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Nika Imani


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Table of Contents Academy Museum of Motion Pictures ARC 405 | Fall 2009 The Museum of Energy Transformation ARC 403 | Spring 2009 Cahuenga Elementary School ARC 303 | Spring 2008 Pajvaak Performing Arts Center ARC 495 | Spring 2010 Grand Isle Apartments Marx|Okubo Trio Apartments Marx|Okubo Fullerton Towers Marx|Okubo

Architecture

Architecture


A

M

M

P

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures and Transparency

Tourists come to Hollywood to see the stars. But the reality is that stars are rarely here, so people make do by looking at the stars names along the walk of the fame. At the onset of the project we asked ourselves “in this age of media have we replaced reality with an image of that reality?” This philosophical question led us towards investigations of vanity, identity, fame, image, and reality pertaining to the movie industry. The building addresses these issues in three ways: 1) exploiting the reflective qualities of glass 2) utilizing the red carpet as the projects’ central focus 3) playing with issues of symmetry and asymmetry. The project emphasizes power, exclusivity, beauty and perfection through its symmetrical configuration and by its use of reflective glass. At the center of the complex is the red carpet which allows it to be seen from all the angles. The reflective quality of the materials and the angles of the building distorts peoples’ images and mingles the viewers own reflections with the reflections of famous people walking along the red carpet. The site is divided into horizontal and vertical bars with the same width. The building is built on two bars with the east-west orientation. One bar holds exhibition spaces and the other bar includes the offices and the administration. These two bars are intersected by a third bar that holds the theater spaces. This creates a large courtyard space in the middle of the site. This space is a landscaped seating area for people to view the red carpet. In order to contribute to the redevelopment of the Vine Street, the main entrance of the building is located in the Vine Street to encourage more pedestrian interactions. In this project we proposed a museum for the new age of media in which visual concepts and spacial characteristics create a memorable experience for the visitors. This experience includes reality and transparency.


Red Carpet De Longpre Ave.

Lobbymus eum Lobby e

production

&design

obby

school

stor

Vine St.

the

sup

History

Cahuenga Ave.

group areas

public

Aca demy

progport ramsarea WORK

The Existing Building

areas

temp orary

exhibits

admin operations

mar

Fountain Ave.

areas

exhibit curation

The Red Carpet

keting

operations

admin Vine St.

Cahuenga Ave.

support

De Longpre Ave.

musprepfoun eumstorage & ders rtroom cafesuppo

building maintenance

SIVE Resta Pre miereareas estaurant immer

support

Fountain Ave.

theatrebox


Theatre

Founder’s Room

Theatre Lobby Administration

Section

Visitor Center & Lobby


Site Design

Skin Pattern Design

Courtyard Pattern Design

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures

View from the Courtyard


8

Visito

r Cen

cafe

20

Muse

um S

tore

Lobb y

ter, L

obby


Section


Energy Resurrection The Museum of Energy Transformation

This Urban planning project was designed for an incinerator in San Donino in the city of Florence, Italy. This incinerator was built in 1973, at a time of great development for the city of Florence. It was operational for a few years while produced over 300 tons of garbage every day. After a few years, it stopped working. In this project, the idea of energy transformation should be translated into a museum of Energy Transformation for an urban community. This project concentrated on the energy release. The incinerator is no longer in power, but the land has the freedom to release its energies to mold its own space. So, the concept of the site design is the Resurrection of Existing Energies. To understand the idea of energy release, CHI method was studied. There are five elements that are associated with this method: Wood: Potential Energy Fire: Release of Energy Water: Rest Earth: Balance and Neutrality Metal: Strength and Structure The Building concept is associated with the symbolic relationship between landscape and the building where the landscape flows and invades the building. Energy transformation in this project is translated as transformation of energy from person to person. Therefore, the design follows the idea of a Spaseum where hosts a spa, hotel, cafe and gardens. The spa is also a museum in which different ways of massage therapy can be seen. To design this urban planning, the context was studied in terms of the elements that are essential to the site as well as their relationship to the community. All these elements influenced the geometry of the project.


Guidelines for the Grid:

Red Orientation of incinerator Blue Orientation of arno Brown Orientation of site boundary Yellow 180 line

The use of a grid allows for multiple patterns and combinations. The idea is to weave the energies.The energies are resurrecting and growing out of The ground. They start to weave into one another, but in the end mutation to change in form.

