocket welts and rear button down vent detail. Article 41 has a detachable quilted liner in khaki. The elasticated jersey trim featured in all our new Quilted Articles is a reference to Thomas Hancock's first ever patent in 1820 when he invented elastication in clothing. The V-Quilt is also a Hancock signature that refers to the process of vulcanization. Hancock was founded in 2012 by Daniel Dunko and Gary Bott, creating a brand and philosophy inspired by the English inventor and Father of the British rubber industry, Thomas Hancock. Utilizing rubber bonded (vulcanized) cloths from a Victorian mill in Manchester, England; the Hancock factory, based in Cumbernauld, Scotland, produces handmade raincoats that are put together using the manufacturing techniques invented by Thomas Hancock (business partner to Charles Macintosh 1831-1843). In the very short period the brand has been in business, it has not wasted any time notching up some very impressive accolades and collaborations, such as a Wallpaper* Design Award, it dressed British actors Michael Fassbender, Dominic Cooper and Matt Smith, it produces outerwear for distinguished brands like Dunhill, Gieves& Hawkes and Richard James and collaborated with Timothy Everest, Missoni and Converse. Tenue de Nîmes is proud and pleased to be the most recent name to be added to that list. — 44

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FEATURE / Hancock VA x Tenue de Nîmes

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CITY REPORT / San Francisco SAN FRANCISCO Most of our friends on the East Coast and the West Coast do not really care much for ‘the other side’. In fact they like to make fun of each other like the Dutch and Belgian do. But to us in fact, it feels like San Francisco combines the best of both coasts. The climate is perfect: fresh and foggy in the morning but during the afternoon the sun burns that away. San Francisco is laid back and very tolerant like like most of California, but it has a little bit of that crazy NYC energy too. The beautiful surroundings will allow you to escape city life as well, so there is no such thing as being stuck in the City by the Bay. Make sure your pockets are well filled though when you visit San Fran because the cities' second 'Gold Rush’ (thanks to Silicon Valley) makes it an expensive place to go around.

LA TAQUERIA Tellason's Tony Patello leaves no doubt: this is the best taco place. Bar none.

AFTER SEVERAL JOURNALS DE NÎMES' WITHOU ANNOUNCE ITS RETURN. FOR THIS EDITION, W COURTESY OF OUR GOOD FRIEND AND LONG OUT OF TOKYO THESE DAYS, THIS CITY REPOR WITH YOU HIS PICKS OF WHERE TO GO AND W OPPORTUNITY TO WANDER AROUN

LA TAQUERIA Tellason's Tony Patello leaves no doubt: this is the best taco place. Bar none.

MISSION CHINESE FOOD Never had such wonderful, contemporary Chinese food in such a nondescript restaurant.

STATIC VINTAGE Wide variety of vintage clothing in eras and styles; from the 1920s to current designs

THE CITY REPORTER Also known as Luis Mendo, works as a designer and illustrator based out of Tokyo. This report continues in the series for TdN, after Paris, Barcelona, NYC and Amsterdam. Luis' works have been featured in magazines worldwide. See his work at www.luismendo.com

SCHATZI Vintage home furnishings, folky primitive next to 1970s glamour.

DE ANGELIS - 20TH CENTURY OBJECTS & DECOR Perfect pit-stop for some extraordinary Mid-Century design.

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SAMOVAR TEA LOUNGE, MISSION Tea like you’ve never seen it before. If you’re in San Francisco and looking for tea and a quick bite, you will love their selection of organic, single origin and direct import teas, chai, iced tea, and herbal blends alongside a selection of bites and sweets.

DE YOUNG MUSEUM The Young Museum is part of the San Francisco Fine Arts Museum, one of the most important art institutions in the Western United States. The museum is located in Golden Gate Park and is names after M.H. de Young, an American newspaper legend. JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 12 — THE NEW VINTAGE ISSUE


CITY REPORT / San Francisco

UT A CITY REPORT, WE ARE MOST PLEASED TO WE SHINE A SPOTLIGHT ON SAN FRANCISCO, G TIME COLLABORATOR LUIS MENDO. BASED RTER AND RENOWNED ILLUSTRATOR SHARES WHAT TO TRY WHEN YOU SHOULD HAVE THE ND THIS AMAZING CITY BY THE BAY.

SONG TEA & CERAMICS A wonderful place that offers a collection of traditional, rare and experimental tea from China and Taiwan.

BOULETTE'S LARDER FOR BREAKFAST Our friend Keith White introduced us to SF's finest breakfast spot before we took the ferry to Sausalito. .

ARIA ANTIQUES An antique curiosity shop filled to the rafters with antiques, art, funk and junk. LEVI'S HQ / ARCHIVE / EUREKA LAB The Vatican of denim. The best place to experience the past and get a glimpse of the future of denim.

AL'S ATTIRE SF's most inspiring retail stop full of bespoke clothing and footwear.

MT TAMALPAIS Just north of San Francisco's Golden Gate you will find Mount Tamalpais. It has redwood groves and oak woodlands with a spectacular view from its 2,571-foot summit.

MARIN HEADLANDS Marin Headlands covers various histories from the Miwok Indians to the military, including historical Fort Barry and Fort Cronkhite, the NIKE Missile site and the 150 yearold Point Bonita lighthouse.

MUIR WOODS NATIONAL MONUMENT Muir Woods is part of a redwood range that spans the California/ Oregon border all the way to Monterey.

MAGNOLIA GASTROPUB & BREWERY Lunch or drinks in the Haight? Magnolia is the only thing you need! Perfect spot for lunch too before you jump into the area to do some superb vintage hunting. JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 12 — THE NEW VINTAGE ISSUE

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TRAVEL REPORT / Levi's & San Francisco

Tenue de Nîmes in San Francisco VISITING THE LEVI’S ARCHIVE & EUREKA INNOVATION LAB

WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOACHIM BAAN & MENNO VAN MEURS

It was early 2015 when Joachim, Rene and I were invited to travel to the United States to visit the Levi Strauss & Co. Headquarters in North Beach, San Francisco. Just before we received the invitation LS&Co. announced that 2015 will mark their 100 year partnership with denim fabric supplier Cone, so it was about time to raise at least one glass to that that dazzling anniversary. From the moment we received the invitation our lives changed. Now I know that sounds a little dramatic for someone who does not work in the industry but if you consider that for us, going to the Levi Strauss HQ equals a Catholic being granted entrance to the Vatican you may get a sense of why we were so excited to go there. One particular part of our trip would ensure that our ‘denim lives’ would never be the same again: entry to the legendary Levi Strauss & Co. Archives where the brand stores its most desirable treasures from its long, distinguished history.

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After an early morning run from The Mission towards the AT&T Stadium alongside the bay our first stop was Blue Bottle Coffee at the San Francisco Ferry Building. Because let’s be clear about one thing: a successful day can’t start without a great cup of coffee. Our friend Ben Starmer, Marketing Manager at Levi’s Vintage Clothing was our guide that day and he invited us to walk to LS&Co.’s Headquarters. You would be right in thinking that up to this point, we took many trips to the Levi Strauss & Co.’s Archives in our dreams and therefore we had this silly view of what everything might look like. Whatever we expected, the reality could not have been more different. The brand’s HQ is a massive and slightly corporate red brick building just off The Embarcadero, close to Pier 23. It has an astonishing view over the bay and one look at the Golden Gate Bridge will instantly remind you of when it all started: The Gold Rush Era.

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TRAVEL REPORT / Levi's & San Francisco

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TRAVEL REPORT / Levi's & San Francisco

HISTORY LEVI’S ARCHIVE On our visit to the Levi Strauss & Co. Archives that morning we were hosted by Tracey Panek, Levi's Historian and Stacia Fink, Archivist/Conservator at the Archives. It was, and we generally use this term in moderation, awesome to realize that after the retirement of the legendary Levi's Historian Lynn Downey, two women were in charge of denim heaven. Who said this is a men’s game? The Levi Strauss & Co. Archives is best described as a normal office with one major difference: it’s literally stuffed with Levi’s antiquities. Store displays, banners, dolls, customized denim products, posters, neon lights - this part of the building showed us everything Levi’s. We were asked to take a seat at a large meeting table and before we laid eyes on some of the most important denim pieces from the brand’s history, Tracey explained some of the pivotal moments in the Levi's history. Right in the middle of the LS&Co. Archives is a large blue metal safe that is home to the oldest Levi’s® jeans. From there, Tracey proceeded to reveal some of the most iconic Levi’s jeans. The denim pieces are carefully wrapped in white cloth and sometimes held together by gently stitched cotton gauze that prevents them from falling apart. All the historical pieces can only be touched with cotton gloves. Before witnessing the jeans that sealed the first chapter of the golden handshake between Levi's and denim manufacturer Cone Mills, we were allowed to see one of the company’s oldest pair of Levi’s jeans: the 1880s "Nevada Jeans. " This historical pair of jeans was acquired by the brand at an online auction on eBay in May 2001 for an astonishing $46,532. Needless to say, this is a vital piece of Levi's history that keeps a globally operating denim machine focused on what it’s all about: creating a functional product that simply lasts a lifetime. Another mind-blowing piece of Levi's history was the "XX "-an 1870s pair of waist overalls made with denim from the Amoskeag Mill, Levi’s' denim supplier before Cone Mills became the brand’s exclusive denim provider by 1922. The last pair of Levi’s jeans that Tracey showed us symbolizes a true milestone in denim history: a 1920s pair of Levi’s Lot 501 made from Cone denim. Cone Mills became the official supplier of Levi’s Shrink-to-Fit denim fabric for all Levi’s 501 jeans in 1915. Read more about this collaboration in this issue's article: The Golden Handshake: Levi’s and Cone Celebrating 100 Years.

