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HAMILTON MILL LIVE

+

WORK

+

COMMUNITY

NICOLE

LAPIETRA

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE MASTER OF INTERIOR DESIGN FINAL PRESENTATION: JAN 28, 2014 ADVISOR: Bonnie Hobbs THESIS REPRESENTATIVE: Paul Joyce PANELISTS: Mai Nguyen Lisa DesJardins Thomas Trykowski Elizabeth Von Goeler

PAUL JOYCE

BONNIE HOBBS

NICOLE LAPIETRA


TABLE OF CONTENTS

RESEARCH

3

PRECEDENTS

6

SITE & PROGRAM

12

PRELIMINARY SCHEMES

18

SCHEMATIC DESIGN

20

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

30

FINAL DESIGN

44

APPENDICES CONTRACT DOCUMENTS SPECIFICATIONS THESIS PROPOSAL BIBLIOGRAPHY QUALIFICATIONS


RESEARCH THE WAY WE WORK IS CHANGING

INSPIRED

[

by research into emerging workplace trends, as well as personal experiences dealing with live/work balance, the project began with a desire to address these changes and issues

THE TREND

that intrigued me most was the increase in mobile workers and at-home workers, and the issue they face (despite the many cited benefits to this situation) with isolation (often cited as the reason for returning to the office)

[

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the proportion of U.S. workers taking advantage of flexible work schedules (including having the option of working at home) has more than doubled since 1985, and now represents 25 million workers, or 27.6% of the full-time workforce. Further, the increase in flexibility is widespread across demographic groups, with little difference in the numbers of men and women taking advantage of flexible schedules

3


STUDY 1

STUDY 2

performance went up 20%

3 out of 5 workers say they don’t need to be in the office to be productive

STANDFORD UNIVERSITY TEST RESULTS FOR A CONTROLLED EXPERIMENT COMPARING WORK AT HOME AND WORK AT OFFICE EMPLOYEES AT ONE CO.:

(mainly came from 9% increased number of minutes worked), as well as reduced breaks and sick days Company saved $2000 per year per employee

employees saved 17% of their salary in gas and time costs By not commuting,

The study was so successful the company implemented the program permanently for employees. Of those participating in the study, half returned to the office, with isolation as the primary reason for returning

RESULTS OF THE 2009 CISCO TELEWORKER STUDY (A SURVEY OF 2,000 WORK-AT-HOME EMPLOYEES) REVEALED:

Where mobile workers feel 46% in the office,

most productive:

38% at home, 2% in a hotel on a place in a

cafe, 1% public trans, 9% no preference 60% of time saved commuting spent on work, 40% spent on personal time 69% cited

higher productivity

75% said their timelines for work improved 67% said

overall work quality improved

91% said telecommuting was

very important to overall

satisfaction (which contributes to a higher employee retention rate)

prevented approximately 47,320 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions Teleworkers

from being released due to avoided travel

[

[

If only 40% of companies implemented a mobile strategy, in 10 years the US could save 1.2 billion tons of CO2 and 21 Manhattans worth of carbon emissions per year

4

fuel cost savings of $10.3 million per year due to telecommuting Employees reported a

66% of employees desired more job flexibility and were also willing to work for less pay if telecomuting was an option

quality of life saved $277 million annually

80% cited improved Company

in productivity


R E S E AR C H

WORK + LIFE + COMMUNITY

The number of mobile workers in the US workforce is increasing: • 84 of Fortunes 100 Best Companies to Work For provide mobile opportunities (In 1998 only 18 did) • Number of Americans working from home (at least one day per month) increased 39% from 2006-2008 (12.4 million to 17.2 million) • 45% of US workforce holds a job that is compatible with at least part-time telework • 29% of companies are considering a mobile work strategy

CONCEPT • Respond to this trend with a live/work building that offers a workspace for those who benefit from a mobile work strategy • Create a residential location that does not isolate, but encourages interaction with the community, not just within the building, for the benefit of both residents and the local district • Incorporate flexibility to allow the spatial conditions to respond to future trends as well

PSYCHOLOGICAL

ECONOMIC

ENVIRONMENTAL

• Increased productivity, increased quality of work, increased perceived quality of life • Time spent traveling is converted to time spent on work and life

• Reduced transportation costs for employees • Reduced overhead (facility and real estate) costs for companies • Money and resources can be reinvested in local communities • Significant savings for small business owners and entrepreneurs

• Reduced CO2 emissions from elimination of travel • Reduced energy (fuel) consumption • Reduction in vehicle abuse, vehicles last longer and minimize material waste

WORK AT HOME BENEFITS PROPOSAL:

DESIGN

A

PLACE THAT WILL INTEGRATE THE CHANGE

Cited Disadvantages: Lack of Community, Social Interaction, Sense of Isolation

TERMS OF CRITICISM • Incorporate workspace outside of personal units • Discourage a feeling of isolation • Offer public, semi-public, and private space both in the living units and additional spaces

IN THE WAY WE WORK

• Incorporate community space among living and

INTO THE WAY WE LIVE

• Furniture and layout should allow for ease in change

WITH ADAPTABILITY

• The design should respect and reflect the roots of

work areas • Spaces should address the need for control by users the site 5


PRECEDENTS

WORKBAR [CAMBRIDGE] Workbar is a network of shared coworking office spaces for

Memberships range from $30/

members who need a place to work and connect. The space

day to obtaining a monthly

offers a “business-centric” cafe space at street level, with sofas,

committed space for yourself

shared tables, whiteboards, a coffee bar, and event information.

or a group.