Weave

Start Pattern

Process

End Mutation


Building Landscape Different Landscape water Features

Top view: Landscape Dominates the Building

Spa/ Research/ Museum/Education Hotel Cafe Water Features

Circulation Building

Landscape Weaves into the Project

Interior space


Site Plan


Circulation Path on the Site

Roof garden Relaxation Lounge Solarium

Treatment Rooms Message MESSAGE THERAPYTherapy

Fitness Room Sauna Baths

Program


Floor Plan


Interior of the Spa


Cahuenga Elementary School

In this project, designing a high performance school where it corresponds to the cultural, climatic, and political situation of the site was the focus. Also, this project complies with the building and zoning codes. The site for this project was in Korea Town, in Los Angeles County, a very dense and diverse community. The main idea for this project was creating a show case of students’ work to the city and the community. In order to achieve this goal, the building is a transparent box from inside and outside. From outside, it has a transparent double skin which allows for exhibiting students’ works. The double skin system also helps the building to be more sustainable. It also helps the students to learn about the idea of sustainability. Another design feature was creating different outdoor spaces that would allow students to study, play and interact with each other. To obtain this goal, there are some shaded and some non-shaded courtyards in different areas that can be occupied by students during the year. Students can interact with each other by looking at each other from different levels. Another concern that was considered in designing this school was the ability of using the school for activities and community use after school hours.


Courtyards

Community Use

N

2ND STREET

OXFORD STREET

WESTERN AVE.

SITE PLAN 1”= 100’-0”


Open Courtyards Connected to the Large Courtyard

Classrooms looking into the Courtyards


1

8

9 K-4

MAIN ENTRANCE

1ST GRADE

2

10

3

12

4

13

K-3

K-2

11

1ST GRADE

PARKING

ADMINISTRATION 5

6

6

1ST GRADE

K-1

14

7

1ST GRADE

15

1ST GRADE

16

CAFE

BOYS’ LOCKER

GIRLS’ LOCKER

STORAGE

CUSTODIAN

STORAGE

MULTI PURPOSE

GYM

1

1

PHYSICAL THERAPY

GENERAL STORAGE

MUSIC STORAGE

1 SUPPLY/REPRODUCTION ROOM

5 PUBLIC WAITING

9 NURSE’S OFFICE

13 FIRST AID/ NURSE’S WAITING

2 ASSIST PRINCIPAL’S OFFICE

6 CLERICAL FRONT DESK

10 NURSE’S TOILET

14 COORDINATOR OFFICE

3 ASSIST PRINCIPAL’S OFFICE

7 FACULTY WORKROOM

11 CHANGING TABLE/SINK

15 CONFERENCE ROOM

4 PRINCIPAL’S OFFICE

8 CUSTODIAN

12 EXAM ROOM

16 LAN SYSTEM

First Floor Plan


2ND GRADE

3RD GRADE

3RD GRADE

3RD GRADE

COURTYARD

3RD GRADE

3RD GRADE

2ND GRADE

2ND GRADE

2ND GRADE LIBRARY

STORAGE

2ND GRADE

COURTYARD

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1/16”= 100’-O”

N

Second Floor Plan


Pajvaak Performing Arts Center

More than 2,500 years ago, Cyrus The Great, the King of Persia introduced the idea of “Human Rights” to the world. Today, his own country, Iran, suffers from lack of freedom.This project attempts to bring back the glory of freedom to Iran’s society by designing a performing arts center, a space for expressions. It is a place to advocate and celebrate liberty. Philosophically, the idea of transparency is associated with the processes of democracy because it allows one to see through the reality. This philosophical idea encouraged this project to focus on the issue of reflectivity and transparency that glorifies liberty. Glass , water, and light are the main elements of this project that reflect the idea of freedom of movement as well as people watching. Pajvaak (echo) is designed for a liberal society as a result of people’s voice for freedom, and it is l ocated in a culturally rich area of Tehran, Iran. In this project geometric forms and symbolic elements of traditional Iranian architecture are combined with Western modern architecture. The intention of this project is to create a focal point in the area by creating activity in the building throughout day and the night. In this project, the concentration of the design is centered on the experience of the visitors. the idea of transparency and people watching is seen all over the project. One can see others and be seen by others while circulating in the building. Also, the idea of using water which is metaphoric as well as transparent, creates an opportunity for the people to see reflections. There is a relationship between the audience and the performers through translucency. People can always see the moving shadows of the performers in the back stage area.


