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NIKKI SCOTT MAJOR PROJECT 4

MY FAVOURITE SUBJECT


Design & Technology currently tends to concentrate on the students’ ability to make products with a focus on materials and components, an emphasis on basic, procedural tasks often unrelated to the design process. Design resources or strategies resources or strategies for use at GCSE Level to help students and teachers make use of the design process.


INITIAL RESEARCH


Bringing the business of design to life


WORKSHOPS WITH

14-16 YEAR OLDS Design Ventura is a new project run by the Design Museum that brings the business of design to life. The aim of the project is to place design skills in a real world context by developing student’s creativity and enterprise capabilities. The challenge is for 14-16 year olds to create a new product and then to present their ideas to a panel of expert judges. The best idea will then be produced and sold in the Design Museum Shop. Above is a photograph from the first workshop I attended. I volunteered because the Design Museum believes that the input of designers will help to raise the achievement and ambition of students studying design in London’s state secondary schools. The briefing and preparation for the involvement were short group activities with designers in the industry. The Design Museum team briefed us on the project and working with children. Then in pairs we brainstormed the brief ourself and then discussed the brief in the group. It was interesting to get everyone’s input and perspective on the project.


HABERDASHER ASKES HATCHAM COLLEGE FRIDAY 15TH OCTOBER 2010

LANGDON SCHOOL, N TUESDAY 19TH OCTO

I came prepared with a list of tips on the design process and a few household products for inspiration. Once we were introduced to the design technology class Tiffany (a freelance educator from the Design Museum) played a video explaining the brief and we then discussed different aspects of it to make sure the everyone understood the task. Tiffany, May Foster (a designer from the National Gallery) and I then went round each group and discussed their initial ideas to get a sense of what direction each group wanted to take. We then set a character profile task for each group to define who their product is for from then I found it was useful for some of the groups that had not refined their idea yet to write down what kind of products they think their character would buy and if their product would appeal to them and why. May and I then showed them existing products and then they were given by Tiffany a selection of products from the Design Museum shop to examine and anaylise. I then discussed my design process tips which changed slightly as I noticed even though the pupils sat in groups they were still working as in individual and I could see some voices were not being heard and group contribution and roles were not even. I found that each group had all decided on the first idea that popped into their head and then were busy designing the packaging when they had not resolved the content or even knew if the product needed packaging. It was clear that there was no set design process to follow and I could see the students were struggling to find a clear direction. The character profiles helped to filter out and define ideas well for those students who did it and by the end of the session each group had stuck with an idea and were delegating roles with in the team.

For this session I came prepared wi tips to discuss and hand out. Once and this time had already been brief seemed to all have settled on an ide O’Neill, Nabeel Hussain (both from round the groups and got them to s and encouraged them to look at it fr it. This was quite a challenge as it w didn’t catch on with the idea that ev it doesn’t have to look like a typical more than 20 sketches a sheet how I then gave a brief talk and gave the tips based on my own experience fr previous workshop. Susan then exp alter your design from touching and and paper models were appearing im were discussed were finance and m to write a list of their considerations from the Design Museum shop to e to the class. The next topic was Bra smoothies’ logo and campaign as a recognise. They understood and com responded well to what role font cho The groups then had a time to do a and logo ideas before presenting th feedback. This was beneficial for th clear on and agreed on as a group a


NEWHAM OBER

ith a page of typed up design process again the students were in groups fed at the Design Museum and ea. The first part of the morning Susan the Design Museum) and I went sketch out quick variations of their idea rom a different angle and question was a mixed age group and some ven though you are designing a mug coffee mug. Eventually there were wever and the ideas were developing. em hand outs of my design process rom working in a group and from the plained rapid prototyping and how to d using the product in that basic form mmediately. The next aspects that materials and the groups were asked s. Then Susan handed out existing examine, anaylise and present back anding and Susan used ‘innocent an example the children could mmented on the tone of voice and oice has in putting across a message. a quick mind map or jot down names he whole pitch to the rest of class for hem to see which parts they were as well as practice for the final pitch.