The second floor mezzanine is a glass-enclosed space for larger

can also be rented out by

group meetings. The top floor is divided into three areas: “The

members, and members are

Study”, for quiet work, “The Commons”, an open area for teams

encouraged

working together, and “The Switchboard”, where members make

in Workbar networking and

phone calls or conduct Skype videochats.

business events.

6

Events space

to

participate

[ENCOURAGING COMMUNITY]


MEMBERS GET: Workspaces (for groups or individuals)

Administrative Support

Unlimited conference calling

Full Office Amenities & Free Office Supplies

Projector screen for presentations

Free bottomless organic coffee, tea &

Conference, Phone & Meeting Rooms

Color & B/W Printing

snacks

Event Space

Access to educational programming &

Full Kitchen

networking events 7


FACTORY 63 [BOSTON] Factory 63 is a live/work building

in

Boston

where

residents are able to take advantage of an open work area on the first level. Upon entering the building, users can either proceed into the open collaborative area which houses

lounge

and

table

seating, a small kitchen, and a conference room than can be made private with a closed curtain. Or they can turn right and proceed to building’s loft and studio apartment style units. Factory 63 offers lofts, live/work artist units, and “innovation units”.

These

micro-sized living spaces are geared toward those who are looking for efficiency in space, while being able to take advantage of being located in the city of Boston. 8

SHARED WORKSPACE

A NEW WAY TO LIVE/WORK


PRECEDENTS

LIVE/WORK ARTIST’S UNITS

INNOVATION

UNITS This project combines live/work for individuals (units) and groups (first floor workspace) into one building, which is a new way of thinking about how we design residential buildings.

The tiny

size of the apartments is offset by

the

surrounding

bustling

neighborhood, with countless forms of social and entertainment resources, making it a place where residents will likely want to spend most of their time. 9


WIX [NYC] Wix

is

a

collaborative

completely

work

and

free event

space for creative types and entrepreneurs.

The

location

is set up to host workers from 9-5 during the week, and host events during evenings. range

from

design,

Events

business,

and social media workshops, to fundriasers, techie panels, product launches, and fashion shows. The most inspiriting aspect of this precedent is that events and community is more of a goal than just provided workspace.

The

mission is to provide space to whomever needs, but mostly to promote networking, socializing, and learning, and the space is designed to accommodate all of the above.

CO-WORKING IS THE NEW NETWORKING 10


PRECEDENTS

GOOGLE [DUBLIN]

All of Google’s offices are known for their innovation in

aspects are crucial for creativity and innovation,

to reflect this character. The spaces are as lively as

design and having a unique reflection of the company’s

and their new Dublin offices exemplifies this in

their themes, and bring an exciting fresh quality to the

holistic work philosophy, which encourages a

their four-building inner city campus.

Each floor

working experience. Throughout the campus, there

balanced, healthy work environment while enabling

is given a theme which reflects some aspect of

are a number of places an employee could choose to

as much interaction and communication between

working at Google, such as “Search”, “Appiness”,

work, from open plan and flexible working spaces, to

employees as possible. The company knows these

“Organize”,

private, playful, and alternate working zones.

and

“Create”,

and

are

designed

COLLABORATE INNOVATE

BE GREEN CONNECT CREATE INSPIRE SEARCH

11


SITE&PROGRAM LOWELL, MA

The most important factor in selecting Tsongas Center

a site for this project was locating an urban environment that could support the sustainable and locally-driven lifestyle of

City Hall & Public Library Downtown Core and Relevant Commercial Streets Site

the type of building to be designed. Lowell is located about 25 miles north of Boston, MA and is located along MA Highway I-495 (home to a number of corporate parks and major businesses), which made it a perfect location for a live/work community which

JAM District Lines

could cater to individuals who commute to

MBTA Commuter Line Station

work to these two major business hubs. It

Public Park

is a unique city which was once the home of the largest textile industry in the nation, though that period was followed by major deindustrialization as the textile mills moved to the south in the 1920’s. Today Lowell is

Lowell’s Hamilton Canal District and Downtown Area

12

which has already seen major improvements in the downtown area. Between its unique

Lowell 2010 US Census Data: Mode of Transportation to Work: 88.74% Car, Truck, Van 3.49% Public Transportation 6.15% Other form of Transportation 1.62% Work at Home

undergoing a massive urban revitalization,

urban texture filled with previously functioning

Travel Time To Work: 25.52% Less Than 15 Minutes 37.28% 15-29 Minutes 29.12% 30-59 Minutes 8.08% More than 59 Minutes

textile mills and its current focus on bringing new life to the area, it is a city that both could support and would benefit from a project such as this.


SUSTAINABLE LOWELL 2025 Research into the history of Lowell as well as the city’s current conditions helped to select a neighborhood to place the project in, finalize building program, and establish how the building could be used to help redevelopment. Sustainable Lowell 2025, a document outlining the city’s objectives and strategies for encouraging further improvements through a sustainable-lifestyle approach, outlines the arts as a specific means to drive growth that is aligned with their vision for Lowell. While there are a number of museums and art galleries in the city, there are few located in the Hamilton Canal District (sometimes referred to as the JAM area), a location that intrigued me due to its number of existing opportunities for growth. Located within the boundaries of Jackson, Appleton, and Middlesex Streets (JAM), its currently home to both vacant mill buildings and buildings that have recently been converted into condos, a health center, and a school. TRAFFIC ANALYSIS

LAND USAGE ANALYSIS Single Family

Mixed-Use

Multi Family

High Rise Commercial

Neighborhood Business

Light Industrial

Site

High Traffic Moderate Traffic Low Traffic Negligible Traffic

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109 JACKSON ST.

