Issuu on Google+

J

There is a high incidence of consensual sex among boys and girls below the age of consent The average age of consent around the world is 16 years. In Bhutan, it is 18 years.

Crime & punishment

Journalist The

Vol 1 Issue 38 05 Sept 2010

Nu 10

www.thejournalist.bt

In This Edition

03 The lack of it all

There isn’t enough modern literature in Dzongkha, say parents. They say the government must encourage Dzongkha writers through subsidy.

05

Committees at work

Three committees of the National Assembly -- public accounts, legislative, and human rights -- are working around the clock, say MPs.

07

Not really a remedy

The education ministry’s remedial class isn’t helping the poor in studies much. Both students and teachers find it a waste of time.

10

extend maternity leave

Many working mothers want a longer maternity leave. They say a minimum of six months is needed for exclusive breastfeeding.

The consequences of consensual rape? The incident of two Mongar students, one of who reportedly raped a minor schoolmate with the girl’s consent, stirs debate on the dynamism of laws Tashi Wangmo

T

he two boys of Mongar Higher Secondary School are in Lungzor Central Jail in Trashigang. They were sentenced by the Mongar Court for raping a minor schoolmate. The boys are both 19 and the girl 17. The incident was reported to the police by the girl’s father on 27 June. The case went to the court on 12 July and the verdict was passed on 28 July. The main accused, a Class IX student, was handed five years and his friend, a Class XI student, three years. The Bhutanese law grades sex with a 17-year-old, even if consensual, a rape. The Penal Code states a person shall be guilty of the offence of rape of a child above the age of 12 years if the person

has sexual intercourse with a child between the ages of 12 to 18 years. The crime is a felony of the third degree where a person, if convicted, is sentenced to prison for a minimum of five years and a maximum of less than nine years. The two boys were taken to Lungzor on 4 August. And while the girl continues to attend school, observers and sources The Journalist talked to are asking if the law has

If anyone has a complaint against the judgment, then they should complain to Parliament. - Mongar Drangpon Gembo Dorji

been fair on the two boys who will now do their time among prisoners of all sorts. The father of the boy who will do five years is a stone crusher operator in Mongar. The other boy’s father is a farmer in Lhuentse. The fathers want to appeal but do not know where to go. They have reportedly enquired about the possibility of petitioning His Majesty the King. But law is law, say others. Two young boys raped a girl, a high school minor. And they deserve the imprisonment. The former attorney general and Gasa MP, Damchoe Dorji, said the law has been just in this case. He said a person below the age of 18 cannot make decision for herself, and the law was perfectly right. But then, the boy, in his statement, has said he was in a relationship with the girl. The » continued on p 22

Vacancy for Reporters at

The Journalist University graduates with aptitude for journalism, good attitude, who appreciate teamwork, and are willing to work hard may visit The Journalist office for the interview to become a reporter. Flair in written English and good attitude are enough to begin with.

Get details from 17666222 17603985

The backyard of clean Bhutan The Thimphu City Corporation officials expressed surprise last week when they saw this garbage heap in the core of town. “When asked who did it, no one owned up,” said an official. But the heap keeps growing by the day.


The age of consent Rape is as old as human civilization. Sources reveal rape makes its first historical appearances in religious texts, especially in Greek mythology. And throughout history women have continued to fall victim to forceful sex. However, throughout history, too, the law has looked at all possible ways to protect women, especially minors, from male predators. And one intervention was the concept of age of consent. Generally, the age of consent is understood as the minimum age at which a person is considered to be legally competent of consenting to sexual acts. In other words, the age of consent is the age when the law says one can agree to have sex. The law basically protects young people from being exploited by adults. It prevents older people from taking advantage of children and young teenagers who may not understand the consequences of having sex. The average age of consent around the world is 16 years. In some countries, it’s as low as 12. And in some countries, although the age of consent might be 13 or 14, it is still illegal to have sex with someone under 16 by exploiting their lack of maturity. In India and Nepal the age of consent is 16. In Bhutan, it is 18. However, many girls in the country, including students, experience sexual contact by the time they cross 16. Therefore,

should the Bhutanese law be amended looking at the ground realities? The law of age of consent needs to be researched, especially on students convicted of rape for consensual sex. But then, the law still persists with the conventional theory to prosecute and lacks the dynamism of the changing times. We have seen cases of minors indulging in consensual sex. But if caught, the boy naturally bears the brunt of the law. And then there are cases where one individual crosses the age of consent while the other does not. In July this year, at its fifth sitting, the National Council discussed rape, consensual sex, and the age of consent. The council was looking at making possible amendments to the Penal Code. They proposed consensual sex between children above the age of 16 should not be considered rape. The members also argued there is a high incidence of consensual sex between two individuals who do not cross the age of consent. In fact, most Bhutanese men, including some well-educated people in high positions, would be in prison if the age of consent is strictly adhered to, or if girls are bold enough to come out in open and report the case. The recent incident of a 19-year-old high school boy who was imprisoned for having sex with his 17-year-old schoolmate should make us rethink if our laws need amendment from time to time.

NCD/Adm-08/2010/2268

Editorial

Journalist the

Ministry of Agriculture and Forests Department of Forests & Park Services WILDLIFE CONSERVATION DIVISION THIMPHU “Managing Bhutan’s Natural Heritage” PUBLIC SAFETY NOTIFICATION This is to inform the general public that it is the season for Himalaya Black Bears/ Sloth Bears (Dzongkha: Dhom/ Sharchopkha: Omsha/ Lhotshamkha: Baloo) to be most active as it is the season for the animal to prepare for their winter hibernation by consuming maximum food. General public are hereby warned of the fatal danger they could face if they encounter with the animal. Therefore general public are requested to avoid the following possible areas of encountering Bears. 1. Areas of plentiful wild shrub berries and mushroom. 2. Areas of oak forest with oak acorns. 3. Areas of dense bamboo forests. 4. Areas with beehives. 5. Areas with bear signs like pugmarks/scats/claw and bite makers on trees. 6. Areas known locally as bear nesting grounds A. If you encounter a bear, the safest thing to do is: speak softly and back away slowly, but this doesn’t necessarily avoid attack. B. Never shout when you see a Bear, this threatens the bear and will try to defend itself by attacking you. C. Always try to go in groups when going into the forests. D. Try to indicate your presence in the forests by shouting occasionally. This will avoid sudden and surprise encounters. E. It is known that meat attract bears, so please try to store meat in the closed boxes. Direcotor DEPARTMENT OF FORESTS AND PARK SERVICES

Ref.No: MoH/Pro/09-Mental/2010/1463

02

05 September 2010 Sunday

MINISTRY OF HEALTH THIMPHU P.O BOX :726 Tender Notice Sealed quotations are hereby invited from the reputed printing firms of Mental Health Manual. The detailed terms and conditions can be obtained from the Procurement Unit, AFD, Ministry of Health from 6th September 2010 to 5th October 2010 on cash payment of Nu.300.00(Ngultrum Three Hundred) only which is non-refundable. The last date and time of submission of the bids is on or before 6th October 2010 at 11:30AM and will be opened at 2:30PM on the same day. For further information, please contact the Procurement Officer, AFD, Ministry of Health on telephone # 328098/93 (extension # 101 or 107) Chief Adm. Officer

Editor: Gopilal Acharya Chief Reporter: Passang Dorji Reporters: Tanka Raj Subba, Tara Limbu, Sonam Pelvar, Tashi Wangmo, Dawa Gyelmo, Nidup Gyeltshen Designer: Duptho Wangdi, Phub Dorji

Letters and opinions should be not more than 800 words and should contain full address and contact number of the writer. They will be edited for clarity and space. All editorial decisions rest with The Journalist. bhutanjournalist@gmail.com


Home

Journalist the

05 September 2010 Sunday

03

Dzongkha literature

The lack of it all It’s time to move away from half-hearted commitments, say Dzongkha writers Dawa Gyelmo

L

iterature sits on dusty shelves of bookstores and libraries but conspicuously missing from these shelves is the abundance of literature in the national language. Besides other unending reasons, the losing battle Dzongkha is waging against English can be attributed to the lack of more simple literature in Dzongkha. Policies and commitments have been thrashed out time and again to improve and popularize the language but for Dzongkha language writers these commitments, barring improvement in oral tradition, are at the most half-hearted. Most written Dzongkha literature today is either in choked or a blend of choked and Dzongkha which is at most times obscure and difficult for ordinary readers. Booksellers often say since English literature consist information of both a national and international nature there is no use in keeping Dzongkha books for sale. A three-time award winning author, Kuenzang Thinley, presently working at KMT Publishers, said compared to the past, today there are many new literatures written in Dzongkha. “However, the government needs to encourage new writers to come up with modern literature which contains fresh and simpler Dzongkha language,” he said. Bhutan’s only specialized Dzongkha bookshop, KMT Publishers, takes a maximum of two to three years to sell 400 to 500 copies of one book. Dzongkha writers say it’s imperative the Dzongkha Development Commission (DDC) came up with new words and translated complex choked words into simpler Dzongkha. They even suggested the government to encourage new writers by providing special funds and awards. A modern Dzongkha writer, Prem Prasad Adhikari, said to encourage readers choked has to be made simpler and user friendly. However, the secretary of DDC, Dasho Sherub Gyeltshen, disagreed saying providing funds to encourage new writers can only be a short-term measure and to create more Dzong-

Dzongkha learners » It’s time the national language has a culture of decent literature kha literature there is a need to adopt many new words in Dzongkha, like English terms. Citing example of English word ‘compute’ that later became ‘computer’, the secretary said Dzongkha language can also be enhanced further by adopting new terminologies. A large number of Dzongkha readers suggested the government recruit more linguists to develop newer user-friendly Dzongkha terminologies and vocabulary that can help both writers and readers. Development of Dzongkha literature can not only enhance the language but can also create utility. However, the half-hearted commitment of the government in developing Dzongkha has not encouraged writers which rather resulted with poor Dzongkha literature, they say. Visiting the capital’s bookshops will tell the story straight. In the midst of overwhelming English titles it’s almost difficult to find a decent Dzongkha title. A parent who went looking for a Dzongkha dictionary for his son had to visit every bookshop in town before he finally spotted one. He wanted to buy some simple story books in Dzongkha but found none. “For the first time I realized how poor the national language is in literature,” he said. “I simply got mad with the authorities responsible for promoting Dzongkha including

the government.” Prime Minister Lyonchen Jigmi Y. Thinley has always stressed on the promotion and preservation of the national language and the need for it to be simplified, made comfortable, and user friendly. The prime minister has also said the simplification should not affect spellings and meanings of the word. A lecturer at the Royal Thimphu College, Sonam Tobgay, said it is discouraging for Dzongkha writers when they are neither considered nor recognized even after writing more than 10 books. “Writing a poem in English is considered greater than writing a thick book in Dzongkha,” he said. A member of the Royal Privy Council, Dasho Sangay Wangchuk, said Dzongkha literature can be improved only with choked since choked is the root of Dzongkha. He said to encourage more Dzongkha authors, it will take time.