CHEAM HIGH SCHOOL FRIDAY 22ND OCTOBER Again armed with my design process tips to hand out I arrived at Cheam High School to this time assist in two separate lessons with two different design technology classes. I took this season with Design Museaum representative Ellie Newland and like the previous sessions we briefed the students and quickly started the idea generation process. As the groups had already decided on their ideas in a previous lesson with their teacher and has already started to draw final sketches we took them back to the rapid sketching stage. The students were unfamiliar with the process of sketching out as many quick ideas/ versions of the idea to develop it further so we spent a quarter of an hour developing the ideas and visualising all aspects of the products with in each group. I then gave a brief talk about the design process and my tips from observing the way they work. I gave them hand outs of my design process tips that I gave out at each workshop based on my own experience from working in a group and from the previous workshops. We then ran through the existing design museum shop products online and discussed pricing, size and audience. The rest of the session was spent finalising each of the groups ideas and rapid paper prototyping. To introduce this concept we set the task of make a cube in a minute using one sheet of paper. Once this method was understood we then set 5 minutes to prototype their product idea and got the class to analysis each one and state the successes, weaknesses and what could be done to improve the designs. The class then voted on the group they thought worked well together and produced the best idea. The same process was repeating with the next class we took.


Weaknesses Each group had all decided on the first idea. Designed the packaging before content. No set design process to follow. Struggling to find a clear design direction. Unfair delegation of roles with in the team. Not all students voices their ideas. Rapid sketching was hard to encourage. Rapid prototyping was a new concept. Strengths Inspiration and movitation. Imagination and no idea limitations. Character profiles helped to define ideas. Delegating roles with in the team. Questioned everything.


A group of brains is better than one!

Drawing out a mind map together is a very good way of getting all your ideas out on paper, even if they are just words or topics at the start. It doesn’t matter at this stage if they are silly or you have no idea how you would even attempt to make it, just get as many ideas flowing together as possible! Your idea could spark off another idea from someone else that you may never have thought of by yourself.

Don’t focus on the final product yet!

It is very easy to jump a few stages and go with the first idea that popped into your head. You then spend hours designing the packaging when you haven’t really given the content enough thought and the product might not even need that kind packaging or any at all! You will get there eventually but for it to be a strong product you need to know why you are making and for who and every step along the way is very important!


Who is your audience?

Make a few character profiles that fit in the age range from your brief. Create imaginary people or base them on people you know. What do they do? What do they buy? What kinds of products are already in their home? What kind of products excites them? Go back to these profiles after you have come up a few final ideas and ask yourself which products would appeal to your character profiles and why. This could help you if you have a too many ideas and cannot decide on one to go with.

Don’t forget to document everything!

Every sketch you do no matter how quickly you did it keep it in a folder! Keep notes of your ideas and do not throw away your mind maps! They are good to look at when you get further along with the project and feel stuck or to bring you back to why are you making the product in the first place as sometimes you can get lost in it. This is important for when you have to present your idea so it is clear how you got from a million ideas to one final product.

MY DESIGN PROCESS TIPS FOR THE WORKSHOPS


Control With in the groups there was usually a pupil who took control of the decisions and wanted to be in charge of every role and process.

Distractor A few of the groups had a student who was either not interested in the project at all or would be distracted by anything and lead the other students off track.


CHARACTER PROFILES

Quiet All the groups had one or more student who did not voice their ideas or choose a role due to confidence or willing to participate.

Motivator Each group had at least one excited member who’s attitude and drive would motivate the rest of the group.


DESIGN VENTURA AND SCHOOL COLLABORATION PLATFORM


EXPLORING THE CURRICULUM


GRAPHIC DESIGN

uses modelling foam, plastics, paper, card & similar materials to produce graphic items used to package, promote or decorate products. There is much more of a graphic design element to this option and it is similar to the sort of work done in small design groups and commercial product design studios. It is important to understand how items are designed for manufacture and it is necessary to be able to create ideas and develop the skills necessary to make the items you design. At least two or three pieces of coursework preparation will be done during the two years with one being refined and submitted - although the earlier components will also form a part of your exam practical component

PRODUCT DESIGN

uses woods, metals, plastics and composites to explore and refine the designs of products. It might also produce graphic items used to package, promote or decorate products to give a much greater insight into the full scope of the design process involved in the creation of modern manufactured items. In this study option again it is important to understand how items are designed for manufacture and it is necessary to be able to create ideas and develop the skills necessary to make the items you design. At least two or three pieces of coursework preparation will be done during the two years with one being refined and submitted - although the earlier components will also form a part of your exam practical component.

FOOD TECHNOLOGY

develops a thorough understanding of food products that might be marketed or included in the specific requirements of catering or dietary needs. A significant part of this knowledge would be applicable to catering as a study choice. There can be a creative element involved in the design of food products, and an understanding of the qualities and needs or markets should be developed and refined from clear and concise early proposals. You should also develop the ability to draw and develop your designs using diagrams, plans and prototypes.

SYSTEMS AND CONTROL

looks at electronic products and the systems used in them. Normally one large piece of coursework is completed over the two years, worth 60% of the whole GCSE. Students have to research existing products then proceed to design and make their own product, with large scope for creativity and independent work.