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EXISTING CONDITIONS • Basement level access from north side of PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

the building (at Hamilton Canal)

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• First floor level access from south side of the building (on Jackson St.) • Structural brick wall from basement to first floor dividing both floors into two areas 14

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SITE&PROGRAM

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Company, one of the largest 1926.

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textile mills in Lowell, until

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for the Hamilton Manufacturing

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counting and storage house

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this time. It was previously the

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the building remains vacant at

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square footage), but the rest of

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Center (only 10% of the total

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Health

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Community

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Lowell

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building is habited by the

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street. The west end of the

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most of the north side of the

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Jackson St. and takes up

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The building is located on

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SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOOD MERRIMACK ST

PALMER ST

DUTTON ST

MARKET ST

Row of retail space (some currently vacant)

CENTRAL ST

MIDDLESEX ST

Site Selection Strategy A gym, cafe and restaurants one block over

LIVE LOCAL

Busy commercial area

To support a healthy and sustainable lifestyle,

• Recreation, Outdoors

it is ideal to reside in areas where essential

• Arts & Entertainment

and desired destinations can be reached

• Work

within a 20-minute radius via walking, biking,

• Retail

car, or other means of public transportation:

• Markets • Daily Necessities

16


SITE&PROGRAM

PROGRAM PUBLIC WORKSPACE • Public work space, open to the community, which allows local entrepreneurs, small businesses, and mobile workers to share resources and creates a local work community

ART GALLERY • A public art gallery, which responds to Lowell’s encouragement of the arts as a means of development, and encourages development of the JAM district

EVENT SPACE • An event space to accommodate both business and social events, open to the community as needed

PRIVATE RESIDENCES

EXISTING AREA AMENITIES Site

Fitness Facilities Childcare Dining Coffee

Entertainment Drinks Retail

Transportation

Public Parks

• Private residences which are flexible in design in order to adapt to future needs of owners The analysis of Lowell helped to define the program, both through eliminating elements which already exist in the area (gym, childcare) and identifying needs for development in the JAM area (art gallery & event space)

17


PRELIMINARYSCHEMES BLOCKING DIAGRAMS FOR DECIDING RELATIONSHIPS SCHEME 1

• Work and community areas are

Living Units

stacked amid the living units,

CIRCULATION

Public and Private Work Areas Third Floor

to integrate the three program types • Increases opportunities for

Second Floor Entry

tenants to encounter the work and community spaces;

First Floor

proximity encourages access

Community Event/Gallery Space

• Acoustics may be an issue

Entry

SCHEME 2

• Work and community spaces are on the first level, separate

CIRCULATION

Living Units Third Floor

from the living units • Units more private, up off the

Second Floor

street • Living units can take advantage

Entry

of better views • Living units may be too separated from other areas

18

First Floor

Public and Private Work Areas

Community Event/Gallery Space

Entry Entry

Entry


SCHEME 3

• Work areas available on each

CIRCULATION

Living Units

level, catering specific areas to

Third Floor

tenants by floor • Work areas divided, so private Second Floor

and group work are separated • May discourage interaction,

Entry

and encourage isolation Private Work Areas

Public/Group Work Areas

Community Event/Gallery Space

REVIEW FEEDBACK

Entry

First Floor Entry

Entry

SCHEME 3 EXTERIOR

Defining the demographic of who would be using the building, and how deciding that could help shape more specifically the design, was important for moving forward at this point. Additionally, how light enters the building (such as if artists will be using the space), was something to think more about.

IDEAS: SHAPED ENTRANCES COMBINING THE NEW AND THE OLD These are some sketched ideas for the existing building’s facade, which would benefit from entrances shaped to break up the monotonous brick exterior while at the same time maintaining

SCHEME 2 EXTERIOR

SCHEME 1 EXTERIOR

the overall statuesque quality of the historical mill. 19


SCHEMATICDESIGN LAYOUT 1 APARTMENT-STYLE LIVING

• Joint entry for public and private spaces • One and two level unit types • No units on the ground floor; all public space is located on ground level

Third Floor Second Floor First Floor

Community space (Gallery and work)

Single level unit

Dual level unit

The first idea was to create a sense of community within the building by encouraging interaction through layout and circulation, though it seemed the “community” was being

LOUNGE

WORK

forced. The intent was to offer a community space that would be encouraged to be used by the tenants as they encounter them.

GALLERY

WORK MAIN ENTRY First floor plan

20


CREATING A SENSE OF COMMUNITY

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CIRCULATION AND LAYOUT WERE A MEANS TO INTEGRATE INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE BUILDING WITH PEOPLE FROM THE EXTERIOR COMMUNITY PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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UNIT

UNIT UNIT

UNIT UNIT

UNIT EVENT SPACE

UNIT

UNIT

Resident Entry

COMMUNITY WORK SPACE

LOUNGE

UNIT UNIT

UNIT

UNIT

UNIT

UNIT

UNIT

Resident Entry

COMMUNITY WORK SPACE

GALLERY Resident and Public Entry

TACTIC: SHARED ENTRANCE 21

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UNIT

UNIT

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UNIT

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LAYOUT 2

Upper unit

EXTERIOR ENTRY • Every unit has its own entrance, stacked on the north side along Hamilton Canal • Creates four available unit sizes to accommodate

Lower unit

different needs

3-Bay Units

3-Bay Units

STACKED UNITS 3-Bay Units

3-Bay Units

4-Bay Units

4-Bay Units

4-Bay Units

Community Workspace

3-Bay Units

3-Bay Units

3-Bay Units

First Floor

4-Bay Units

Community Gallery

Jackson St.