Geometry and Site Design


1 A -2 0 3

Orientation of the palace Orientation of the Main Street Orientation of the Freedon Tower Arc centered on the Palace

Structural Grid


First Floor Plan


coat room

Second Floor Plan


Embed Waterproof Membrane

Water Line Tile

Pile

Concrete Footing

Slab on Grade

Rebar

Concrete Column

Concrete Beam

Metal Plate Welded to the column

Beam

Glass

Connector

Structural Glass

Light Gauge Steel Stud

Truss

Beam

Waterproofing Membrane

Metal Panel

Steel Tube Column

Wide flange

Finished Floor

Metal Deck with Concrete Fill

Drywall

Finished interior wall

Gypsum Board

Gypsum Board

Insulation


Lautner

Carport

Structural Problem Solving: Lautner Carport

The Payne House was originally constructed as a simple cabin in the hills of San Dimas but has grown into a much greater space and a much more refined style. The home was renovated in 1953 and again in 1980 by the architect John Lautner, who transformed this modest wood framed structure into a unique two bedroom plan with numerous windows, expansive views of the surrounding mountains, and room for even more addition. The interior is designed with special attention to the details of material choice and functional efficiency. The exterior manages to complement the surrounding landscape with redwood siding and trellis elements. The site also includes a unique carport, designed in the style of the Lautner renovation, which cantilevers over three main beams and is seemingly anchored only by a small storage shed. The intelligent design allows for easy vehicle access and relatively cheap simple construction. Over the years the redwood columns, joists, and beams of this carport structure have succumbed to severe weathering and were replaced recently without the approval of city assembly or other official permission. The structure must now be inspected to insure structural safety and must comply to all IBC and other enforceable construction codes. The following Method 1 and Method 2 Calculations will allow us to discern whether or not the structure is currently to code, and will suggest methods for retrofitting in the case that the structure does not meet current code requirements.


Course: ARC 424

SAN GABRIEL MOUNTAINS

210 FWY

LAUTNER CARPORT SAN DIMAS, CA

TO LOS ANGELES

57

FWY

toyon/oaks

10

end deck

71

citrus trees

FWY

slope

pool

large oak

path shrubs

60

toyon/oaks

slope

FWY

Assignment Number: 5

large pine

exist. conc. stone paved terrace

toyon/oaks concrete & stone paving

oaks

70’-0” to PL

slope

N

60’-0” to PL

flat driveway

slope shrubs

toyota trees

325 w. Gladstone st. San Dimas, CA 91773

olive trees

existing asphalt drive dn

Marissa Buchman

oak

area of work


INTERIOR GUSSET BACKING TOENAILED PER IBC 2304.9.1

BASE GAP (1in.)


Sheet of

siding in interior walls door wood siding exterior shelving units

lautner

window frame top and bottom plates

detail. This phase re-built columns 11 joists main beam

roof structure

due to deterioration the wood

was

replaced

in

tional structural support to maintain stability and prefurther vent damage to this structure.

order for the structural survival of the carport

pre-hoyos

hoyos

cal poly

Marissa Buchman Bridget Flecky Jacqueline Hilo Nika Imani

studs in storage space plywood in storage space

constructed, up to the very last

plywood wood siding stud framing

we propose a two shear and bearing wall addition that will provide addiAssignment Number: 5 Assignment Title: Lautner Carport Method d 1 Calculation Date Due: 02/17/2010

exactly the way it was initially

walls

a total of eight roof joists

Scale: 1/64”=1’-0”

Course: ARC 424

everything was replaced to

exterior storage

construction phases nts


1 Sheet of Scale: 1/64”=1’-0”

Course: ARC 424

2 asphalt pavement

roof above

carport remains open plan

d.1

3 d.3

beam above

edge of slab

posts

storage

storage

views remain unobstructed

d.2

wood framing storage room

1

proposed shear wall

Torsion is caused by eccentric loads being applied to the structure. If the resulting loads would be normal to the surface axis then torsion could be overlooked.

Assignment Number: 5 Assignment Title: Lautner Carport Method 1 Calculation Date Due: 02/17/2010

concrete floor

The Lautner carport would suffer immensely due to torsion because the entire roof structure is resting mostly on columns and would be susceptible to severe rotation. A shear wall running along the central axis of the structure would be the most efficient way to avoid torsion, however taking into consideration site context and architectural intentions; we would propose a shear wall system around the South-West perimeter. This would preserve the openness provided by the cantilever system while counter-acting any torsional force.