TEXTILES

uses a variety of compliant materials to produce items and products that might be marketed or used as a part of more complex interior designs. Understanding the properties of textiles and the processes and techniques used in manufacture is important . There can be a significant creative element involved in the design of graphics to use on items to be made and both the design and the product would be expected to be refined from clear and concise early proposals. You should also develop the ability to communicate your designs using diagrams, plans and prototypes.


UNDERSTANDING THE CIRRICULUMN

1. Designing and making

2. Cultural understanding

Understanding that designing and making has aesthetic, environmental, technical, economic, ethical and social dimensions and impacts on the world. Applying knowledge of materials and production processes to design products and produce practical solutions that are relevant and fit for purpose. Understanding that products and systems have an impact on quality of life. Exploring how products have been designed and made in the past, how they are currently designed and made, and how they may develop in the future.

Understanding how products evolve according to users’ and designers’ needs, beliefs, ethics and values and how they are influenced by local customs and traditions and available materials. Exploring how products contribute to lifestyle and consumer choices.


3. Creativity

4. Critical evaluation

Making links between principles of good design, existing solutions and technological knowledge to develop innovative products and processes. Reinterpreting and applying learning in new design contexts and communicating ideas in new or unexpected ways. Exploring and experimenting with ideas, materials, technologies and techniques.

Analysing existing products and solutions to inform designing and making. Evaluating the needs of users and the context in which products are used to inform designing and making. Exploring the impact of ideas, design decisions and technological advances and how these provide opportunities for new design solutions.


Importance of Design and technology In design and technology pupils combine practical and technological skills with creative thinking to design and make products and systems that meet human needs. They learn to use current technologies and consider the impact of future technological developments. They learn to think creatively and intervene to improve the quality of life, solving problems as individuals and members of a team. Working in stimulating contexts that provide a range of opportunities and draw on the local ethos, community and wider world, pupils identify needs and opportunities. They respond with ideas, products and systems, challenging expectations where appropriate. They combine practical and intellectual skills with an understanding of aesthetic, technical, cultural, health, social, emotional, economic, industrial and environmental issues. As they do so, they evaluate present and past design and technology, and its uses and effects. Through design and technology pupils develop confidence in using practical skills and become discriminating users of products. They apply their creative thinking and learn to innovate.


Key processes of Design and technology These are the essential skills and processes in design and technology that pupils need to learn to make progress. Pupils should be able to: GENERATE, develop, model and communicate ideas in a range of ways, using appropriate strategies. RESPOND creatively to briefs, developing their own proposals and producing specifications for products. APPLY their knowledge and understanding of a range of materials, ingredients and technologies to design and make their products. USE their understanding of others’ designing to inform their own. PLAN and organise activities and then shape, form, mix, assemble and finish materials, components or ingredients. EVALUATE which hand and machine tools, equipment and computer-aided design/manufacture (CAD/CAM) facilities are the most appropriate to use solve technical problems. REFLECT critically when evaluating and modifying their ideas and proposals to improve products throughout their development and manufacture.


CURRICULUM OPPORTUNITIES During the key stage pupils should be offered the following opportunities that are integral to their learning and enhance their engagement with the concepts, processes and content of the subject. In ways appropriate to the product area, the curriculum should provide opportunities for pupils to: analyse products to learn how they function undertake focused tasks that develop knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to design and make assignments engage in design and make assignments in different and progressively more complex contexts, including for purposes and uses beyond the classroom work individually and in teams, taking on different roles and responsibilities work with designers and makers where possible to develop an understanding of the product design process use ICT as appropriate for image capture and generation; data acquisition, capture and handling; controlling; and product realisation make links between design and technology and other subjects and areas of the curriculum.


RANGE AND CONTENT This section outlines the breadth of the subject on which teachers should draw when teaching the key concepts and key processes. The curriculum should include resistant materials, systems and control and at least one of food or textiles product areas. In each product area the study of designing should include understanding of: users’ needs and the problems arising from them the criteria used to judge the quality of products, including fitness for purpose, the extent to which they meet a clear need and whether resources have been used appropriately the impact of products beyond meeting their original purpose and how to assess products in terms of sustainability aesthetic, technical, constructional and relevant wider issues that may influence designing, selection of materials, making and product development. The study of making in food should include: a broad range of practical skills, techniques, equipment and standard recipes, and how to use them to develop, plan and cook meals and single or multiple products how to plan and carry out a broad range of practical cooking tasks safely and hygienically healthy eating models relating to a balanced diet, the nutritional needs of different groups in society and the factors affecting food choice and how to take these into account when planning, preparing and cooking meals and products the characteristics of a broad range of ingredients, including their nutritional, functional and sensory properties. The study of making in resistant materials and textiles should include: a broad range of techniques, including handcraft skills and CAD/CAM, and how to use them to ensure consistency and precision when making single and multiple products the behaviour of structural elements in a variety of materials how to use materials, smart materials, technology and aesthetic qualities to design and make products of worth how to prepare and assemble components to achieve functional results The study of making in systems and control should include: the practical application of systems and control in design proposals electrical, electronic, mechanical, microprocessor and computer control systems and how to use them effectively using systems and control to assemble subsystems into more complex systems feedback and how a variety of inputs can give rise to a variety of outputs.