PUBLIC/PRIVATE Private/Quiet Spaces Public/Group Spaces

DISCOURAGING ISOLATION A NEW APPROACH By changing my goal of creating a community within the building, to using the building to help shape one that reaches beyond, it

Upper unit entry Lower unit entry 22

seemed more appropriate to give individual users more private and flexible living areas that could integrate into a rich and communitydriven Jackson St. neighborhood


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Two Units (4-bay)

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Two Units (3-bay)

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TACTIC: PRIVATE ENTRANCES

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SCHEMATICDESIGN


LAYOUT 3 ONE UNIT TYPE REPEATED

Private Spaces

• Every unit has its own entrance • Simplified layout for more flexibility (units designed to

Public Spaces

accommodate multiple uses per unit, rather than one unit type designed for each need) • Entrances on Basement and First Levels allow

One Unit

separation within

Flexible Spaces

• Some units would lose space for the community areas on the first floor

First Floor

2-Bay Unit

Community Gallery Community Workspace

INNOVATIVE LIVING FOR CHANGING NEEDS Flexible space can be used for: • Income Property (UMass Lowell located nearby) • Aging parent’s living space • Home office • Extra living space (children’s play area, master suite, etc.) • Guest suite 24

Jackson St.


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SCHEMATICDESIGN

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A USER DEFINED PROGRAM

The next set of ideas came from exploring

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one space into many, without having to PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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how flexibility can be used to really change PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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entry

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FLOOR PLAN OPTION 1

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

integrate active elements the user would need to manipulate

PRODUCED BY PRODUCED AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT BY AN PRODUCED AUTODESKBY EDUCATIONAL AN AUTODESK PRODUCT EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRO

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY ANPRODUCED AUTODESKBY EDUCATIONAL AN AUTODESK PRODUCT EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT D BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

25

ED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTPRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

FLOOR PLAN OPTION 2

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PR

First floor main entry circulation

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

private space

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LAYOUT 4

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

small or too large (each unit is 2.5 bays)

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

• Main entry on Jackson St. side of building, elevated from

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

sidewalk on the first floor

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

FIRST FLOOR open storage above

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

• Rear entry for access to outdoor area by Hamilton Canal

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

• Allows for enough room without creating units that are too

26

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

JACKSON ST. MAIN ENTRANCES

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


SCHEMATICDESIGN PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONA

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

First floor as home office and large alternate master suite

First floor as large home office (space for up to two employees)

First floor as home office and small alternate master suite PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

First floor as parent’s suite

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

First floor as home office and children’s room

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

MULTIPLE LAYOUT OPTIONS • Users with any need can use the space effectively

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Possible Uses Home office Parent’s suite Guest suite Income Property Storage Area

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Basement level as home office

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Basement level as living unit

Flexible Space Needs: Full Bath Ground level entrance

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Living/Dining/Kitchen Needs: Toilet Room

Bedrooms Needs: 2 Full Baths (Master Suite and Secondary) Laundry area Flexible Space Needs: Full Bath Main entrance Possible Uses Home office Alternate master suite Parent’s suite Guest suite Secondary living area

27


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN EDUCATIONAL AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Option A

First Floor Community Flexible Space

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Jackson St.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Units

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Units

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Community Flexible Space

Jackson St. PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

First Floor

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN EDUCATIONAL AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Units

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Option B

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

D BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PR

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUC

PRODUCED BY AN AUT

28

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


SCHEMATICDESIGN BUILDING LAYOUT • Community gallery and workspace are incorporated into one general public area with a shared entrance • Community space can be located either at the right end of the building, or in the center of the building • Passageways split the building into manageable circulation paths from the north to the south side of

Ha

to mil

nC

l ana

the building

son

k Jac

St.

• Units adjacent to passageways have the opportunity for interior window space and some added daylight

REVIEW FEEDBACK The big question I had at this point moving forward was how the location of the community spaces would impact its use by the community. Located next to a busy main artery or down on further on Jackson St. was no the important decision based on feedback, but how the space itself would be designed, since the distance between the two options was fairly negligible. The views offered at the end of the building and distribution of units and circulation around the building should be the main deciding factors. It was also brought up that alleyways through the building for circulation could be potential safety issues.

