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Rachel Keeven Kyle Kutz Nicole Mater Mariah Trevizo

DDI STUDIO O design | detail | intent

DDI Studio is comprised of a set of University of Kansas architecture students in their third year of undergraduate study, mentored by architect Brad Satterwhite and industrial designer Chris Grill of KEM Studio. The hands-on studio focuses on the building of prototypes as a tool to refine design. We would like to thank Rick Mihevc, of Grace Construction, and Bruce Johnson for the donation of materials.

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Table of Contents

Site context

1

Program and Predesign

3

Proposal

5

Sequential Construction Process

23

Details & Materiality

25

Prototype

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The Field Station is a part of the University of Kansas dedicated to biological studies, but they are located several miles north of campus. There is very little connection between the two campuses. From the site, you can also see campus from an elevated position over the tree line. The proposal draws on and enhances this connection.

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The field station received a grant to expand their infrastructure by adding a small greenhouse that they could use for controlled experiments year round, a large glasshouse that would house experiments in the warmer months, and a multi-purpose building that would be used as a flexible space. The multipurpose building needed to function as a classroom, workshop, and event venue and have the flexibility to accommodate more if need be.

1 • Glasshouse 2 • Multi Purpose 3 • Greenhouse 3

3 2

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N

1


Prior to the introduction of this new facility, the approach to the site was one expansive view. Our scheme proposes blocking this view from the approach, and dramatically revealing it. Certain views will be blocked in order to create smaller, but more impactful, framed views. For example, the opening of the barn style doors at the entrance creates a framed view through the building and showcasing the magnificent landscape.

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1


The parti for the design creates a space on the south side that is embraced on either side by the building, so named the “hug.” Three pivoting doors open up the workspace into the patio area blurring the definition between outdoor and indoor space. This allows for natural ventilation for the workshop’s users, and it also creates a space for visiting groups that provides a connection to the prairie. The patio can become an outdoor classroom or an expansion to the multipurpose room for an event venue.

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1


The 1600 square foot multipurpose room is a space to gather, have fund raising events, host classes, and, on a daily basis, become a workshop. Large pivoting doors allow users to view the panoramic landscape. The room has a preparation area with three sinks and many storage cabinets. The walls are covered in peg board, which allows users to easily hang tools. It also gives them the opportunity to hang other items such as works of art for a rural studio or large documents for town meetings or other events.

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1


The tower allows for visitors to view the surrounding site and creates an important connection by establishing a visual line back to the University Campus. From the top of the tower, onlookers can view the outline of Frasier Hall, an iconic campus building that can be seen from miles away. At night, the view would be particularly impressive, because of the glowing lights of Lawrence and the halo-effect it creates. The tower also allows the Field Station to harvest wind energy and bring internet access to this rural part of town, possible sources of revenue for the Field Station to subsidize the cost of experiments.

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1


Large sliding doors allow large vehicles and other equipment to move through the building. The field station also does many experiments with mesocosms that are held in large tanks twelve feet in diameter and the doors allow these to be transported in and out of the building. To accommodate for pedestrian circulation and egress, there are also standard size doors and double doors. This plan allows one bay for preparation and three bays for work space. Each bay is about the size of a two-car garage.

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N


15


Glasshouse

Multipurpose Room

Greenhouse

Storm Shelter


The multi-pupose building is designed to expand to the south by opening large pivoting doors and essentially removing the south wall. From a warehouse aspect, this functions by allowing large vehicles and mesocosms to move throughout the space and by the entire space to become open air. It also becomes a feature to create an indooroutdoor setting for events and open up the patio to guests. It also showcases the framed view of the prairie landscape.

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N


Glasshouse

19


Glasshouse

Multipurpose Room

Greenhouse

Storm Shelter

Multi Purpose Space SCALE 1/16”=1’

Small Greenhouse


Glasshouse 21

Scale 1/4”=1’

Multi Purpose Space


Small Greenhouse

Polycarbonate Facade


Sequential Construction Process

The building is based on a clear bay system. Varco Pruden rigidframe structural elements have a thirty-five foot span and sit sixteen feet apart on concrete footings. By choosing the increment of sixteen feet, we are maximizing the use of materials, as most materials are manufactured in increments of four feet. The bay system also allows for the option of expansion in the future. The thermal and skin elements then are applied to the structure sequentially in a rapid process. The refined elements, such as the rain screen and custom doors can be crafted off site and attached to the building at a later stage.