BBC Bitesize is the name given to the BBC’s free online study support resource for GCSE students in the United Kingdom. It is designed to aid students in revising and testing in preparation for exams.


DESIGN THINKING & PROCESS


MY USUAL PROCESS Through my design journey from my Graphic Design A Level, Art and Design Foundation and 3 years of university Graphic Product Innovation my design process has expanded and I have introduced much more defined and richer stages. I was fortunate to have a dedicated A Level teacher who based her design process on university level assessment. She complied a “Graphic Design Handbook� which contained all the stages of the design process outlined and references for each. So from the first week of receiving the handbook I had a process to follow from writing a brief to producing an outcome. These guidelines stuck with me onto foundation and keeping sketchbooks and documenting my journey was always essential to me. When I started Graphic Product Innovation it was suggested we documented our process on spreads like the ones this is printed on. I was excited by this as previously I documented in similar content but my layout was not as considered. We explored grids and boundaries. When it came do idea generation there were no boundaries, being a small number of students and largely focusing on group briefs our idea generation methods and style of collaboration had to be strong in order for the projects to become successful and for us to grow as designers. A process which never fails and is always the starting point for any brief is group brainstorming. We set up large pieces of paper on the wall, armed with either marker pens or and or post its we write down anything and everything from ridiculous ideas, word association to practical solutions. This process is particularly successful in regards to getting the whole group to participate and every voice heard in a short period of time.


QUICK MIND MAPPING CHARACTER PROFILES Character profiles are a vital way of understanding your user/audience. From my own experience getting approaching your end user/audience directly either face to face or online. Gathering this information from real people is obviously going to be more insightful however basing the charcter profiles on stereotypes and people who you know is also useful if time is a factor. Once you have created/collected the profiles, it is useful to anaylise them for common aspects/ answers. Then create one or two general characters based on the real ones to concentrate on desinging for. You can then anaylise a scenario for example where your product/idea will fit in their lifestyle etc.

RAPID PROTOTYPING Prototyping was a word that scared me before I was introduced to making quick and crude paper models of ideas and then was told this in fact was a form of rapid protoyping. I found it particularly useful even for prototyping an web interface for example. To do this you draw out in rough or as accurate detail each page/slide etc and film how you would use it by pressing the hand drawn button with your finger and then someone takes the paper away and replaces it with the page that would appear to that command. It is a simple and effect process. For product design it is extremely useful before you make foam models etc to get an understanding of the products, shape, size and feel etc before you spend money on materials etc.

DEVELOPING PROTOTYPING Another aspect of prototyping is the anaylsis and development. I find the useful next stage after crude paper prototypes is either photoshoping your product/ design into situation or a simple animation to explain the use of the product or the parts of your service etc. Photoshoping and animations can make sucessful documentation of your process and if done to a high standard can aid your/become part of your final outcome.


IDEO METHOD CARDS


IDEO Method Cards is a collection of 51 cards representing diverse ways that design teams can understand the people they are designing for. They are used to make a number of different methods accessible to all members of a design team, to explain how and when the methods are best used, and to demonstrate how they have been applied to real design projects. IDEO’s human factors specialists conceived the deck as a design research tool for its staff and clients, to be used by researchers, designers, and engineers to evaluate and select the empathic research methods that best inform specific design initiatives. The tool can be used in various ways sorted, browsed, searched, spread out, pinned up as both information and inspiration to humancentered design teams and individuals at various stages to support planning and execution of design programs. Inspired by playing cards, the cards are classified as four suits: Ask, Watch, Learn, Try, that define the types of activities involved in using each method. Each approach is illustrated by a reallife example of how the method was applied to a specific project. As new methods are developed all the time, the deck will grow and evolve over time.


IDENTIFYING THE DESIGN PROCESS


PLANNED PROCESS


ACTUAL PROCESS


WORKSHOP WITH NATIONAL DIPLOMA ART & DESIGN STUDENTS


MY DESIGN PROCESS WORKSHOP

1 2

Introduction to the students and what there course involves What is it they do on the course what are their favourite parts.