The Druk Phuensum Tshogpa manifesto states the party will allocate the necessary resources for further developing Dzongkha into a dynamic and user-friendly language. It also commits to promote and enrich the other dimensions of cultures such as arts, literature, festivals, music, architecture, and sports. However, the majority of Dzongkha writers believe commitment alone is not enough, and the government should work on creating simpler Dzongkha and encourage more writers. “Dzongkha literature can go worldwide if the language is made simpler,” said a writer. However, the suggestion was seen impossible by an official of DDC, who said Dzongkha literature could go nationwide if given vast and correct opportunity for Dzongkha learners. He said writers have to see the possibility of encouraging native readers instead of dreaming about taking Dzongkha worldwide.

Post Box No.: 1336 Tel: +975-02-/331653 Fax: +975-02-321680 Email:editor@thejournalist.bt


04

05 September 2010 Sunday

Advert

Journalist

To advertise call us at 17809270/ 331653 e-mail: markjournalist@gmail.com

the


Journalist the

Politics

05 September 2010 Sunday

05

NA committees

» MP Sonam Penjore, Public Accounts Committee

» MP Ugyen Wangdi, Legislative Committee

» MP Damchoe Dorji, Human Rights Committee

The three busy ones The public accounts committee has initiated hearing sessions in dzongkhags and gewogs while discussing difficult audit cases Tara Limbu

P

arliamentary committees everywhere in the world are one busy bunch of people. They propose and review legislations, they fine tune laws and mediate differences. In Bhutan’s National Assembly, represented by the elected members of the ruling party and the opposition, of the several committees, three stand out in their somber business. The legislative committee, the public accounts committee, and the human rights committee have been able to show tangible outputs. The legislative committee considers any bill introduced into the house or submitted to the speaker and reports to the house as to whether the bill, by express words or otherwise, trespasses unduly upon individual rights or freedoms. It also makes rights, freedoms or obligations dependent upon insufficiently defined administrative powers. The committee looks into acts or practices that may have an adverse effect on personal privacy or right to privacy. They perform such functions as are conferred on the committee by the subordinate legislations, among other things. Every bill submitted to the house has to be studied by the members of the legislative committee. And they have to be accountable for every bill enacted by the National Assembly. “You would have noticed how the legislative committee is taking the flaws on every issue that is raised in respect to any bills,”

said Prime Minister Lyonchen Jigmi Y. Thinley. “I feel sorry for the chairman of the legislative committee and its members.” The public accounts committee assesses the integrity, economy, efficiency, transparency and effectiveness of government financial management. The committee also reports on the various audit reports of the auditor general on revenue receipts, expenditure by various ministries and departments of the government, and accounts of autonomous bodies. The former chairman of the public accounts committee, MP Sonam Penjore, said the committee has been able to boost the morale of the Royal Audit Authority. The close scrutiny and constant reporting to Parliament on audit reports have helped the image of the audit, he said. Among others, the committee brought down the unresolved audited memo from about Nu 1 billion in 1982 to about Nu 108 million in 2009. “We swept the garbage,” said MP Sonam Penjore. The public accounts committee also initiated hearing sessions in dzongkhags and gewogs while discussing difficult audit cases. Since the committee has representatives from the National Council and the opposition, it comes out as a balanced body. The human rights committee submitted a comprehensive report, focusing on prisoners and prison conditions, to Parliament at the fifth session recently. The chairman of the committee, MP Damchoe Dorji, said the report is an important work given that there can be violation

of rights because prisoners are not free. He said the report is a good start but there is still a lot to be done. The human rights committee will also look at the state of private employees and drayangs. MP Damchoe Dorji said the working hours, minimal wage rate, and responsibilities of private sector employees need a comprehensive study. Meanwhile, people are of the opinion that other parliamentary committees are not working as hard. They say any major work done by the committees should be made public. The prime minister disagreed with the public perception that other committees are not working hard. “I don’t think that is true,” said Lyonchen Jigmi Y. Thinley. He gave the example of the environment and the urban development committees that have been quite active as well. MP Damchoe Dorji said the committees are working hard, but there are so many things to be done. “The effort has to be channeled in a right way,” he said.


06

Politics

05 September 2010 Sunday

Journalist the

Local Government

Voters aplenty » Shortage of candidates dogs the Election Commission

Test scares candidates The Election Commission officials say candidates need not worry about the test; it will be simple and basic

O

ne probable reason why not many are coming forward to participate in the local government elections is the

test. Potential candidates desirous of contesting the election have given up after it dawned on them that the failure to clear the functional literacy test could mean lasting embarrassment in the community. The test has been introduced by the Election Commission in line with the Election Act to facilitate uniform and standardized testing as against disparate and localized methods of such tests of the past. And it is mandatory for all the local government contestants to produce proof of the test. Choki Dorji of Trashigang who wanted to participate in the election said it would be an embarrassment not to pass the test. “Such a formality for the post of tshogpa is not necessary if you compare the post to the meager entitlement,” he said. As of 19 August 2010, about 4,600 candidates had registered for the test. The Election Commission has extended the date for registration until 15 September for want of more candidates. The gewog administrative officer of Radhi in Trashigang, Sonam Tobgay, said they had to coax people to participate for the local government election. A lot of them are scared they might flunk the test, he said. The turnout in Radhi has not been bad. For 15 chiwogs, nine have registered to contest for the post of the gup, 10 for tshogpas, and five for the post of the mangmi. Dorokha Gup Chandra Prashad Phuyel said some incumbents are also not very

sure of the test. “Most did not apply though they wanted to do so,” he said, adding they feared tough questions. Many aspirants have approached the gewog administrative officers asking them to categorize the test for different posts. Kanglung GAO Karma Wangdi said he was asked by the candidates to make the test easier for the mangmis and tshogpas. “Mangmis will have to officiate the gups when they are out of station, so the need for them to have the functional literacy skills, but tshogpas spend most of their time in the villages, and we don’t see the need for a test for tshogpas,” he said. Karma Wangdi said there is only a hand-

File No. GoI/SPBD-Edn/2010

Tara Limbu

ful who wants to be tshogpas and the literacy test is seen as yet another hurdle for these people. “Maybe we can have the test for tshogpas in the future, in another five to ten years,” he said. The ECB officials say the test will fulfill the requirement of chapter six of the Local Government Act which talks about the sessions and proceedings of the local governments. They say the test will look into the minimum skills required for the posts. They say the candidates need not worry. The tests will be kept simple with basic questions. The tests will be held on 27 and 28 September.

School Planning and Building Division Ministry of Education

CORRIGENDUM This pertains to NIT No. GoI/GENE-8/SPBD-Edn/2010 and GoI/KINZ-9/SPBDEdn/2010 published earlier. SPBD would like to inform all the intending bidders that the dates for the sale and submission of the tender for the construction of Genekha MSS and Kinzaling MSS have been changed as under: Sale of document: from 13/09/2009 Last date/ time of submission: 13/10/2010/ 2:00 PM. For further clarifications, contact Pasang Dorji, Project Manager, SPBD, Telephone No. 02-332308 anytime during office hours or at pasangdorji@education.gov.bt. Inconvenience caused is highly regretted. Chief Engineer, SPBD


Home

Journalist the

05 September 2010 Sunday

07

Remedial class

It doesn’t seem to help, sir Started with a good intention to help the poor in school, the education ministry’s remedial class draws contradicting opinions from teachers and students

A

s the name suggests, it was a search for solution. A two-pronged solution at that: one that would end private tutoring and help the poor students. The initiative began in 2004 and was expected to close the gap between good and poor students. And every now and then the education ministry kept reminding the dzongkhag education officers about consistent remedial classes in schools. Six long years and the opinions are varied. Many teachers say the remedial class is more futile than functional. They say the idea of improving weaker students through remedial classes is more or less a joke. Teachers stand the whole day long in front of the class lecturing. In between they attend to other academic chores – meetings, test paper correction, and plan for extra-curricular activities. And to conduct remedial classes after all this, where on earth would the energy come from? Teachers say the initiative has neither helped individual students nor brought any improvement in the quality of education, both in rural and urban schools. Most urban schools have enough teachers, but then they also have more students. A Thimphu teacher said most teachers can hardly conduct remedial classes after continuous lecturing for seven hours in compact classrooms of 45-50 students. Even if a teacher conducts a remedial class, fatigue sets in and the quality of teaching is compromised, she said. Sangay, a teacher in Trongsa, said most rural schools conduct remedial

classes as part of school curriculum. But, with fewer teachers, most often the quality of education is compromised. Rural schools also face shortage of teachers. Many have just a handful of them teaching day in day out trying to cover the syllabus. “In such a scenario, you don’t expect teachers to do well,” Sangay said. “They are completely bogged down, mentally exhausted. And students don’t really benefit.” Students are also of the opinion that remedial classes will not necessarily deliver quality education. They say the education ministry should instead recruit enough quality teachers and distribute them in the country’s schools equitably. Some students suggested the remedial class could be discontinued since it wasn’t benefiting them much. It’s a waste of time, a high school student in Thimphu said, because teachers can’t teach good and students don’t learn much at the end of the day. A principal of a school in Trashigang said teacher shortage was the major hindrance to remedial classes. He said the teachers are overworked and the remedial class doesn’t produce quality education. “Despite the heavy work

MOIC/Pro/12/010-11/419

Dawa Gyelmo

Not a pill » The remedial class is no remedy, say teachers and students

schedule some teachers still volunteer for remedial classes,” he said. The assistant dzongkhag education officer in Trashigang, Ugyen Thinley, said teachers often fail to conduct the remedial class because of their workload. “That’s why we can’t make the remedial class compulsory,” he said. Teachers suggest quality home work and frequent class test instead of unnecessary reme-

dial classes. A teacher in Bumthang said remedial classes overload teachers and compromises the quality of delivery. Some schools have stopped conducting remedial classes. However, some dzongkhag education officers and principals believe conducting remedial classes at least twice a week will help poorer students. They say remedial classes could help students appearing board exams and reduce

private tuitions. The director general of the department of school education, Tshewang Tandin, said the remedial class was started not only to help weaker students but also to provide opportunity for extra classes. “But it is not compulsory,” he said.