1920-LOT501- CONE

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TRAVEL REPORT / Levi's & San Francisco

1870S AMOSKEAG

1880-NEVADA

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TRAVEL REPORT / Levi's & San Francisco

FUTURE LEVI’S EUREKA LAB Our day could not have been more paradoxical than it already was. Our heads were exploding from all the treasures we were allowed to look at in the Levi Strauss & Co. Archives. We then set foot on the other side of the Levi's building to witness a glimpse of the future, creativity 2.0 at Levi’s' private playground: Eureka Lab. It is ha rd to describe the energy that goes through Eureka Innovation Lab. It was the introduction to various people on the team that set the tone. Most of the people involved with Eureka Lab were not trained in the denim business. Most of them were artists, technicians, or people from the tech business hired to take the way we look at denim to the next level. In order to understand the uniqueness of the group of people working in this unusual denim laboratory, it helps to know that it was set up to gather all the Levi's knowledge on pattern making, cutting, sewing, washing, printing and product testing all under one roof. The main idea behind the Eureka Lab is to investigate the past, create the best possible product in the present and define the exciting future of denim. Each and every stage of denim production is literally put to the test in the LS&Co Eureka Lab. So whether the brand wants to test its latest screen prints, explore the possibilities with indigo dyes or test new laser machines to finish jeans without using any water - it’s all possible at the Eureka Lab. Instead of having all that knowledge spread across the world in washing facilities, at pattern makers and in denim factories - all this intellectual priority is now concentrated right where it belongs: in San Francisco. —

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TRAVEL REPORT / Levi's & San Francisco

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BRAND FEATURE / Côte d’Ivoire Cotton Jeans

Japan Blue introduces Côte d’Ivoire Cotton Jeans

We at Tenue de Nîmes are proud to be part of the Japan Blue and Momotaro family ever since the company decided to move to Europe in 2008. We wrote about the Momotaro brand in our Journal de Nîmes Nº10, the City of Blue Issue. The Manabe family is not just an ordinary denim family. Mr. Manabe and his son Katsu recently merged two of the world's most influential denim companies: Rampu-ya Co. Ltd and Collect Co. Ltd. became Japan Blue Co. Ltd. To understand what the Manabe family is all about it is important to emphasize that there is no denim business without the best textiles available. The Japan Blue company depends on high quality textiles as a first step towards a pair of jeans. So, unlike many other denim companies, Japan Blue weaves its own denim fabric. The company devotes the majority of its time to creating the very best denim fabrics. Their simple design clearly reflects a true Japanese aesthetic while at the same time the texture of each fabric shows its unmatched craftsmanship. By touching a Japan Blue fabric you can feel the spirit of traditional Japanese artisans in which material plays a crucial role. In April 2015 Mr. Manabe honored Tenue de Nîmes with his second visit to our Tenue de Nîmes store right after joining the Amsterdam Jean School Board of Directors. It was during this meeting that he proposed to do a special partnership with Tenue de Nîmes and Japan Blue Co Ltd. Together they would introduce the world to one of Mr. Manabe’s latest denim achievements: Côte d'Ivoire Cotton Jeans.

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Côte d‘Ivoire cotton is said to closely resemble the original species. Japan Blue started investigating this type of African cotton while on a journey to uncover the origin of jeans. The Japanese denim experts were in search of a type of cotton that could match the sort that was used when production of denim first took off, as far back as the 19th century. After a long period of investigating and testing the ultimate match was found in the West-African country of Ivory Coast. But it was quite clear to Mr Manabe that the country suffered heavily from the Civil War and he felt he had to do something that would go further than him solely buying this special cotton. So he set up a collaboration between his Japanese company and Ivory Coast. Japan Blue decided it was time that the value of Côte d’Ivoire cotton was acknowledged globally and in order to achieve that Manabe decided to team up with the Embassy of the Republic of Ivory Coast in Japan. The agreement that followed soon after their meeting outlined that Japan Blue would donate 1% of their denim sales made from Côte d’Ivoire cotton to the African country to support the local government and to take part in areas of development in the country. Tenue de Nîmes is proud to participate in this collaboration as well, contributing to the awareness of sustainability and the co-creation of a better future for the people in Ivory Coast. —

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BRAND FEATURE / Côte d’Ivoire Cotton Jeans

CÔTE D’IVOIRE COTTON IS HAND-PICKED AND THEREFORE ANY DAMAGE IS MINIMIZED. IT IS COMFORTABLE TO WEAR AND SHOWS A MAGNIFICENT, NATURAL COLOR FADING.

JAPAN BLUE —

1992 Founded Collect Co.Ltd. 1996 Founded Rampu-ya Co.Ltd. 1998 Opened the Ai-zome (Japanese indigo dye) studio. 2003 Opened the hand-weaving studio. Opened the Jeans sewing factory. 2006 Started manufacturing and sales of the brand "Momotaro Jeans" 2009 Opened the denim weaving factory. Paris (France) branch office opened. 2010 Started manufacturing and sales of the brand "JAPAN BLUE JEANS" 2013 Opened JAPAN BLUE JEANS flagship shop in Kojima, Okayama. 2014 Founded JAPAN BLUE Co. Ltd. by combining Rampu-ya Co. Ltd. and Collect.Co. Ltd.

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ESSENTIALS / Elza & Joost

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ESSENTIALS / Elza & Joost

Essentials

ACCORDING TO ELZA AND JOOST AT ATELIER DE L'ARMEE — PHOTOGRAPHY BY SOPHIE HEMELS (FRANCIS MORRIS MORRISON)

We at Tenue de Nîmes do not believe anyone needs particular brands and logo's to define him or herself, or to have them make statements on their behalf. That does not mean we do not acknowledge that we all have particular brands with which we identify, or even feel a kinship with. In particular specific items of clothing that we will always pack, whether we're off to Paris for a day or two, or taking a longer break in Bali. We like to characterize these as Tenue de Nîmes essentials. Think of my favorite slup-yarn 1930s T shirt by Levi's Vintage, or a pair of rigid Double RL jeans, and Red Wing 877 boots. I could not imagine taking a trip anywhere without these simple treasures. For Journal de Nîmes we are writing a recurring column about our friends' essentials, people who inspire us.

ELZA JEANS My Vintage Levi's 501 selvage - found this one on the biggest vintage market in the Netherlands, at the IJhallen. It's a selvage denim with a light stone wash and it has aged beautifully. I bought it from this super cool older lady who said this was her favorite pair during the 70's. Top: Levi's made and crafted stripe top. It's from one of the last collections I worked on at Levi's xx and the fabric is great. SHIRT I have 2 favorites: First: a (very long) simple white cotton shirt from H&M. My favorite white shirt, it looks good with everything. I'm a very big fan of white cotton blouses in general. Second: my Kenzo blouse - it has a crazy tiger print. The fabric is beautiful cotton silk. But since the print is so intense I don’t wear this one every day. DRESS Favorite dress is a blue one from COS, it has an open back. It is special to me because I wore it on the day of my civil wedding to Joost. TEE a simple black top with an open back from &other stories. I love nice basics. JACKET My Levi’s vintage clothing Sherpa jacket which is based on a denim type 3 jacket. I love the fit and it's super warm.

JOOST SHOES My Martin Margiela black ankle boots. SUMMER SHOES My nude leather Chloé pumps. I never wear them because they hurt like hell haha. SOCKS Light baby blue socks from &other stories. SUNGLASSES Dick Moby – one, because these are great quality, full cool sunglasses and two, because the brand's founder is our good friend. PERFUME I have two that I use: Annick Goutal and Le labo. They are both very herbaceous fragrances. OTHER COSMETICS My Aesop hand cream and day cream are great HAND BAG An Atelier de l'Armée leather shopper. TRAVEL BAG Atelier de l'Armée big denim shopper. STATIONERY Midory booklet and agenda. I've been using this one for over two years now, it's a great booklet.