From the moment you are given a brief for a new project to when you create your final solution and in your case hand it in to be marked you are going through a design process each person will have a different methods and order that they will follow along the way. Thinking about this we would like you to draw out in anyway you fancy your personal design process, this could be a storyboard, a mind map, an illustration, anything that quickly and visually describes your design process.

3

1. How would you describe your working methods? 2. Which part do you think is most important? 3. Your favourite and least favourite part?


4

Idea generation exercise to focus on three design methods: Character profiles Brainstorming Idea generation

5

Firstly we looked at character profiles. Filling out profile sheets, made up of some basic questions similar to that of a social network profile. Now going to take these profiles and using the responses create an average using the most common responses.

6

Then we looked at brainstorming which we are all familiar with. We worked as a team and using post it notes got as many responses as we could to each of these question. After each question we discussed what thet common responses were for our character profile. The we introduced our ‘average’ character. Who becomes our ‘end user’ or ‘client’. We then came up with ideas for a solution for young people getting a job. The responses were both practical and imgainary getting the students to think outside of the box. We then discussed the workshops purpose.


The workshop at Havering College was a successful insight into student’s attitudes and practice in regards to the design process. The students were keen to share their own processes which we then discussed and compared with in the group. The over all opinion and stages of each students process seemed to be uniformed in content but not structure leading me to conclude that although each student ticks the same boxes and goes through the same motion, the order, length and time spent on each stage differs.


This was a quick exercise to get a large quantity of user research in a small amount of time by placing sheets of paper with questions written up, sticking them to a wall in a busy area (in this case between the library and the cafeteria in LCC). Then handing out post its notes and pens to encourage people to answer the questions. It proved to be a successful tool in the research stage of the design process and it can be customised to fit any brief.


ONLINE QUESTIONNAIRE


“I think the sooner designers start to learn about process as a tool the better. They are guiding principles that allow us to design for a need as opposed to designing for ourselves. My main concern with design education in general is it’s “fluffy” approach to the subject and it’s failure involve process within the curriculum” Jason Gregory, Linkedin forum discussion


Occupation Graphic Design

Occupation Interior Design

What best describes your work process... Unpredicabtle

What best describes your work process... Unpredicabtle

Where do your ideas come from? Inspiration

Where do your ideas come from? Clients Briefs Inspiration Problems

Which part of your design process is most important to your area of work? Blank pages Describe your design process from brief/ inital idea to final outcome/product... A line, an idea, 3 colours and 2 typefaces... Favourite part of your design process? Client’s smiles Least favourite part of your design process? Monday’s

Which part of your design process is most important to your area of work? Interpreting client’s thoughts Describe your design process from brief/ inital idea to final outcome/product... Consultation, Survey, Design, Product Sourcing, Quotation, Presentation, Invoicing, Order Processing, Project Management, More Invoicing, Beating builders with a stick, Managing Expectation, Snagging, Photographs Favourite part of your design process? Drawing out schemesLeast favourite part of your design process?Managing Expectation


Occupation Sound Design

Occupation Freelance Fashion Designer

What best describes your work process... MethodicalWhere do your ideas come from? Clients Briefs Inspiration

What best describes your work process... Meticulous

Which part of your design process is most important to your area of work? Creative Describe your design process from brief/ inital idea to final outcome/product... I attempt to research what the client is looking for to get a general feel of what they want to gain as an outcome. Then think of a few basic ideas that follow the clients proposal and also some other apporaches that I could show the client to see if they would rather go another way as well. After back and forths from clients and feedback a more advanced idea/prototype of the outcome can be made to the final stage of polish if there was anything missing from the final idea here is were it can be fixed or added. Favourite part of your design process? Polishing

Where do your ideas come from? User research Inspiration Which part of your design process is most important to your area of work?Paying attention to the trend forecaster, Prediction what will be big for the next season Describe your design process from brief/inital idea to final outcome/product...Each designer is different, this is how I usually collect pictures, clippings from magazines, pictures from past; I watch movies read magazines etc. I keep up to date on trends and not only what’s new, but what’s next. Forecasting services such and the colour service provided by pantone can be a lifesaver. After I have a bundle of ideas I try to think of how these can be translated into fabric and look for swatches or I draw swatches onto the design board. A design board can be quite large and not only have a drawing of a dress, but fabric swatches, pictures from where-ever, beads, trims, any number of things. When I have enough that I like I will usually see a theme rise from the sketches. I then refine everything to fit the theme. I don’t choose all my themes, sometimes they choose me, and you can dye fabrics or print them to get the desired effect. I would translate my ideas into things that real people can wear. This includes selecting fabrics, colours, shapes and silhouettes, and then the technical process of making shirts, jackets, pants, whatever including drafting patterns for the sewing room, sourcing threads, zippers, notions etc. Next, they sit down and sew the prototype. Then there’s the business part, paying for materials, accounts receivable, insurance, etc. Drawing, finnier details, full sketch, fabrics, choose the perfect one, start making the outfits, complete the outfit, get a model to fit or try it on yourself, see if you would like it Favourite part of your design process? Getting my ideas down Least favourite part of your design process? Not able to find the right fabric


