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NOVA SCOTIA Where Dreams Come to Life 20 Years of the NSISP


Inside this book you will find images from students, staff, and families who are involved in the Nova Scotia International Student Program. It also includes a selection of some of my favourite images. The book was produced by Paul Millman and Mike Rosson as well as the folks at Nimbus Publishing, and will give you, I hope, a glimpse of the wonderful and welcoming province of Nova Scotia. Enjoy! LEN WAGG, PHOTOGRAPHER.

Front cover photo: D. GĂœNEY


The Nova Scotia International Student Program has been operating for twenty years changing the high school experience for a generation of students in our province. I have made many speeches where I relate the fact that my trip through high school in rural Nova Scotia included no opportunities to meet students from abroad coming to study with us in this part of Canada. I am so thrilled to be able to say this has changed for students in our schools today, with over 15,000 alumni from forty countries in our twenty years of welcoming international students. This book is a tribute to those twenty years. It is meant to be a photo narrative of four seasons in the life of an international student in Nova Scotia. Student life, school life, family life—but most of all, the unparalleled beauty of the province we call home. Creating this keepsake for our anniversary has been a wonderful journey involving some very difficult choices among the hundreds of photos we had for consideration. In the end, we have photos from international students, host parents, homestay coordinators, ISP staff, and the very talented photographer and journalist, Len Wagg. I hope you enjoy these photos as much as we did choosing them. So, to all who have been part of this adventure, a huge thank you from the NSISP on our 20th Anniversary! Chimo,

PAUL MILLMAN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NSISP


Every September more than 1,200 international high school students arrive in Nova Scotia and are greeted by their new host families. E. WAASBERGEN. OTHER

AIRPORT WELCOME PHOTOS ARE CREDITED TO M. PIKE

International student traditions—posing with the “Welcome to Nova Scotia” sign on the border with New Brunswick. O. DARICI

(FACING PAGE)


The beautiful fall colours of Cape Breton. M. MARIN A young woman takes a picture from her vantage point at Cape Clear on Cape Breton Island. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


(TOP LEFT)

Fall traditions—an Annapolis Valley corn maze. S. IZUTA

Halloween is very popular with international students, as many don’t have the opportunity to celebrate it in their home country. M. PUBLICOVER

(TOP RIGHT)

(BOTTOM LEFT)

Competing in NSSAF soccer playoffs in Cape Breton. E. WAASBERGEN

(BOTTOM RIGHT) (FACING PAGE)

Windsor.

Visiting pumpkin patches in search of a good jack–o’–lantern to carve for Halloween. M. TOUSSAINT

Participants in the annual Pumpkin Regatta paddle their giant pumpkin across a lake in

PAUL DARROW.


Ingonish Beach fun. J. SEXTON Carters Beach near Port Mouton is a great place to dip your toes in the clear cool water or camp overnight at the nearby park. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


There are many student excursions around Nova Scotia. M. LANDRY (BOTTOM)

Peggys Cove rocks! L. BRUNS

(FACING PAGE)

Peggys Cove.

The iconic lighthouse at LEN WAGG


The Yarmouth to Portland Maine, USA, ferry rests along the dock at the Yarmouth waterfront. Roughly 6,500 hundred people live in this community at the southwestern part of the province. LEN WAGG Nova Scotia’s 7,500-kilometre-long coastline is dotted with coastal communities such as Annapolis Royal. Annapolis was the first European settlement in North America. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)

(OVERLEAF) Lights from the aurora borealis shimmer in the night sky along the Cobequid Mountains in northern Nova Scotia. The lights, referred to sometimes as the northern lights, occur when charged particles from the sun collide with the earth’s atmosphere. They occur frequently in the northern latitudes but sometimes, during powerful solar storms, reach Nova Scotia. LEN WAGG


Host sisters bundle up for the Santa Claus parade in Halifax. C. SWIMM Stars appear to spin around the North Star in this time-lapse shot taken in Milford. It is the earth rotating, and the stars, as point light source on the film, appear to move. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


New Year’s Day traditions—the Polar Bear Dip. Purcells Cove in Halifax is one of many in Nova Scotia. M. PYKE (TOP)

Skating around the outdoor Emera Oval in Halifax. L. BRUNS

(BOTTOM)

A family takes a picture before they get ready to skate at the Civic Square outdoor rink in Truro. The free skating area in the downtown has become a gathering place for families to socialize and enjoy the outdoors. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


Ski trip to Martock Mountain. M. PYKE Adirondack chairs are a contrast to the snowy scene of Granville Ferry. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)

(OVERLEAF) Two bald eagles fly over a farmer’s field near Sheffield Mills. Every year a festival is held and thousands of people brave the cold to watch the eagles soar around farms.