JEANS This is a difficult one as I own so many, but if I have to choose one it has got to be the big Mac selvage denim work pants which I found on the Denim Days vintage market. It is beautifully faded with lots of stains and I spent hours and hours repairing it with Sashiko stitches. TOP I am a sucker for moleskin jackets. My favorite is a completely worn down French moleskin jacket which I wore on our wedding day (yes I got married in moleskin). SHIRT Levi's RED shirt made out of white cotton voile padded double weave fabric SUIT I would never wear a suit. TEE White Italian army Tees. I bought about ten of them, perfect fit, extra long. WINTER JACKET Swedish army winter parka. Big, comfy and warm.

SUMMER SHOES Birkenstocks or All Stars. WINTER BOOTS Red wing Iron Rangers. SOCKS Anything woolen. SUNGLASSES Dick Moby's Summer in the City. PERFUME Comme des Garçons Kyoto. BACKPACK Atelier de l'Armée Series Flight Pack in Mustard with Green Camou. STATIONERY Midori leather agenda. BEANIE Robert Mackie woolen beanie in Red . HAT 6 panel denim mechanic hat . SCARF Kapital Japan chijimi woolen scarf (best scarves ever!).

JEWELLERY Custom made golden wedding ring. WATCH 70's vintage Valjoux 7750 chronograph in black metal.

JEWELLERY Haha where to start... I think the biggest obsession I have is jewellery. I love my ring from Wouters en Hendrix. It has a blue sapphire stone with diamonds. Need I say more? I'm also in love with my watch from Amsterdam Vintage Watches. JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 12 — THE NEW VINTAGE ISSUE

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BRAND SPECIAL / Double RL

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DOUBLE RL

BRAND SPECIAL / Double RL

Creating product you would wish to find in a vintage store The Double RL brand is the one brand I cannot be objective about. Whether RRL would sell at Tenue de Nîmes or not, the brand is so connected to the Tenue de Nîmes principles we will always take great care of it. We also do because we know that Mr. Ralph Lauren, who recently announced he puts in a new CEO to lead his company, is personally involved in selecting shops that may tell this personal part of his legacy.

The Double RL brand was founded in 1993 but the spirit of the brand dates back to the 1980s when Ralph Lauren created his Sante Fe collection, inspired by the western movies he had watched almost obsessively during his upbringing. The Sante Fe collection was littered with Native American blankets, western shirts, bandanas, denim silver buckled belts and turquoise highlights. It was during the 80s too that Ralph Lauren acquired his RRL ranch in Ridgway, Colorado which is best described as a filmic reflection of the rugged spirit of the untamed American West. Throughout the eighties and nineties the Polo Country label was a continuation of the Sante Fe collection. The label was one of the most interesting designs

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in the company’s history with jackets with Native American portraits head hand painted on the back, indigo pea coats, sweaters in Aztec prints and denim fire jackets. Looking back at the concept and the look and feel of the Polo Country brand, it was a clear predecessor of the Double RL brand today. Ralph Lauren has always been fascinated by ‘real clothes’. Growing up in a poor neighbourhood of New York City he was surrounded by hardware and army stores. Those shops offered real mercantile goods. It is where his true appreciation for well-made goods started and where he developed two guiding principles.

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BRAND SPECIAL / Double RL

"I love things that are worn. The patina is evidence of a history of work, and a kind of honesty, which to me is very American. "

It is Ralph Lauren’s conviction that clothes made for a purpose and function are timeless and iconic and through this function they get better with age. Take for instance a pair of jeans or a classic car. Those two aspects explain why the Double RL brand is a collection that represent the sophistication and spirit of the American worker. The brand is about iconic building blocks of men’s style. Most of the inspiration comes from military or sportswear heritage. The brand is not about proclaiming what the latest fashion is, they are in this game for the long haul. Double RL is about those pieces that will stay cool forever. Over the years the brand specialized in those pieces you would wish to find in a vintage store. Their true appreciation for product (as opposed to fast fashion) sometimes feels like an addiction. Double RL only works with the finest materials available and uses manufacturing techniques as well as construction details that are extremely rare today. Authentic American selvage denim and leather shoes form the United States, indigo fabrics from Japan, suits and leather jackets from Italy - all made at small, privately owned factories around the world. On top of these iconic

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styles seasonal vintage inspired collections of clothing have been added, along with a full collection of accessories, including handmade belts, bags, and leather goods. Both the brand and the collection are expanded slowly. You could almost say: the longer they take, the longer their products last. Consider Double RL an Oak tree: it grows slowly but grows strong and stable. Double RL is sold through no more than a handful of independent retailers around the world, including Tenue de Nîmes. On top of that the brand has private stores in New York, Los Angeles and London. The stores car­r y a broad assortment of products, vintage, home furnishings, and dry goods. Ralph Lauren was the first contemporary rebel who presented vintage next to new items in his stores. RRL retail is best described as a ‘discovery shop’ and above all a place where Ralph Lauren feels comfortable. The same can be said of the RRL crew members. Every single one of them was a customer first. The Double RL brand is a label that appeals to all of them: “You just have to care for this brand!” —

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BRAND SPECIAL / Double RL

RRL VINTAGE PRODUCTS

1.

A very early Double RL archive style; a classic A1 style jacket in chocolate deerskin, with olive wool knit trim, and reproduction melamine fish-eye buttons.

2.

An iconic single-pocketed pleatfront Cowboy Blouson, made in the USA of specially developed Japanese selvedge denim. Hand distressed and finished following a vintage jacket. RRL "DecoStitch " on pocket – a nod to classic cowboy boot toe-stitch. This jacket was developed in 2003, and was signed by RL.

3.

This is a Double RL design prototype from 2007; a European workwear-inspired sportcoat in indigo-dyed corduroy. This jacket was hand finished and repaired in the US, and has served as inspiration in the Double RL line in several seasons.

4.

This jacket was developed for the Double RL Fall 2010 collection, and was based on a vintage chore jacket in indigo Stifle cloth. The fabric is an indigo discharge print that Double RL developed in Japan. The jacket itself was made in the USA, and hand-distressed and handrepaired in the USA. It features specially developed reproduction railman ring-back buttons.

"When I was young…I would go to Army-Navy Surplus stores and search for safari jackets and military clothes. They were rugged. They were made for real life and work, and that’s what I loved."

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FEATURE / Hopes More Boot Store

TOKYO'S HOPESMORE BOOT STORE RED WING ENGINEER HEAVEN WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS PHOTOGRAPHY JOACHIM BAAN

In April 2013 we had the pleasure of visiting one of the most remarkable retail stores in Japan. During our first day in Tokyo, Red Wing Japan’s GM Michiya Suzuki was a great tour guide, helping our search of Japan’s most exquisite retail. Although we did come across beautiful shops from A.P.C., Ralph Lauren and Patagonia, we choose an outsider as our Tokyo favorite: The Hopesmore Boot store. I first came across the shop in Free & Easy magazine in 2009. The strange thing about it was that images only showed vintage and dead stock Engineer boots, mainly from Red Wing Shoes. My first reaction was: How can a store survive when you only sell the harshest steel-toe work boots that I know of? Maybe it’s true that crazy supply creates ditto demand. But the most important thing to know is that if you are into boots Hopesmore store is the one to visit, period. The shop is known for its huge range of vintage and dead-stock Red Wing boots. If you are looking for a specific version of the famous Red Wing 2268 Steel Toe Engineer boot in for instance

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the black-brown Klondike leather, this is the store to go to. But there are also wonderful other Red Wing boots for sale. When we visited the Hopesmore place in 2013, they had a small range of vintage Red Wing 6 " Moc in green Kangatan available. This style was notoriously hard to find until its re-release earlier this year at the European Red Wing Shoe stores. Ever since the store opened its doors in December 2008 the shop continues selling thousands of vintage and dead-stock boots every year. Some of the most exclusive vintage pairs go back as far as the 1950s. Aside from Red Wing the Hopesmore team sells wonderful boots from brands such as Wesco, Whites, Chippewa and Viberg. We could have spent an entire day in this wonderful treasure room and I can’t wait to go back. The sooner the better! — www.hopesmore.net

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FEATURE / Hopes More Boot Store

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HANDCRAFTED MODERN / Nº 4

Handcrafted Modern Nº4 It is our pleasure to introduce you to Leander and Patricia, co-founders of Bloomberry. Their design collection perfectly embodies what we at Tenue de Nîmes are all about: 'The Good Things in Life'. The couple offers a wide range of vintage design objects by established as well as lesser known designers and architects. What typifies their assortment is the high quality and purity of each item. They are all vintage, without exception, and they strive to keep the patina and wear original, or as close to it as possible (just the way we like it). All the pieces from the Bloomberry collection may be considered once-in-a-life-time-purchases. The collaboration between Bloomberry and Tenue de Nîmes is best described by comparing Wharton Esherick's wooden staircase to a Hickoree Stripe overall by Lee: they have more in common than you would believe at first. This vision describes how we believe the following pieces of art would take any Tenue de Nîmes interior to another level.

WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS PHOTOGRAPHY BY BLOOMBERRY

Pair Large Flavio Poli pink glass wall appliques SEGUSO, ITALY, 1950S A pair of rare Flavio Poli wall appliques for Seguso. The lamps are made of blown pink glass elements, hanging from a metal frame. Five light bulbs are surrounded by glass, which, through its shape and texture, gives a beautiful light effect. It is in fully original and good condition.

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HANDCRAFTED MODERN / Nº 4

Pair of Jose Zanine Caldas 'Z' Line Lounge Chairs, Brazil, 1950s BRAZIL, 1950S A pair of lounge chairs composed of a wooden frame with woven brown leather seating. The chairs were designed by José Zanine Caldas (1918-2001) in the 1950s, as part of his 'Z' line. Caldas was a self-taught Brazilian architect and designer. He made sculptural, carved furniture from locally sourced wood as well as Modernist plywood furniture. In the early 1940s Caldas started the "Z Artistic Furniture" (“Móveis Artísticos Z”) line.

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HANDCRAFTED MODERN / Nº 4

Pentagon Concrete and Steel Neon Floor Lamp by Gerd Arens GERMANY, 1980S A very rare and published mfloor lamp designed in 1987 by Gerd Arens. The lamp is made of a concrete base and a steel frame with a neon light on it. Towards the top, the frame and the neon tubes form a square with a globe inside. Inside the globe you can see the movement of the neon. The tubes do not touch each other, but strongly interact. Arens is a member of the “Pentagon” group which was founded in 1985. Other members are Wolfgang Laubersheimer, Ralph Sommer, Reinhard Müller and Meyer Voggenreiter. These young German designers set out to create independent projects which radically change the traditional concept of living. They were very successful at the exhibition “Documenta 8” at Kassel.

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HANDCRAFTED MODERN / Nº 4

Four Klaus Grabe Multicolor Webbed Side Chairs AMERICAN, 1950S A set of four ebonized plywood Klaus Grabe side chairs with webbed cotton seating in different colors: green, white, red and black. Each is a beautiful piece in its own right, but the combination of the strong colors makes this a truly stunning set. Klaus Grabe left Germany for Mexico in the 1930s. Here, Grabe worked together with fellow Bauhaus student Michael van Beuren and Morley Webb. This team was part of the MoMa Organic Design in Home Furnishings Competition and exhibition in 1941. Their winning entry was a chaise with leather webbing. A few years later, Grabe moved to New York where he started his own company. His designs in the 1950s were based on plywood, a new material back then, and were marketed as "prefab kits" to be assembled by the owners to keep the purchase price down. —

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PHOTOGRAPHY / Ricardo Gomes

California PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICARDO GOMES

The 'California Dream' series is part of a photo documentary from 2013 by Paris-based photographer Ricardo Gomes. Specially for the ‘New Vintage’ issue of Journal de Nîmes, Gomes and Tenue de Nîmes teamed up to publish a selection of the series that Gomes hopes to present as a book one day.

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PHOTOGRAPHY / Ricardo Gomes

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PHOTOGRAPHY / Ricardo Gomes

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PHOTOGRAPHY / Ricardo Gomes

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BRAND FEATURE / Fabric Brand & Co.

Fabric Brand & Co. Indigo Everything

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BRAND FEATURE / Fabric Brand & Co.

If you ask any denim expert in the world what the ultimate challenge is in today’s denim industry, he or she will most likely reply: "To make the perfect ‘New Vintage’ jean ". The truth is, we live in a time where barely anyone has the patience to properly wear in their jeans anymore, let alone spend years in one jean to create their ultimate, personal signature. So it is not surprising that the vast majority of denim brands have tried to find that one method to ‘create’ a vintage garment, instead of waiting for it. Unfortunately not a single one of those companies have come close to anything remotely resembling what we like to refer to as true 'new vintage'. In July 2015 though, Tenue de Nîmes was invited to the New York Headquarters of Fabric Brand & Co. When the company introduced us to their mission it basically all came down to the simple desire to work with artisans that have spun, woven, constructed and washed indigo products for decades. They explained that it was their aim to create a range of the most authentic, hand-crafted products in Japan with small artisan factories and laundries

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from the Kojima area in Japan. All Fabric Brand products go through a slow process of blending cotton, spinning yarns and weaving fabrics. The process involves a unique blend of slow spinning, shuttle looms and slow dyeing techniques. Traditional dead-stock or vintage fabrics (such as Sashiko) are used sometimes too. Back in the day, these original stitched fabrics were often used for repairs, to strengthen garments or even to provide warmth when needed. The wash process is similarly detailed and focused on creating the most authentic washes while creating a well-crafted product. This strong dedication to craftsmanship, with each skilled hand of these laundries involved, creates the feeling of hand-made washes in every single Fabric Brand product. This extraordinary denim collection combines Japan’s superior manufacturing techniques with modern silhouettes and finishes to create a quality product that is durable and distinctly relevant today. Maybe we have found ‘New Vintage’ denim after all. —

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BRAND FEATURE / Current elliott

CURRENT ELLIOTT

These days we don't think much about the jeans we wear – much less about the vivid American history behind the garment and the denim fabric. But, aside from the usual associations, jeans can be seen as a symbol of change as the start of women wearing them heralded a new era. Just a few decades ago, jeans were purely seen as all-American, masculine work wear. Far from a fashion statement they were just essential, comfortable and protective garments made for cowboys and mineworkers. Therefore women in jeans were seen as rebels, making a personal statement of power and independence. But with growing numbers of prominent women arguing the relevance and acceptance of women’s jeans, denim gradually gained importance and earned its place in fashion. No wonder the jeans - whether it’s a skinny, flare, boyfriend or high waist – has since become the favorite item of clothing for many women around the world. Inspired by this backstory and a shared love for vintage denim, (Emily) Current and (Merritt) Elliott of the eponymous brand aspire to further evolving denim’s place within the fashion world. To them a pair of jeans can be compared to an epic love story - just like true love, your favorite pair of jeans gets better with age. Rips, repairs and faded indigo tell the stories of long morning strolls, first times and cloud-bursts. The more you love and wear your denim, the more stories it will tell. And with that in mind, Current/Elliott builds its collection for women who know very well that a pair of jeans never goes out of style.

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The prominent role of denim is apparent just from a single glance at the Current/Elliott collection. The brand presents a dizzying array of jeans – from high on your waist to low on your hips – but the material is also present in overalls, dresses, skirts and jackets. And in these items it puts in appearances that vary from dark, almost unwashed colors to distressed, worn in and back to fresh blue. By staying true to the rich history of this iconic fabric, the brand seeks to transcend fashion trends with their own vintage inspired fits, worn in washes and translation of denim as inspiration for everything they do. Filled with pieces worth wearing over and over again, the Current/Elliott collection can be used to create your own stories.

TEXT ROBIN VAN BEZOUW

So, to all the women out there: wear the hell out of your jeans! Take them out dancing, on trips abroad or just enjoy them in the comfort of your own home. And by the time your jeans is far faded and destroyed, don’t just throw them away. Get them repaired and start another chapter of your favorite denim item. Because you don’t buy a pair of jeans for a season, you treasure them for a lifetime. We know we do! —

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BRAND FEATURE / Current elliott

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INTERVIEW / Geert Bruloot

"...to know what has been done before and creating something new out of it: that is for me what 'new vintage' is."

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INTERVIEW / Geert Bruloot

Talking New Vintage with Geert Bruloot — A retail pioneer and well-respected figure within the fashion industry, Geert Bruloot has played a pinnacle role in the road to stardom of the infamous Antwerp Six, which he sold before any one else at the avantgarde designer store Louis and exclusive footwear boutique Coccodrillo. On a rainy afternoon in Antwerp we sat down with him and talked about the main theme of the issue 'new vintage', the importance of the experience in a fashion store and the need for rebellion in these times of homogeneity. Joachim Baan, creative director of Tenue de Nîmes, in conversation with Geert Bruloot.