FIFTY FIVE RESPONSES


OCCUPATION Photography Interior design

Product Design

Illustration Other

Architecture

Web design

Interior design

Design Graphic design


Other Unpredicatble Methodical

Meticulous

Unorganised

Sporadic

METHOD


OCCUPATION? PRODUCT DESIGN WEB DESIGN INTERIOR DESIGN DESIGN GRAPHIC DESIGN ARCHITECTURE ILLUSTRATION INTERIOR DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY FASHION SOUND DESIGN OTHER

10% 2% 8% 8% 48% 1% 5% 2% 2% 2% 2% 10%


WHICH WORD BEST DESCRIBES YOUR PROCESS?

METHODICAL SPORADIC UNORGANISED METICULOUS UNPREDICTABLE OTHER

44% 7% 5% 26% 13% 5%


WHERE DO YOUR IDEAS COME FROM? PROBLEMS USER RESEARCH INSPIRATION PROBLEMS BRIEF CLIENTS OTHER

14% 21% 27% 4% 16% 13% 5%

Other

Problem


User research

Brief

Inspiration Client


FAVOURITE

End result

Production

Whole process

Development

Research

Experimentation

Improvisation

Idea generation

Pleasing clients


LEAST FAVOURITE Testing

Blank paper

Nothing

Changes

Varies

Admin

Clients

Concept

Post production

Research

Development

Technical

Production

Time Limit

Money

Finalisation


IDEAS & OUTCOME


DESIGN PROCESS BINGO After exploring the design process, leading workshops, creating questionnaires and analysing designer’s methods etc I decided that the resource needed to be playful and have the ability to encourage the design process with out demanding that it be used in a particular order due to the differences in methods I have seen. I brainstormed various ideas to play, remember and create the design process. I decided that a metaphor or platform such as a game would be most engaging and could have whole class participation. I decided on a process “check list� in Bingo card form. To be used as a tool in the classroom to encourage students to check off (by stamping) the design process stages. This can be done in any order that suits the individual, teacher or the project brief. On completion of the card it not only wins the student who stamped all the boxes first the game but it will ensure that everyone can finalise their project to a standard that will meet the teachers marking criteria.


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etches sketches

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iagramdiagram

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development planning challenge challengeproductionproduction development

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DESIGN DESIGN

PROCESS PROCESS BINGO BINGO

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The development of the design for the cards was inspired by the typical solid red and blue style. I experimented with various layouts, fonts, colours and sizes. I thought that the logo, colours and layout I decided on were simple and clean with enough reference to a typical bingo card archetype with out being tacky. The circle outlines are to encourage the use of stamps or pens to mark upon competition of that process stage.


DESIGN

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analysis

Ask yourself have you analysed the brief, research, chosen design ideas and aesthetic choices. Be your own critic as well as give yourself credit. Explain the strengths and weaknesses.

prototype

Rapid or final? Have you made a scaled down or to scale version? How have you tested it? Try making quick paper versions first before you move on to expensive materials.

mind map

Do you have an extensive mind map of key words? Explored all the possibilities? Try word association and see where it leads. Try not to be precious just get lost in it.

safety

annotate

development

end user

planning

Have you considered and documented visually the safety aspects of the production as well as the use of your outcome? Consider form, function and placement.

You know what your sketches mean and how they would work but try to imagine you are seeing them for the first time... you need to write explanations. Analysis of your designs and explanations of your choices are important.

Is there a clear journey from your ideas to outcome? Have you visualised your thought, design and production process? Storyboards, photographs, mind maps can all help to do this. Have you presented your research, ideas and sketches in order?

Have you considered who your outcome is for? How old are they? How do they use it? When and where? Make an imaginary profile or ask real people.

Made a time plan? Did you stick to a check list? Show how you managed your time and stages of the project. Which part would you have given more time to if you could do the project again?