2 torsion scale: 1/4”=1’-0”

Marissa Buchman Bridget Flecky Jacqueline Hilo Nika Imani

carport roof above

N


A bearing wall i s one that holds the weight of its o w n s t r u c t u r e a n d t h a t o f a n o t h er making it crucial for its stability. T h e w a l l s h i g h l i g hted in orange above are bearing w a l l s b e c a u s e o f t h e i r d i r e c t c o n nection to the foundation and to t h e r o o f a b o v e . T h e s e b e a r i n g w alls are minimally disrupted by ope n i n g s ; p r o v i d i n g m a x i m u m s t r u ctural support.

This back wall containing a 2’x2’ window clearly contains more t h a n 70% o f s o l i d b e a r i n g s t r u c t u r e f r o m b o t t o m to t o p .

The interior walls do not act as bearing walls because the joists do not sit on them for structural supp o r t , t h e r e f o r e t h e y o n l y a c t a s partition w a l l s w i t h i n t h e s t o r a g e s p a c e .

A23 angles acting as hold down devices.

h

sheathing nailed to wood frame

A 2 3 a n g l e s c onnect the shear wall to the exsting joists and fascia in order t o h o l d d o w n the roof.

v

v h

anchor bolt foundation

from

bearing walls scale: 1/4”=1’-0”


Sheet of

4

Scale: 1/64”=1’-0”

Course: ARC 424

2

asphalt pavement

carport roof above

concrete floor

concrete floor

d.1

3 d.3

beam above

d.5

d.2

edge of slab

d.4

storage shelves storage shelves

low retaining wall

posts

proposed bearing wall

Assignment Number: 5 Assignment Title: Lautner Carport Method 1 Calculation Date Due: 02/17/2010

roof above

asphalt pavement

wood framing

1

Marissa Buchman Bridget Flecky Jacqueline Hilo Nika Imani

storage room

existing bearing wall

floorplan scale: 1/4”=1’-0”

proposed shear wall

N


Grand Isle Apartments Disabled Accessible Studies: Grand Isle Apartments

Grand Isle Village Walk Apartments is a senior housing residential apartment community with a total of 453 residential units within eight 3-story buildings. The property was reviewed to provide a general overview of building components, as well as its related Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements, Federal Fair Housing Act (FFHA) guideline requirements, and major building code requirements.


Antigua

October 20, 2011

17”

30” X 48”

45”

48”

17”

30” X 48” clear floor area centered at appliance is required per CBC Section 1124A2.2 and FFHA.

18” on both sides of toilet required per CBC 2001.

18” 14”

18” strike side clearance at bathroom door required per CBC 2001.

30” X 48”

Living Room

BedRoom

Currently, thermostat is located in the corner adjacent to wall where it does not allow a 30” X 48” clear floor area. A 30” X 48” clear floor area centered at appliance is required per FFHA.

Patio

Existing Dimension Required Dimension


Dominique

October 20, 2011

18” strike side clearance at bathroom door required per CBC 2001. BedRoom

18” 10”

32” nominal door opening as the closet requires used passage. Required per FFHA and CBC 2001.

32”

<32”

BedRoom

Balcony 48”

Living Room

44” 30” x 48”

30” X 48” clear floor area centered at appliance is required per CBC Section 1124A2.2 and FFHA.

Existing Dimension Required Dimension


Trio Apartments REPAIR WORK: TRIO Apartments

The Trio Apartments is a mixed-use project in the City of Pasadena, California. The project consists of 304 apartment units located within two buildings; one 4-story building over a concrete podium parking garage, and one 2-story building, interconnected to the four-story building on the second level. The scope of this project included investigation for sundecks, balconies, podium deck drainage, miscellaneous repairs, and replacement of exterior siding material. We surveyed a sample of the following: 1) Sundecks utilizing a laser level and leveling instrument. We recommended re-building the sundecks on the fourth floor. 2) Podium deck floor drains in areas covered by pavers to locate low spots and areas with missing area drains and/or in need of additional area drains. We noticed many low spots, dead end corners and areas in need of additional area drains. We recommended the installation of additional area drains on the podium level. 3) Mechanical shaft bases to verify drain floor existence and proper slope. We recommended the retrofit of the area drains to allow for installation of a strainer cap to prevent future clogging as well as installation of an overflow protection on the side of each shaft. 4) Roof level siding. In order to prevent future damage to shaft walls and flooding, we recommended that the siding material to be properly removed, demolished, and disposed. Also, installation of new wall siding material (Hardi-plank) over the building wrap material is recommended.