29


DESIGNDEVELOPMENT INSPIRATIONS

Conference room inspiration: a mix of old and new materials to represent the history & new life of the building Kitchen layout and materials inspiration

Social and collaborative inspirations for the event space

Stair detail inspiration, reminiscent of a loom Inspiration for gallery “sculptural insert�, reflecting the woven nature of textiles

30


A DESIGN LANGUAGE

WARP & WEFT

After some research into the history of the building, which was formerly the storage and counting house for the Hamilton Manufacturing Company, the use of “Warp and Weft” as a design language for the spaces seemed to be an appropriate homage to the origins of the site. The Hamilton Manufacturing Company, one of the largest textile companies in the Lowell during the 19th century until it closed its doors in 1926, produced “plain- and twill-weave cotton goods” for over 100 years. The idea of using the weave structure in architectural details as well a rich layering of fabrics in the final materials selection became a goal for the final design. 31


BASEMENT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LIVE/ WORK

LIVE/ WORK

FLOOR PLAN 32 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


DESIGNDEVELOPMENT

FIRST FLOOR PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

EVENT SPACE

GALLERY

FLOOR PLAN 33 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LIVE/ WORK

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LIVE/ WORK


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

SECOND FLOOR

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

DINING GROUP WORK SPACE

LIVING

LIVING

FLOOR PLAN 34

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

DINING

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

DESIGNDEVELOPMENT

THIRD FLOOR

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

INDIVIDUAL/ SMALL GROUP WORK SPACE

BEDROOM

FLOOR PLAN 35 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

BEDROOM

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

BEDROOM

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

BEDROOM


ROOF PLAN PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

A COMMUNITY OUTDOOR SPACE WORKING, MEETING, SOCIALIZING

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

THE DESIGN GOAL MOVING FORWARD FOR THE ROOF WAS TO MAKE A SPACE THAT COULD BE USED AT LEISURE BY THE COMMUNITY, TO MAXIMIZE OUTDOOR SPACE IN AN URBAN ENVIRONMENT, OR FOR SOCIAL OR BUSINESS EVENTS

36


DESIGNDEVELOPMENT UNIT PAIR

COMMUNITY SPACE

WORK SPACE

BUILDING SECTIONS Since

the

development

last of

review, the

the work

space and the finalization of the WORK SPACE

building layout were the major steps taken.

The community

worked best at the East end of the building, where it could take GALLERY

advantage of light from three sides within the space, with the units extending to the left

S1

(fourteen units total). The gallery

S2

and event space worked best

UNIT SECTION 1

UNIT SECTION 2

on the basement and first floor, where noise would be less of an issue. The workspace located on the top two floors would be a more quiet area, matching the quiet levels on the top two floors of the units (bedrooms and living space). Additionally, having the gallery and event space below meant foot traffic would not affect people working inside.

37


COMMUNITY SPACE

WORK SPACE

THIRD FLOOR OPEN WORK SPACE

WORK SPACE

EVENT SPACE GALLERY

ELEVATION @EVENT SPACE The double height space created by the existing structural brick wall gives the opportunity to create a structure within the gallery that could both display the art, as well as function as a piece of art itself. The event space holds retractable seating, making it adaptable for various types of events.

38

ELEVATION @GALLERY


DESIGNDEVELOPMENT VARIED SEATING CHOICES: GROUP, INDIVIDUAL, OPEN, ENCLOSED

FOURTH FLOOR ELEVATION (NORTH) ENCLOSED GROUP OR INDIVIDUAL WORK SPACE THROUGH MOVEABLE PARTITIONS

FOURTH FLOOR ELEVATION (SOUTH) MULTI-HEIGHT COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT

THIRD FLOOR ELEVATION 39


LIVING UNITS The major obstacle for the units was creating stairs that used the least amount of space. Having finalized that layout at this point, the next step was to think about ceiling height, shaping space, adding storage, and deciding materials. The ceiling THIRD FLOOR BEDROOMS

heights were lowered in the first and fourth floors to create an appropriate human-scale environment. The second floor has a slightly lowered ceiling only over the kitchen area in the center of the space, to help define the separate sections and break up the long distance across the room. Adding closets and shelving to otherwise “dead” space

SECOND FLOOR LIVING AREA

under the stairs was also something that developed during this time. The other new design feature was a closet located on each floor that aligned vertically and was large enough to be converted into residential elevator, if that became the owner’s desire, adding to the adaptability of the space.

FIRST FLOOR LIVE/WORK SPACE 40


DESIGNDEVELOPMENT LIVING

KITCHEN

DINING

SECOND FLOOR ELEVATION

FIRST FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

MATERIAL FOCUS:

SECOND FLOOR

A DESIGN GOAL MOVING FORWARD WAS TO START CONSIDERING HOW MATERIALS SELECTION COULD COMPLEMENT THE EXISTING MATERIALS

EXISTING BRICK & WOOD FLOORING 41


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

• Fourteen units with North and South entrances • Unit entrances are built up into the building, to give shelter from street traffic but accessibility to Jackson St. • Community space located on the East side of the building, where it is able to take advantage of maximum natural light available, and offers easiest pedestrian access from Central St.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

SITE PLAN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

42


DESIGNDEVELOPMENT

GALLERY DESIGN

AN INTERIOR DESIGN STRATEGY FOR THE GALLERY WAS TO REFLECT THE HISTORY OF THE BUILDING, AS WELL AS PAY HOMAGE TO THE CURRENT ARTISTS OF LOWELL

HISTORY & ART

INITIAL STRUCTURE IDEAS: WARP & WEFT

WRAPPED ‘WOVEN’ INTERIOR

HANGING ‘FABRIC’ STRUCTURE

3-DIMENSIONAL WARP & WEFT

REVIEW FEEDBACK Most of the review centered around the workspace, since it was in need of further development. The biggest issue was pushing the concept of flexibility’ further, without having the space feel cluttered or stiff. It seemed some of the layout was still too stagnant and didn’t offer enough variety of desking or seating types. Additionally, having a lighting scheme that reflected a layout that would change, rather than having one designed around stationary furniture, would help the design. Having enough support and storage space in the work areas was also an issue to be resolved. For the units, the last item was to make sure there was one ADA-compliant unit to meet codes requirements.

