Page 1

ROUTE FIVE FASHION

l

LIFESTYLE l ARTWORK l SUSTAINABILITY

VOLUME ONE


ROUTE FIVE is an outdoor lifestyle, creative, and sustainable living

magazine that explores the stories of individuals and their motivation behind their inspirational lifestyles. We cover a diverse selection of subjects’ rich in exploration, creativity, innovation and discovery. We aim to serve as a source of inspiration for those who pursue an adventurous and active lifestyle, by revitalizing a positive-thinking, confident and optimistic mindset.


The Editor MORGAN ZASLAVSKY

We created Route Five to remind people to get up, get out of their towns and see what is happening in the rest of the world. See what different people there are and different types of personalities that are spread out through society. We want people to remember that there are incredible people and so many incredible places in the world and we should always be expanding our horizons. Growing up in a Russian Jewish home, I was exposed to different types of cultures early on. It is so interesting to be raised in a Russian family while going to an American school and living in a Westernized world. I am a strong believer in keeping an open mind and constantly learning about different cultures and different societies throughout. The outdoors has always been an escape for me. When things went south or my mood just needed to be boosted, I would go outside and either relax on my hammock, hike, and much more. I grew up in a suburban town outside of Kansas City where there wasn’t much exposure to nature. I would spend weekends driving an hour

towards the middle of nowhere with my dad to go spend time on the land that he owned. We would spend this time shooting guns, fishing in a small creek, riding around on four wheelers, and pretending that we had no responsibilities. I feel as we all grow up, making sure to spend time outside has gone lower on our to do lists. We have so many priorities and responsibilities and forget the importance of exploration. The world around is so large, and we forget about that when we are put inside of our small bubbles. We forget that humans were put on this earth to explore. While reading Route Five, I hope your desire to explore, learn and grow expands and pushes you to plan your next trip, talk to the person sitting next to you on a train, bus, airplane, etc. We must always remember, everyone is different. Everyone’s talents and flaws are different. The human race was not created the same for good reason. Everyone contributes their part to society and not one person holds more or less value to the world than another.


EDITOR IN CHIEF MORGAN ZASLAVSKY ART DIRECTOR GILLIAN WARE CREATIVE DIRECTOR NICOLE LEUNG PRODUCER MARIA SANTAMARIA EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ASHLEY HIMPEL GUEST CONTRIBUTORS YMKE FRANSSEN, WILL LEATHERMAN, MACKENZIE SCHAEFFER, GRANT KELLY, MICHAELA MAGNANI, MICHELLE MORIN, RACHEL ANDERT, EDUARDO JIMENEZ, HYATT MAMOUN, REED WATKINS, HARRY WERNER, GRACE MILLAR, PAOLA MALDONADO, CAROLINE BAILEY, GRACE ROKELA ALAINA AYLWARD PUBLISHING PARTNER

PRINTED IN SAVANNAH, GA ISSN: 2053-4498 WWW.ROUTEFIVE.COM CONTACT US HELLO@ROUTEFIVE.COM DISTRIBUTION STOCKIST@ROUTEFIVE.COM ADVERTISING ADVERTISE@ROUTEFIVE.COM C Route 5. All rights reserved. Content may not be reproduced or copies without permission. Views and opinions expressed by authors may not reflect those of the publisher or the editorial team. Although information presented in Route 5 is, to the best of our knowledge, accurate and credible, authors may not be experts in the respective subject matter.


CONTENTS Route Five consists of different editorials, interviews and articles. Each which open up your creative mind and look into different types of lifestyles.The main focus of this magazine is to show fashion, lifestyle, artwork and sustainability. Understand that our articles are written from the writers point of view.

