Page 182

LUSKINIGN Yields 1 batch traditional native quick bread

In large mixing bowl, combine all dry ingredients. Add shortening, mix until texture is crumbly.

8 cups (1.8 L) flour 1/3 cup (75 ml) baking powder 1 1/4 cups (300 ml) sugar 2 tsp (10 ml) sea salt 2 cups (500 ml) shortening 4 cups (1 litre) milk 3 tbsp (45 ml) minced chives, optional

Add milk and chives, mix until combined. Transfer onto baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Dough will be one mass, not uniform in shape. Place into preheated 350°F (175°C) oven, bake 25 to 35 minutes or until done. Check it by inserting skewer into thickest part. Dough should stick to it. Serve warm with butter and molasses.

“Bannock, or luski, is something that came very easily to me as it’s a big part of the Native culture here. Modern bannock was introduced by the Scots, although Indigenous people had their own version before that. It has stayed pretty much the same. We make it every day for one reason or another—a meeting or a snack. You have to eat it that day as it doesn’t hold up well. We hardly changed it at all; we added chives. A lot of the older people wonder why we play around with something that’s already so good.” SHAUN ZWARUN, MEMBERTOU CENTRE

168

N o v a S c o t i a C o o k e r y, T h e n & N o w

Nova Scotia Cookery, Then and Now: Modern Interpretations of Heritage Recipes  

Take one batch of historic recipes, add a handful of local, inspired chefs, mix well, and serve up a modern version of Nova Scotia culinary...

Nova Scotia Cookery, Then and Now: Modern Interpretations of Heritage Recipes  

Take one batch of historic recipes, add a handful of local, inspired chefs, mix well, and serve up a modern version of Nova Scotia culinary...

Advertisement