43


FINALDESIGN

WORK/ LIVE

WORK/ LIVE

STORAGE

OFFICES

WARMING KITCHEN

BIKE STORAGE/ TRASH

CRAWL SPACE

CRAWL SPACE

MECH

GALLERY

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN

C

B

RECEPTION

A

N.T.S

44


IP2 IP2

IP2

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

14' - 0"

LP2

TYPE 1

LP2

IP2

FP3

FP3 14' - 0"

TYPE 1

LP1

LP1

LP1

a balance between a completely open work plan and one that is defined enough to be

LP1

LP1

LP1

LP1

LP1

The final floor plans are more developed in the second and third floor work areas, finding

14' - 0"

LL1

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

LL1

LL1

LR1

of flexibility was pushed further, with more opportunities to manipulate space to meet different needs. Most spaces can cater to anywhere from individual to large group work LR1

TYPE 2

LR1

LW4

HS1

HS1

LR1

LR1

LW4

TYPE 2

10' - 0"

14' - 0" TYPE 2

10' - 0"

TYPE 1

LR1

LR1

11' - 6"

through some form of user control.

LR1

LR1

HS1 LW4

10' - 0"

TYPE 2

BATH

WORK/ LIVE

EVENT SPACE

WORK/ LIVE

1

A601

1

1

Copy of Third Floor 1/4" = 1'-0"

LR1

LR1

WORK/ LIVE

TYPE 2

11' - 6"

LR1

14' - 0"

C

TYPE 1

LW4

TYPE 2

10' - 0"

LR1

HS1

B

BATH

WORK/ LIVE

MEN’S

STORAGE

CONFERENCE ROOM

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

14' - 0"

LL1

acoustically efficient, while still allowing large groups and open collaboration. The concept

STORAGE

WOMEN’S (OPEN TO BELOW)

A N.T.S.

45


46 N.T.S.

1

2

A602

11' - 6"

A602

11' - 6"

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

W.C.

LR1

LR1

LR1

TYPE 2

LR1 LP2

LR1

LIVING

W.C.

INFORMAL MEETING/LOUNGE

LR1

A LP1

LP2

LIVING

GROUP WORK

14' - 0"

LP2

FP3

TYPE 1

FP3

LP1 10' - 0"

HS1

TYPE 2

10' - 0" TYPE 2

LP1 LW4

HS1

KITCHENETTE & PRINTERS LW4

FP3

FP3

LP1

LP1 14' - 0" TYPE 1

10' - 0"

14' - 0" TYPE 1

10' - 0"

HS1

LW4

TYPE 2

LR1

LL1

LL1

LP2

14' - 0"

LP2

TYPE 1

14' - 0"

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

LP1

IP2

IP2

LP1

TYPE 1

IP2

TYPE 2

14' - 0"

IP2

11' - 6"

LR1

IP2 LR1

LP1

IP2

LR1

LL1

LR1

LP2

1

HS1

11' - 6"

LR1

LR1

Copy of Third Floor 1/4" = 1'-0"

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

LW4

11' - 6"

LR1

LR1

A601

GROUP WORK

TYPE 2

LR1

LL1 LR1

1

JANITOR’S CLOSET

QUIET ROOM

14' - 0" TYPE 1

TYPE 1

1

KITCHEN

W.C.

A601

W.C.

CAFE/MEETING

QUIET ROOM

3

DINING

LW4

10' - 0"

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

HS1

C 1

14' - 0"

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

KITCHEN 2

DINING B

Copy of Third Floor 1/4" = 1'-0"

HS1

LR1

LR1 LW4

TYPE 2

10' - 0" 14' - 0"

TYPE 1

LR1

LR1 TYPE 2

11' - 6"

LL1

LL1

TYPE 1

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

14' - 0"

LR1

LL1

LL1

LP1

LP1

LP1

LP1

IP2

IP2

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

14' - 0"

IP

IP

LP2

TYPE 1

LP2


FINALDESIGN

C

LAUNDRY

BATH

PRINTER STATIONS

BATH

BEDROOM

BATH

BATH

LAUNDRY

BEDROOM

OPEN WORK SPACE WORKPODS

KITCHENETTE

CONFERENCE ROOMS

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

INDIVIDUAL DESKING

JANITOR’S CLOSET

W.C.

A

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

B

W.C.

QUIET ROOMS QUIET ROOMS

N.T.S.

47


B

C

1

1

P007

P008

ROOF PLAN

DN

DN

DN

-

A 1

P006

1

Roof Plan 1/4" = 1'-0"

N.T.S.

Project Number Date Drawn By Checked By

Scale

48

Project Number 17 January 2014 Author Checker

P005

1/4" = 1'-0"

1/12/2014 3:13:45 PM

Unnamed


FINALDESIGN

The final lighting scheme for the public space is centered around a similar light fixtures used throughout, with others mixed in at various moments. A mixture of

BASEMENT RCP

fabric and metal fixtures were used, to continue the balance between new & old that began to establish itself in materials selections. Copper was used to bring warmth, and balanced with dramatic black fixtures in other locations.