Fullerton Towers MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT STUDY

The Fullerton Towers are Located on the intersection of Harbor Boulevard and Brea Boulevard, in the City of Fullerton, California. The Fullerton Towers development comprises two office towers, one parking structure, and surface parking lots. The North tower is a 9-story building and the South tower is a 7-story tower; together they total 235,597 SF of office space. The towers are post tensioned concrete buildings and were built in 1970â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. They were positioned on a trapezoidal-shape 8.089-acre site in Fullerton, California. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility of turning the existing site and/or structures into a mixed used development by exploring three different approaches: 1) To renovate the existing structure and turn the buildings into apartments and commercial spaces. 2) To demolish one of the existing office towers, and construct a new apartment building that includes a commercial base, and a parking structure serving the proposed building, in the emptied parcel. 3) To demolish both towers, and construct a new building that will occupy the entire site.


Overview and Code Analysis:

The site is located within the community improvement district that The City of Fullerton names as “Focus Area G”. The proposed land use for the area is a balanced mix of housing, retail, and office that will support the expansion of St. Jude’s Hospital. Based on information retrieved from the City of Fullerton’s Planning and Zoning Department web site, the following assumptions were used in this analysis: Community development type: “Downtown Mixed-Use” Density: Min. 30 du/ac – Max. 60 du/ac (60 du/ac was used for the analysis) FAR: Min. 0.9 – Max. 2.0 (excludes structured parking) Lot Coverage: N/A Parking requirements for commercial use: 1 space per 250 SF Parking requirements for residential use: 1 Bedroom – 2 spaces, open or covered, per dwelling unit, 2 Bedrooms – 2 ½ spaces, open or covered, per dwelling unit, 3 Bedrooms - 3 spaces, open or covered, per dwelling unit. Marx Okubo made additional assumptions based on our experience with similar projects. These include: Assumed SQ FT per apartment type: 1 Bedroom – 800 SQ FT, 2 Bedrooms – 1000 SQ FT, 3 Bedrooms – 1300 SQ FT. Distribution of building square footage per apartment type: 25% of total SQ FT – 1 Bedroom apt., 60% of total SQ FT – 2 Bedroom apt., 15% of total SQ FT – 3 Bedroom apt.


Alternative A: Building Retrofit:

To demolish one of the existing office towers, and construct a new apartment building that includes a commercial base, and a parking structure serving the proposed building, in the emptied parcel: This alterative explores the possibility of maintaining, updating, and restructuring the existing office building, to allow for apartment subdivision. New amenities, commercial space and parking area will link the two buildings. Calculation for the number of units based on the existing building square footage that is 235,597 SF. Apartment Unit Calculations: Alternative A: Building Retrofit - Assumed 235,597 SF Unit Type

SF

Unit Count

SF per Unit Type

% Distr. Assumption

1-Bedroom

800

74

58,899

0.25

2-Bedroom

1,000

141

141,358

0.60

3-Bedroom

1,300

27

35,340

0.15

Total Units

242

The new 2 level construction featuring amenities, retail space and parking will total an approximate area of 38,000 SF. The total development area for the Alternative A will be 273,597.00 SF.


Calculation: Parking Spaces Calculation: Alternative A: Building Retrofit - Assumed 242 Units Unit Type

Parking Requirement

Total Units

Number of Spaces

1-Bedroom

2

74

148

2-Bedroom

2.5

141

353

3-Bedroom

3

27

81

242

582

Total Units

Based on the site plan provided, there are currently 252 parking spaces available in the existing parking structure, and 489 ground level parking spaces. This total number exceeds the space count requirement for this alternative.

Advantages and Disadvantages: Pros:

- Faster time to market: Reduction of the construction time and a quicker start of leasing. - Cost: Lower hard and soft costs due to the reuse of portions of the exterior skin, structure and building systems. - Sustainability: Reduction of the waste stream by using some of the existing building struc ture and portions of the site elements. - Neighborhood acceptance: Less impact on the neighborhood by reusing the exterior shell of the building. The change in use is more likely to be acceptable to the community given the familiarity of the exterior appearances of the structure.