6 SEA COMPASS THROUGH THE DUNES

10 THE JOURNEY QUEENSTOWN, NZ

12 LOST IN THE PALMS A WANDERER

14 ARTWORK BY ALAINA AYLWARD

16 ADVENTURE SEEKER LANDROVER EDITION

20 THE WYLD WHERE YOU COME TO EAT

24 GRAPHIC DESIGN BY HARRY WERNER

26 ORGANIC BEAUTY SUSTAINABLE MAKEUP

28 OFF THE GRID HUNTING GROUNDS

34 GRAPHIC DESIGN BY GRACE MILLAR

36 OUTER YOGI FINDING INNER PEACE

34 ARTWORK BY MICHELLE MORIN

42 SINGLE STEP INTO THE WOODS

48 EXPLORE ON A BOARD SURFING THE WAVES

52 ARTWORK BY ALAINA AYLWARD

54 DREAM WEAVER THE BUILDING OF A KAYAK

60 BATTLEGROUND FORT PULASKI

68 WITH A SINGLE THREAD THE FIBERS MAJOR

72 THE JOURNEY LOST IN THE WILD

ROUTE FIVE VOLUME ONE


HAPPY CAMPERS The Route Five family welcomes you to our little world Journeys are far more than just the destination. Through the people and topics that we feature, our aim is to inspire and encourage our readers to actively explore their own aspirations. Route Five is comprised of a mix of ideas-based articles, features, people pieces and photo essays. There are themes of outdoor culture, sustainability and responsible practice throughout our publication. The magazine is divided into focused sections, with each section’s topic explored from different perspectives. We want to create a well-designed publication that you could slot into your bookcase, sit on the coffee table or be slung into a backpack. In our featured sections, we discover how nature can guide us on our way, and how by following the wisdom of great navigators past and present, we can augment our outdoor experiences by using nature’s cues and compass. We cover a wide range of adventures and encourage you to join us in embarking upon an epic journey, to gain insight on the motives and experiences of innovators and explorers. We talked to multiple artists who have a strong passion for their art and how it changed their lives in an extraordinary way. Whether these travelers are on the road, or making art inspired by nature, these innovators are learning about self-sufficient living and making positive changes to their lives. Route Five is about discovering new adventures and having an optimistic, forward thinking attitude. After all, life isn’t just about staying in one place. Open your mind and set yourself free.


7

SEA COMPASS THROUGH THE DUNES

TYBEE ISLAND, GA


10


The Journey WORDS MARIA SANTAMARIA

PHOTOGRAPHY DANNY ZASLAVSKY

THERE IS SO MUCH WORLD AROUND YOU THAT YOU HAVE NOT SEEN. SO WHATS STOPPING YOU?

This brings us to travel: wild travel. We want an open space. Travel as a type of escape, a chance to get back to nature. We want remote travel and remote spots. It’s nothing unexpected that exotic, not mainstream destinations are ending up being truly alluring getaways like Queenstown, New Zealand, for instance, offers finish inundation in the components. This is wild in each and every sense. Bounded by the soaring indigo heights of the Remarkables and bordered by the twisting coves of Lake Wakatipu, Queenstown is a must see. Looking like a small town, but displaying the energy of a city, it really is a ‘Global Adventure Capital’ as everyone says proudly, and the majority of tourists that come visit take the time to do crazy and intrepid things that they’ve never done before. Is very weird to hear someone saying ‘I’m bored’ when visiting Queenstown. At some point it was only a place known to be visited on winter for the amazing slopes and mountains, for skiing and snowboard. The exquisite scenery will seize any adventure´s the appetite for adventure. Every year from early June forward, the region transforms into a winter wonderland, attracting sports enthusiasts from around the world with its lakes and alpine scenery. Even though Queenstown is still known for spending the winter holidays is now also visited to experience a wild destination retreat.

THE JOURNEY QUEENSTOWN, NZ

Queenstown also has a cosmopolitan side with arts scene, and excellent vineyards. Go on and jump off a bridge or out of a plane the options are endless but also take your to enjoy and experience Queenstown without the adrenaline. My advice for anyone who visits is to find a bench next to a lake at dusk and submerge in one of New Zealand’s most beautiful views. If you’re a pacific person, explore the beautiful wilderness further up the lake at Glenorchy. A rustic town, 45 minutes from Queenstown. It´s spectacular landscapes have become a major location for films, many scenes from The Lord of the Rings trilogy as well as the Narnia movies were filmed here. This is true paradise lies it provides a soul cleanse because the old fashioned air will provide a peaceful therapy. Some say the land was blessed for its natural charms. People are still trying to figure out were the name of this beautiful place came from, but the one thing is for sure; its breathtaking beauty of this land. So when you get the chance to visit Queensland wrap up warmly and explore the region’s spectacular views by foot or by bicycle in their many trails. The Queenstown Trail provides 110km of walking and cycling trails which link popular scenic spots so it will be impossible to miss the beautiful. If you want a relaxing experience you will find it and if you want to be intrepid and reckless you will find it at Queenstown too.

11


12

LOST IN THE PALMS A WANDERER

TYBEE ISLAND, GA


11


15

ARTWORK ALAINA AYLWARD


Adventure Seeker INTERVIEWER HYATT MAMOUN

PHOTOGRAPHER YMKE FRANSSEN

Hyatt Mamoun is a junior at the Savannah College of Art and Design, studying wildlife documentary. We talked to her about what has inspired her the most about pursuing her career in film, and how her Land Rover has helped her made it all happen. 16 I have always been into Wildlife since I was extremely little. I remember coming home from school and watching the Crocodile Hunter and wanting to be just like him. I was lucky enough to have this passion for art and science for as long as I can remember, and documentary film allows me to explore both. I decided to come to SCAD because I found out they had an Ecological Documentary film class, and it was the only undergraduate Wildlife film class in the nation, so I knew I had to go. Being here at SCAD helped me realize that my dreams are 100% valid. Recently, I won the Student Emmy for short form non-fiction

film, with my film about dolphin feeding habits called “The Strand”.

expressing yourself. It truly embodies the spirit of adventure.

And now, I am continuing my adventures by traveling to Colorado to film wild horses (I’m actually writing this from the plane now!). My life is nonstop Wildlife filmmaking, it’s really a lifestyle; wearing the “Steve Irwin” boots and driving the Land Rover, I really live the classic Wild-life!