Based on previous

feedback, where moveable furniture was placed the lighting was kept to not reflect any certain layout. For the units, lighting was kept simple and energy efficient, so residents could move in and add their own lighting style to the space. C

B 1

2

A602

A602

8' - 2" TYPE 1

LT1

LS1

LS1

LS1

8' - 2"

8' - 2"

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

LT1

LT1

LT1

LT1

LT1

8' - 2"

LS1

TYPE 1

8' - 2" TYPE 1

IW1

LS2

LT1

LT1

LT1

LS1

LT1

LS1

HS1

LS2 LS2 LS1

LS1

LS2

LT1

LT1

LT1

LT1

LT1

IW1 8' - 2"

8' - 2"

8' - 2"

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

HS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

7' - 0"

7' - 0"

7' - 0"

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

22' - 9" TYPE 1

A

LS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

1

A601

N.T.S. 1

Copy of Basement 1/4" = 1'-0"

49


1

FIRST FLOOR RCP

B

C 2

A602

A602

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1 LP1

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

LW3

IP3 FP1

IP3

IP3

FP1 12' - 7"

LW3

TYPE 2

LP1 LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LW3

14' - 0"

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

LP1

10' - 0"

TYPE 1

FP1

FP2

LW3

TYPE 2

HS1 IW1

LS2

FP1

LR1

LW2

LP1 LS2

LS2

IW1

10' - 0" TYPE 2

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

LR1 LR1

10' - 7"

LR1

LW3

LW3

LW3

LW3

LW3

TYPE 2

10' - 7"

LP1

TYPE 2

LW1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LW1

LW1

10' - 0"

10' - 0" TYPE 2

LW1

22' - 9"

A601

LR1

IP2

IP1

IP1

IP2

TYPE 1

10' - 7" TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

IP2

LW1 LR1

IP2

IP1

LW2 LR1

FP2

IP1

IP1 LW1

LR1 LW2

TYPE 2

LW1

LR1 LR1

1

FP2

LR1

LS2

HS1

A

FP2

LW2

LW2

LW1

LW1

LW1

LW1

LW1

IP2

IP1 IP2

IP1 IP1

LR1

IP2

IP1 IP2

IP1 IP1

IP1

IP1

N.T.S. 1

First Floor Copy of Gallery Insert 1/4" = 1'-0"

50


FINALDESIGN

C

1

2

A602

LP1 LR1

LR1

LR1

LP1

LP1

LP1

LR1 FP4

LW1 11' - 6"

FP4

FP4

9' - 0"

FP4

FP4

12' - 9"

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

9' - 0" TYPE 2

TYPE 1

LR1 IP2

IP2

IP2

LW1

9' - 0"

FP4

FP4

FP4

LW1

TYPE 2

10' - 0"

9' - 0"

TYPE 2

10' - 0"

TYPE 2

10' - 0" LP1

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

LR1

FP4

LW1

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

FP4

11' - 6"

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LP1

LP1

LP1

IP2

IP2

IP2

IP2

IP2

SECOND FLOOR RCP

B

A602

IP2

LR1

LR1

LP2

LP2

LP1

LR1

LP2

LP2

LP3 LP2

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LL1

LL1

FP4

A 1

A601

LR1

LR1

LP2

TYPE 1

TYPE 2

LL1 LR1

LP2

TYPE 1

LP2

12' - 9"

11' - 6"

TYPE 2

LP2

12' - 9" LP1 LP2

11' - 6"

LP2

FP4

FP4

FP4

LL1

LP3

LP3

LR1 LP1 12' - 9"

LP2

LP2

LP2

LP3

TYPE 1

N.T.S. 1

Copy of Second Floor 1/4" = 1'-0"

51


THIRD FLOOR RCP

B

C

1

2

A602

A602

11' - 6"

11' - 6"

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1 LP2

LP2

LP2

LP2

LP2

LP2

LP2

LP2

LP1 LR1

LR1

LR1

14' - 0"

LR1

FP3

TYPE 1

12' - 5"

FP3

FP4

TYPE 2

FP4

FP4

LP1 10' - 0"

10' - 0"

HS1

TYPE 2

LP2

TYPE 2

LP2

LP2

LP2

LP1 LW4

HS1 LW4

FP3

FP3

LP1 IP2

IP2

IP2

IP2

IP2

LP1 14' - 0"

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

LP2 10' - 0"

10' - 0"

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

LW4

HS1

LW4

11' - 6"

11' - 6" TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

LL1

LL1

LR1

1

LR1

LP2

LR1

14' - 0"

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

9' - 0" TYPE 2

LP1

IP4

IP4

LW5 IP2

IP2

9' - 0" TYPE 2

LR1

14' - 0"

LL1

LP1

TYPE 1

IP2

IP4

IP4

IP4

IP4

IP4

IP2 LW5

LP1

LR1

LW5 IP2

LL1

14' - 0"

A601

14' - 0" TYPE 1

IP2

TYPE 1

A

LP2

LW5

HS1

TYPE 2

LR1

LP2

LR1

LW5

LW5 9' - 0" TYPE 2

LW5 IP4

IP4

IP4

LW5 LW5

9' - 0"

9' - 0"

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

N.T.S. 1

Copy of Third Floor 1/4" = 1'-0"

52


FINALDESIGN

COMMUNITY + WORK SPACES BLENDING C R E A T I N G

WORK

&

P L AY

C O N N E C T I O N S

ART GALLERY TO SUPPORT LOCAL ARTISTS The final design of the structure for the gallery was a sculptural abstraction of the warp and weft pattern of a twill weave, extruding and eliminating elements into a three-dimensional format until a final balance was found. SECTION C

N.T.S.