WRITTEN BY CHRIS VAN VEGHEL PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOACHIM BAAN

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INTERVIEW / Geert Bruloot

NEW VINTAGE J: This magazine has as its theme 'new vintage', focussing on brands with a rich heritage like Levi's and RRL by Ralph Lauren, but also new brands, the friction between them and the future that lays ahead. G: Before we start, could you tell me what your definition of 'new vintage' is? What's the difference between vintage and 'new vintage'? J: For me the brand Hancock is an extraordinary example of 'new vintage'. They use century-old techniques to create their materials, using them to produce elegant cutting-edge garments. That's the epitome of 'new vintage' for me.

G: Personally I have a problem with 'vintage'. In my eyes, the concept is most easily described through furniture. There are designs from the fifties or sixties, which you can find at a jumble sale and you love them. But once you want to do something with it, put it out there, it will be copied and produced by someone else in no time. And that's what I hate about the whole vintage phenomenon, the soul will be sucked out of whatever gets the label 'vintage'. Moving on into fashion: with young brands like VETEMENTS' which was founded by a group of designers led by Demna Gvasalia -who went to school here at the Academy- and the former right hand of Martin Margiela, who knows every fiber of the Margiela archive. From the moment of its inception, VETEMENTS has been celebrated by the fashion world and critics alike. But I really can't like it, I really can't. Martin was incredible. He was an unheard-of force in fashion for 20 years. With every one of his shows being my favorite at every fashion week in Paris I visited. I feel privileged that I have seen his development from the very beginning until the moment he quit, first hand. But at the same time that makes it very disillusional to see all that he has created simply being repeated by a younger generation. To me that's a form of vintage which I really don't appreciate. I feel that nowadays there is a renewed desire for the new. Having been in the fashion world for 35 years, I was lucky enough to have seen an incredible transition in fashion with my own eyes. The rise of ready-to-wear fashion designers: Claude Montana, Thierry Mugler, Gaultier, the Japanese designers, the Belgians. Not to forget punk, the work of Vivienne Westwood in England. It has been a tremendous period, with something radically new being presented during every different phase, created by a different inspirational mind time after time. I have been amazed so many times, startled almost. I wanted to be part of that world.

"A show by Jean-Paul Gaultier was like a football match. People were lining up outside of the venue, cheering and singing. Once you were inside there was something in the air. When a show would start and the first model walked on the runway an indescribable feeling would unleash. Those were shows. That was emotion!" I don't want to sound nostalgic, but thinking back to all those defining shows: Gaultier, Comme des Garçons; that was all pure emotion. A show by JeanPaul Gaultier was like a football match. People were lining up outside of the venue, cheering and singing. Once you were inside there was something in the air. When a show would start and the first model walked on the runway an indescribable feeling would unleash. Those were shows. That was emotion!

"I miss rebellion Today, if you visit a fashion show everyone just sits there uninterested, fumbling with their phone. The models walk by like robots. The audience claps like robots once the show is over. Why? Because it's about the product. I see that's the kind of 'vintage' being represented by VETEMENTS, having as its fundamental drive to bring product onto the market, through incredible marketing in the case of VETEMENTS. But it just doesn't amaze me. I don't feel anything to be honest. Nothing. I understand the hype, but it doesn't get to me as I have seen it all before. That's why I feel that 'vintage', in the sense of repeating ideas from the past is not interesting at all. But the concept 'new vintage' as you have named it; to reintroduce older techniques and use them to create something modern, that's a fruitful approach. That's what Margiela did himself, assembling ideas from Japan, the 18th Century, the Seventies, ethnical ideas - always using it to create something new. And it was astounding. If you visited a show by Margiela you always needed to recover, as he never did shows without new ideas. There have been seasons in which Margiela didn't show, as there wasn't anything new to show. Sublime. The acme of consistency. But, I feel that emotion is slowly on its way back. People are saturated with 'brands'. The strength of someone like Dries van Noten isn't just that he continues to be better, he also consistently succeeds in translating emotion into his shows. His shows are still able to evoke strong responses from its audiences. To just copy ideas from the past feels like vintage, but to know what has been done before and creating something new out of it: that is for me what 'new vintage' is. A clear example of that can be found in the modern world of gastronomy. Look at all these young people these days, renting a former garage, put in 4 tables and chairs, finding local herbs along the railroad, breed their own chickens and create some of the most incredible dishes with just that. That's new vintage! What they do isn't new, on the contrary, but they use it to create something new. And everyone rightfully loves it. We have to move on, we have to renew ourselves. I was a little down and pessimistic when I went to Paris this year, but rather cheerful when I came back. I feel that there is a new positive energy in the air.

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INTERVIEW / Geert Bruloot

THE STORE AS EXPERIENCE

THE IMPORTANCE OF REBELLION

G: When it comes to fashion stores: I feel that we need to return to less but better. Go to a random city these days and you'll see the same stores. It's a homogeneous mass. If we return to less [stores] it will also guarantee a bigger diversity, I feel.

G: In that light I still hold a person like Vivienne Westwood in the highest regards. Recently she rode a tank right up to David Cameron's house. That is incredible. That's what we need. Without realizing it, while we were creating the exhibition, most shoes on display were designed under her label. She never stopped rebelling since she grew out of the punk movement.

J: I totally agree, but still I feel some friction. When I think about Tenue de Nîmes we aspire to offer exactly this vision of less but better, but I realize that we nevertheless need to reach a large number of people in order to sell the numbers we aim for. Our approach in this has been elegant marketing, of which the Journal de Nîmes is an example, reaching a large number of people to make them aware of our world. This works very well for us. But there remains the difficult balance between less but better and the general rules of fashion retail. G: In my eyes you are on the right track with your approach, but I also believe there's still a lot of potential to move away from the initial products, for instance in the magazine. Why not ask a writer to pick his brain about jeans? I feel it's important to get back in touch with the soul of the people that encounter your store, instead of focusing on product merely. At the end of the eighties Comme des Garçons published Six Magazine. Although it was clearly in line with the overall Comme des Garçons aesthetic and feel, there were hardly any products in it. Art, design, interviews, all kinds of stories. It was incredible, strictly focused on emotion. I believe we need to move back in that direction. J: The interesting thing about this era is that literally any product is available online. People still visit stores because they are looking for more, an experience. G: I agree. An online purchase is a solitary experience. You are alone, at home. Acting because you feel the need to buy whatever you are buying. This reality of people always being able to buy the product we are selling has been on our agenda for years now, asking ourselves how we continue to make a difference. How do we succeed in triggering people to choose the shop experience above the solitary experience, without being cheap in our approach. I don't like to lure people with champagne, basically buying your customers, but I want to offer them a sincere experience by entering the store. That is what's most important to me. One of the few places where I still see a strong sense of experience remains on Savile Row. Whoever decides to get a suit there, which will last a lifetime, will agree that it's a tremendous experience. After you have experienced Savile Row it will be the only thing you want. And even when your next experience there will be years later, you will remember every time for the rest of your life.

J: The difficult element of these times is that it has become so hard. Everything has been or is being done. Most subcultures have faded away. G: I think there's still enough to rebel against. For instance the slavery in the production of fast fashion. Isn't that something we can rise against? It's possible! People are collectively appalled when a factory collapses in Bangladesh, but have forgotten about it 3 days later. It is about time that people start really resisting. J: Where else could rebellion come from? G: There are many ways. Starting with a creative rebellion, like Walter van Beierndonck does. Take the old values, cut them up, reshape them, juxtapose it all and create something new out of it. But also conceptually one can rebel by raising your voice about mishaps in modern fashion. We all have voices, therefore we all can express ourselves. Be introspective, express your true sentiments. Stop using the vocabulary of the masses. The younger generations need to step up and say: Fuck you, you are doing it wrong. This is not acceptable, we don't want it. They really need to do that! I love rebellion, as it's an important source for new ideas to grow from. In my eyes punk was the biggest form of rebellion in the second half of the 20th century, still resonating throughout our Western society, but I feel we are ready for a new kind of rebellion.

"the biggest form of luxury for me are freshly ironed sheets. No expensive cars or a coat, no. Fresh sheets, that's luxury for me" I have lost faith in the system of modern fashion. The model of big luxury houses basing their turnover on the sales of bags and perfume in the Middle East is slowly losing relevance in my eyes. The walls are coming down. Whenever people ask me: what is luxury for you? I will tell them: the biggest form of luxury for me are freshly ironed sheets. No expensive cars or a coat, no. Fresh sheets, that's luxury for me.

n these days." J: How do you see a brand like Acne?