LEN WAGG


Snow sledding and snowball fights are a part of winter life in Nova Scotia. A.HEWEY A lone tree stands in a farmer’s field near Milford, in the winter. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


(TOP LEFT)

Winter views of the Cabot Trail. C. AZCUGUA

(TOP RIGHT) (BOTTOM)

Dog sledding on a cultural trip in Quebec. E. MARCHINI

Trying their hand at “shinny”—outdoor ice hockey. A.HEWEY


Creating an international igloo.

(TOP LEFT)

M. BRABANT

Family traditions—Christmas Eve in new pyjamas. C. SWIMM

(TOP RIGHT)

Cheering on the Halifax Mooseheads hockey team. The Mooseheads are a Quebec Major Junior Hockey League team with many players who go on to the NHL. E. JANSSENS

(BOTTOM)


For many students from warmer climates the Nova Scotian winter provides them with their first chance to see snow. S. TRAN Heading out of built-up areas is always fun in Nova Scotia. Here, at Peggys Cove, a meteor streaks over the lighthouse during the Geminids shower in December. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


Apple blossoms in Annapolis Valley are a sign summer is on its way. S. DUBEAU Wild lupins grow in a farmer’s field in the spring near Economy. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


Student life in Nova Scotia. Academics, athletics, extracurriculars, and even the big yellow buses. There are eighteen sports including soccer, football, cheerleading, rugby, and so many more. In addition, there are arts and dramatic activities in all schools. For most students, when the academic day ends, the real school day begins. SCOTT MUNN


High school musical production at Sir John A. Macdonald High. C. SWIMM Competing for their school in the NSSAF cross country provincial championships. C. SWIMM

(BOTTOM)

(OVERLEAF) One of the most exciting places to hike in Nova Scotia is the Cape Breton Highlands National Park. Here, cars make their way along the road as the Milky Way glows overhead. LEN WAGG


(TOP)

Early morning fog in Cape Breton.

J. SEXTON

(BOTTOM)

Nova Scotia vistas. E. JANSSENS

A statue of Glooscap, a mythical warrior of the Mi’kmaq, stands against an orange sunset near Truro. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


Host sisters hiking in Timberlea. C. SWIMM (BOTTOM)

Family hike to a local waterfall.

A male moose chomps some wildflowers on Cape Breton Island. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)

A young couple walk along the shore near Burntcoat Head. The Bay of Fundy has the highest recorded tides in the world and at low tide people can walk along the ocean floor. LEN WAGG (OVERLEAF)


Peggys Cove photo op. Y. NAZARÉ Sunset at the lake with the family dog. L. BRUNS

(BOTTOM)

The sun rises over the tiny coastal community of Prospect. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


Canada’s 150th birthday festivities. A.LOPEZ Kayaking, canoeing, and stand-up paddleboards gather before a long paddle in in Lower Prospect. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


Yachts are moored along the shores of Halifax, capital city of Nova Scotia, in the early evening. LEN WAGG An early morning ferry crosses Halifax Harbour. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)

Fireworks explode off the Angus L. Macdonald Bridge that joins Halifax and Dartmouth. The bridge is a platform for fireworks on special occasions. LEN WAGG (OVERLEAF)


A warm embrace from a host mother. S. JEONG International host sisters enjoying a lobster boil with their Canadian host family.

(BOTTOM)

C. SWIMM

Sunset on the Bay of Fundy that separates Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.

(FACING PAGE)

LEN WAGG


Iconic Cape Split views. J. HARNUM A couple walk along a beach near Summerville, on the province’s South Shore. LEN WAGG (OVERLEAF)

A popular hiking trail at Cape Split rises hundreds of feet above the Bay of Fundy. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


Top of the world hiking—the Skyline Trail in Cape Breton. C. JAMAEL A pod of humpback whales surface off Brier Island. Local tour companies enable people to see the whales up close. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


The province is dotted with small coastal communities and one of the most photographed is Mahone Bay, along the South Shore. LEN WAGG A UNESCO World Heritage Site the Town of Lunenburg, with its colourful buildings and original street layout from the 1700s is a popular spot for a day trip. LEN WAGG

(FACING PAGE)


C. SWIMM

More than two hundred NSISP students graduate with a Nova Scotia high school diploma each year. Students participating in their prom and graduation ceremonies. A joyful end to the year in the NSISP.

SCOTT MUNN


C. SWIMM

O. DARICI


A cap and a gown bring the year to a close. LEN WAGG

Nova Scotia International Student Program Handbook  

A photographic tribute to twenty years of the NSISP;

Nova Scotia International Student Program Handbook  

A photographic tribute to twenty years of the NSISP;

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