Ministry of Information & Communications Thimphu Announcement The Ministry of information and Communications (MOIC) intend to seek services for operation of its Office Canteen. MOIC now invites eligible interested bidders to provide all related information which indicated experience to such similar services offered (e.g. description of similar services provided in the past, license, availability of appropriate skilled cook etc...) Interested bidders may obtain further information and submit above documents to the procurement/Adm, Section by 14th September, 2010, at 11am. Offgt.Chief Administrative Officer


08

Home

05 September 2010 Sunday

Journalist the

Media matters

Don’t wag the watchdog The greatest battle of the 21st century will be between openness and secrecy

Nidup Gyeltshen

I

f media is the agent of transparency, go on and let corruption filter. This was the mantra during the forum on ‘Journalism and Society’ held by the Center for Media and Democracy on Wednesday last week. While the debate revolved around the responsibility of media in fighting corruption, it also highlighted some key essence the journalists in the country should embrace for investigative reporting. The director of the Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism at Columbia University, Sheila Coronel, said the media should act as a watchdog against corruption in the government. While explaining the power of investigative reporting, she said it has the force to change government policies. Media plays a positive role by attracting public attention on other least prioritized areas which are usually not given much importance, but these little things are sometimes the key which can unlock bigger issues, she said. For example, the ousting of the 13th president of the Philippines, Joseph Ejercito Estrada, started with a rumor in a coffee shop that he was corrupt. Joseph Estrada, a former film star, became the president of the Philippines in 1998. But soon he was convicted of possessing huge sums of illegal assets, and was charged with bribery, graft, and corruption. The Philippines Center for Investigative Journalism where Sheila Coronel worked showed that Estrada had business interest in

60 firms where he was listed as an incorporator or a board member. Estrada did not declare these companies which were worth more than 800 million Pesos. “The greatest battle of the 21st century, therefore, will be between openness and secrecy,” said Sheila coronel. She said there should be a certain level of transparency in a system and the media must also respect government’s secrecy that is grounded on the country’s security. She also said a democracy cannot mature unless the media and the citizens are matured and well informed. The Anti-Corruption Commission director, Rinzin Dorji, who was part of the discussion panel, said the media should take the lead in creating awareness among people, deter corruption, and establish accountability through investigative journalism. The media should also expose flaws in the system, participate in governance, and in decision making. Because of the small society that we live in, there is a general tendency to be more tolerant toward corruption. “Corruption is anti-GNH and we cannot tolerate it,” said Rinzin Dorji. Considering that majority of the people live in rural areas, the media should help the people in understanding the operations of the government and educate them on the rule of law and their rights and choices of leaders, he said. The ACC’s strategy to combat corruption includes public education, prevention, investigation, and networking. Rinzin Dorji

said the ACC is also studying the system that are most vulnerable to corruption and will formulate ways and methods to deal with them. The secretary of the ministry of information and communications, Dasho Kinley Dorji, said journalism in Bhutan should be professionalized so that it has the strength and power to question the system, bring about transparency, and establish a well informed society. In view of the expanding media industry in the country, the editor in chief of the South China Morning Post, Reginald Chua, said media has to specialize in specific fields such as on politics, social issues, corruption, economy, agriculture, tourism and other specific areas. He said the country is experiencing an era of post industrial information age with the advancement in information technology where most information is easily available from the Internet. Therefore, there is a need for the media to specialize in certain specific fields. Sheila Coronel and Reginald Chua are coaching young Bhutanese journalists on enterprise reporting where they are teaching the methodologies of investigative reporting, accountability journalism, and numeracy skills. Bringing her ethics of watchdog journalism to Bhutan, she advised the local journalists to bark, shout, and scream against corruption.


Outlook

Journalist the

05 September 2010 Sunday

09

The withdrawal

A great deal for Obama, nothing for Iraq What does it mean in this country, in this part of the world, if America declares that its war is over for the second time?

O

n 1 May 2003, US President George W. Bush announced the end of combat operations in Iraq. This month, President Barack Obama will end the fight for a second time. But who won? Certainly not the Iraqis. It started with an ultimatum, with the arrogance of a man who not only commanded the world’s largest military force, but also appeared to hold sway over time. “Saddam Hussein and his sons must leave Iraq within 48 hours,” George W. Bush ordered on the evening of 17 March 2003. “Their refusal to do so will result in military conflict commenced at a time of our choosing.” This was in total disregard of the United Nations, whose Security Council has the sole legitimate authority to declare such a war. And for those allies who refused to take part, the US president had nothing but disdain. America chose the time of the attack, and also of the presumptuous victory speech which Bush gave six weeks later on board the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln: mission accomplished. What came afterwards -- the terror, the civil war, the 100,000 dead, the widows and the amputees and the tiny sliver of optimism that followed -- was no longer America’s choice. It was the consequence of Bush’s hubris and his disastrous blunders made right at the beginning of the occupation. Today these mistakes continue to plague Iraq. Today there is no end in sight to the war -- it is merely gradually slipping from our attention. Now comes another “time of our choosing,” the penultimate one that Bush negotiated before he left office. Barack Obama is gratefully adhering to the inherited timetable because it benefits him in the mid-term election campaign: On 31 August the combat mission will officially be terminated for the second time. Last Thursday, the last combat brigade left the country. A total of 50,000 US soldiers, now called ‘trainers,” will remain until the end of 2011. “Iraq! We’ve won! America!” yelled a soldier as his Humvee rolled across the border. Who Won? Is the Iraq War over? Was it worth it? Who won? Saddam and his sons are gone, that is to America’s credit. A parliament was elected three times -- the only relatively free elections in the Arab world. That is an accomplishment. But there is no security, unless we declare as ‘secure’ a country in which hundreds of people continue to be murdered every month. There were 222 murders in July, according to the statistics compiled by the Americans. The Iraqis, who have now assumed responsibility themselves and therefore don’t tend toward exaggeration, have counted 535 dead. The freedom that they enjoy today is an

For politics’ sake? » The withdrawl is expected to benefit President Obama in the mid-term election campaign

abstract achievement for most Iraqis. Last Friday, the temperature in Baghdad soared to 47 degrees Celsius (116 degrees Fahrenheit). The electric fans ran twice -- shortly in the morning and shortly at night -- for a total of two hours. Iraq, the energy giant whose enormous potential America set out to unleash, is now producing less oil than under Saddam. Only 1% of the workforce is employed by the oil industry, which produces 95% of government revenue. And, nearly six months after the last election, they are still squabbling over the oil -- the same party and militia leaders whose hatred drove the country into civil war four years ago. There is no new government. A great deal for Obama America has failed to create a buttress that would hold this state together. It too quickly dissolved an army that it is now painstakingly trying to put back together again. Yet today the Iraqi army’s officers openly talk about which bridges over the Tigris they would block in the event of a putsch. Their chief of staff said in mid-August: “The US Army has to stay until the Iraqi army is fully operational in 2020.”

The Iraq War has stirred things up in the Middle East, but it has made no headway. It has a winner that nobody wanted: Iran, whose arch enemy Saddam has been eliminated. It has a loser: America’s reputation as a power capable of restoring order. And it has left behind a country that is just as divided today as the day it was founded. King Faisal, who was placed in power by the British, complained that in Iraq “there is still no nation, but rather an unmanageable mass of people who are adverse to every patriotic idea, steeped in religious absurdities, bound by no commonalities, susceptible to anarchy and prepared to revolt against every type of government.” His dynasty lasted 37 years, survived two attempted coups, and is recognized as the most stable period in the history of modern Iraq. What does it mean in this country, in this part of the world, if America declares that its war is over for the second time? A great deal for Obama -- and nothing for Iraq.

SPIEGEL ONLINE INTERNATIONAL


10

Home

05 September 2010 Sunday

Journalist the

Maternity leave

Time for revision, say mothers Working mothers say the existing maternity leave is too short; they want it revised to six months

Tashi Wangmo

I

t takes immeasurable courage to be a mother. First, you carry the baby in the womb for nine months, then that excruciating labor pain, and those sleepless nights when you have to breastfeed the baby at ungodly hours. However, the bonding a mother achieves by breastfeeding her child is indescribable. In fact, it is always cherished. But then this is also the guilt a working mother has to stomach when she is not able to breastfeed her baby constantly. It’s a tough juggle -- working at an office and breastfeeding your child. Moreover, national and international guidelines recommend that all infants be breastfed exclusively for the first six months of life. Breastfeeding may continue with the addition of appropriate foods, for two years or more. In Bhutan, the government policy promotes exclusive breastfeeding in the first four months of life, and sustained breastfeeding together with adequate complementary foods up to two years of age or beyond, to reduce diarrheal morbidity and mortality. However, the National Health Survey 2000 found that among all women with children younger than one year old, exclusive breastfeeding was practiced in only 42% of cases. Dr. K.P. Tshering, a neonatologist at the Jigme Dorji Wangchuck National Referral Hospital, said in Bhutan most women willingly breastfeed their babies and by the time they leave the maternity and neonatal ward they would have already established the practice. But then exclusive breastfeeding is not high in Bhutan, said Dr. K.P. Tshering. He said Bhutan is not able to meet the World Health Organization criteria as most working women start feeding other foods early. Infrequent breastfeeding and early introduction to supplementary foods affects lactation in women. Thus, for want of time, most working women resort to mixed feeding or the practice of giving early supplement feeds in the form of cow’s milk, formula, diluted cereals, glucose water or water. These early supplements are

Mother’s milk » Research says breast feeding is good for both children and mothers an important cause of diarrhea and breastfeeding failure in both developing and developed countries. The WHO emphasizes the value of breastfeeding for mothers as well as children. It recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and then supplemented breastfeeding for at least one year and up to two years or more. But owing to the demands of the day, this principle is difficult to adhere to, especially for working mothers whose maternity leave is three months for the civil servants and two months for the corporate and private employees. The health ministry spends millions on the health care of babies and women but a simple exclusive breastfeeding can cut down a lot of cost, say observers. Infants who receive exclusive breastfeeding develop stronger immune system, fewer infections, and higher intelligence amongst others. During breastfeeding, beneficial hormones are released into the mother’s body. There are also the long-term benefits to mothers like less risk of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and endometrial cancer. Breastfeeding could help diabetic mothers requiring less insulin and there is reduced risk

of post-partum bleeding. However, the government’s policy of the established maternity leave has been debatable with many arguing that the leave should be extended. Sonam Yangzom, a junior engineer at the health ministry, who is still on maternity leave, has already started feeding Cerelac (infant food) to her five-monthold baby. She said her baby demands milk every two hours. “But once I join office it will be difficult to come home every two hours, that’s why I am getting the baby used to Cerelac” said Sonam Yangzom. She said that from the health point of view exclusive breastfeeding every two hours is a must till the baby is six months. She wants the government to revise the maternity leave to at least six months. Women working in the civil service enjoy an additional month of maternity leave compared to their counterparts in corporations and private companies. The chief labor officer of the labor ministry, Suman Pradhan, said at the moment the labor ministry does not have any plans of revising the existing three-month rule. He said the government acknowledges the need for longer

maternity leave for nursing mothers. But doing so for the private sector entirely depends on the employers. “How long will the private sector employers be willing to pay their women staff without actual work?” asked Suman Pradhan. He said the existing two-month maternity leave was fixed after numerous consultations with the parties concerned, but the private companies have the option of making it more than two months if they can afford. The Bhutan Civil Service Regulation 2006 does not specifically provide for female civil servants for breastfeeding. However, it says civil servants can use flexitime, allowing them the flexibility of work hours. Section 114 of the Labor and Employment Act 2007 states mothers who resume work after the expiry of their maternity leave are allowed to nurse their children every four hours for a period of one month and those interruptions shall be treated as work time.


J

Business & Economy

Journalist

Journal

the

05 September 2010 Sunday

11

Foreign Investment

For cleaner grounds

Business

The current international climate change regime has not encouraged low-carbon foreign investment and related technology flows, especially into poor developing economies

Inside Investing in Bhutan he first international trade fair organized by the Bhutan Chamber of Commerce and Industry began on 3 September last week and will end on 7 September. Being the first of its kind, the trade fair was organized for the purpose of strengthening international trade relation and to promote foreign investment in the country. Although Bhutan has so far remained an unattractive destination to foreign investors, the liberalization of foreign investment following the revised 2010 Foreign Direct Investment Policy and activities such as the international trade fair which is being organized at the moment is expected to provide stimulus toward attracting foreign investment in the country.