In 2003, it went on a world expedition race with 24 other vehicles that traveled the old Land Rover expedition routes in South America, Australia and finally ending in Utah. I never thought in my life that I would ever get that car; it’s more me than any car could ever be! It also is extremely helpful when it comes to the Wildlife Filmmaking- it’s the perfect production car, with Land Rover’s highest end off-road equipment, mud, rock, snow and dirt trails are a breeze. Well, my plane is at the Jet way and we have to collect all the camera gear and get going to document these horses!

I feel like by doing this, I am saving the old fashioned style documentaries that David Attenborough made, because that style is dying, and I want to keep it alive and well. My G4 Challenge Land Rover Discovery really embodies my work, and I believe that a car is another form of


17

ADVENTURE SEEKER LANDROVER EDITION

PHOTOGRAPHY YMKE FRANSSEN


18


19

ADVENTURE SEEKER LANDROVER EDITION

PHOTOGRAPHY YMKE FRANSSEN


20

Our connection with the environment is our first level of experience, and one of the most impacting. Surrounding ourselves in clean and happy environments creates a deeper connection to nature, and a positive impact to our existence. Located at 2740 Livingstone Ave Savannah, Georgia, right in front of the Wilmington river, The Wyld Dock Bar offers a sensational experience connecting us with nature, while enjoying local seafood, backed by craft cocktails, and global wine and beer. It is where rustic meets elegance. Coowners Brad Syfan and Executive Chef Tony Seichrist have taken contemporary American cuisine back to its roots since they opened in April 2015. Being so close to the water and marine life has major benefits for the restaurant. The dock is a unique feature that allows customers to “dock and dine�. During the warmer months, locals visit the restaurant frequently by kayak, boat, or car. The courtyard offers recreational games and areas to lounge with a group or to enjoy the scenery solo.

THE WYLD WHERE YOU COME TO EAT

SAVANNAH, GA


23

THE WYLD WHERE YOU COME TO EAT

SAVANNAH, GA


26

ORGANIC BEAUTY SUSTAINABLE MAKEUP


Organic Beauty WORDS ASHLEY HIMPEL Going green these days has become less of an eco-friendly sacrifice and more of a new beauty trend. Organic beauty collections are showing up all over the place, from high end makeup stores, to the local drugstores. So when it comes to your skin, there are several reasons why organic beauty products are the way to go. After all, no makeup is the new makeup look.

So what exactly does “Organic” mean? It means using skin products made of plant delivered ingredients along with some other naturally occurring ingredients. These ingredients are grown without the use of pesticides, herbicides, synthetic fertilizers, GMO, and so on. They often come with an organic certification as well. People with sensitive skin often find that organic products are much gentler than traditional products. When you are searching for organic skin care products, look for items that contain the highest amount of natural ingredients. Organic ingredients are grown without synthetic fertilizers or pesticides, which is much healthier for the planet and healthier for our bodies. However, these products can get a tad expensive if you want top notch results, so there is nothing wrong with making your own skin care treatments that will give you the same satisfaction with all natural ingredients in the process. The best way to spend the least amount of money and still feel healthy and revitalized is a good diet and exercise. These should play vital roles in your

skincare regimen. Besides working up a good sweat to keep nutrients circulating throughout the body, be sure to feed yourself plenty of protein and healthy fats, along with complex carbohydrates and fruit. Drinking six to eight glasses of water is also the best way to flush out toxins that might otherwise show up on your skin. So when you are doing your makeup routine in the morning, keep it simple. All you need is a basic cleanser, toner, moisturizer (with SPF of course) to keep your skin glowing and fresh that will last all day. There is nothing wrong with embracing your natural beauty and only using a few products for enhancing. Instead of using a cakey foundation, BB cream works just as well and is much lighter on the face. Adding a touch of concealer under the eyes, mascara and little bit of blush on the apples of your cheeks can go a long way. Sales of organic personal care items reached $350 million last year, an increase of $68 million over 2005, according to manufacturers’ data compiled by the

Organic Trade Association, an industry group. We’re constantly seeing an increased consciousness that what you put on your body is just as important as what goes in your body. Using plant based cosmetics have proven to be safer, healthier and more effective for people. However, just because an ingredient comes from a plant does not necessarily make it safe to use in a cosmetic. So how do you know if a makeup or skin product is actually organic and safe to use? Cosmetics are eligible to be considered organic if they contain at least 95 percent of certified organic ingredients that are agricultural products made from livestock or cops, grown and processed without chemicals, fertilizers, pesticides, growth hormones and antibiotics. If you are still feeling unsure about any of the products you are interested in, ask your dermatologist to further assist you. Don’t be afraid to let your natural beauty shine through and use products that not only make you look great, but feel great from the inside out.

27


30

OFF THE GRID HUNTING GROUNDS

SOUTH CAROLINA


31

PHOTOGRAPHY YMKE FRANSSEN


33

There is something so unique and exciting about going somewhere you’re not supposed to go. These hunting grounds are prohibited to the public, which is unfortunate considering the beauty of the land and water that live here.