DESIGN CHECK LIST

check brief

Go back and re read the brief after every few stages. Have you challenged it or forgot what it was completely? Ask yourself how have you answered the brief?

challenge

Have you challenged the brief? Or did you find the brief challenging? Explain why and what you did to overcome the challenges you found.

document

Keep everything you draw, find, make and document! Keep a folder of all your ideas, inspiration, research, development etc. Go through it again when if you feel stuck. Pick the most relevant pieces to present.

diagram

Have you got visual aids such as diagrams and charts to help support your research, ideas, process etc. Laying out your idea in word form can be as powerful as a sketch.

research

aesthetic

design ideas

packaging

Looked, asked, listened, read, experienced and documented everything to inform and insipire you? Research should continue through out the design process.

Have you considered materials outside of your classroom? What about researching ones that are more suitable to your outcome? Present your samples or explain visually.

Quick explanations, small sketches, titles, storyboards! Get as many ideas down before you pick the most successful. Brainstorm with a friend or in a group if you get stuck.

evaluation

Why did you choose that colour, size, material etc? Explain all your choices and evaluate if and why they work. Describe how you have answered the brief. If you were to be given more time what else would you do, how would your develop the outcome?

Have you considered the packaging? Does your outcome even need any? How can you reduce it to make it sustainable?

production

Look into how your outcome would be mass produced or if it is a one off how and where? Consider [production methods, cost, size and quality control.

DESIGN CHECK LIST

HINTS & TIPS

DESIGN

DESIGN

CHECK LIST

Fill your page with as many small and quickly sketched ideas as you can. Trying variations of the same design can develop and push your ideas further. You will have a much better outcome by exploring all the possibilities instead of going with the first one that popped into your head.

materials

You might think it is cool but does your aesthetic appeal to your audience. How can you test this? Have you asked them? What other aspects of your design can your user give you feedback?

HINTS & TIPS

HINTS & TIPS

sketches

CHECK LIST

HINTS & TIPS

DESIGN CHECK LIST

HINTS & TIPS


Rian, 16

Cara, 15

Which design technology subject are you taking as a GCSE? Graphics How do you document your work? In an A3 folder How do you double check your work before you hand it in? We have a list that our teacher encourages us to stick to... like choose your best idea, 3d drawing, model, evalutation and annotate everything. What do you think of the prototypes of the design process bingo cards? I think it is a fun idea, I like the design and my class get excited about anything that isn’t usual work so it might make us pay attention to the stages more. Would be cool if we won real money! How and why would you use them? I would probably use them at the end... can you use them before? It makes sense at the end because if you are missing anything you can see what it is and make sure you remember to do it before you give the project in for marking.

Which design technology subject are you taking as a GCSE? Textiles How do you document your work? I have a small folder for research, materail samples and evalution sheets and we have to do A3 sheets as well. How do you double check your work before you hand it in? My teacher goes through it with us to check we have filled in the evalution sheets and there are annotations on our A3s. There is a list we got given in year 9 I think too. What do you think of the prototypes of the design process bingo cards? I like them but I don’t think everyone in my class would do it. How and why would you use them? I would use it as a check list more than actually play it with the class unless the teacher made time for it.


USER FEEDBACK

Geovani, 16 Which design technology subject are you taking as a GCSE? Resistant Materials How do you document your work? We photograph our work and use a log book and A3 folder. How do you double check your work before you hand it in? We have a quality control check list and I read the brief making sure I have pay attention to the bullet points. What do you think of the prototypes of the design process bingo cards? They might be better if they were designed to each subject, to fit the style of the subject but the content looks like it would make sense. How and why would you use them? My teacher would probably love them, we have little competitions quite a lot so it would probably become something we did for every project.


Use the design process Bingo card’s as a check list in the class room by stamping the design process stages. This can be done in any order that suits you, your teacher or the project’s brief. When all the design process stages are stamped shout BINGO! The cards can be used through out the project to guide you or just before your assessment to check that you have ticked all the boxes in the marking criteria.