G: I feel Acne's brand is quite interesting. In the end they are selling relatively normal products, which aren't very different. But looking at their brand, the way how they present themselves and communicate, that's how they have created an interesting brand. I really liked their magazine. J: What I personally really appreciate are their stores, talking about experience, when looking at their New York store, the look and feel is completely different from their Tokyo store - which I personally really like.

G: Dries van Noten has that same approach. And don't forget Aesop! That's the future for me. Those stores entice you to walk in, experience what's inside and see what the product is about. Every Aesop store you enter will give you a different experience. There's always something new to be found. I love that. Also the Raf Simons/Sterling Ruby pop-up store, here in Antwerpen, was spot on. Everything was well done: the space, the products, every week there was an event with people like Richie Hawtin and Marcel Dettman performing in that remarkable industrial space. Sublime. That's innovation, giving people that experience. Every one visiting that store knew: it's now or never.

In this light I feel that at the moment the transition of Gucci is very inspirational and hopefully indicative of a trend. With the new creative director Alessandro Michele, who rose out of their own ranks, they didn't choose a head designer being a brand of his own, but instead they are giving power to a creative visionary, carving out a significantly new direction for the house. The emotion is sensible again, as has been the case so strongly in the last decades. Michele dressing men in traditional female garments in his first collection, without it being blatant feels refreshing. One feels that he has new ideas and he's being granted the possibility to work out his vision.

When I visited the Gucci store in Paris recently, I finally felt some excitement which hasn't been the case with many stores lately. A company as big as Gucci giving creativity and emotion a chance and being rewarded by the consumers for it gives me good hope for the future. —

'FOOTPRINT, THE TRACK OF SHOES IN FASHION' WILL RUN AT MOMU ANTWERP FROM 3 SEPTEMBER 2015 UNTIL 14 FEBRUARY 2016.

That's how I envision the future of fashion: a newfound diversity. We are living in a time of enormous homogeneity, a time of the mainstream, everybody looks the same. I hate that. We need to make a change. I want some pepper and salt back into our society. And I feel that we actually are on the brink of change. It's up to the younger generations to break with the old. I miss rebellion these days.

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COLLECTION PREVIEW / Acne Studios

Expressive Pieces of Individuality

BY ACNE STUDIOS

Everyone who thinks life in the fashion industry is tough: think again. Especially when it comes to working with brands like Acne Studios. Every time we travel to Paris or Copenhagen to visit their showrooms we are amazed all over again by the exquisite taste that seems to pervade that company. We will never forget the first time that we entered their former Paris home at Rue St. Croix de la Bretonnerie. It felt like we were in heaven. We had never been in a room with so many beautiful people. Boys and girls, freshly dressed, welcomed us with the most extraordinary drinks and local cuisine, a playlist that would befit David Lynch’s Silence club and of course a showroom full of the greatest ready-to-wear available. There is no showroom in Paris that I would rather spend time in than the Acne Studios space at Espace Commines. Acne Studios has become more than a brand and because we noticed that hardly anyone seems to know what they are really about, or more importantly: where they came from, we thought it was time to share some inside info on Europe’s most popular yet not that well known fashion house. WRITEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICARDO GOMES SHOW IMAGES BY ACNE STUDIOS

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COLLECTION PREVIEW / Acne Studios

Acne Studios is originally from Stockholm and became known because of an unusual, multi-disciplinary approach. Everything the brand does is influenced by contemporary art and culture to some extent. Acne Studios was founded in 1997, inspired by a global movement cross-breeding creative disciplines. Its concept was to create a working space where ideas flowed freely, with a strong DIY spirit. With the motto 'Ambition to Create Novel Expression', Acne developed into a dynamic creative collective working in fields of fashion, film and advertising, not hindered by their respective borders. The first Acne Studios product was a 5-pocket denim that they launched in their very first year in business. This fledgling run consisted of 100 pairs in raw denim with red stitching and were distributed to friends, family and a handful of local clients. With denim as its backbone Acne Studios started building a full prêt-à-porter collection in 1998. Characterised by founder and Creative Director Jonny Johansson’s interest in photography, art, architecture and contemporary culture, Acne Studios found a distinctive kind of resonance with the world by doing things that were genuinely joyful and heartfelt. The result of choosing this unique path has turned Acne Studios into a wellrespected multidisciplinary creator of prêt-à-porter, magazines, furniture, books and exhibitions. Acne’s entire design process is directed by founder and Creative Director, Jonny Johansson. The brand offers men and women prêt-à-porter, footwear, accessories and contemporary denim. Typical of Jonny Johansson’s design is craftsmanship and attention to detail combined with an emphasis on tailoring and the use of an eclectic mix of materials and custom developed fabrics. Acne Studios is housed within a historic building at Lilla Nygatan 23, in the heart of Old Town in Stockholm. In addition to the Stockholm headquarters, Acne Studios is also represented by its local offices in Paris, Copenhagen, Oslo, London and New York City.

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COLLECTION PREVIEW / Acne Studios We took a closer look at the brand’s Men’s collection in 2016 together with Mr. Jonny Johansson, Founder and Creative Director at Acne Studios.

"I have always loved the New York Dolls, and a friend of mine used to play with Johnny Thunders. I was inspired by the rawness of their unisex approach to dressing in 70s New York. I also had the honor of getting to surf in Sweden with Robin Kegel, whose surfboard art we have used to bring his attitude to the collection and an individual mood"

WHAT TO EXPECT The collection is clear. It uses lightweight tailoring wools, treated cotton and linen, woven jersey, crepe and silk poplin. Colors range from city greys and browns to vivid primary red, blue and green. A green double-face cotton trench has a dirty downtown attitude, as do coated linen coats, zip-up leather jackets, and a naplak leather jacket with knitted linen rib at the cuff. Abstract graphic surfboard art by Robin Kegel is printed on loose fit jumpsuits in poplin silk. They also appear on cashmere sweaters that have been purposefully pilled. A billowing navy shirt is worn with matching shorts, while blouses drape at the front, folding and held by a small press stud at the neck. Tailored pants are loose fitting, their superfine wool almost transparent. They also come in vivid blue and red, worn with contrasting long ribbed cashmere knits. Blazers have utilitarian patch pockets, as does a long linen workers coat, while a short sleeve jacket and wide pants in apricot in Punto Milano fabric have a functional feel. Zip-ups come in tailoring wool or velvet, while little velvet tanks have been laser cut as if perforated. Platform boots come in leather or suede with a cork sole. Bags are like hybrids of sacks mixed with satchels, or a sack combined with a rucksack. Belts are like oversized shoelaces made in leather.

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COLLECTION PREVIEW / Acne Studios

We would not dare leave out the Women's collection for 2016 so Mr. Jonny Johansson walked us through this part of the new Acne collection as well.

"I wanted to look at the intelligence of naivety and the toughness of free expression, especially DIY patchworking and geometry. There’s a feeling of wallpaper and decorative fabric, inspired by the art of Albert Gleizes, with the spray painted pop of Mario Schifano"

WHAT TO EXPECT Expressive pieces of individuality, using tactile fabrics such as silk twill, linen, suede and silk organza. Colors go from linen beige, indigo and black and white to hot pink and fiery red. Dresses wrap around the body as if caught in movement, like the cotton/linen sleeveless dress of wallpaper stripes that spiral downwards, a flash of hot pink at the hem. Patchworks of stripes and color blocks appear in silk organza tops, while Cubist patchwork, semi-sheer boxer pants combine fabrics and colors. A long white loose coat has panels of pink check bordered in black down the sides and sleeves, while a twisted and draped top has wide loose sleeves. Exaggerated silhouette trenches come in bonded linen or supple leather in red or beige, while a suede coat is split at hip level and held by knotted ties. A silk twill camisole combines various wallpaper-inspired prints, the patchworked panels draping as if peeling away. Chokers elevate the tattoo necklace, while pumps and heels have raw frayed edges, and monk shoes finish at an exaggerated pointy toe.

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10 QUESTIONS / Libertine-Libertine

10 QUESTIONS TO LIBERTINE-LIBERTINE AN INTERVIEW WITH RASMUS BAK, CO-FOUNDER / CEO

WRITTEN BY MENNO VAN MEURS PHOTOGRAPHY BY RASMUS WENG KARLSEN

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10 QUESTIONS / Libertine-Libertine

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10 QUESTIONS / Libertine-Libertine

1

Please introduce yourselves and tell us about your backgrounds? Well, Libertine-Libertine was founded in our native Copenhagen in 2009 by the three of us; Pernille Schwarz, Peter Ovesen and me. Pernille, our Head of Design, has a formal education form the renowned Designskolen Kolding, Pete is a graduate in philosophy and economics and owns a special head. Me, I have a blurry background mainly in music and fashion - I guess I am selftaught. That's the bastard wolf pack constellation right there.