OFF THE GRID HUNTING GROUNDS

SOUTH CAROLINA


35

ARTWORK GRACE MILLAR


36


The Outer Yogi WORDS GILLIAN WARE

Exercise is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle, contributing to longevity and quality of life. A well-rounded fitness program includes aerobic, strength, core, balance and flexibility training. Yoga, along with cardiovascular and strength training fit in all of these components, as well as reduce stress. Yoga is included in the official exercise recommendations of major health organizations, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as a way to improve strength. Regular yoga practice correlates with reduced anxiety, and stress may provide relief from the symptoms of arthritis, asthma, depression, diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease and irritable bowel syndrome. A study published in the November 2011 issue of the “Archives of Internal Medicine” found that adults with chronic low back pain who participated in a 12- week yoga

program experienced greater relief and improvement in function than those who participated in more traditional medical forms of care for up to 12 months. Many yoga poses, especially the warrior pose, plank pose and boat pose, also help tone the muscles of the trunk – the hips, abdominals and lower back. These muscles contribute to balance and improve back function. One of the key aspects of a yoga practice is flexibility. Flexibility training keeps your joints, ligaments, tendons and muscles supple. Yoga poses help increase lung capacity because they stretch out the area around the shoulders, back and ribs providing more room for chest and lung expansion. Linking breath and movement, provides an aerobic component, and standing or arm balancing poses build strength. As yoga has become an increasingly

integral part of 21st century life, scientists have armed new tools that allow them to look deeper into the body and have been turning their attention to what happens physiologically when we practice yoga along with meditation. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin have shown that meditation increases the activity of the left prefrontal cortex – the area of the brain that’s associated with positive moods, equanimity, and emotional resilience. In other words, meditating regularly may help you with life’s ups and downs with greater ease and feel happier in your daily life. Yoga and meditation have positive effects on our mental and physical health and may help prevent and assist in the treatment of a number of common ailments that jeopardize our vitality and shorten our lives. It would be incredibly beneficial for everyone to give yoga a try and begin to stretch those muscles.

37


“My creative process is all about flow. The way you work shapes your piece and in my work I want to show the movement and the emotion of what I'm feeling when I paint. It’s pure expression of my soul. I’m so inspired by the world around us and draw inspiration from my experience, nature, and my yoga practice” -Michelle Morin


42

This beautiful place is 35 minutes away from historic Savannah; this park borders Skidaway narrows, a part of Georgia’s waterway. The trails will get you to incredible sites where you can explore and disconnect from the world. You can feel the maritime wind

through forest and relax each step you take. Past the salt marsh there is a boardwalk and observation tower were visitors can enjoy the landscape and for deer, fiddler crabs, raccoons, egrets and other wildlife. This scenic campground is nestled under exquisite live oak and Spanish moss, which surrounds

almost every area. This park is well liked because it is great for staying during the day and perfect for a camping trip. You can fully immerse in the nature while walking and biking, which is really popular. Bird watching is therapeutically you can discover different species also you can find owls and foxes in the park.


43

SINGLE STEP INTO THE WOODS

SKIDAWAY ISLAND


Explore on a Board 48

WORDS MORGAN ZASLAVSKY Ymke Franssen, a 21 year old college student doesn’t have the time to focus strictly on school when one thing is constantly flowing through her mind, surfing. When speaking with Franssen, you could hear the passion in her voice about the sport. She has taken part in many different surf events from Surfers for Autism to attending many Surf Expo’s. She is constantly trying to better herself as a surfer and getting as much beach time as possible. Not a bad lifestyle to live.


37


WHAT GOT YOU INTERESTED IN SURFING? I’ve always been a “water rat” as my mum liked to call me. When I was younger it was impossible to get me out of the swimming pool, even at very low temperatures in the Netherlands. My parents grew up windsurfing and sailing, so growing up I was always on boats, and by the age of 8 I was sailing together with my dad. In Dubai I started sailing on my own, and continued that for a few years until we moved to Texas, where there was not much ocean culture. We were on vacation in South Padre Island, I saw a surf shop, we rented out a board and I was instantly hooked. Not long after we moved to Florida where there's not much surf, but there was on good days plenty to get started. From there it only grew.

ARE YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY ALSO INVOLVED IN SURFING? My family doesn’t surf the way I do, just with a board and waves, but my parents windsurfed when they were younger, and now paddle board, and my older brother picked up kitesurfing after I started surfing, so we are somewhat of a board family! It's also easy to make friends in the water, and even out of the water if you share a connection with the ocean. Its always nice to go surfing with other people, both to keep you company, share road trips with and for safety reasons, so a lot of my friends do surf, yes.

50

WHERE ARE THE BEST PLACES YOU’VE GONE SURFING? I haven’t taken many big surf trips, but the first one I really took was to Puerto Rico with a bunch of friends who were also studying at scad. We rented a house and a car, and scavenged the island for waves for the entirety of spring break. The water was beautiful and the waves were super fun. I also spent a summer in Zarautz, Spain, as a surf photographer. It was in a bay area, so the water was very calm, with big sets rolling in on certain days. Also very clear, just no sea life.

ARE THERE ANY INTERESTING PEOPLE YOU’VE MET THROUGH YOUR EXPERIENCES? Oh definitely. I meet people almost every time I am out in the water. The surf community is such a family based group of people. Being a girl in the water with a big camera in an underwater housing also kind of grabs some peoples attention, so I always have fun conversations in the water, and the best part is that I often follow up with them to pass photos along. In the water you meet people from everywhere, and people with lots of travel stories. Those are the best!