Letters and opinions to The Journalist should not be more than 800 words and should contain full address and contact number of the writer. They will be edited for clarity and space. All editorial decisions rest with The Journalist. editor@thejournalist.bt

Tanka Raj Subba

T

he perpetrators of the climate change problem can now become a part of the solution as foreign direct investment (FDI) can be leveraged into low-carbon economies to combat climate change. The highest emitters of greenhouse gas (GHG), basically the transnational companies (TNC) or multinational companies, are also in the position to generate and disseminate technology and finance investments to mitigate GHG emissions, according to World Investment Report 2010. Low-carbon foreign investment is the transfer of technologies, practices, or products by TNCs to host countries through equity (FDI) and non-equity TNC participation, such that their own and related operations and the use of their products and services generate significantly lower GHG emissions. It also comprises FDI undertaken to acquire or access lowcarbon technologies, processes, and products. These includes introduction of low-carbon processes that reduce GHG emissions related to how products are made, creation of low-carbon products and services that lower GHG emissions in how they are used, and low-carbon products which include powersaving electronics and integrated mass transport systems. However, considering the potential, the current international climate change regime has not encouraged low-carbon foreign

investment and related technology flows, especially into poor developing economies as much was anticipated. Besides the Kyoto Protocol, whose prospects remain largely unclear, there is a need for a clear, stable and predictable policy framework from the current climate change regime to help the private sector reorient their business strategies. Developing countries moving toward low-carbon economy generally lack the resources to mobilize necessary finance and investment and also lack the ability to generate and disseminate relevant technology where foreign investment can contribute significantly. Low-carbon FDI is estimated to have already reached a significant level, with flows of roughly US$ 90 billion in 2009 in three key industries, namely alternative/renewable electricity generation, recycling, and manufacturing of environmental technology products such as wind turbines, solar panels and bio-fuels. These industries form the core of initial new low-carbon business opportunities and over time low-carbon investment’s scope will permeate all industries. Improved production processes and the emergence of new technologies and industries, leapfrogging to new technologies, particularly for the efficient use of energy and other inputs, as well as first-mover advantages and attendant export opportunities in key industries are some benefits a developing country

will reap. In the power and industry sectors, TNCs have a strong presence and are in a prime position to diffuse cleaner technologies and processes. Industry also provides equipment and services to help reduce emissions in other sectors. In terms of disadvantages, the crowding out of domestic companies, technological dependency, higher costs for essential goods and services, and related social consequences will be the challenges least developed countries and other structurally vulnerable countries are ill-equipped to meet alone. Home-country measures can support outward low-carbon foreign investment in terms of national investment guarantee, and agencies could reward low-carbon investors by granting them more favorable terms, for instance in the form of a reduced fee. International financial institutions like the World Bank Group and various regional development banks are actively engaged in supporting the move toward a low-carbon economy in developing countries. These institutions’ engagement should be geared toward furthering partnership approaches between the public and private sectors to help developing countries combat climate change, including by leveraging private engagement in high-risk areas without directly subsidizing TNC activities.


12

Advert

05 September 2010 Sunday

Journalist the

Election Commission of Bhutan

Ensuring Free Fair & Democratic Election and Referendums

Announcement ECB/NOTIF-01/2010/424

Subject: Thromde Elections, 2010 First Local Government Elections under the Constitution of the Kingdom of Bhutan

The Election Commission of Bhutan, in pursuance of Section 196 of the Election Act of the Kingdom of Bhutan 2008, hereby announces that the first Local Government elections under the Constitution of the Kingdom of Bhutan shall be conducted for the Dzongkhag Thromde Tshogdes of (1) Gelephu of Sarpang Dzongkhag, (2) Phuentsholing of Chhukha Dzongkhag, (3) Samdrup Jongkhar of Samdrup Jongkhar Dzongkhag and (4) Thimphu of Thimphu Dzongkhag as declared vide Notification No. C-4/268 dated 25 August 2010 of the Royal Government of Bhutan. It may be noted that the Elections in the two hundred and five Gewogs shall be conducted once the Yenlag Thromdes and proper demarcation of boundries of these Thromdes and affected Gewogs in the twenty Dzongkhags is declared subsequent to the approval of Parliament. The elections for the other sixteen Dzongkhag Thromdes shall be conducted as soon as the issue of institution of the Dzongkhag Thromde Tshogdes in the Dzongkhags, as required under the Constitution, is resolved in conformity to the Constitutional provisions. Similarity, the election of the Dzongkhag Thromde Thuemi to the respective Dzongkhag Tshogdu shall then be conducted in all twenty Dzongkhags, once these issues are addressed by the Sixth Session of Parliament. The schedule for preparation and conduct of the Local Government Elections in the four Dzongkhag Thromdes mentioned above shall be: (A) Delimitation

(1) Draft Delimitation Plan of the four Dzongkhag Thromde A to be released for public inspection. (By 20 September 2010)

(2) Conduct public hearings and thereafter review, finalise and issue the Delimitation Plan of ther four Dzongkhag Throm des. (by 20 October 2010) (B) Functional Literacy and Possession of Adequate Skills (3) Issue of Certificate of Functional Literacy and Possession of Required Skills. (To be completed by 20 October 2010) (C) Electoral Roll and Voter Photo Identity Card (VPIC) (4) Updating of the Electoral Roll (Special programme for voter registration in four Dzongkhag Thromdes in October 2010) (5) Issue for VPIC in the four Dzongkhag Thromdes. (Start after 15 October 2010) (D) Electoral Education and Voter Awareness Programme 6) Initiate the Electoral Education and Voter Awareness Programme in the four Dzongkhag Thromdes. (Start by Third week of October 2010) (E) Code of conduct (7) The Code of Conduct under the Electoral Laws shall come into effect from November 2010 (F) Issue of Notification Calling Elections (8) Issue of Notification calling for the conduct of elections for Thrompons and Thromde Tshogpas in the four Dzongkhag Thromdes. (November 2010) Issued on the 25th Day of the 7th Month of the Iron Male Tiger Year corresponding to 3 September 2010. Chief Election Comissioner of Bhutan

MINISTRY OF HEALTH THIMPHU:BHUTAN P.O.BOX: 726 Ref.No: MoH/Pro/04-TB/2010/1464

Tender Advertisement Sealed quotations are hereby invited from the reputed printing firms for printing of Revised TB Guidelines and Other Materials. The detailed terms and conditions can be obtained from the procurement Unit, AFD, Ministry of Health from 6th September 2010 to 5th October 2010 on cash payment of Nu. 300.00 (Ngultrum Three Hundred) only which is non refundable. The last date and time of submission of the bid is on or before 6th October 2010 at 11.30 AM and will be opened at 2.30 PM on the same day. For further information, please contact the Procurement Officer, AFD, Ministry of Health on telephone # 328092/93 (extension # 101 or 107) Chief Adm. Officer


Business & Economy

Journalist the

05 September 2010 Sunday

13

International trade fair

Investing in Bhutan The international trade fair is expected to promote foreign investment in the country and enhance international trade

T

he first international trade fair organized by the Bhutan Chamber of Commerce and Industry began on 3 September last week and will end on 7 September. Being the first of its kind, the trade fair was organized for the purpose of strengthening international trade relation and to promote foreign investment in the country. Although Bhutan has so far remained an unattractive destination to foreign investors, the liberalization of foreign investment following the revised 2010 Foreign Direct Investment Policy and activities such as the international trade fair which is being organized at the moment is expected to provide stimulus toward attracting foreign investment in the country. Various countries such as India, Nepal, Thailand, Singapore, Bangladesh, and Bhutan will be participating in the event to show case and demonstrate their

products and services. Other parallel programs, seminars and business to business meetings will also be held at the event. They include a list of program on investment in Bhutan, entry into joint venture, importance of Small and Medium Enterprises in economic development and potential for eco-tour-

ism in the country among others. These programs are held to promote business tie-ups, market linkages, and investments. The participants of the international trade fair said their main objective to take part in the trade fair is to enhance brand and product visibility, promote sale, and reach out to a larger market.

A Thailand based health center known as Phyathai Group of Hospitals is also participating in the trade show. The health company expressed its interest to establish business in Bhutan. The chief medical and international business officer, Surapong Ambhanwong, however, said they are yet to carry out studies on business prospects and peruse the revised FDI policy before taking any further step. The Phyathai Group of Hospitals provides medical services worldwide. With their partnership with the Thai tourism company Magic Carpet, the two companies provide health services to patients for half a day after which the patients are taken for holiday, spa, massage centers, and fun tours. Surapong Ambhanwong said they will meet with the Tourism Council of Bhutan to discuss possibilities of partnering and carrying out business in Bhutan.

DDA/DES-22/2009-10/114

DAGANA DZONGKHAG ADMINISTRATION

ENGINEERING SECTOR

NOTICE INVITING TENDER 1. The Dzongkhag Administration, Dagana, now invites sealed bids from the eligible and qualified bidders for the following works under the Dzongkhag. Sl No.

Name of Work

1

Construction of Science Block two nos., NPH Hall, Toilet for boys and Development of football field at Geserling LSS

2

Construction of PF Toilet for boys and girls at Phuensumgang CPS under Laja Geog

Bid Security

Category of Contractor

340,000.00

“B”

3,500.00

Petty

2. The period for execution of the assignment is 24 months for SL. No. 1 and 1 and 1/2 for the SL. No. 2. 3. Bidding will be conducted through national competitive bidding procedures specified in the Royal Government of Bhutan Procurement Rules and Regulations and are open to all bidders from countries as defined in Section III of the bidding Documents. 4. Interested eligible bidders may obtain information from Mr. Karma Choida and Lam Dorji at + 17691850 or + 17657763 or 481119 respectively from 9:00AM to 5:00PM. 5. A complete set of bidding documents in English may be downloaded from the Dzongkhag website www.dagana.gov.bt W.e.f 6/9/10 and non- refundable fee of Nu. 200.00 for each work to the Dzongkhag Revenue Officer during the submission of the bids. The method of payment will be by cash. 6. Bids must be delivered to the address below at or before 12.00 noon on 6/10/10. Submission of bids electronically shall not be permitted. Late bids will be rejected. Bids will be open physically on the same day in the chamber of Dasho Dzongrab at 2:30PM in the presence of the bidders’ representatives who choose to attend in person. 7. All bids shall be accompanied by Bid securities as mentioned in against each work in the above table in the form of Demand Draft or Bank Guarantee in favour of address given below. 8. The address referred to above is Dzongdag, Dzongkhag Administration, Dagana. DZONGDAG


14

Advert

05 September 2010 Sunday

Journalist the

ZD/ADM-06/2010-2011/1058

DZONGKHAG ADMINISTRATION ZHEMGANG

Notice Inviting Tender The Dzongkhag Administration,Zhemgang invites sealed bids from the interested eligible Bhutanese contractors holding a valid CDB Certificate and Contract License for the following works:

Name of Work

Class

Re-surfacing of Urban roads at Zhemgang town.