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You have been business partners since day one. Could you reveal the secret behind a long and happy partnership? Yes we have, can you believe it? I don't know if there is any secret but there was absolutely a huge will to take risks and seek out a constellation with a special dynamic. You know, sometimes it feels just right and then you have to go with the gut feeling. However, looking back I can see that the way we split the different assignments between us played a huge part in our early success and our ability to carry heavy weights on few shoulders. We were very open about which aspects of the work were stimulating and which were stressful and it became clear, quickly, that with an ego-less approach it was doable to stay afloat, despite the enormous work load. Besides that we all had the ambition to get into this recession-hit industry shit storm with complete dedication and establish a kick ass work life. That moral has laid the foundation of the entire company and is still paramount.

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What was your main goal when you started Libertine-Libertine back in those days? And did these goals change? We had the urge to launch a brand and company based on intuition and existentialist values and a platform where we could realize our sincere love for high quality products. I like the thought of having a spirited and free floating brand and company that refuses to get pigeonholed. That main ambition is still the same but a lot has been added to it since. Game is on.

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You started designing menswear and got into women’s wear years after. Could you explain why? That's not exactly correct. We've actually had a small range of women's wear in the collection from day one and have always been aware that we wanted the women's to be an integrated pat of the brand. However as the company was, and still is, entirely self-financed we had no funding to develop a full scale women's collection that we felt would impress the world, so we kept it tiny and tidy. One could question that strategy looking back but at the time we were operating from my living room and slept between prototypes and boxes to save a few hundred Euro's a month. It wasn't really an option to handle it differently.

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What is the most important difference between designing a men’s and a women’s collection? Another big question, you're on a roll here Menno. Well, I don't think there is one real superior thing that makes the big difference. These are two very different processes for us. In fact, the only thing in common is the certain fabrics that we choose to use for both lines. Either because they’re outstanding fabrics with a high level of craftsmanship that we really feel are important for the collection or it can be fabrics that serve a clear purpose in some of the key looks. Everything else we have a completely different approach to. The man and woman we have in mind when designing the collections are not stereotypes and not necessarily alike. You follow?

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Please choose one item from your Libertine-Libertine archive that feels like the perfect piece and could you explain why you believe this is such a great one? I am actually pretty attached to quite a few archive pieces of various reasons. Some of the more vibe-y styles we have made certainly have earned some affection but I am particularly fond of some of our most simple signature styles - like the Italian made merino knits and shirting. They work in so many different contexts regardless of your normal style preferences. But now we speak of it I must say that the denim shirt we made together some years back is actually a highlight for me. Again, a simple product, but I think it came out very well balanced and represented both our houses. The quality and detailing was spot on. It was a big success as well which meant a lot momentum-wise for the young shaky company we were back then.

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10 QUESTIONS / Libertine-Libertine

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How do you look at the world (of fashion) in 2015? What are the opportunities and what are the most important challenges we got ahead of us? Well a key opportunity and constant challenge is to make the consumer even more aware of the importance of quality and well produced garments instead of the impossibly fast paced and produced shit that is being delivered to countless stores each week in an over-saturated market. Once you have knowledge about the process of manufacturing, your perspective changes completely. I believe it is absolutely achievable to contribute to change people's buying habits. The general, absurd world of fashion I stopped worrying about a long time ago. We feel it is pretty easy to simply detach ourselves from the aspects we don't like and we are ready to face the consequences of such moves in order to preserve a work atmosphere we can relate to and feel has some degree of integrity. This will never change.

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You will launch your new identity soon. What was the main reason to re-define your entire identity? Could you introduce us to the ‘new’ Libertine-Libertine? We really felt the urge to develop a stricter frame work graphically for the brand - time has changed and the artisan vibe in the old logo (the signature is made by master architect and father of Pernille, Poul Schwarz) didn't correspond so well with our perception of the brand anymore. I think the new design represents a stricter and focused brand; it gives me associations with quality and courageousness. It also provides a frame that organizes loose ends and it's a frame we can go nuts in - so let's do that, I know you guys are up for it. No seriously, I think it is so important to challenge these kinds of things and make sure the brand identity reflects the state of our own minds. The spirit here is that LL is a vibrant venture on a mission and a lot of the creative output and the majority of our designs derive from this actually.

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Can you reveal some of the Libertine-Libertine future with us? What great new stuff may we expect from you? We have entered a new era in the story of Libertine-Libertine and the past months we have worked intensely on re-grouping and defining the vision for the coming years which we are all top motivated to make reality. It is very important for us to keep developing the brand, pushing the collections forward and reaching our international ambitions. We might even enter the retail business with our first big flagship store! Overall there is great balance, we are cranking up, and I am looking forward to some good times ahead

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What are the things in life that really make you happy? Could you describe the perfect day in the life of a Libertine-Libertine co-founder? When the biggest passions of my life; work, art and family all co-exist beautifully I feel accomplished and grateful. A perfect day would start with a slow morning with my lovely wife and son; long shower, jazz in the air, loads of fresh hot coffee. My son would probably be impossible to get dressed and pooping a lot, my wife would probably be annoyed with my ukuleles and guitars laying around the house and giving me a random bullwhip while passing by - so loving and caring. I would leave the house with a big smile and go to the LL HQ by bike along the lakes. The sun would be out and so would the cops. They would fine me 100 euro for passing through an old theater alley - however on this day I would outrun the pigs. Ok. It is 10.00 now and work is ace. Perhaps we are putting out a few fires and solving some issues compassionately as we always aim to do. New samples for the new season would arrive. All killer, naturally. Late afternoon I would pull the plug and go to the Death Has No Dominion studio in the meatpacking district of Copenhagen. We'd have a ton of new songs and ambient material to complete while drinking chilled Bandol rosé and Sancerre white. After that I would be lucky to find my way home. It's all pretty true actually and I could repeat it every day more or less. I have a taste for peaks you know.

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MUSIC / Tenue de Nîmes Playlist

Tenue de Nîmes Playlist BY RUDY ROSS

When bands and artists cut the shit and go back to basics - that’s where I come in. These days it seems "musicians " put in more hours producing, editing and mixing music than they do actually playing an instrument or writing lyrics and that’s where things go wrong. Luckily there will always be musicians who recognize that fine line and stay on the right side of it, being: closer to the core of music making. Some even stay away from fooling around with faders which could also be considered a ‘producing’ technique but that’s a different story altogether. I hereby present to you my favorite albums of 2015 by bands and artists who’ve poured their soul and spirit into making music. Enjoy!

DAWES ALL YOUR FAVORITE BANDS I see this fourth Dawes album as a classic Americana record of which you just know there’s no agenda other than creating the most honest songs without any sensationalism. Songs that seem to take hours to fully develop. The guys are the masters of ’the wait’. The title of the record comes from one of the most anthemic lyrics you’ll hear this year: "May all your favorite bands stay together ", as sung in a heartfelt farewell to an old friend. If there’s one wish you could get a sense of from this album, it would be Dawes unapologetically aiming for the sound of classic 1970s Laurel Canyon rock (Laurel Canyon, L.A. in the seventies, had the cross-breeding scene of folk with psychedelic rock and created some of the greatest music ever made by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young / Joni Mitchell / Jackson Browne). Long summer night jam-sessions at the Laurel Canyon home of Jonathan Wilson (producer, multi-instrumentalist and spiritual guidance to many musicians) inspired them even more to become a live group who dare to improvise and step away from studio recordings. All Your Favorite Bands ensures you, with its crystal clear harmonies and sweet-and-sour poetic lyrics, that the spirit of classic rock has never been so alive. Favorite Track - Right On Time

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everyone to notice. But the sheer diversity and strong performances of a backing band featuring Josh Block and Austin Jenkins of Austin, Texas based powerhouse White Denim, the songs come to life, breathing timelessness and standalone-quality. Bridges sings brilliantly and powerfully but at the same time displays an appealing gentleness to his voice that sets him apart. Favorite Track - Smooth Sailin’ CURTIS HARDING SOUL POWER With one leg in the past and one leg in the future, Harding finds a solid path between soul and garage rock on this album where, rather than a lot of horns or strings, a small rhythm section is clearly present, with more emphasis on the guitar and Hammond than a lot of his fellow soul singers. This may be at least partially because he called in rock ’n roll bad-boys Jared Swilley & Cole Alexander of the infamous Black Lips to fill in on some parts. ‘I Don’t Wanna Go Home’ is a cleaner version of Black Lips fuzzed out rambler but fits perfectly on Soul Power. Cole Alexander ‘discovered’ Harding in Atlanta and together with Harding and Danny Lee Blackwell of Seattle psych-band ‘Night Beats’ they formed Night Sun. This album really evokes a feeling of shaky, lo-fi garage soul with a ‘recorded-live-instudio’ sound but nowhere does it sound like any of it was unintended. Favorite Track - Drive My Car