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR GREATEST SURFING ACHIEVEMENT? Not so much surfing itself, but through my surf photos I have been put into contact with Richard Graham, founder of SURFING Magazine. He loved my work and now we are working together on a book of women surfing. It's an honor to have such a legend appreciate your work, and talk to one of the originators of the surf culture.

TELL ME ABOUT YOUR SUMMER INTERNSHIP Well, I don’t have one yet, but I am working on that book this summer, and together with sharkbanz, a company that creates bands that without harming the sharks, deters them from you using a powerful magnet. I’m working on creating their imagery for all sorts of fun stuff.

HOW HAS SURFING CHANGED YOUR LIFE? Its made me be more open to different activities. Surfing is an extreme sport, and it has opened a whole world of other extreme sports for me. Its made me more relaxed, and understanding of the waters and an all around more compassionate person.

IS THERE ANYTHING YOU HOPE TO ACHIEVE OUT OF SURFING? Surfing is very much about finding peace. It's a sort of meditation that almost every surfer can agree with. I’m not looking to be competitive, but just to be able to connect with nature on what feels like a very personal level. I myself don’t spend too much time on a board anymore, since I am swimming and photographing a lot more these days. But every now and then I want to be even less connected with technology (my camera) so I grab a board myself and its almost like a fresh start once I get out of the water. I’d love to continue shooting and traveling the world though.

PHOTOGRAPHY YMKE FRANSSEN


51

EXPLORE ON A BOARD SURFING THE WAVES

ZARAUTZ, SPAIN


Dream Weaver CREATED BY JACOB KLEINMAN PHILLIPS AND CLAUDIA MIRANDA MONTEALEGRE Both SCAD Industrial design students, Claudia Miranda Montealegre, from Caracas, Venezuela, and Jacob Kleinman Phillips, from Philadelphia, PA, took part on the creation of a 2’x17’x1’ kayak with a 7.1’x8” paddle this past summer. We got the chance to talk to Claudia and she shared their experience with us.

DREAM WEAVER THE BUILDING OF A KAYAK


“There is a quality about a finely crafted wooden kayak and matching paddle that seems rather inexpressible. This kayak was completely handcrafted using the traditional method of strip-built construction while integrating the highest quality of materials. Strips of Red Western Cedar, Padouk, Wenge, Curly Maple, and Zebra Wood are joined together by hand and encapsulated in fiberglass bonded in place with epoxy resin then coated with marine varnish. A well-built strip kayak is the ultimate union of form and function in a watercraft that is as useful and durable as it is appealing. The details on the kayak include flush mounted hatches in the front and rear which allow for easy access to the separate compartments, along with an adjustable seat and foot pedals for comfort. The kayak and the paddle result of a clear design language developed during the preliminary stages of the construction process. When not paddling, the Dream Weaver is a striking addition to any lodge or great room.” It all started in an elective course during the Summer of

2016, where Claudia and Jacob would learn how to build a kayak. Initially, the class as a whole created a kayak using strip-built construction techniques based on an offered kit. This process lasted 2 weeks, and by week 3, they had to start designing their own personal kayak. At first, there were only 8 students in the class; two dropped out by the third week. The class was divided into groups of two and that’s how Claudia’s and Jacob’s kayak story begins. Claudia and Jacob met each other back in their freshman year and had previously taken other classes together. For this occasion, they both agreed to register for the course and partner up for the final project, which main objective was to deliver their own kayak. It seemed that the class couldn’t handle the team work, and by week 4, everyone left their group and decided to work on their own, Claudia and Jacob were the only excpetion. She says what she found that the most difficult part of the creation process was the actual building of the kayak. It was a learning process, not only working with new tools and

55

PHOTOGRAPHY EMILY GALVIN, NATALIA SERRANO


56

materials but also the change in scale. "Moreover, there were many factors that were rather difficult to plan for; scheduling was most certainly one of them. It’s really hard to account for the amount of hours it will take to fix a mistake on a 17ft structure.” Claudia goes on to say that boat building is not an easy task. It requires a sound knowledge and understanding of construction methods, materials, application, geometry and boat engineering. And learning such skills in a short period of 10 weeks, with 2 other classes, and a job, is not easy to accomplish. As she expressed her difficulties in the process of creating the kayak and how she had to quit her job in order to focus on her courses, she also expressed how gratifying the whole experience was for both of them. “The building would close at midnight every day because it all took place over summer. We decided to make the entire kayak at Jake’s house since he has a working shop at his house. Unfortunately, his shop wasn’t big enough to place the kayak so we had to take over his living room. We covered the entire room with plastic, from top to bottom, and once that was done we moved the kayak inside Jake’s house. Moving our work to Jake’s house helped us focus 24/7 on the kayak", Claudia states. For 6 weeks that’s all we did. We polished the wood and worked on putting everything together. Our routine would consist on working as much as we could for how long as we could. Jake had an internship with Design More creating furniture, so he would work all day doing furniture and all night on the kayak. We would even stay up working past 3 in the morning. Whenever we had time, one would cook while the other stayed working and so on. I had to move to the house next door in order to keep the flow of the work

