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architecture portfolio 2018

selected works 2012-2017

niharika shekhawat


NIHARIKA SHEKHAWAT Architect New Delhi, India +91 9999449993 niharikashekhawat@gmail.com


EDUCATION

PUBLICATIONS & DOCUMENTATION

Graduated Bachelor of Architecture School of Planning and Architecture 2017 New Delhi

2017

Editor : Archichakkar Seminar Series Publication School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi

Graduated High School Sanskriti School, New Delhi 2010

2017

Architecture Thesis : Rehabilitation through Reformation Correctional Centre School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi

2016

Seminar : safar ya suffer? * सफ़र या Archichakkar, Seminar Series School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi

WORK EXPERIENCE 2016

Internship StudioCoDe, New Delhi

2013

Internship AUM Architects, Gurgaon

2015

2015

Student Exchange Program Fachhochschule Erfurt, Germany

Dissertation : Parametric Architecture * School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi

2014

Documentation : Mandi, Himachal Pradesh Commercial and historical documentation drawings School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi

2014

Documentation : Sinli Village, Barmer,Rajasthan Jhompa Settlement and Documentation drawings School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi

2013

Documentation : Chorao Island, Goa Portuguese Settlement and Documentation drawings School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi

STUDIO DESIGN PROJECTS 2017

Reformation through Rehabilitation * Correctional Centre (Thesis)

2016

Urban link * Transit Oriented Urban Development

2015

The Infinity * Airport Terminal

2015

Studio Interlace * Undergraduate block, SPA Vasant Kunj

CO-CURRICULAR

2014

Incubation Centre Research Centre

2014

Aapno Dharohar * Village Welfare Centre

2013

Dharampura Intervention Street edge intervention

Languages English Hindi

2013

Tetris Residency * House Design

2013

Rubik Home-stay Designing 2050

2012

Abstract Child’s Play Children’s Playground

Softwares AutoCAD Sketchup Autodesk Revit Rhinoceros Adobe Photoshop Adobe InDesign Adobe Illustrator Kerkythea Ecotect Microsoft office

COMPETITIONS 2015

Highway Rest-stop NACS by INDAG National Student Competition for large span construction

2014

Unexpected City * HYP Cup International Student Competition for Architecture in Transformation

2016

Elective : Industrial Design

2015

Elective : Photography

SKILLS

Design

Conceptualisation Research and Development Organisation and Planning Graphical Representation Functional Zoning Form Development Model making (Physical & Virtual) Construction Detail Landscaping Presentation Fields marked in * are shown in portfolio


SELECTED WORKS 01 Reformation through rehabilitation 02 Urban link 03 The infinity 04 Studio interlace 05 Aapno Dharohar 06 Tetris residency 07 Unexpected city 08 Safar la suffer? सफ़र या 09 Inclusion of tangible parametrics in parametric architecture

LINKS TO COMPLETE PROJECTS सफ़र safarया la suffer? : Usability Analysis around Transport Hubs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzgH6xT-VXU Reformation through rehabilitation : Correctional center https://issuu.com/niharikashekhawat/docs/correctional_center_-_ niharika_n_sh


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studio compilation


rehabilitation through reformation Correctional Centre on the outskirts of New Delhi Semester X - 2017

The thesis focuses on how incarceration spaces can be expressed as a function of rehabilitation that can successfully imbibe correctional qualities in order to release the convicted back into the open environment, as changed citizens.