D

Construction of Goling Bailey Bridge (DDR 200 ft. TS 100 ft. double span) on Goling Farm Road under Zhemgang Dzongkhag Construction of CIC at Tingtibi

Construction of CIC at Goshing Construction of Integrated Science Laboratory for ZHSS at Zhemgang

Cost of document

500.00

B

D

D

C

3000.00

300.00

300.00

800.00

Bid security

13,600.00

2,25,000.00

15.000.00

15,000.00

1,60,000.00

Completion time

Date & time of Opening

Date of sale of documents

Date &time of Submission

5 months

2ndSeptember, 2010 to 1st October 2010

1st October 2010 before 12 noon

1st October, 2010 at 2:30PM

12 months

2nd September, 2010 to 1st October, 2010

1st October, 2010 before 12.00 noon

1st October, 2010 at 2:30PM

6 months

1st September, 2010 to 30th September, 2010

30th September, 30th September, 2010 before 12 2010 at noon 2:30PM

7 months

1st September, 2010 to 30th September, 2010

30th September, 30th September, 2010 before 12 2010 at noon 2:30PM

20 months

1st September, 2010 to 30th September 2010

30th September, 30th September, 2010 before 12 2010 at 2:30PM noon

Tender documents may be purchased from Dzongkhag Revenue section during office hour on production of the above document in Original. For further information, please contract Dzongkhag Engineering Sector/Dzongkhag Municipality at Phone # 03741142/741281/741116. Offtg.DZONGDAG

MoLHR/DoE/10/10-11/691

MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND HUMAN RESOURCES

DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT

ANNOUNCEMENT NATIONAL GRADUATE ORIENTATION PROGRAM 2010 Department of Employment MoLHR, is pleased to inform the university graduates of 2010 that the National Graduate Orientation Program for 2010 would be organized from 6th October to 14th October 2010 at Nazhoen Pelri Centre, Thimphu. Online registration for the program is already opened and the last date of registration is 13th September 2010. Graduates are required to come with original and authentic academic certificates at the time of verification which would be done from 20th -30th September 2010. Graduates are required to report to Nazhoen Pelri Centre, Thimphu on 4th October 2010 at 9:00 AM for briefing and election of counselors. Graduates having accommodation problem in Thimphu may contact the Department for necessary support and assistance. Due to limited resources support will be provided on first窶田ome-first serve basis. For details, please contact Department of Employment at Tele # 02-333867/326734 or e-mail us at damchu_w@molhr.gov.bt Director


World

Journalist the

05 September 2010 Sunday

15

US withdrawal from Iraq

Baghdad residents mourn departure of former enemy The decision to leave the country has not been called into question for one moment, despite the Iraqis’ new-found affection for their occupiers

U

S combat troops are withdrawing from Iraq, where terrorist attacks are once again part of everyday life. The Iraqi population is suddenly mourning the departure of the once-hated occupiers, as fears of a civil war grow. The Al Faw Palace in Baghdad is a relic from the reign of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. Last Wednesday, 1 September 2010, it was the scene of a significant moment in the history of American involvement in the country, when US General Raymond Odierno handed over the command of US forces in Iraq to his successor. The ceremony marked the penultimate step of the US withdrawal from Iraq. Only 50,000 US troops will remain in the country, out of a total of over 170,000 soldiers that were in Iraq at the high point of the American deployment. They are staying mainly to support the Iraqi security forces as advisers and trainers, and are also due to return to their homeland at the end of 2011. The withdrawal of US combat troops from Iraq’s urban centers just over a year ago was welcomed euphorically. Fireworks lit up the sky, honking motorcades drove through the streets and men danced with joy. They were celebrating the fact that the occupiers were finally out of sight, but still close enough to intervene should terror once again regain the upper hand. No one expected much dancing in the streets of Baghdad last Wednesday. The streets are deserted these days. It is not only the infernal heat of up to 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit) which keeps people in their homes. It is also the fear of what will happen once the Americans are gone. Visitors to Baghdad can sense the fear that many people have of a new civil war. That fear is underscored by the daily news reports on television. Last week, at least 56 Iraqis died at the hands of suicide bombers and snipers in around two dozen terrorist attacks. In August, an average of five policemen or soldiers died every day. ‘Not in Iraq’s interests’ Given the violence that is flaring up again, many Iraqis want their occupiers to stay longer. “They shouldn’t leave. The situation is not stable,” says Mohammed Ali Mohammed, a 55-year-old shopkeeper in the New Baghdad district who sells vegetables and canned goods. Iraq has no government, the politicians are incompetent and the situation on the streets is “brutal,” he says. “The Americans are leaving, but they didn’t ask us.” Zeinab Ali, a 19-year-old student, agrees with him: “We had hoped that the US would help the Iraqis to end the political chaos. Instead, they surprised us with the decision to withdraw their troops,” says Ali, who is currently in the first semester of a course in Islamic Studies.

His assessment of the situation is not, however, completely correct. It has been clear ever since Washington and Baghdad signed an agreement in late 2008 that the US would withdraw its troops by the end of 2011. Many Iraqis could not, and did not want to, believe that the US government would abide by its agreements, however. It has been decades since Iraq has had a government that keeps its word. The uncertainty about what will happen now is so far-reaching that it has even affected the former arch-enemies of the US Army. Abu Mujahid lost a leg in 2004 when he fought against the invaders in the battle of Fallujah. Shrapnel fragments are lodged in his head, the legacy of a US missile strike. “Yes, we fought them to the death,” Mujahid, who is a Sunni Muslim, told the news agency Reuters. “We dreamed of the day when they would leave Iraq. But their withdrawal at this time is not in Iraq’s interests.” Deep-Rooted Fears On the political level, too, doubts are growing as to whether Iraq can survive on its own. “Withdrawing at this moment is extremely dangerous,” says Shaher Ketab, a political consultant who is close to the secular al-Iraqiya coalition. He has just come from the latest in a series of meetings with Vice President Tariq al-Hashimi. They were discussing the formation of the new Iraqi government -- a process that is no further forward today, fiveand-a-half months after the election. It is this political vacuum that is making the Iraqis fearful. The experiences of recent years have shown that chaos reigns wherever there

is no strong state in charge. “The US is leaving behind a huge security hole,” complains Ketab. He rejects the suggestion that the hole has in fact been created by his own clients, the politicians who do not want to agree on a compromise for a coalition government. Mahmoud Othman, a member of parliament within the Kurdish bloc, is hard on his fellow politicians. In the tough negotiations, Othman occupies a position between the Shiite-dominated State of Law coalition of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and the nationalist-secular Iraqiya coalition of former Prime Minister Ayad Allawi. The major parties “are responsible for the fact that Iraq is paralyzed,” rants Othman, speaking in his heavily guarded villa near the Tigris River. “They have betrayed their voters.” Othman believes the reason for the deadlock in negotiations is the feeling of suspicion that became burned into Iraqis during the dictatorship. “No politician wants to go into opposition,” he says. In the Arab world, a government’s political opponents traditionally ended up in prison, he explains. “It’s impossible to get rid of people’s fears.” But Othman, too, sees the US as at least partly responsible for the current situation. The US had promised “a responsible reduction in troop levels,” he says. “But is it responsible to now simply run away? No!” he says. “Obama is acting according to the motto: I will leave Iraq to the Iraqis, and the Iraqis to themselves.” The Kurdish politician argues that the US should have provided better training for local security forces. “After all, it was the Americans that got us into this mess.” There was no al-Qaida in Iraq when Saddam was in power, he points out. “The Americans now have to teach the Iraqis how to deal with the problems that they are leaving behind.” ‘You can’t please the Iraqis’ The US forces, for their part, are observing the sudden regret over their departure with interest. “We are seeing that very clearly,” says Brigadier General Mark Corson, speaking in the US military base in Balad about 70 miles (110 kilometers) north of Baghdad. Most of the troop withdrawal in recent months has taken place via the Balad base. Corson compares the logistics of the operation to moving an entire American city with a population of 80,000. The decision to leave the country has not been called into question for one moment, despite the Iraqis’ new-found affection for their occupiers, Corson says. “You can’t please the Iraqis. If you’re here, you are the evil occupier. If you leave, you are letting them down. Then it’s better to just leave at some point.” SPIEGEL ONLINE INTERNATIONAL


16

Time off

05 September 2010 Sunday

quick

Journalist the

wordit

Across

gruff

Down

1. Central point [5] 5. Obnoxiously forward [5] 9. Hearing organs [4] 10. Unit of weight [5] 11. Attempts [5] 13. Tale [5] 15. Leif -------, Norse mariner [7] 16. Cutting instrument [5] 21. Central Pennsylvania city [7] 24. Courtyard [5] 26. Roman garments [5] 28. Fatigued [5] 29. Diplomacy [4] 30. Small pulpy fruit [5] 31. Trials [5]

1. Bring [5] 2. Lever for rowing [3] 3. Weeps [5] 4. A person that uses [4] 5. Sneak [9] 6. To (Archaic) [4] 7. Small sweet cake [5] 8. Pronoun [3] 12. Signer [9] 14. Evergreen tree [3] 17. Little drink [3] 18. Provide food [5] 19. Long stories [5] 20. Prices paid [5] 22. Person who lies [4] 23. Short letter [4] 25. Admiration [3] 27. Statute [3]

adjective 1. (of a voice) deep and rough, and often sounding unfriendly. Last week’s solution

2. (of a person’s behavior) unfriendly and impatient.

mumbleit

calvin and hobbes

reporter Solution:

Last Sunday’s answer glOaT, MOUnd, apaTHy, sMOkeR THEY CALL THE TALKATIVE MECHANIC THIS “MOTOR

MOUTH”

cryptic Across 1 Interrupt posh bloke confronted by copper [3,3] 4 Statements matter in a case of claims [8] 9 Runs into strong depression [6] 10 Batting well, accepting it is without limit [8] 12 Dogs’ names [4] 13 Time in motors drags [5] 14 Wood handle [4] 17 Road junction in centre is to change [12] 20 Firm starting to make written requests for contests [12] 23 Burden for youth outside job centre [4] 24 Knock-out base [5] 25 The advantage of incisiveness [4] 28 Permission for a couple of coppers to run cricket ground [8] 29 A fruit rumoured to have coolness [6] 30 Make fun of rite, as is fitting [8] 31 Girl getting married accepts George is cross [6]

Down 1 Marsh plant that grows in Queen’s dock [4,4] 2 Ideas whilst tanks get emptied [8] 3 Cigarettes for learner abandoning standards [4] 5 The law? It counts on it going wrong [12] 6 Commanding officer keeps note of the hearing [4] 7 Arrested for getting hammered? [6] 8 Moves stealthily to get bargains [6] 11 Supply food to columns of heavy vehicles [12] 15 Chef pinches right staff [5] 16 Warning about Tory leader’s strength [5] 18 Leave nothing to daughter – promise recommendation [4,4] Last week’s solution 19 Get together for poor blameless student being dropped [8] 21 Issues shares in carnival displays [6] 22 Dress down, darling – supporting vehicle [6] 26 Way out for giver with no name [4] 27 Knocks up box [4]

