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ARCHITECTURAL PORFOLIO Nicole Regier

36120 RICHMOND STREET RR#1 CENTRALIA, ONT. N0M 1K0 PHONE: 519-872-9631 E-MAIL: nicoleregier1@gmail.com


Ever since I was young, I could not image myself in any profession other than architecture. I am extremely passionate about design and how architecture can affect us in so many ways. I worked for nine months at Allan Avis Architects Inc. in Goderich, Ontario while completing my undergraduate degree and started working at Nicholson Sheffield Architects in London, Ontario in September of 2018 where I am currently employed. Working at these architecture firms has given me the opportunity to complete and assist in a large variety of projects as part of the office team. I am involved with all aspects in the projects, from design conception, to construction, administration, and completion. Both firms have allowed me to learn every day and become more knowledgeable about construction standards and processes. The architects that I have worked for are amazing designers. They have shown me that I still have more to learn, and that I need to grow as a designer in the way I think and approach design challenges. I believe I have a great deal of potential in this field if I pursue further education where I will have the chance to push the boundaries of design and explore different challenges that our society will face in the future. Furthering my education will allow me to follow my dream of becoming an architect.


TABLE OF CONTENTS THE COFFEE HOUSE......................................................1-8 PAPE BIRD OBSERVATION TOWER....................................9-12 HOTEL AGUA................................................................13-22 RURAL WORK SHOP......................................................23-26


THE COFFEE HOUSE LOCATION: Village of Yorkville Park Toronto, Ontario - Individual, Academic For this assignment, we were required to select a site within Toronto that was viewed as a site with opportunity to improve on, such as a site that is under-used or a site that has over time, become seemingly exclusive to only a specific demographic. I selected the Village of Yorkville Park for two reasons. The largest driving factor behind this choice is that I believe that the existing design of the park works well but has an opportunity to be better utilized with the introduction of a more diverse demographic through a reinvigorated design. Currently, the park is located in a quiet residential area with shopping and restaurants that are directed towards the upper class but in the 1960’s the area was once home to a very different culture. The other main reason why I choose this site is because of its history. It was once a thriving area for a hippy culture and the coffee shops provided young, up and coming artists at the time, like Joni Mitchell and Neil Young, a place to perform. These coffee shops no longer exist so, my intent is to create a space in Yorkville where all young artists of the 21st century, can come and express themselves and pursue their dreams in a space where the public can also enjoy their musical talent. I developed this concept of introducing musical performance back into the area because I truly believe that music is an art that can bring everyone together and architecture can create the space that fosters this environment. My proposal provides a large outdoor stage for free performances, practice rooms, a small coffee shop and areas for people to gather within the park and enjoy the performances. The building is barrier-free allowing anyone to practice within the spaces and with a variety of practice room sizes, all sizes and types of ensembles can be accommodated. Performances on the outdoor stage can occur throughout the day within the by-laws. Musicians throughout the city rely on spaces like these to be able to comfortably practice the art and this building gives them that opportunity and will turn the space into an inspirational dwelling for young musicians.


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3

N

Village of Yorkville Park 0

10m


4


5

1

9

8

2

3

10

11

4

5 6

FIRST FLOOR

12 7

14

SECOND FLOOR

12

13

12

12


6 1. Entrance to TTC Subway Station 2. Vestibule to Elevator offering barrier-free access to the TTC and Coffee House 3. Mechanical Room 4. Barrier-free Mens Washroom 5. Barrier-free Womens Washroom 6. Music Practice Room Management and Security Office 7. Outdoor Covered Seating Area 8. Public Performance Stage 9. Outdoor Concrete Stadium Seating 10. Large Ensemble Practice Room

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11. Elevator Vestibule 12. Small Ensemble Practice Room 13. Medium Ensemble Practice Room

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14. Outdoor Semi-Private Seating Area 15. Coffee Shop

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The existing park was designed with elements taken from Canada’s geography and allowed for an entrance to the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC). The design incorporates some of these existing features as I have included the TTC entrance in the building and reused the rock that was meant to symbolize the Canadian Shield as the stage. Not only have I retained all existing seating areas, I have also created additional seating spaces on the upper levels of the building and next to the TTC entrance using concrete stadium seating. The building also maintains the many of the connections from the surrounding city to park. This was achieved by keeping most of the program off of the ground floor and allowing it to be open as people can pass under the building instead of having to travel around it creating minimal disruptions to existing travel paths.