Tikri Khurd village Prisoner accommodation : 8,058sqm Prisoner support : 1,036 sqm Prisoner facility : 16,470 sqm Total Area : 25,996 sqm Total Parking : 112

farmlands

shop

space for staff accommodation

AIR Khampur

Design in context


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01 correctional center entry 02 admin entry 03 mail convict entry 04 female convict entry 05 admin block 06 visitor entry 07 reformation block 08 Transformer 09 Generator 10 Sewage treatment Plant (STP) 11 Godown 12 Way to farmlands 13 Farmlands (men) 14 Farmlands (women)


Access road

Levels of boundary wall security

Vehicular patrolling road and other roads

Watch towers

4th floor male cell block female cell block miscellaneous recreational activities 3rd floor male cell block female cell block medical centre 2nd floor male cell block female cell block medical admin 1st floor male cell block female cell block classroom+workshop courtroom

G floor kitchen+laundary security reception visitation admin control center

Farming as a way for rehabilitation and a means for earning


Inculcate self good behavior without constant vigilance

seperation of men and women

reformation axis with functions on either side

courtyard fortification with green

green terraces

greens at each levels


Cell Type A Single Room (High Security Convicts)

Cell Type B Double Room (Convicts)

Cell Type C 6 People Dormitory (Under-trials)


prisoner facility 63%

prisoner accommodation 31%

AREA PROG

block support 3%

prisoner support 4%

GENDER WISE

men’s prison 76%

services 2%

block facility PRISON male housing 36% 55% ACCOMMODATION

female housing 6%

women’s prison 20%

common administrative areas 4%

security reception 21%

PRISON staff facility SUPPORT 67%

security department 2%

medical center 31%

kitchen 2% visitation 10% classroom 9%

PRISON FACILITY

courthouse 21%

library 6%

workshop 21%

The area program for the project was derived with the help of the Delhi Jail Manual and the UNOP document. Every space has been accounted for and the major heads of the program are Prisoner accommodation, prison support, prisoner facility and services.


Ground floor

First floor

Prisons should aspire to become a place for promotion of mental health as a positive state; a place lessening the risk of deterioration of mental health through high-quality care and environment for inmates to thrive.


Jail Open

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0630

Bathing, cleaning & tea

Prayer/ yoga/ meditation

0730

0830

Breakfast & reading

Lunch delivery

1000

Jail Closed

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1100 1230 Lunch in library/ temple

Prayer/ yoga/ meditation

Evening group Workshop/ prayer & farming tea

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Physical & cultural activity

Timeline of a day in the correctional centre

1800

Television & dinner

1930

Jail Closed

2200 Rest


Second floor

Third floor

Fourth floor


Courtyard spaces with towers for guards


The facades fabricated in concrete ranging in tone from earthy pinks to rusts, creating a lightly variegated pattern.

Shop for selling prison goods on main road.

The correctional center employ the idea of a double skin for energy saving and visually striking.


urban link

Transit Oriented Development around Dwarka sector 10 metro station in New Delhi Semester IX - 2016

A transit Oriented Development built around Dwarka Sector 10 metro station, consisting of various functions such as office, residence, retail, convention centre and hotel. Also consisting of public spaces interlinked via mandatory green, this urban design projects aims to create a viable addition to the urban fabric of the city.


bus stop metro station

Design in context


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01 mandatory green 02 entry to primary school 03 primary school 04 entry to serviced apartments above 05 affordable housing 06 bus stop 07 entry to retail 08 entrance retail hall 09 anchor stores 10 fire station 11 medical center 12 departmental store 13 office 14 office entrance hall 15 central court 16 hotel 17 convention center


Public transport linkages

encourage public transport

Robust greens

Dense pedestrian network

enhance pedestrian movement

Pathway connecting two parts of the site divided by metro line minimize vehicular movement

Vehicular movement restricted to the periphery

Transit oriented development site integration

Public spaces form the focus of the complex around which the built is scattered. Programmatic disposition allows public movement at lower levels, bringing people into the complex. Lack of boundary leading to urban permeability.


dispersed mixed use

stacked mixed use

combination of dispersed and stacked

physical linkages connecting program components

visual linkages binding the site experience

visually, seamlessly and experientially seamless site without compromising privacy or building efficiency

Ground Coverage : 24,880 sqm Total Area : 226,786 sqm F.A.R : 3.8


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Business Centre ground floor plan

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Business Centre typical upper floor plan

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01-office 02-conference room 03-entrance lobby 04-entrance court 05-drop-off 06-hotel 07-coffee shop 08-restaurant 09-entrance lobby 10-food court


office

hotel convention centre

All three functions linked in a self sufficient interconnected business centre

Outdoor green spaces and staircases

Business center opens to the other part of the site and the central (mandatory) greens

Business Block : Office, hotel and convention centre


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Residential Block Ground floor

Unit A 40 sqm

Unit B 60 sqm

01-affordable housing 02-serviced apartments

Serviced apartments 120 sqm


An enclosure is formed for the residents to enjoy, due to the position of the blocks, creating a direct connection between the metro station and bus stop promoting public transportation.