LEON BRIDGES COMING HOME Hailing from Fort Worth, Texas, 25 year old Leon Bridges offers a voice of gold. His debut Coming Home on Columbia Records (not the least of records labels) clearly stands on the shoulder of giants of soul (think: Sam Cooke, Aretha and of course Otis Redding). An honest homage to these giants, this album includes female backing singers, doo-wops, organs, strings and horn arrangements, ballads about love, loss and, most importantly perhaps, heartfelt throughout. Many who have come before Bridges have made the revival of Soul music so obvious for

romantic, he always carries his heart on his sleeve. Although this sounds like green grass and blue skies it’s not the strongest release they put out: there are 10 songs on this album and it offers a wide range of styles. There are many worthy parts which will stick with you long after listening, so make sure to grab one of those hooks that seem to appear out of nowhere. Be advised though: this record needs your full attention otherwise it won’t survive. UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA MULTI LOVE

Favorite Track Compound Fractures BEST COAST CALIFORNIA NIGHTS

MY MORNING JACKET THE WATERFALL Believe (Nobody Knows), opener of The Waterfall, My Morning Jacket's 7th album makes you realize that they have truly become one of the major American rock bands of the 21st century. It’s packed with big California-esque dreamlike sounds, multi-layered tracks of Flying-V guitars, accompanied by Jim James’ high pitched yells and close-centered harmonics, big stadium rock reverb drums and synths capable of sending you into outer space and back. Yet with all these elements present on the album, frontman and mastermind Jim James is not, and never was, afraid to also cut back to just an acoustic guitar and show his personality to all of us. Lyrically more spiritual and maybe even more

California Nights is the follow-up to mini-album "Only Place " that put lead singer Bethanie Cosentino in the spotlight as a singer-songwriter more than ever before. After putting down the tracks for California Nights she draped the fuzz right on top of her voice for an American radiofriendly take on '90s alternativegrunge rock. First single California Nights covers you with a warm desert-blanket after a night of Joshua Tree drug-intake. Well at least with me it does. The greater part of California Nights really pushes down on the throttle and Best Coast consequently sounds tighter, heavier and generally very well produced especially compared to their prior releases, where they sounded more like a quirky surf garage rock threepiece with lyrics on teenage girl anxieties, this proves to be a mature, bombastic rock album. Don’t be shy and put all your feelings aside and make this your new guilty pleasure.

This is genuine Psych Pop by Nielson’s Unknown Mortal Orchestra, a true instant gem since it has nothing in common with any other Psychedelic driven popmusic. Where even neo-psychedelia follows the guidelines within the psych-world and shows loyalty to its roots, Nielson found no boundaries writing and producing Multi-Love. The results are intoxicating and infectious. The album comes at you as a sensual, soul-funk fuelled concoction in a space-bound rollercoaster. Lyrically this effort is just as personal as its predecessors, with subjects ranging from his relationship with his father to love and his past drug abuse. Ruban Nielson builds his own synths, keyboards and effects; he never shies away from a challenging process which is precisely what makes his music so endlessly refreshing and inventive. Let Multi-Love Rule. Favorite Track - Necessary Evil

Favorite Track - California Nights

ANDREW BIRD ECHOLOCATIONS: CANYON Recorded in the Coyote Gulch Canyons of Utah, Echolocations: Canyon is the first in a series of recordings with special compositions performed by Andrew Bird and recorded and filmed by close friend Tyler Manson in unusual natural environments. Bird says: "Ever since I was a child I would test different spaces with my voice or whistle or violin... I thought it would be interesting to take all this outside where the reflections of the landscapes are triggering countless inferences and steering the conversation. "In this case he chooses the wide and spacious Canyons for

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 12 — THE NEW VINTAGE ISSUE


MUSIC / Tenue de Nîmes Playlist

a challenging soundscape for the listener. This one-man-orchestra does not seek the easiest way to display his extraordinary talents: with just his violin and a sample device to layer multiple tracks he sculpts his own little masterpieces. Waterfalls, birds, rain and wind are all well noticeable since his music is gently strummed and his voice rings high and lonesome on the open prairie.

KENDRICK LAMAR TO PIMP A BUTTERFLY Kendrick’s third instalment To Pimp A Butterfly is a celebration of the hip hop culture. It oozes the bop jazz of Pete Rock, the neo-soul of D’Angelo, the melancholic spoken words of Marvin Gaye and the cosmic funk of Parliament/Funkadelic. It delivers a heavy throwback to the

respect flows both ways. "N.W.A did a lot more than entertain. They told the truth, " says Lamar. "Unless you come from Compton, it’s not a world you’re privy to. Our music lets you visit Compton from a safe distance. " Ice-Cube states. Favorite Track - ‘I’

BILAL IN ANOTHER LIFE

NOEL GALLAGHER CHASING YESTERDAY As an Oasis fan avant-la-lettre every output of the Gallagher brothers -and especially Noel Gallaghernever lets me down. Although the first listen to Chasing Yesterday did not stick. It’s known to many that Noel always thrives on music history popping up again and again in his song writing. I would not go so far as to call it copying or stealing, but rather: playful plagiarism, since this musician knows and appreciates the original masters of this craft. Aside from many winks and nudges to Bowie, Marc Bolan and some Pink Floyd that I discovered on this album, Gallagher also downright re-does some Oasis grooves. He shakes but does not stir this cocktail and reinvents himself as a solo artist on his sophomore album. He was never anything short of honest about his game, much less bit his tongue ("The idea, really, is to f– king sell lots of records and make millions of dollars. ") but when he told the media he ranked two songs of Chasing Yesterday in his top12 songs ever written I just had to go back to the record store. And honestly, after giving this album a few more shakedowns there’s just no way around the intimate and genial output of this moody mastermind.

old school hip hop sounds that were initially inspired by the early soul and funk greats. George Clinton’s contribution (Wesley’s Theory) has a lot to do with that as do samples of The Isley Brothers classic (The Lady) as well as backing vocal tracks by Ronald Isley (How Much a Dollar Costs). Let’s not forget, however, the fact that the role of executive producer was filled in by Dr. Dre and Anthony ‘Top Dawg’ Tiffith. Other hip hop producers that played a big part in the coming together of this album, which was recorded in various places around the United States, are Flying Lotus, Pharrell Williams, Thundercat and Knowledge. ‘To Pimp’ debuted atop the Billboard 200 and received widespread critical acclaim. The critics praised its musical richness and the social urgency of Kendrick's politically spiced lyrics. In recent interviews with N.W.A. (Dr. Dre, MC Ren, DJ Yella & Ice-Cube) conducted by Lamar, himself a Compton MC, the inheritance is clearly visible and

"I’m a jazz musician. That’s what I went to school for, I want to make music that is going to confuse the computer", Bilal once stated in an interview. Well not only the computer but also the listener has their work cut out. You never know which Bilal you will get. Both live as well as on record, his goal is to test his audience. On In Another Life though, he holds back thereby making this album less complex, more structured and focused and therefore much easier to embrace. On a production level he and studio heavyweight Adrian Younge chose the more difficult route. In Another Life was pretty much recorded with only live instrumentation and on analogue equipment which resulted in far more raw and less polished production. For me, coming from a rock ’n roll background and being a drummer since I was a kid, I can appreciate 4-4 backbeats with a loose hi-hat. It has more soul and so not really slick, so it can be said that while everybody else is becoming more electronic, ‘over’-produced and more commercial, Bilal becomes more honest and daring. This album sparkles with energy and spirit. Favorite Track ‘Open Up The Door’

Favorite Track - The Right Stuff JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 12 — THE NEW VINTAGE ISSUE

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"The only thing that we can be sure of about the future is that it will be absolutely fantastic." ARTHUR C. CLARKE PREDICTING THE FUTURE IN 1964

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 12 — THE NEW VINTAGE ISSUE


FEATURE / Bobby's Gin

The perfect New Vintage cocktail 'THE GRANDSON' Bobby’s Gin (35 ml.) Cocchi Vermouth di Torino (35 ml.) Orange bitters (2 dashes)

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 12 — THE NEW VINTAGE ISSUE

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AT TENUE DE NÎMES

Journal de Nîmes Nº12  

The New Vintage Issue / Winter 2015/2016

Journal de Nîmes Nº12  

The New Vintage Issue / Winter 2015/2016