15

N

THIRD FLOOR

0

10m


7

EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION


8

EAST-WEST SECTION

NORTH-SOUTH SECTION 0

15m


PAPE BIRD OBSERVATION TOWER LOCATION: Pape National Park, Latvia - Group Project Competition, Academic

This competition project was completed as a group of four and the design was created collaboratively during a lengthy group meeting after each team member conducted individual research about the site and local architectural style. In addition to generating the design with my peers, I also created the digital model that was used to produce the drawings and designed and drew the significant details for the structure. The primary design intent behind our observation tower proposal is to offer users the ability to observe the different wildlife and bird species that migrate through Pape Park while at the same time not being intrusive to the surrounding landscape. Through our research, we concluded that the design of the tower should respect the context with a low impact on its surroundings and environment, allow for clear visibility and be both functional and sustainable in its execution and future maintenance. The design focuses on constructability through simple, affordable, and efficient, modular design and construction, making it a practical structure for the use and location. The tower has an exposed wood structure that creates nooks for birds to nest, bringing viewers even closer to the wildlife. The prefabricated spiral stair creates easy access to the multiple platforms with a comfortable rise and run making the structure available to all ages. The second platform intentionally has no roof so that birdwatchers that choose to venture to the top platform can look above them and out to the park to get the best viewing range of the migrating birds. The form of the structure takes on a tree like figure where the central spiral staircase acts as the trunk and the base, which grounds the building. The two platforms extend out in a circular form to resemble the crown of the tree which also creates a 360 viewing space for users. The cladding surrounding the first viewing platform is composed of modular, cedar shake panels. The top of each panel is cut on a slight angle to allow for more privacy towards the south of the tower, where people approach the structure and to provide some protection from the harsh southern sun. The cladding is then sloped so that the north end is lower than the south end of the tower, which allows for a great view of the park. The details are based on standard wood frame construction methods with materials that fit the natural and simplistic design intent. Using standard methods of construction allows for easy transportation to the remote location. The constructibility of the observation tower is practical, environmentally sustainable, and relatively low in cost due to the use of simple, commonly used methods of construction and materials.


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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST VIEWING PLATFORM

SECOND VIEWING PLATFORM

N

0

3m


11

EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

0

3m


12 ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY, RECYCLED, RUBBER TILES FOR DURABILITY

PLYWOOD SHEATHING 2” x 10” WOOD JOISTS

Roof/ Second Viewing Platform Assembly

ALUMINUM DRIP EDGE FLASHING

ANGLED WOOD SHIM TO PROVIDE SLOPED SURFACE AT WALL EDGE PLYWOOD SHEATHING

FELT UNDERLAYMENT

2” x 4” WOOD STUDS

CEDAR SHAKE

Modular Cedar Shake Panel Assembly


HOTEL AGUA LOCATION: Lisbon, Portugal - Individual, Academic Project at the Technical University of Munich The site for this project that I completed while studying in Germany was an underused harbour front where we were tasked with designing a hotel to meet the needs of the city. The site had some existing uses that locals frequented like a gym, dance studio and architectural office. With inspiration from the 2018 Biennially in Venice, with a concept of “Freespace”, I decided to take advantage of the existing uses on the site that would draw locals to the area and the touristic use of the hotel to draw in tourists and create a freespace for both to interact with each other and enjoy Lisbon’s beautiful harbour front. I thoroughly enjoyed this project as we were encouraged to think outside of the box and push the boundaries of reality. For the design of the hotel, I wanted to create a simple structure that would both contrast the surroundings and make the location memorable for both locals and tourists. The structure offers connections to the existing paths of travel, to the river and the city. The hotel rooms all have large views of the city and the outdoor gathering space offers a direct connection to the river. This space will become an oasis for visitors with water wall features blocking out unwanted noise from the rail system and highway running behind the site and a large canopy feature for shade. This canopy does not block any views to the west, east or the river, allowing for a visual connection across the site. With the connections this space has to offer, the views that the hotel has, and the luxurious freespace, this site will be well utilized for many years.


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15

7 3 1

2

1. Mechanical Room

9. Restaurant Kitchen

2. Mens Washroom

10. Restaurant Seating and Bar, Seating for General Public

3. Womens Washroom

11. Room Style #1

4. Universal Washroom

12. Modified Room Style #2

5. Main Entrance Vestibule

13. Room Style #3

6. Entrance/Lobby

14. Room Style #2

7. Store

15. Private Lounge for Hotel Guests

8. Laundry and Staff Quarters

16. Open to Below

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13 9

5 6

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12

13

13

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4 15 10 16

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GROUND FLOOR

SECOND - FIFTH FLOOR

0

10m


16

AREA OF NEW BUILDING SOME ABANDONED BUILDING TO BE DEMOLISHED TO FIT NEW BUILDING

NEW BUILDING TO FIT WITH SURROUNDING BUILDINGS AND NOT EXCEED THE HEIGHTS OF THE OTHER BUILDINGS


17

WEST ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION 0

10m


18

EAST - WEST SECTION

NORTH - SOUTH SECTION 0

10m


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OUTDOOR GATHERING SPACE FOR ALL INDOOR PRIVATE GATHERING SPACE INDIVIDUAL PRIVATE SPACE INDOOR PUBLIC GATHERING SPACE


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ROOM STYLE #1: - One Queen size bed - Full kitchen and Bathroom - Television - Storage shelves and closet