Connecting bridges add another layer of pedestrian movement within the site

Residential block

Units removed to provide intermediate terraces on each floor of the blocks, and a Restricted Access space for the residents, flowing over the retail public space bridging the metro


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Ground floor

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Fifth floor

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01-entrance to retail 02-anchor stores 03-entrance to office 04-brand store 05-gaming center 06-cinema hall 07-office 08-concesssion area


Mandatory green of the site acts as public space in front of the retail block

Direct access from the metro station to the upper level of the block, and also to the existing retail mall and the community centre

Retail block

Retail blocks open to the central greens which lead to the business centre on the other side of the metro station


the infinity

International Airport Terminal on the outskirts of Chandigarh Semester VII - 2015

Built on the outskirts of the city of Chandigarh, adjacent to the existing working airport, this design creates an iconic landmark for the city. The airport provides a safe, comfortable and easy to navigate space with all amenities required by the user during their travel.


Ground Coverage : 15,400 sqm Total Area : 38,800 sqm Peak Hour Traffic considered : 350 arriving, 350 departing

Design in context


The concept for the airport was visualising time as infinite in space. The symbol for infinity materialises that. It represents continuity and flow which is how the airport is perceived. It is a step in the journey, a transition, not the destination itself. The form came about by the physical manifestation of “infinity� into multiple Mobius strips, ultimately giving the multiple curved roofs with the two courtyards.


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Ground Floor (Arrival Level)

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First Floor (Departure Level)

01-Arrival/concourse waiting 02-Baggage claim 03-City side restaurant 04-Duty free shops 05-Airside corridor 06-Kerb side shops 07-departure concourse/waiting 08-baggage/check in 09-security check


Split-view of structural components of airport terminal


Ground floor Passenger (arrival) Visitor (arrival)

Upper floor Passenger (arrival) Visitor (arrival)

Ground floor Staff access

Upper floor Staff access

Ground floor Baggage

Upper floor Baggage Circulation

longitudinal section of building


Elevation of built

The project combines light, colour, and sound as it leads passengers through the terminal of the airport. The coloured glass makes for a very unique experience as the user moves along the space.


studio interlace

Undergraduate Block for School of Planning and Architecture campus in Vasant Kunj Semester VI - 2015

Built on the master plan provided as a prerequisite for this design, the land parcel provided for the undergraduate block is enclosed by the rest of the campus. The design was born adhering to the guidelines provided, keeping in mind the overall plan for the campus. The intent was to create an inclusive block with hierarchy for different zones and spaces


Design in context


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01-Entry 02-Canteen 03-Core 04-Conservation laboratory 05-Climatology 06-Ceramic and pottery workshop 07-textile Workshop 08-Faculty block 09-Bachelor Architecture studio 10-Bachelor planning studio 11-Library 12-graphics and installation studio 13-Surveying and map making 14-Digital design lab 15-carpentary workshop 16-Accoustic and illumination lab 17-Material testing lab 18-Computer lab 19-metal workshop 20-Transport lab 21-Records office 22-Research Centre


The three major zones of the undergraduate block, functionally connected. From left to right - Administration and Faculty rooms, Resource Centre, Studios

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Ground floor

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11am march

2pm march

4pm march

11am august

2pm august

4pm august

11am november

2pm november

Outdoor spaces were designed by analysing sun path and passive heating strategies by solar analysis

The south facade receives harsh summer sun which created a need for shading device. Slanted slit windows were designed for the studios, which also reduced glare for working students.