DREAM WEAVER THE BUILDING OF A KAYAK

consistent. Jacob expressed that the entire process itself is so gratifying because you can see it building itself up. You see your entire vision being created and all the hard work put into it. "There was a lot of trail error because at the end of the day, it was the first kayak we ever built. Our professors would come to the house twice a week to see the progress of our work and at the end of the course, we were the only kayak that was completed." "In the end, I think that what made everything successful was that we worked together and stuck to each other. We spent over US $4,000 in materials. It was quite a process but I did learn a lot through this experience. There was a lot of frustration involved and the fact that we were both new to the concept of building an entire kayak made it harder, but I wouldn’t change anything. Of course, working as a team had its difficulties, but those were greatly overshadowed by the perks of counting on someone to discuss your design decisions and help you move 20ft pieces of wood around Savannah. Besides, time was certainly a constraint, and if we had not work together, none of the details, nor the paddle, could have been achieved." "I honestly didn’t think we would finish on time. We were actually the last ones to start the design process. We spent an entire week designing and sketching our ideas while others started their kayaks. We wanted everything to be perfect and create something that we both completely loved", Claudia expresses. Claudia and Jacob both agreed that the beauty of creating a project like this from scratch lies in the creative process. One of the coolest parts of the process was deciding on every single aspect of the design as a team. In doing so, we learned that the creative process has no timeline. As much as thereare deadlines that you need to be achieved… it’s very hard to rush the design process.”


57

PHOTOGRAPHY EMILY GALVIN, NATALIA SERRANO


“We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender” - Winston Churchill

BATTLEGROUND FORT PULASKI

PHOTOGRAPHY WILL LEATHERMAN


Battleground WORDS GILLIAN WARE Fort Pulaski is located on Cockspur island between Savannah and Tybee Island, Georgia. In 1862, the American Civil War, where rifled cannon was successfully tested by the Union Army for combat, the success of which rendered brick fortifications obsolete. The fort was also used as a prisoner-of-war camp. U.S. President James Madison, following the War of 1812, ordered a new system of coastal fortifications to protect the United States against foreign invasion. In 1829, the construction of the fort began to protect the port of Savannah. They named it Fort Pulaski in honor of Kazimierz Pulaski, a Polish soldier and military commander who fought in the American Revolution under the command of George Washington. He played a large role in training Revolutionary troops, and was a noted cavalryman, and took part in the sieges of Savannah and Charleston. To support an estimated of 25,000,000 bricks, there

were wooden pilings that were sunk up to 70 feet into the mud. It took eighteen years of construction, and was finished in 1847. Walls were eleven feet thick, thought to be impenetrable except by only the largest land artillery- which at the time were smooth bore cannon. These cannons had a range of only around a half mile, and the nearest land (Tybee island) was much further away than that. It was assumed that the Fort would be invincible to enemy attack. We were absolutely isolated beyond any possibility of help from the Confederate authorities. Between 1869 and 1872 the demilune to the rear of the Fort was covered with powder magazines and the few gun positions left were enlarged for heavier guns. The fort began to fall into disrepair in the 20th Century, and it was declared a National Monument on October 15th, 1924 in effort to save the old fort. At the beginning of World War II, it was opened to the public only for a short time. It was a section base for the U.S. Navy. Fort Pulaski remained public after and opened a museum in the 1980s.

63


With a Single Thread INTERVIEWER PAOLA MALDONADO

WORDS NICOLE LEUNG

We spoke with Paola Maldonado about her passion for fibers and how her cultire has shaped her to pursue her career and has served as insiration throughout her pieces. Paola shares insight into her personal journet in fibers and how she created her pieces. TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF I am 21 years old, I was born in Ecuador and I’m currently in my third year here at SCAD, majoring in Fibers. I initially entered SCAD perusing a graphic design major and when I got here a friend talked to me about the Fibers department. I decided to go and give it a look and saw all their work. It was the weaving, the looms, and I fell in love with everything they had to offer. Since then, I applied for fibers right after my first year when I was done with my general electives. At first I was kind of scared, but then little by little with each class I took, I noticed how I was actually enjoying and liking it. I actually didn’t know if I wanted to study fibers but then, as I started getting into the classes I realized how it has been with me all my life.

68

HOW IS THAT? Since I’m from Quito, Ecuador, I’ve always loved going to the market and seeing all these women back home doing Ecuadorian traditional weaving and how they always seemed to be so fascinated by their work. It was their colors, their use of natural dyes and how they did all the traditional weaving process, but I never knew that I actually wanted to do this. It was always like “I would appreciate their art and buy their ponchos and their blankets”, and my mom would always be like “why are you buying this?” [Laughing]. I was always so interested in textiles without even knowing it. WHY DID YOU CHOOSE SCAD? I came to SCAD and they talked to me about this career. I always loved art and design but it was always super abstract so I never knew what exactly I wanted to focused on. It was always like “what can I do with this?” and I loved color, and they told me about architecture and all the different majors. I simply said “no, it has to be something that involves color and working with my hands.” I always loved working with my hands. I remember my mom would constantly put me into all these workshops from wood, to painting, to sewing. She would always be like “Wow you are pretty interested in this”, but I would never have thought about it as something that I would actually get to do as my career. In Ecuador you are surrounded by beautiful landscapes that I’ve always been in love with. I’ve grown up taking photographs of nature, and animals, so slowly I’ve been realizing the influence I’ve had of my country and all my childhood in my work so all my work is very inspired by nature. INSPIRED BY NATURE? Yes, in color and a lot in terms of materials. Many of the material I like working with are natural, I don’t like working with any artificial materials.