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ROOM STYLE #3: - One Queen size bed - Pull out couch (Twin size) - Full bathroom - Television - Storage shelves and closet

ROOM STYLE #2: - Two Queen size beds - Full bathroom - Television - Storage shelves and closet


RURAL WORK SHOP LOCATION: South-Western Ontario - Individual, Personal Project I completed this small project for a client who wanted a detached workshop and garage located at his rural home in Southwestern Ontario. He and his wife did not want the workshop to clash with their farmhouse but they also were inspired by small brick, commercial, flat roof buildings. After showing them a few options for the exterior of the building with a simple floor plan, they decided to go with a unique design that offered attic storage space on the upper floor and a floor plan with two different levels for the workshop and garage. The exterior blends together different cladding materials that are pre-existing on their property so that the new building will not look out of place. Half of the shed has a mono sloped roof so that from the front of the building it would appear to be a flat roof. The mono roof slope in the garage also allows for the garage door in the front to go straight up instead of curving like typical garage doors which was a request from the client. There is a small portion of the building clad in a similar red brick as their house as they were able to find a small amount of old, red brick from another deconstructed farm house. The work shop features two levels to accommodate the grade change on the property. The step down in levels within the building also allows the client to use the floor of the garage as an extended work surface from the work shop as it is at counter height. The client plans on starting construction of this project in the spring.


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1 1.

Side door for access to outdoor patio.

2 9

3

2.

Spare refrigerator and freezer.

3.

Large storage tool chest.

4.

Large freestanding sink.

5.

Line of attic storage space above.

6.

UPPER GARAGE

Cantilevered wood floor level with the concrete floor at the upper garage. This floor is 3’ above the work shop

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on the lower level. This will create a

4

large work surface for longer pieces of lumber in the work shop. 7.

5

6

Wood burning stove in order to heat the work shop.

7

8.

Roll up garage door to provide access to the yard adjacent to the work shop.

LOWER WORK SHOP

ATTIC STORAGE

This will allow for additional work

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space outside the shop. 9.

Sloping flat truss above garage.

10. Ships ladder for access to attic storage space.

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11. Raised heel attic roof truss with floor above work shop.

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

N

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 0

5'


25 25

WEST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

0

5'


ROOF CONSTRUCTION: - PREFINISHED METAL ROOFING - ROOFING UNDERLAYMENT - 1/2" EXTERIOR GRADE PLYWOOD SHEATHING - PRE-ENGINEERED RAISED HEEL ATTIC TRUSS WITH FLOOR - 1 1/2" AIR SPACE IN CAVITY - ATTIC BAFFLE VENT IN CAVITY - MINERAL WOOL BATT INSULATION IN CAVITY - 1x3" WOOD STRAPPING - 1/2" PLYWOOD SHEATHING

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8' - 3"

LEVEL 1

4' - 0"

CEDAR SHAKE WALL CONSTRUCTION: - SCALLOPED CEDAR SHAKE - WATER RESISTIVE BARRIER - 1/2" WOOD SHEATHING - 2x6" WOOD STUDS @ 16" O.C. MAX. - 1/2" WOOD SHEATHING

ATTIC

THRU-WALL FLASHING LAPPING OVER ALUMINUM FLASHING BEHIND WALL WATER RESISTIVE BARRIER

0' - 4"

1' - 4" 3' - 1 1/4"

ALUMINUM FLASHING WHERE ROOF MEETS WALL T/O FOOTING

ALUMINUM DRIP EDGE UNDER ROOF UNDERLAYMENT

-6' - 4"

2x6" FASCIA BOARD W/ ALUMINUM FLASHING

EAST-WEST SECTION

ATTIC 8' - 3"

A

PREFINISHED VENTED ALUMINUM SOFFIT

9' - 7"

BRICK WALL CONSTRUCTION: - BRICK CLADDING - 1" AIR SPACE - WATER RESISTIVE BARRIER - 1/2" WOOD SHEATHING - 2x6" WOOD STUDS @ 16" O.C. MAX. - 1/2" WOOD SHEATHING

PROVIDE WEEP VENTS AT 16" O.C. MAX. POSITIVE SLOPE AWAY FROM BUILDING LEVEL 1 0' - 4"

10" CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL

LEVEL 1

LOWER LEVEL

0' - 4"

-2' - 8"

LOWER LEVEL -2' - 8" T/O FOOTING

T/O FOOTING

-6' - 4"

-6' - 4"

FLOOR CONSTRUCTION: - 5" CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE WITH WELDED WIRE MESH - 15 MIL. POLY VAPOUR BARRIER - COMPACTED GRANULAR

0' - 8"

ATTIC 8' - 3"

NORTH-SOUTH SECTION 0

5'

0

4'

Profile for nicoleregier

Nicole Regier - Masters of Architecture Portfolio  

Masters of Architecture Portfolio

Nicole Regier - Masters of Architecture Portfolio  

Masters of Architecture Portfolio

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