The studios for both architecture and planning department were interlinked with ramped connectors, increasing interactivity. There is also a visual connection between the different years of the same department.


aapno dharohar

Village welfare Centre opposite Sinli village in Rajasthan Semester IV - 2014

Built across the road from Sinli village in Rajasthan, this welfare centre is made using vernacular technologies and construction from the village itself, giving a sense of identity and employment to the people. As the name suggests, accumulation of the heritage of the people, the site is an extension of the village and its people, including many functions of the design to be a part of their daily activities.


Sinli Village

Design in context


Minimize cutting of the natural Vegetation by building in the spaces left

Use of vernacular technology and construction for built expression and materiality

Congregating community spaces interacting with each other.

Site as an extension of the village and its activities

Organic paths of circulation

Easy visibility from top contours

Built, semi-covered, open, and pathways for pedestrian and vehicular access


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01 Resource centre 02 Lecture room 03 Workshop lab 04 vet clinic 05 Admin 06 Reception 07 Market 08 Water harvesting tank 09 Library 10 Adult education 11 Staff room 12 Toilets 13 Cold storage 14 Normal storage 15 Living accommodation 16 Canteen and dining 17 Kitchen 18 Public healthcare 19 Pathology 20 Staff 21 Dentist 22 Gynecologist 23 Physician 24 Emergency 25Operation Theatre 26 labor room 27 Female ward 28 New born ward 29 Male ward 30 Bath

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Details of library: elevation, section, plan

Details of accommodation: elevation, section, plan

The living accommodations are made similar to the jhompas of the village, but with improved construction techniques so that the villagers relate to it more and have pride in their practice of living in jhompas


tetris residency

House design in Sanjay Van in New Delhi Semester IV - 2014

Built on the banks of the water body in Sanjay Van in the heart of New Delhi. The house was designed for Architect Shuvojit Sarkar and his family, which includes his wife, a child and In-laws.


Design in context


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01-Entry 02-Drawing room area 03-Studio 04-Office 05-Office entry 06-Kid’s play area 07-Courtyard 08-Dining area 09-Outside dining area 10-Kitchen 11-Client’s room 12-Client’s parent’s room


Interactive spaces Courtyard house

Visual link View of water edge

Straight lines tetris blocks

Separated private spaces

The house has straight edges along interlocking tetris blocks, with a courtyard which is a perfect congregation space for the members. While the private spaces are separated , their is a visual link between the entrance and the water body. Most of the existing vegetation is conserved, whilst also creating spaces that enhance them.


competitions


unexpected city

Public space in the bustling Chandni Chowk Semester V - 2014

For the HYP Cup competition, the aim was to create a sense of finding something unexpected in the bustling streets of Chandni Chowk. The abandoned havelis were retro-fitted to create a serene calming public space that can be used by people. All components are connected by the “gully� which is dynamic, having different experiences at different times. The need for public spaces in such chaotic congested parts of the city is a necessity. Thus the unexpected city is a creation of such spaces benefiting human society and having various public functions coming together in this cluster area.


Site: Gali connecting Kinari bazaar Site area: 4000 sqm

Design in context


Figure ground plan

Residential/Commercial

Relative heights

Occupied havelis

Old/New construction

Religious demographics


Exhibition hall + restaurant + museum Park Baithak

Cultural courtyard

Library + canteen


publications


safar la suffer? सफ़र या

Usability analysis around Transport hubs Semester IX - 2016

This seminar presented in the form of a movie, focuses on how Architectural Disability is used as a means to determine Usability around transport hubs with focus on New Delhi railway Station, Hauz Khas Metro Station and Kashmere Gate Metro Station