Cons:

- Aesthetic Limitations: Limited opportunity for a clearly multifamily residential design. The revised project may send a mixed message about the nature of the property. - Commercial configuration limits opportunities: Less opportunity to incorporate balconies on the exterior of the buildings due to the square shape of the tower floor plates as well as the narrow exterior cladding spacing. - Post tension slab construction: Careful study is required before laying out the units. Cable configurations within the slab may necessitate shifting of unit configurations.


Alternative B: Partial Developement:

To demolish one of the existing office towers, and construct a new apartment building that includes a commercial base, and a parking structure serving the proposed building, in the emptied parcel: The lower building would be demolished and tenants occupying spaces in this tower would be relocated to the remaining tower. This alternative will suggest demising the existing property in to two, where the new parcel will have an area of approximately 4.6 acres. An initial calculation of the allowed units per acre was done to obtain estimated square fotage of site coverage. This assumption was made based on a 60 dwelling units per acre density. As per the allowed density and the 4.6 acres assumed, the proposed new parcel would yield 288 units maximum. Subsequently a graphic massing exercise followed to adjust the quantity of permitted units to the geometry of the existing site. Apartment Unit Calculations: Alternative B: Partial Site Development - Assumed 260,000 SF Unit Type

SF

Unit Count

SF per Unit Type

% Distr. Assumption

1-Bedroom

800

81

65,000

0.25

2-Bedroom

1,000

156

156,000

0.60

3-Bedroom

1,300

30

39,000

0.15

Total Units

267


Calculation: Parking Spaces Calculation: Alternative B: Partial Site Development - Assumed 260,000 SF Unit Type

Parking Requirement

Total Units

Number of Spaces

1-Bedroom

2

81

162

2-Bedroom

2.5

156

390

3-Bedroom

3

30

90

267

642

Total Units Parking Structure size: Total 3 Parking Total number of parking spaces: 844

Advantages and Disadvantages: Pros: Cons:

- New construction: Contemporary in design that meet market expectations. - Maximization of site: Creation of new buildings that maximizes available site area, and helps to create more rentable units. - Improved marketability: Creation of interest in order to market the residential units easier. While a â&#x20AC;&#x153;storyâ&#x20AC;? could certainly be crafted around the reuse of the existing buildings, new construction negates the need to overcome the stigma of mediocre 1960s architecture - Cost of new construction: Increase of costs compared to the renovation option due to the demolition necessary for the existing buildings. - Lack of Sustainability: Creation of a large waste stream. - Longer development time: The need to completely open the entitlement process will likely extend the project duration by a minimum of one year. The need to demolish the existing structures will also increase the duration of the construction phase.


Alternative C: Complete Re-developement:

To demolish both towers, and construct a new building that will occupy the entire site. This alternative explores the possibility of doing a complete redevelopment of the site where all the existing structures would be demolished and a new mixed used development will materialize. The same methodology as previous alternative is assumed for the allowed units per acre. Per the allowed density of 60 dwelling units per acre, 484 units is the maximum density in this alternative. Apartment Unit Calculations: Alternative C: Complete Re-development - Assumed 383,600 SF Unit Type

SF

Unit Count

SF per Unit Type

% Distr. Assumption

1-Bedroom

800

120

95,900

0.25

2-Bedroom

1,000

230

230,160

0.60

3-Bedroom

1,300

44

57,540

0.15

Total Units

394


Calculation: Parking Spaces Calculation: Alternative C - Complete Re-development - Assumed 394 Units Unit Type

Parking Requirement

Total Units

Number of Spaces

1-Bedroom

2

120

240

2-Bedroom

2.5

230

575

3-Bedroom

3

44

132

394

947

Total Units Parking Structure size: Total 3 Parking Total number of parking spaces: 1,166

Advantages and Disadvantages: Pros: Cons:

- New construction: Contemporary in design that meet market expectations. - Maximization of site: Creation of new buildings that maximizes available site area, and helps to create more rentable units. - Improved marketability: Creation of interest in order to market the residential units easier. While a â&#x20AC;&#x153;storyâ&#x20AC;? could certainly be crafted around the reuse of the existing buildings, new construction negates the need to overcome the stigma of mediocre 1960s architecture - Cost of new construction: Increase of costs compared to the renovation option due to the demolition necessary for the existing buildings. - Lack of Sustainability: Creation of a large waste stream. - Longer development time: The need to completely open the entitlement process will likely extend the project duration by a minimum of one year. The need to demolish the existing structures will also increase the duration of the construction phase.



Portfolio- Nika Imani