SO YOU WOULD SAY YOUR CULTURE HAS INFLUENCED YOUR ENTIRE WORK PROCESS? Yes, I would say my culture has influenced a lot of my work in terms of the materials I use. Back home there are so many natural resources, producing our own leather, creating our own wool; there are all this primary resources that we export. AND YOUR CULTURE IS FULL OF COLORFUL ARTISAN WORK THAT MUST BRING A GREAT MIX OD IDEAS TO YOUR PIECES, CORRECT? Yes, the artisan work is amazing; it’s something that has been a tradition in Ecuador for so long. That’s what I love about weaving; it’s something that is timeless. Because despite the technology advancement, all this art that is going digital. I feel like weaving is something that has maintained itself timeless. You still have to do the work; a computer can’t do it for you. And even though there is digital weaving, you still need to design it, you still need to do this manual little details, like putting in the threads etc. Right now I’m taking digital adobe weaving and even though you still have to put the pattern in the computer, you still control it. You create it and you control how you design it and what you put to it. It’s amazing because people still buy weaves and people are still interested in tapestry and traditional artisan work. It has always interested me how it has stayed around, and despite me learning it now I feel like it will never really leave, because people still go back to the primary artwork or craftwork. So yes, I would say that all of my culture’s artisan work has influenced me in what I do. The appreciation I have for their colorful textiles, and what mainly influenced me the most is going back home and go through hikes. That inspired me in such a way, like unconsciously I feel like when I’m weaving. I bring a lot of textures from nature to my designs that I take from tree trunks and pattern from nature. Most importantly, I would say I love keeping it natural and making sure everything seems and looks organic. FOR YOUR FUTURE PIECES, DO YOU WANT TO EXPLORE MORE IN SUSTAINABILITY? I would love to explore more on sustainability. I love recycling. For example, whenever I have a piece of leather or fabric left, I like to keep it because I know in weaving you can work with anything. I think that’s an advantage when working in this type of field because you can make art with things people consider trash. I have this box in my house full of sticks that I collect when I’m walking around that I feel like would look super cool on a wallhanging, tapestry, or incorporated in my weavings. So instead of buying more, it’s more about using what you already have. In the future I would love to reach out to companies that have all


70

WITH A SINGLE THREAD THE FIBERS MAJOR


these left over materials because I don’t really need to buy new materials to create my pieces. That doesn’t mean I’m planning on doing everything recycled, but a majority yes. Because apart from reusing materials, I love using raw materials like in their natural state. For example, in wool I prefer using 100% wool more than processed or blended with acrylic or any other material. WHO WOULD YOU CONSIDER HAS INFLUENCED YOU THE MOST IN YOUR WORK? I would say my mom and my grandmother because ever since I can remember my grandmother has been super crafty and she has always embroidered and would always knit me sweaters. So she is what you would consider a very traditional grandmother. She was born in Germany and then moved to Ecuador and was left fascinated by Ecuadorian culture. She loves knitting and making cookies, a very traditional grandmother. CAN YOU TELL US ANY HIKING STORY THAT HAS INFLUENCED YOU ARTISTICALLY? I was in a hiking program around 2013-2014, sort of a hiking camp that was throughout the year, where you start training at the lowest peak and then ascending every weekend to higher mountains. The Ecuadorian Andes mountain chains offers a variety of heights and the purpose of the program is to start at the lowest mountain, making your way to the highest, building up your physical strength. But its more about the process and the people you get to meet throughout the program. While you hike you get to see all these people who live in the mountains, and that haven’t moved to the city and haven’t been influenced by the city life, keeping their lives in the mountain with the minimum. Part of the program is making road trips where you visit many towns as you hike and get to stay the night and then keep making your way up. So in this process, an example would be in the town of Otavalo which is known for its market and for all their production of textiles. There are a lot of alpacas, and when I’m back home I bring a lot of wool from alpacas. Otavalo is one of its greatest producers back home and like back in Quito where I live, I wouldn’t be able to find raw wool. At Otavalo is where they produce it and export it. So to get there, you come across these little towns that have a certain way of living that you don’t get to see staying in the city. I feel like these kind of hikes has connected me more with my culture and the nature around me. It makes you appreciate all the things that you have and make you more intrigued in internally exploring your country, because I feel like we are not curious enough about our own countries. We are so eager to go to other places without realizing that there are tons of people that come to Ecuador with the purpose of hiking and tourist around, and we are not really intrigued in exploring our own country. So I feel like this program helped me a lot in terms of that. Making me appreciate the real side of Ecuador, like the social circle that we found ourselves into doesn’t really portray the true Ecuadorian culture, but when you get to go away from the urban life and get to see the small towns, that’s where you get to find all these artisans that are so passionate in keeping the traditions and culture alive, without having technology or contemporary society affect it. I feel like