Last week Solution

Sudoku

Each 3x3 box should contain every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively


Journalist the

Musings

05 September 2010 Sunday

17

The Tiger in the Tunnel A Short Story by Ruskin Bond

Tembu, the boy, opened his

eyes in the dark and wondered if his father was ready to leave the hut on his nightly errand. There was no moon that night, and the deathly stillness of the surrounding jungle was broken only occasionally by the shrill cry of a cicada. Sometimes from far off came the hollow hammering of a woodpecker, carried along on the faint breeze. Or the grunt of a wild boar could be heard as it dug up a favourite root. But these sounds were rare, and the silence of the forest always returned to swallow them up. Baldeo, the watchman, was awake. He stretched himself, slowly unwinding the heavy shawl that covered him like a shroud. It was close on midnight and the chilly air made him shiver. The station, a small shack backed by heavy jungle, was a station in name only. For train only stopped there, if at all, for a few seconds before entering the deep cutting that led to the tunnel. Most trains merely slowed down before taking the sharp curve before the cutting. Baldeo was responsible for signaling whether or not the tunnel was clear of obstruction, and his hand-worked signal stood before the entrance. At night it was his duty to see that the lamp was burning, and that the overland mail passed through safely. ‘Shall I come too, Father?’ Asked Tembu sleepily, still lying huddled in a corner of the hut. ‘No, it is cold tonight. Do not get up.’ Tembu, who was twelve, did not always sleep with his father at the station, for he had also to help in the home, where his mother and small sister were usually alone. They lived in a small tribal village on the outskirts of the forest, about three miles from the station. Their small rice fields did not provide them with more than a bare living, and Baldeo considered himself lucky to have got the job of Khalasi at this small wayside signal stop. Still drowsy, Baldeo groped for his lamp in the darkness, then fumbled about in search of matches. When he had produced a light, he left, the hut, closed the door behind him, and set off along the permanent way. Tembu had fallen asleep again. Baldeo wondered whether the lamp on the signal post was still alight. Gathering his shawl about him, he stumbled on, sometimes along the rails, sometimes along the ballast. He longed to get back to his warm corner in the hut. The eeriness of the place was in-

creased by the neighbouring hills which overhung the main line threateningly. On entering the cutting with its sheer rock walls towering high above the rails, Baldeo could not help thinking about the wild animals he might encounter. He had heard many tales of the famous tunnel tiger, a man-eater, who was supposed to frequent this spot; but he hardly believed these stories for, his arrival at this place a month ago, he had not seen or even heard a tiger. There had, of course, been panthers, and only a few days previously the villagers had killed one with their spears and axes. Baldeo had occasionally heard the sawing of a panther calling its mate, but they had not come near the tunnel or shed. Baldeo walked confidently for, being a tribal himself, he was used to the jungle and its ways. Like his forefathers, he carried a small axe, fragile to look at, bur deadly when in use. With it, in three or four swift strokes, he could cut down a tree as neatly as if it had been sawn; and he prided himself on his skill in wielding it against wild animals. He had killed a young boar with it once, and the family had feasted on the flesh for three days. The axe head of pure steel, thin but ringing true like a bell, had been made by his father over a charcoal fire. This axe was part of himself, and whenever he went, be it to the local market seven miles away, or to a tribal dance, the axe was always in his hand. Occasionally an official who had come to the station had offered him good money for the weapon; but Baldeo had no intention of parting with it. The cutting curved sharply, and in the darkness the black entrance to the tunnel loomed up menacingly. The signal light was out. Baldeo set to work on haul the lamp down by its chain. If the oil had finished, he would have to return to the hut for more. The mail train was due in five minutes. Once more he fumbled for his matches. Then suddenly he stood still and listened. The frightened cry of a barking deer, followed by a crashing sound in the undergrowth, made Baldeo hurry. There was still a little oil in the lamp and after an instant’s hesitation he lit the lamp again and hoisted it back into position. Having done this, he walked quickly down the tunnel, swinging his own lamp, so that the shadows leapt up and down the soot-stained walls, and having made sure that the line was clear, he returned to the entrance and sat down to wait for

the mail train. The train was late. Sitting huddled up, almost dozing, he soon forgot his surroundings and began to nod. Back in the hut, the trembling of the ground told of the approach of the train, and a low distant rumble woke the boy, who sat up, rubbing the sleep from his eyes.  “Father, it’s time to light the lamp,” he mumbled, and then, realizing that his father had been gone sometime, he lay down again; but he was wide awake now, waiting for the train to pass, waiting for his father’s returning footsteps. A low grunt resounding from the top of the cutting. In a second Baldeo was awake, all his senses alert. Only a tiger could emit such a sound. There was no shelter for Baldeo, but he grasped his axe firmly and tensed his body, trying to make out the direction from which the animal was approaching. For some time there was only silence, even the usual jungle noises seemed to have ceased altogether. Then a thump and the rattle of small stones announced that the tiger had sprung into the cutting. Baldeo, listening as he had never listened before, wondered if it was making for the tunnel or the opposite direction-the direction of the hut, in which Tembu would by lying unprotected. He did not have to wonder for long. Before a minute had passed he made out the huge body of the tiger trotting steadily towards him. Its eyes shone a brilliant green in the light from the signal lamp. Flight was useless, for in the dark the tiger would be more-sure footed than Baldeo and would soon be upon him from behind. Baldeo stood with his back to the signal post, motionless, staring at the great brute moving rapidly towards him. The tiger, used to the ways of men, for it had been preying on them for years, came on fearlessly, and with a quick run and a snarl struck out with its right paw, expecting to bowl over this puny man who dared stand in the way. Baldeo, however, was ready. With a marvellously agile leap he avoided the paw and brought his axe down on the animal’s shoulder. The tiger gave a roar and attempted to close in. Again Baldeo drove his axe with true aim; but, to his horror, the beast swerved, and the axe caught the tiger on the shoulder, almost severing the leg. To make matters worse, the axe remained stuck in the bone, and Baldeo was left without a weapon.

The tiger roaring with pain, now sprang upon Baldeo, bringing him down and then tearing at his broken body. It was all over in a few minutes. Baldeo was conscious only of a seering pain down his back, and then there was blackness and the night closed in on him for ever. The tiger drew off and sat down licking its wounded leg, roaring every now and then with agony. It did not notice the faint rumble that shook the earth, followed by the distant puffing of an engine steadily climbing. The overland mail was approaching. Through the trees beyond the cutting, as the train advanced, the glow of the furnace could be seen; and showers of sparks fell like Diwali lights over the forest. As the train entered the cutting, the engine whistled once, loud and piercingly. The tiger raised its head, then slowly got to its feet. It found itself trapped like the man. Flight along the cutting was impossible. It entered the tunnel, running as fast as its wounded leg would carry it. And then, with a roar and shower of sparks, the train entered the yawning tunnel. The noise in the confined space was deafening; but, when the train came out into the open, on the other side, silence returned once more to the forest and the tunnel.  At the next station the driver slowed down and stopped his train to water the engine. He got down to stretch his legs and decided to examine the headlamps. He received the surprise of his life; for, just above the cowcatcher lay the major portion of the tiger, cut in half by the engine. There was considerable excitement and conjecture at the station, but back at the cutting there was no sound except for the sobs of the boy as he sat beside the body of his father. He sat there a long time, unafraid of the darkness, guarding the body from jackals and hyenas, until the first faint light of dawn brought with it the arrival of the relief watchman. Tembu and his sister and mother were plunged in grief for two whole days; but life had to go on, and a living had to be made, and all the responsibility now fell on Tembu. Three nights later, he was at the cutting, lighting the signal lamp for the overland mail. He sat down in the darkness to wait for the train, and sang softly to himself. There was nothing to be afraid of- his father had killed the tiger, the forest gods were pleased; and besides, he had the axe with him, his father’s axe, and he knew how to use it.


18

Advert

05 September 2010 Sunday

Journalist the

Ref No FD/Lobeysa/2010-2011/W-15/329

Ministry of Works & Human Settlement

DoR Field Division, Lobeysa “Towards Quality Infrastructure”

Notice Inviting Tender The Executive Engineer, Field Division Department of Roads (FD DoR), Lobeysa, now invites sealed Bids from eligible and qualified Bidders for the following (category-W1) Bid Security (Nu. in million)

Class of Contractors

Time for completion of works

Date, time & venue for bid opening

S.No

Name of Work

Date of sale of bid

1

Resurfacing of DochulaSamtopana Highway km 499.50 to km 505.00 = 5.50 km

3rd September 2010

0.217

B

7 Months

5th October 2010 at 2 PM DoR Head Office Thimphu

2

Resurfacing of DochulaSamtopana Highway km 505.00 to km 512 = 7.00 Km

3rd September 2010

0.291

B

7 Months

5th October 2010 at 2 PM DoR Head Office Thimphu

3

Samtopana -Tekezampa Highway km.469 to km 482 = 13 km

3rd September 2010

0.338

B

7 Months

5th October 2010 at 2 PM DoR Head Office Thimphu

4

Resurfacing of PellelaTekezampa Highway km 440 to km 445 = 5 km

3rd September 2010

0.140

C

6 Months

5th October 2010 at 2 PM Field Division DoR Lobesa

5

Resurfacing Pellela-Tekezampa 3rd September Highway km 420.00-421.00 0.37 2010 km & 434-440 = 5.62 = 5.99 km

0.159

C

6 Months

5th October 2010 at 2 PM Field Division DoR Lobesa

6

Resurfacing of Missina-Punakha 3rd September Highway km 0.00-12km = 12km 2010

0.321

B

7 Months

5th October 2010 at 2 PM DoR Head Office Thimphu

7

Resurfacing of Chuserbu-Pellela 3rd September Highway km 399.00-421.00 km 2010 = 7.14 km in stretches

0.160

C

7 Months

5th October 2010 at 2 PM Field Division DoR Lobesa

1. Bidding will be conducted through the National Competitive Bidding procedures specified in the RGoB Procurement Rules & Regulation 2009. 2. Interested eligible Bidders may obtain further information from the Executive Engineer Field Division, Department of Roads, Lobysa, and inspect the Bidding Documents at the address given below from 9AM to 5 PM during working days. 3.

Qualification requirements includes: Key Technical Personal, Financial & Equipment

4.

A complete set of Bidding Documents in English may be purchased and collected by interested Bidders on submission of a written application along with a copy of a valid trade license & CDB certificate to the address below and upon payment of non refundable fee of Nu.1000.00/=(Nu one thousand only). The method of payment will be in cash.