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Materiality

All materials were chosen based on their performance and functionality and stay true to the agrarian aesthetic prescribed by the context. These materials are be easy to install in a modular fashion for faster construction.

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Corrugated metal acts like a rain screen and protects the membrane from sunlight while keeping out most moisture.

Reclaimed wood salvaged from telephone poles has been cut and planed to size.

Perm-A-Barrier (Grace Construction) polyethylene membrane ensures the longevity of the wall. It insulates and seals out most moisture, but also allows vapor to escape the wall. It is flexible and easy to install, but must not be extensively exposed to sunlight. Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) insulate the building with an R-value of 14 and are able to be installed quickly. SIPs are also capable of spanning the full distance between columns without further lateral support. We finished ours with peg board to accomodate the users needs.

A trench of river rocks controls water drainage around the building and allows water to percolate back into the water table.

The structure is a basic kit-ofparts component from Varco Pruden. Using industrially manufactured components saves money, since Varco Pruden is a local company this places less stress on the environment.

The concrete mixture is made from a mix of cement and flyash, a biproduct of coal production.


Rain Screen The rain screen works by shading the UV sensitive vapor barrier from the sun and keeping most direct water away from the vapor barrier and the walls of the building. Aesthetically, it emulates other architectural installations on the premises, such as the Trailhead and gate, constructed and designed by other University of Kansas architecture students. The wood used in the rain screen has been recycled by planing down telephone poles into slats and purlins. The Field Station already has access to the telephone poles thereby conserving the budget. The finely handcrafted process creates a beautiful detail in the building and elevates the aesthetic.

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E


Peg Board Peg board was chosen for its functionality within the warehouse, to make organization and storage easier. It also allows the walls to breathe more easily, in the case that any moisture vapor needs to escape and is more durable than gypsum board. Installed with precisely placed, exposed fasteners, it accentuates the modularity of the design and also recalls the modularity of the Field Station’s experiments on the site.

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Corrugated Metal Galvanized corrugated metal is durable and affordable. In this design, it also functions as a rain screen. It is installed in the same manner as the wood rain screen, with exposed hex-head fasteners.

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E


Vapor Barrier Two separate vapor barriers were chosen for this process. On the vertical surfaces, Perm-A-Barrier controls moisture by being semipermeable. It seals out moisture from the outside, but allows vapors to escape. It is applied in a two-part system, with a primer and a self-adhering fabric. After it has been applied, any seams or punctures from fasteners are sealed. The roof is covered with Ice and Water Shield, a nonpermeable asphalt based product that seals out all moisture. Ice and Water shield works best on horizontal surfaces and will keep the roof from leaking. It is adhered with self-adhesive backing. Many thanks to Grace Construction for the donation of materials.

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River Rocks A bed of rocks at the base of each of the walls ensures that water runoff will percolate back into the water table and helps the perimeter resist puddling. It prevents costly plumbing drainage systems from being installed. It also benefits the water table by helping to filter out contaminants, like fertilizers, making the site more sustainable. It grounds the building in to the landscape, creating a connection from ground to building in a clean, minimal aesthetic.


Prototype By building a prototype wall section of the building, we were able to gain further understanding of how the elements of the walls work and how the construction process can be made easier. The process of constructing the mock-up allowed us to make our design intent clearer and to maximize the effectiveness of our materials.

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Self-tapping galvanized #10 Hex head screws Galvanized corrugated metal, 1/4” depth Metal Purlins, 18 gauge steel, 4”X2.5” 1.5” X 1.5” pine slats Self -piloting galvanized #14 Hex head screws W8 X 8 X 31 1.5” X 1.5” pine purlins

Self-piloting galvanized #14 Hex head screws

Ice and Water Sheild 4” Structurally Insulated Panel (SIP) 5/8” Gypsum board

Concrete footing

Perm-A-Barrier

3/8” Peg Board backed with 1X2 frames

Thermal break Water-filtering river rocks

Concrete knee wall

Concrete footing Control break Concrete slab, 4” thick


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University of Kansas Field Station-Design & Prototype