that’s how I connect everything to my work. If I hadn’t been born in Ecuador surrounded by all the mountains, the people and the textiles, I guess I wouldn’t have been inspired, and I wouldn’t have the passion that I have in what I do. WHAT IS YOUR DESIGN PROCESS? Honestly I haven’t had the chance to get my own freedom in developing my pieces because I’m always being guided or it has always a project with a set goal. But I always fall into nature. In a certain way, I always find myself inspired by nature either in an abstract or a literal way. When I’m given a project I just start picturing it my mind and I always think of the material more than the concept or the meaning behind it. With me it’s more about transmitting a meaning or concept with the materials I use. So is not like making something literal like a shape, it’s always by guiding myself with textures. WOULD YOU SAY YOUR FAVORITE PART IN STARTING A NEW PROJECT IS LOOKING FOR NEW MATERIALS? Yes, I think the planning process of the materials, making them work together and manipulating them is what I love the most. For example, being able to cut the leather or burning it and making it look different. I guess that’s why I wanted to take an accessory class which I’m considering making it into my minor, because I also love structural pieces and being able to blend them together. Recently I created a bag with a weave I designed. So instead of buying the fabric. OUT OF ALL OF YOUR PIECES, WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE? Since I’m recently starting my senior year, I still haven’t developed much my collection. Because before senior one, two and three, you don’t actually get to work freely on your pieces. But I would say I have one piece that I consider my favorite because it explores a lot of textures. First of all, it’s made by all natural materials, so nothing is synthetic and it has to do with recycled materials. It has pieces of leather that I recycled from my uncle. He refurnished his car, and the car company sent him the left over leather pieces and I told him I needed them, even thought at the moment I actually didn’t know how I would use them. So when I started this piece I was like “Wow it would be super interesting to add the leather.” Because mainly, I wanted to explore materials with this piece and that’s what I did using 100% wool, 100% cotton, leather. These materials portrays nature, recycling, but at the same time exploring the textures… it all kind of blends together. WOULD YOU PREFER COLLABORATING WITH OTHER PEOPLE TO OR DO YOU WANT TO CREATE YOUR OWN PIECES? wI would say both. I have this friend in the fashion department and he is very interested in working with weaving, so I would love to collaborate with other people as well as being able to make my own pieces.

71


The Journey 72

“I’ve learned that fear limits you and your vision. It serves as blinders to what may be just a few steps down the road for you. The journey is valuable, but believing in your talents, your abilities, and your self-worth can empower you to walk down an even brighter path. Transforming fear into freedom - how great is that? - Soledad O’Brien


73


74

THE JOURNEY LOST IN THE WILD

SOUTH CAROLINA


75

There is no better peace then completely submerging yourself into the woods. Getting away from all the hustle and bustle. Not having to hear cars go by or honking their horns for a little while. All you can hear around you is birds chirping and the wind in the air. Can you imagine it? In society today, we forget that this peace even exists. We are constantly running around and doing the next errand. We don’t allow ourselves to think about nothing and have no worries. Having nothing to do seems more stressful than

having a hundred things to do now a days. But you know what, you deserve some alone time and some peace and quiet. Go outside, pitch a tent, gather around a campfire with all of your closest friends and enjoy yourself. Lord Byron once said, “There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, there is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar; I love not Man the less, but Nature more�. The outdoors is something to embrace and enjoy. So go ahead and step outside.


CONTRIBUTORS

PUBLISHING PARTNER

Morgan Zaslavsky Ashley Himpel Gillian Ware Nicole Leung Maria Santamaria Will Leatherman Ymke Franssen Caroline Bailey Mackenzie Schaeffer Emily Galvin Natalia Serrano

SUPPORTED BY

FEATURED Danny Zaslavsky Hyatt Mamoun Harry Werner Grace Millar Alaina Aylward Jacob Kleinman Phillips Claudia Miranda Paola Maldonado Grant Kelly Michaela Magnani Michelle Morin Rachel Andert Eduardo Jimenez Reed Watkins Grace Rokela

The Savannah College of Art and Design exists to prepare talented students for professional careers, emphasizing learning through individual attention in a positively oriented university environment. SUBSCRIPTIONS Route Five is an independent publication and the best way to support us is by subscribing or purchasing single copies through our online shop. Please visit our website: routefive.com

CONTACT US HELLO@ROUTEFIVE.COM DISTRIBUTION STOCKIST@ROUTEFIVE.COM ADVERTISING ADVERTISE@ROUTEFIVE.COM


Route five  

Route Five is an outdoor lifestyle, creative, and sustainable living magazine that explores the stories of individuals and their motivation...

Route five  

Route Five is an outdoor lifestyle, creative, and sustainable living magazine that explores the stories of individuals and their motivation...

Advertisement