5. Bids for S/No 1,2,3 & 6 must be delivered to The Chief Engineer, Road Division, DoR Head Quarter, Thimphu, on or before 2 PM on 5th October 2010 and Bids for S/No. 4, 5 & 7 to The Executive Engineer, Field Division, DoR Lobeysa on or before 2 PM on 5th October 2010. Electronic bidding “shall not” be permitted. Late bids will be rejected. Bids will be opened physically in presence of all bidders’ representatives who choose to attend in person at the address mentioned above at 2:30 PM (local time) on 5th October 2010. 6. All bids shall be accompanied by a bid security of Nu. as mentioned above in favour of the Executive Engineer, Field Division, DoR, Lobeysa in the form of Cash Warrant /Demand Draft /unconditional Bank Guarantee. Executive Engineer


19 Journalist In Conversation “Demand information persistently” the

05 September 2010 Sunday

The director of the Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism at Columbia University, Sheila Coronel, talks about why the media should act as a watchdog against corruption in the government

What were some of the challenges that you faced while you were involved in investigating the case of the 13th president of the Philippines Joseph Estrada’s corrupt practices?

Journalists in Bhutan today are helping build the press as a democratic institution. You are not just reporting and telling stories. You are building an institution. It is important to keep this in mind. The press is like other institutions - it needs to be effective at what it does and transparent and accountable as well.

The major challenge in that investigation was getting to the truth behind the rumors. We heard a lot of coffee-shop talk about Estrada’s corruption. But none of these could be proven: after all, bribery takes place in secret and it’s almost impossible to document it has taken place. So we focused instead on what we could prove. If we could not prove bribery, we could prove what the president did with the money he got from corrupt acts. So that is what we proceeded to do - we documented the houses, the cars, the lavish lifestyle that could not be accounted for by what the president legitimately earned. Documenting this took months and entailed a great deal of effort. The second major challenge was dealing with the security and other risks after the reports were published. We needed to secure our documents, the safety of our sources and the safety of our journalists.  How can investigative journalism help in achieving a sound democracy in the society? Investigative journalists play a watchdog role in a democracy. They hold individuals and institutions accountable for what they do. They expose wrongdoing in the hope that it can be corrected. Investigative reporters may seem cynical people, but they are actually quite idealistic and hopeful. They believe that by exposing what is wrong, reforms can be made, officials and citizens will take action, and the wrong will be righted. What can be more hopeful than that?  You have said that the greatest battle of the 21st century will be between ‘openness and secrecy.’ what according to you should remain open to the journalist? Journalists need access to public records so they can do their jobs. They recognize that there are limits to what should be made public. Information that endangers national security, for example, or impinges on the right to privacy. We do not ask that medical records be released because these are private records. We do not need to know the exact location of troop deployments because this would endanger national security. But we need to know how government is spending the

people’s money. We need to know the assets of public officials because we can use the knowledge to track corruption. Journalists should be granted access to information that will enable them to play their role as watchdog of the public. How can they hold officials accountable if they do not have sufficient information to know what policies officials have made, how those policies are implemented or how public funds are spent? How do you consider investigative journalism a powerful tool toward bringing out transparency in a government system? Through their work, investigative journalists open the doors of secrecy. By constantly demanding for information - and showing to the public how such information contributes to the public good - they compel government to be more transparent. If they do their jobs well, investigative journalists build support among the public, which begins to appreciate the value of their work. Public support for watchdog reporting and for transparency eventually puts pressure on government to be more open. We’ve seen this in our work in the Philippines. Because journalists there persistently demanded information - and the public supported their demands - the government eventually released information. We just didn’t stop. We made persistent requests, we even threatened to file lawsuits in court. It’s important that journalists are aware of their rights under the constitu tion and the law and to assert those rights. What should be the responsibilities of the media in a country that has recently witnessed a transition toward democracy? Journalists in Bhutan today are helping build the press as a democratic institution. You are not just reporting and telling stories. You are building an institution. It is important to keep this in mind. The press is like other institutions - it needs to be effective at what it does and transparent and accountable as well. The press needs to do its job responsibly. Irresponsibility, sensationalism, inaccuracy weaken the press. They erode the media’s support among the public. They lower the prestige of journalists and the status of journalism as a profession. 

ROYAL GOVERNMENT OF BHUTAN NATIONAL LAND COMMISSION THIMPHU

Notice Inviting Tender Sealed tenders are invited from vehicle owners for hiring of vehicle to National Land Commission, Thimphu. 1.

Toyota Hiluxes (different duration)

The tender documents can be purchased from the NLC Procurement Office on any working days w.e.f 7th September 2010. The cost of the document is Nu. 300/- (non refundable). The last day of submission of tender is on 8th October,2010 before 5PM and will be opened on 11th October 2010 at 10:30AM. Procurement Officer


20

Advert

05 September 2010 Sunday

Journalist the

Ministry of Works and Human Settlement THIMPHU CITY CORPORATION Post Box – 2150, Lungtenzampa, Thimphu

Invitation for Bids I. Provision for street lights at various locations within Thimphu City. [Tender no. II. Construction of 11 units Aqua Privy Toilet at seven Thimphu Schools. [Tender no.

: (TCC/ENG/E01)] : (TCC/ENG/CMS/03)]

1. Executive Secretary, TCC, invites sealed Bids from eligible and qualified Bidders for the following works: Sl. No.

Name of Work

Category

Time Period

Bid Security

Cost of Documents

1.

Provision of street lights at various Class locations within Thimphu City (W4)

`C’ 6.5 (six & half) months

100,000.00/-

1000.00

2.

Construction of 11 units Aqua Privy Class Toilet at seven Thimphu Schools (W3)

`C’ 6.5 (six & half ) months

155,000.00/-

1000.00

Note: The above works are to be treated as separate packages 2. Bidding will be conducted through the National Competitive Bidding procedures specified in the RGoB Procurement Manual2009, and are open to all bidders registered as class `C’ (W4) & class `C’(W3) respectively with CDB including other Countries as defined in Section III of the Bidding Documents. 3. Interested eligible Bidders may obtain further information and inspect the Bidding Documents at the address given below: Engineering Division/TCC, NPPF Building, Behind MKTS Shopping Complex at Tel. No. 336310, 322757, 324689, 324587 during office hours 4. Qualification requirements includes: (Site Engineers, Electrical & Civil for Sl. No. 1&2 respectively). A margin of preference for eligible national contractors/joint ventures/consortia/associations may be applied. 5. A complete set of Bidding Documents in English may be purchased by interested Bidders on the submission of a written Application to the address below and upon payment of a non refundable fee of Nu.1,000.00 for each document and the method of payment will be in cash. The sale of bidding documents shall commence from 06/09/2010 till 07/10/2010 during office hours from Asst. Adm. Officer, Administration Section, City Corporation, Thimphu. 6. Bids must be delivered to the address below on or before 12:00 Hours, 07/10/2010. Electronic bidding shall not be permitted. Late bids will be rejected. Bids will be opened physically in the presence of the Bidders’ representatives who choose to attend in person or online at the address below at 14:30 Hours 07/10/2010 at the Conference Hall of TCC. 7. All Bids shall be accompanied by a Bid Security of Nu. 100,000.00/- & 155,000.00/- respectively as stated above. 8. The Bid shall be addressed to the employer at the following address: Executive Secretary, Thimphu City Corporation, Post Box No.215, Thimphu: Bhutan 9. The Bidders must visit the site prior to filling up the tender to avoid any inconvenience on the part of bidders. 10. The IFB is also available at the TCC’S website: www.tcc.gov.bt

RCSC/HRMD/5/2010/1254

Executive Secretary

Royal Civil Service Commission

BRIEFING TO GRADUATES ON BCSE 2010 The Royal Civil Service Commission is pleased to inform that a special briefing session is being organized for Graduates who wish to appear the Bhutan Civil Service Examination (BCSE) 2010 as follows: Venue

:  Nazhoen Pelri (Youth Development Centre), Thimphu

Date

:  September 10, 2010

Reporting Time

: 10.00 A.M

It will be in the interest of graduates to attend the above briefing which will benefit the graduates in terms of better preparation for the BCSE, particularly the Preliminary Examination. For further information, please contact the officers of Human Resource Management Division at Telephone No: 322491/322954 or the Chief HR Officer, HRM Division at 332476. MISD


Advert

Journalist the

05 September 2010 Sunday

21

DCCL/PC/01/TH/2010/192

DUNGSAM CEMENT CORPORATION LIMITED POST BOX 1426, THIMPHU

NOTICE INVITING TENDER Dungsam Cement Corporation Limited is pleased to invite sealed tenders from eligible Civil Contractors registered with Construction Development Board for following works. SL. No.

Name of Works

Contractor Category

EMD/Bid Security

Cost of Tender

Time of completion

1

Construction of Retaining Wall-Ch.5260 & Drainage

“A”

2% in the form of CW/ DD/BG

Nu.1500

6 Months

2

Construction of Retaining Ch.2130, Ch.2160 & Ch. 2140

“B”

2% in the form of CW/ DD/BG

Nu.1500

5 Months

3

Construction of Retaining Wall-Ch.3200

“C”

2% in the form of CW/ DD/BG

Nu.1000

3½ Months

4

Construction of Retaining Wall-Ch.500 & Ch.990

“C”

2% in the form of CW/ DD/BG

Nu.1000

3½ Months

5

Construction of Retaining Wall at receiving yard

“C”

2% in the form of CW/ DD/BG

Nu.1000

3 Months

6

Construction of Retaining Wall-Ch.1260

“D”

2% in the form of CW/ DD/BG

Nu.500

2 Months

7

Construction of Retaining Wall-Ch.2780

“D”

2% in the form of CW/ DD/BG

Nu.500

1½ Months

Wall-Ch.2110,

The tender documents with detail terms and conditions for above works can be purchased from the office of Dungsam Cement Corporation Limited at Nganglam and Liaison office at Thimphu during office hours (8:30am to 5:30pm) from 6th to 30th September 2010 along with written application to above office with photo copies of valid CDB Certificate, Contract License and Tax Clearance Certificate. The tender may be delivered by hand or by registered post in sealed envelopes and received by the DCCL, Nganglam no later than 1400 hours on 5th October 2010 and shall be opened on the same day at 1500 hours. Any tender received after the deadline for the submission shall be rejected. Please note that bids will be reject at the time of opening if 1) Integrity Pact is not signed by authorized person and witnesses with legal stamp affixed, 2.) Bid bond not sufficient or not enclosed, 3) Incomplete from of bids, and 4) Complete set of COPY is not enclosed as per notification No: FM/DNP/PD/08/2009/715 DATED September 7, 2009. For any inquiry, please contact Construction Engineer (Tel. 07- 481114, Mobile 17538334). General Manager - Project

RICB OPENS MICRO OFFICES IN TRASHIYANGTSE, PEMAGATSEL & LHUENTSE Thimphu, Bhutan The Royal Insurance Corporation of Bhutan Limited opens Micro offices in Trashi Yangtse, Pema Gatsel and Lhuentsi Dzongkhags. The inaugural ceremony was attended by the dzongkhag officials, the business community and the general public of the dzongkhags. The new micro offices shall be manned by one person and function like a branch office. The micro offices shall facilitate in providing prompt services to the people, catering all services related to life insurance, general insurance and credit. The office will also be instrumental in delivering services related to Rural House Insurance Scheme, which is managed by RICB and supervised by the government. The opening of these new micro offices which adds to the existing twelve branch offices and two micro offices is a part of RICB’s effort in taking services to the people and enhancing accessibility and convenience in availing required services from RICB. By the end of the year, RICB would have set up a micro office each in those dzongkhags which do not have a branch office. Royal Insurance Corporation of Bhutan Limited (RICB) was incorporated on 7th January 1975 under the Royal Charter of His Majesty, the fourth Druk Gyalpo Jigme Singye Wangchuk, primarily to meet the Insurance needs of its Citizen as well as to actively participate in the economic development of the nation. It has grown from strength to strength over the years in keeping with nation’s march towards the goal of economic growth, self-reliance and Gross National Happiness. As an insurance provider, RICB plays a significant role in the financial sector and in socio-economic development of the country. RICB provides multifaceted financial services including social security services to the society through its various schemes/products.