Abstract सफर या SUFFER? identifies usability as a cross cutting issue that is lacking in some of the most important public spaces of the capital city. We begin with understanding what it is that makes a space usable as per principles laid out in existing theories. These theories also show how architecturally disabling a space can be, which is the phenomenon where the built space disables the user with disability which makes the experience inconvenient, uncomfortable or unsafe. These existing definitions are extended to include visual usability as an equally important parameter to holistically evaluate a space. These parameters are applied to multiple points on major pedestrian movement lines in the area under investigation: area surrounding the New Delhi Railway Station. In this area of high traffic, wide impact and huge significance, the user experience is found to be very low. There are multiple identified break points on the pedestrian movement lines. Deconstruction of these break points into infrastructure, and their control and ownership results in an interesting pattern. Finally, to establish this pattern as a recurring phenomenon in the whole city, more such transport hubs have been analysed. What is Architectural Disability? ‘Architectural disability’ is a term that has been used (Goldsmith, 1997) to describe how the physical design, layout and construction of places and buildings can confront people with hazards and barriers which make the built environment inconvenient, uncomfortable or unsafe and may even prevent some people from using it at all. Architectural disability is not about considering all individuals to be equal, it is about the need to have a “design for all” attitude by the designer. When the designer designs for all, there is a high usability of that space. This “usability” factor is inversely proportional to how architecturally disabling a space can be. ARCHITECTURAL DISABILITY 1/USABILITY Architectural Usability is the potential of the built environment to accommodate and cater for the needs of all user groups, aiding in a “seamless travel” through urban space. Principles of Usability The 7 principles for determining the “Usability” factor as per Centre for Universal Design (1997) are: • Equitable use • Flexibility in use • Simple and intuitive • Perceptible information • Tolerance for error • Low physical effort • Size and space for approach and users

22 break points were studied for New Delhi Railway Station and the tabulation showed: When agency overlap is > 4, usability = very low The above study, correlating usability of a space to the number of agencies present may be relevant only to the New Delhi Railway Station. Or is it a city wide phenomenon? To test it out, similar studies were conducted for two other sites in Delhi. Visual Usability Among all factors that determine experiential usability, we examined the visual quality of the space, specially that pertaining to its built environment design. However, with a large in-cohesive material palette, there was no one defining colour or texture to the built environment. Through this study we question the priorities in the development of the city. Is the majority of the population, interfacing with the city as pedestrians, the least important? However, these very pedestrians and users of all kinds are also responsible for the state of public infrastructure. But are there mechanisms to instill that sense of responsibility through civic pride? While they encounter innumerable physical hindrances, is the lack of an architectural order and cohesiveness in these spaces a desirable diversity or a visual chaos that needs to be addressed? Due to the lack of cohesiveness in the architecture, spaces of informality are created at the junctions of multiple agencies. This allows the public space to become more inclusive, vibrant and creates livelihood opportunities, but at what cost? Most public spaces are adjoined to infrastructure for transportation and it is at these junctions that lack in usability and experiential chaos occur. Who will address these cross cutting issues? Who can intervene holistically and ensure the lateral coordination that is clearly missing between individual participants? An organisation like this does exist but lacks the power to prevail over other organisations. In the current scenario, UTTIPEC is a government organisation that is made up of representatives from each transport and infrastructure organisation. The overall design of public spaces and the responsibility of each organisation is decided/approved by this body. But UTTIPEC lacks the power of keep check on each organisations execution of work. Therefore, how can the scope for such a pro le be created in the current disjointed multiplicity?


parameters of parametric architecture Inclusion of social and cultural parameters in parametric architecture Semester V - 2014

Architectural dissertation focused on the research question: ‘Why is the parametric equation not inclusive of social and cultural parameters in the process of designing in the digital age?’


Abstract

Inclusion of intangible parameters

Trends in architecture are not arbitrary, but a reflection of the society that architecture provides for. The background of a given design is deeply affected by the relevant cultural and social factors that affect the context. This dissertation is an attempt at understanding how the trends we see in parametric design architecture came into being—with a specific focus on the inclusion of social and cultural aspects into the equation.

We cannot tangible parameters and ideas for a more comprehensive design approach. We have to look towards the possibilities to include the intangible in the tangible of digital architecture.