Design & Technology currently tends to concentrate on the students’ ability to make products with a focus on materials and components, an emphasis on basic, procedural tasks often unrelated to the design process. As the brief was to design resources or strategies for use at GCSE Level to help students and teachers make use of the design process I thought it would be beneficial to gain first hand insight. I volunteered for the Design Museum’s new project ‘Design Ventura’. The aim of the project is to place design skills in a real world context by developing student’s creativity and enterprise capabilities. The challenge I took part in was for 14-16 year olds to create a new product and then to present their ideas to a panel of expert judges. The prize being that the best idea will then be produced and sold in the Design Museum Shop. I volunteered because the Design Museum believes that the input of designers will help to raise the achievement and ambition of students studying design in London’s state secondary schools and I thought that it would be a great chance to observe the skills, processes and attitudes of GCSE design technology students to inform my research. The workshops took place in London schools, I attended 3 where I got lead the session and interact as a mentor and ‘expert designer’. For each workshop I came prepared with a page of typed up design process tips to discuss and hand out. In each school the students were in groups had already been briefed at the Design Museum so most students already had ideas. My role along with a Design Museum representative was to develop and prototype these ideas by introducing design process stages that the students were unfamiliar with such as character profiles, rapid prototyping and simple exercises such as quick sketching. I found common weaknesses with in the groups for example each group had all decided on the first idea, they designed the packaging before content and there was little or no set design process to follow. However there were strengths in the groups which encouraged me such as the scale of imagination and no idea limitations, role delegation with in the team and the questioning of every step. This lead me to conclude that design process with in the curriculum should be the area in which I focus on and work towards. I then decided to explore the literature available on national curriculum specifically GCSE design technology. From analysing the structure and content it seemed that there should be scope for challenging briefs and following an exciting design process but this did not appear to be the reality from my observations at this point. I then put myself in

the postion of a GCSE design technology student (again… I did a GCSE in DT graphics) and used the BBC Bitesize revision aid website. I revised the content and used the ‘test’ feature; I was surprised by how mundane the motions are that students have to go through. It is more of a test of memory skills by remembering material names and production methods than design. This was apparent in the workshops as well as the students were discussing the ‘injection molded packaging’ before they had even designed the product. To investigate and experiment with elements of and attitudes to the design process I firstly analysed my own process by comparing the order of the set process and the reality of which occurs. This lead me to examining the processes I have used as an individual designer as well as when collaborating. I then collected hand drawn processes from designers of different professions and age levels and explored existing tools and systems that current design studios and service design companies. I lead another workshop, this time at a college with National Diploma art and design students to focus on their own processes and some design process exercises. I asked the students todraw out their personal design process, encouraging that this could be in the form of storyboard, a mind map, an illustration, etc anything that quickly and visually describes your design process. Then we discussed methods, how they would describe the methods they use and which part of the design process they see as most important or enjoyable etc. We the moved onto an idea generation exercise to focus on three design methods: character profiles, brainstorming and idea generation. Firstly, we looked at character profiles. Filling out profile sheets, made up of some basic questions similar to that of a social network profile. Then we took these profiles and using the responses created an average using the most common responses. The next exercise was a simple and effective way of brainstorming in a group. We worked as a team and using post it notes got as many responses as we could to each of these question. After each question we discussed what the common responses were for our character profile. Then we introduced our ‘average’ character. Who becomes our ‘end user’ or ‘client’. We then came up with ideas for a solution for young people getting a job. The responses were both practical and imaginary getting the students to think outside of the box. We then discussed the workshops purpose and the students said that they would incorporate these steps into there own


process. This was a successful insight into student’s attitudes and practice in regards to the design process. The students were keen to share their own processes, which we then discussed and compared with in the group. The over all opinion and stages of each students process seemed to be uniformed in content but not structure leading me to conclude that although each student ticks the same boxes and goes through the same motion, the order, length and time spent on each stage differs. An online questionnaire was set up to evoke responses from designers of all disciplines with short questions to find out about design process opinions, structures and methods. I used social and professional networking sites as well as design and education forums to get responses and start discussions about the topic. I received 55 responses, analysed, and documented the results to inform my development. A result that stood out was the quantity of respondents that listed ‘methodical’ and ‘meticulous’ to describe their process method which furthered my opinion on the importance of the process. After exploring the design process, leading workshops, creating questionnaires and analysing designer’s methods etc I decided that the resource needed to be playful and have the ability to encourage the design process with out demanding that it be used in a particular order due to the differences in methods I have seen. I brainstormed various ideas to play, remember and create the design process. I decided that a metaphor or platform such as a game would be most engaging and could have whole class participation. I decided on a process “check list” in Bingo card form. To be used as a tool in the classroom to encourage students to check off (by stamping) the design process stages. This can be done in any order that suits the individual, teacher or the project brief. On completion of the card it not only wins the student who stamped all the boxes first the game but it will ensure that everyone can finalise their project to a standard that will meet the teachers marking criteria. The development of the design for the cards was inspired by the typical solid red and blue style. I experimented with various layouts, fonts, colours and sizes. I thought that the logo, colours and layout I decided on were simple and clean with enough reference to a typical bingo card archetype with out being tacky. The circle outlines are to encourage the use of stamps or pens to mark upon competition of that process stage. I think that the outcome is successful in concept but I would still like to develop the materials and production to a higher standard.


Nikki Scott 2010 - 2011 BA (Hons) Graphic Product Innovation

My favourite subject  

3rd year Major project 4 of 4

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