Contact: Royal Insurance Corporation of Bhutan Limited Telephone #:- 02-325725/321037/322426/321161/323487/324282/321036 Toll Free No.: - 181 & 151


22

Home

05 September 2010 Sunday

Journalist the

continued from p 1 »

The consequences of consensual rape? girl, who a source says made similar statement earlier, denies it. She says they knew each other and were close friends. “Initially the girl said that they were in a relationship, but I think she was compelled to deny it because of family pressure,” said the source. The source added that the victim’s father told the boys that if they confess to the crime, then he would consider leniency. But the boys denied and that made the man mad. He reported the matter to the police at 12 pm on 27 June. The medical team from the Mongar Hospital attending to the girl confirmed no signs of struggle or physical abuse. Dr. Sonam Jamtsho, the gynecologist at the hospital, said his team conducted the medical examination of the girl. They detected semen. “The victim seemed normal and looked clinically OK,” he said. The principal of Mongar Higher Secondary School, Jigme Yangtse, said the boys had no bad records in school. The main accused, a Class IX student, was new in school. His friend, who was convicted for helping, was a Class XI student and a vice counselor. He was a good and hardworking student.

“What happened is sad, but the girl has been very brave to continue her education,” he said. “She is doing fine.” Drangpon Gembo Dorji of the Mongar District Court said that the judgment was passed as per the law and he had been lenient on the boys. “If anyone has a complaint on the judgment not being fair then they should complain to Parliament,” he said. Following the verdict, an online discussion took off. It was a matter of individual conscience, but people from diverse segments expressed their views. Is the idea of rape correct, especially when the girl initially confessed the act was consensual? Is Bhutan’s age of consent a bit too high? Will the two boys, one of who never even touched the girl, be back in school some day? Will the prison deprive them of their otherwise bright lives ahead? While some said the justice was not just, others said the age of consent needs amendment. The age of consent is the age when the law says one can agree to have sex. The age of consent law basically protects young people from being exploited by adults. It prevents older people from taking advantage of children and young teenagers

who may not understand the consequences of having sex. The average age of consent around the world is 16 years. In some countries, it’s as low as 12. And in some countries, although the age of consent might be 13 or 14 it is still illegal to have sex with someone under 16 by exploiting their lack of maturity. In India and Nepal the age of consent is 16. In Bhutan, it is 18. However, many girls in the country, including students, experience sexual contact by the time they cross 16. Can (or should) the Bhutanese law be amended looking at the ground realities? But the repeal can only be made by Parliament. People say the law needs to be researched, especially on students convicted of rape for consensual sex. But then, the law still persists with the conventional theory to prosecute and lacks the dynamism of the changing times. In July this year, at its fifth sitting, the National Council discussed rape, consensual sex, and the age of consent. The council was looking at making possible amendments to the Penal Code. The council members said penalties for child rape should be imposed based on the age of the victim with severe

DIAL

113 it is toll free

STOP THIEVES GETTING THEIR HANDS ON YOUR PRIVATE PROPERTY

punishment for the rape of lower age groups. They proposed consensual sex between children above the age of 16 should not be considered rape. The members argued there is a high incidence of consensual sex between two individuals who do not cross the age of consent. They said there are also instances where one individual crosses the age of consent while the other does not. A typical Mongar incident. The house didn’t reach any conclusion. Chairperson Namgye Penjore said the National Council will conduct a thorough research and deliberate the issue if people are asking for an amendment in the law. But he said the boys in the Mongar case were 19, and he has full faith in the justice system. MP Damchoe Dorji said what is more important than reducing the age of consent is to educate people, including students, on the existing laws. Young people must be made more aware of the consequences of violating laws. Others say lowering the age of consent might give a greater license to youth to engage in casual sex. And older people will take advantage of young girls. Many people The Journalist talked to randomly about the Mongar incident say

the boys deserve the punishment. Youth cannot be an excuse to violating the laws, people say. They, however, acknowledge that in such cases girls generally generate more sympathy. According to a source, when the two boys were brought to the police station, they seemed disturbed and scared. The parents of the two boys pleaded with the girl’s father not to file the case. They were afraid it would be end of their sons’ education. The director general of the school education department, Tshewang Tandin, said the ministry sympathizes with the boys, but will respect the interpretation of the law by the Mongar Court. “Everyone knows rape is a crime and this will be a lesson for others as well,” he said. “Everyone has to abide by the law.” There is some hope around the corner, though. Director Tshewang Tandin said the ministry will continue to support the boys if they want to continue their education. Youth who come into conflict with law and are kept at the Youth Development and Rehabilitation Centre at Tsimasham, a special police division, and they can continue their education.

Turn off lights and appliances before you leave home or office. Use natural sunlight whenever possible.


Opinion

Journalist the

05 September 2010 Sunday

23

The power of softness

A

Our democracy, our thriving free media, our civil society, our energetic human efforts to sustainable development, and the repeated spectacle of our remarkable efforts to build GNH stronger, have all made of Bhutan a rare example of the successful management of diversity in the developing world.

s a Bhutanese, it has now become a little discomfiting over the unending supposed monikers like ‘Shangri-La’ or ‘the happy nation’ foreign travel guides have managed to give to Bhutan with a gratuitous caption, ‘the emerging nation as an example for the rest of the world’. Now, I appreciate that this is not entirely unreasonable but still the term ‘Shangri-La’ makes me a little uncomfortable because what is it that makes a country happy? Is it military superiority? Is it economic development? Bhutan is just a least developed country where the annual economic growth rate fluctuates as hydroelectric projects come in commission. We are famously a land of paradoxes, and one of those paradoxes is that so many speak about Bhutan as a Shangri-La of the 21st century when we are not yet able to feed, educate, and employ all our people. So does the answer rests on something altogether more difficult to define -- the soft power of its culture which makes Bhutan click? The notion of soft power is relatively new in international discourse. Joseph Nye, the coiner of the term argued that power is the ability to alter the behavior of others to get what you want. And there are three ways to do that: coercion (sticks), payments (carrots), and attraction (soft power). If you are able to attract others, you can economize on the sticks and carrots. Enter soft power -- both as an alternative to hard/military power, and as a complement to it. Nye said the soft power of a country rests primarily on three resources: its culture, its political values, and its foreign policies. A country’s soft power, to me, however, emerges from the world’s perception of that country. The associations and attitudes conjured up in the global imagination by the mere mention of a country’s name is often a more accurate gauge of its soft power than a dispassionate analysis of its foreign policies. In my view, hard power is exercised; soft power is evoked. What does this mean for Bhutan? It means acknowledging that Bhutan’s claim to a significant exemplary role in future lies in the aspects and products of Bhutanese society and culture that the world finds attractive.

The roots of Bhutan’s soft power run deep. Bhutan is a civilization that, over millennia, has offered refuge and, more importantly, religious and cultural freedom, many religions namely Buddhism and Hinduism. So in a way Bhutan fully embraces the world offering equality in almost every aspect of the inherent culture. This unique heritage of diversity is what makes Bhutan perhaps special. The Bhutanese mind has been shaped by remarkably diverse forces: ancient Buddhist Dharma tradition, mythology, the impact of Hinduism and throughout the centuries of no colonial rule. The result is unique. Though there are some who think and speak of Bhutan as a Buddhist country, but Bhutan’s civilization today is an evolved hybrid one. We are a land of rich diversities. This land imposes no narrow conformities on its citizens: you can be many things and one thing. You can be a good civilian, a good police officer and a good Bhutanese all at once. So the idea of Bhutan is of one land embracing many. It is the idea that a nation may endure differences of caste, creed, color, culture, cuisine, conviction, and custom, and still rally around a democratic consensus. Like the king going around talking to his people and unifying all less than one law. And not forgetting to mention we were bestowed democracy as a gift from the throne without any sufferings where anyone’s child could be heading the government. The world of the 21st century will increasingly be a world in which the use of hard power carries with it the odium of mass global public disapproval, whereas the blossoming of soft power, which lends itself more easily to the information era, will constitute a country’s principal asset. Globalization has both sparked and allayed many Bhutanese fears that economic liberalization will bring with its cultural imperialism of a particularly insidious kind -- that Baywatch and burgers will supplant Gho/Kira and Emadatsi. Bhutanese will not become any less Bhutanese if, in His Majesty’s metaphor, we open the doors and windows of our country and let foreign winds blow through our house -- because Bhutanese are strong enough not to be blown off their feet by these winds. Besides, the strength of

‘Bhutanese’ lies in its ability to absorb foreign influences, and to transform them -- by a peculiar Bhutanese alchemy -- into something that belongs naturally on the soil of Bhutan. In the information age, Joseph Nye has argued, it is often the side which has the better story that wins. Bhutan must remain the land of the better story; as a society with a free press and a thriving mass media, with a people whose creative energies are daily encouraged to express themselves in a variety of ways. It is not just material accomplishments that will enhance Bhutan’s soft power. Even more important are the values and principles for which Bhutan stands. After all, His Majesty the fourth King won Bhutan its recognition through the use of soft power – because Gross National Happiness was a variation soft power before the term was even coined. But Bhutan also needs to solve its internal problems before it can play any role of an example to the world. We must ensure that we do enough to keep our people healthy, well-fed, and secure and safe from the daily terror of poverty, hunger, and ill health.  At the same time, if Bhutan wants to be a source of attraction to others, it is not enough to attend to these basic needs. It must preserve the precious pluralism that is an asset in our globalizing world. Our democracy, our thriving free media, our civil society, our energetic human efforts to sustainable development, and the repeated spectacle of our remarkable efforts to build GNH stronger, have all made of Bhutan a rare example of the successful management of diversity in the developing world. I believe that the Bhutan that has entered its centenarian age as an independent country with rule of monarchy as one open to the contention of ideas and interests within it, unafraid of the prowess or the products of the outside world, wedded to the democratic tradition, and determined to liberate and fulfill the creative energies of its people. Such a Bhutan truly enjoys soft power, and that may well be the most valuable way in which it can offer its services as an example rather than just being called a ‘Happy Nation’ without basis.   Ugyen Rangdol is studying politics, economy, and society at Rangsit International College, Bangkok.

   


24

05 September 2010 Sunday

SPORT

Journalist the

Published by The Journalist Pvt. Ltd. || Printed by Kuensel Corporation Ltd. || Regd. Office: The Journalist Pvt. Ltd., Post Box: 1336, Norzin Lam, Thimphu, Bhutan || www.thejournalist.bt, Ph: 327540/331653 || Fax: 321680


pdf