The dawn of the new digital age brought about many hopes with special consideration given to parametrically created design form. Parametric design has been viewed to be of the future. This digital architecture takes into account all parameters to create the perfect design with respect to its form or taking into account every context available. The autopoiesis of architecture has made it adapt to the changing times. With the advent of technology the designing has to the solving of many couples structures. This designing takes into account every element such as context, structure etc. The sociological aspect is giving form a lot of meaning. The cultural or vernacular aspect that defines us can be upgraded. Taking features of the old and renewing them to our new design capabilities is a possibility. There can be use of the parametric order but at the same time it shouldn’t lead to a mundane order of simplicity and minimalism where character is lost. Looking at the unknown and leaping beyond each obstacle will make iconic structures. The final design product must be a culmination of all parameters and must be derived from cultural, social and economic contexts.

The autopoiesis of architecture has made it adapt to the changing times. With the advent of technology the designing has to the solving of many couples structures. This designing takes into account every element such as context, structure etc. The sociological aspect is giving form a lot of meaning. The cultural or vernacular aspect that defines us can be upgraded. Taking features of the old and renewing them to our new design capabilities is a possibility. There can be use of the parametric order but at the same time it shouldn’t lead to a mundane order of simplicity and minimalism where character is lost. Looking at the unknown and leaping beyond each obstacle will make iconic structures. Methodology in attaining such is to look at the bigger picture. To see how the whole is other than the sum of part (gestalt psychology). We can look at groups of people and example of architecture where the culture is revived. This will help in spreading of the word to design in a particular way. The propagation of such will enable a way of designing for the future with no gaps and problems. Parametric is the designing of the future and it must be so in every aspect.

Aims

Architects do not build building anymore; they make physical manifestation of information. This fact has been decisively emphasized by the plethora of ways to parametrically design spaces in present times. Therefore these vocabularies of feeder data must be realigned to include every parameter for creation. We are moving away from the metaphor of physical topography to deal with the inherent topography of information itself. Discovering the lines of space requires suspension of existing resistances and factors not included. It requires becoming immersed in order to emerge with a clearer insight.

The aim of the study is to enumerate the parameters that affect the parametric equation. These parameters can vary from tangible aspects such as orientation, context etc, to intangible aspects such as cultural and social aspects affecting the design. The aim is to figure out why some elements play significant role in the parametric equation while others don’t. Also to find out why the parameters that are not used in the equation are not accountable and how they can be made to in the future.

Architects may choose to shift culture by instilling meaning in the language of the built environment; by contributing idealized form. We might also seek to alter it more directly, through the dissemination of idealized systems that are often enacted for and by the other portion of the pie chart. The architecture we choose to validate as a society represents a set of values within our global culture, as measured by stylistic shifts. I ask whether we might not limit ourselves to a single trajectory.

Objectives

We as future architects must approach parametric thinking as a way to integrate formal experimentation with performative concerns. The final design product must be a culmination of all parameters and must be derived from cultural, social and economic contexts. Designers and architects can make it a point to gather information surrounding their project through fieldwork, before proposing a ‘program’ for generating form. The intention must be to incorporate a discipline of analysis, avoiding form for its own sake. This method establishes a correlation between a complex array of relevant external parameters through the architectural techniques of geometry and organization.

This dissertation looks into the inclusion of such parameters and the hope of a more comprehensive design approach inclusive of every aspect that can be accounted.

Since figuring out the equation and its elements we find that there are very noticeable amount of features that can be accounted in a parametric equation. These features have physical weightage in the sense that they only take into account the physical features. While this has been a great leap from the primitive method of design. It does not accumulate all that can be thought of in terms of features that affect the final design.


niharika shekhawat

niharikashekhawat@gmail.com

+91 9999449993

Architecture Portfolio 2018 Niharika N Shekhawat  

Selected works 2011-2017

Architecture Portfolio 2018 Niharika N Shekhawat  

Selected works 2011-2017

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