53


---

WORKPODS

CURTAIN CAN ALTER GROUP SIZE, OFFER PRIVACY SLIDING PANELS CREATE SENSE OF PRIVACY IF DESIRED

DN

DN

UP

UP

---

DESKING

UP

DN

-

---

DN

UP

FLEXIBLE WORK SPACE

TEXTILE WALL AND MOVEABLE FURNITURE CAN OFFER A GROUP WORK SPACE

HEIGHT ADJUSTABLE TABLES ALLOW FOR USER COMFORT

CONFERENCE ROOMS

FOLDABLE GLASS WALLS CHANGE FOR GROUP SIZE NEEDS

1

Third Floor 1/8 1/8" = 1'-0"

FLEXIBLE WORK AREA

TEXTILE WALL AND MOVEABLE FURNITURE ALLOW FOR MULTIPLE LAYOUTS AND GROUP SIZES

Unnamed

-

-

---

---

CAFE/MEETING SPACE

MOVEABLE FURNITURE AND PRIVACY CURTAINS ALLOW FOR INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP MEETING SPACE WHEN NOT IN USE AS AN EATING AREA

Project Number 17 January 2014 Author Checker

Project Number -

-

Date---

---

Drawn By Checked By DN

P015

DN

Scale

1/8" = 1'-0"

1/28/2014 10:36:21 AM

WORKSPACE FLEXIBILITY

1 P007

DN ---

EVENT SPACE

RETRACTABLE BENCHING ALLOWS FOR VARIETY OF EVENT TYPES -

1

-

---

-

P007

---

---

DN

-

---

DN

UP

DN

DN

DN

UP

UP

DN

ACTIVE ADAPTABILITY USER DEFINED FUNCTIONALITY THROUGH TRANSFORMABLE ELEMENTS

---

1

DN

UP

DN

P007

---

DN

DN

UP

DN

1

-

P007

-

---

DN

---

UP

54

DN

DN

UP

UP

DN

DN

UP

DN

UP


FINALDESIGN

THIRD FLOOR WORKSPACE

ELEVATION @SECOND FLOOR WORKSPACE

ELEVATION 3

N.T.S.

55


SECOND FLOOR WORKSPACE A PLACE TO COLLABORATE AND CONNECT

DESIGNED

TO

FLEXIBLE FURNITURE, 56

&

C AT E R

TO

M U LT I P L E

PARTITIONS,

S PA C E S

FOR

WORK

STYLES

MOVEABLE

P R I VA C Y

THROUGHOUT


FINALDESIGN

GROUP OR INDIVIDUAL AREA E N E R G Y E F F I C I E N T L I G H T I N G , R E U S E O F E X I S T I N G M AT E R I A L S ,

ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS FABRIC AND FURNITURE

TO

FOCUS

ON

S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

57


BUILDING SECTION

SECTION A

58

N.T.S.


FINALDESIGN

LIVING UNIT ADAPTABILITY The overall layouts of the units remained as was from schematic design, just with refined moments and the development the rooftop patios. The layout allows the basement and first floors to be used in a variety of ways possible, whether work or live. The bathrooms on both floors feature a shower hidden behind a sliding painted glass door, which helps to hide this ‘residential’ feature if the space is being used as a home office, which may make owners more comfortable having business visitors. The rear entry on the basement level and the Jackson St. entrance on the first floor create a sense of separation within the building if that is desired, such as if one level is used for work and the other for live. The top two floors remain typical residential layouts, which are necessary for comfortable living.

FOURTH

FLOOR:

BEDROOMS

THIRD FLOOR: LIVING AREA BASEMENT & FIRST FLOOR TO BE

USED

[ L I V E

AS

O R

NEEDED W O R K ]

SECTION B

N.T.S.

59


W

A

R

M

S P A C E EFFICIENT

MODERN S U S TA I N A B L E

M AT E R I A L S

THIRD FLOOR LIVING SPACE ELEVATION @THIRD FLOOR

ELEVATION 2

60

N.T.S.


FINALDESIGN

LIVING UNITS PASSIVE ADAPTABILITY USER DEFINED FUNCTIONALITY THROUGH LAYOUT AND CIRCULATION

SECOND FLOOR FLEX SPACE (WORK OR LIVE) ELEVATION @SECOND FLOOR

ELEVATION 1

N.T.S.

61


A FOCUS ON COMMUNITY: PUBLIC SPACES

ROOF PATIO FOR SOCIAL AND BUSINESS EVENTS

62


FINALDESIGN

EVENT ROOM FOR SOCIAL AND BUSINESS EVENTS

A PLACE TO LEARN, NETWORK, SOCIALIZE 63


A FOCUS ON HEALTHY LIVING: OUTDOOR SPACE Since one of the objectives of this project was to design for a way of living that contributes to overall health and well-being, I decided to develop an outdoor space to supplement the needs of those living at 109 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Jackson St., but also for all those living in the area. Access to outdoor space is critical for well-balanced living, and the vacant lot at the end of Jackson St. was the perfect place to develop recreational outdoor space. Looking at the other parks in the area I was able to determining what amenities were lacking, and developed the park’s program based on this.

P E R F O R M A N C E S TA G E

DOG

PA R K

PARK LOCATION

109 JACKSON ST.

PUBLIC PICNIC & GRILL AREAS P

L

A

Y

G

R

O

U

N

D

GARDEN PLOTS FOR RENT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ELEVATION @PERFORMANCE STAGE PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ELEVATION @GARDEN PLOTS & WALKWAY 64


FINALDESIGN

JACKSON ST. PARK

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ELEVATION @PICNIC AREAS 65


MATERIALS PUBLIC

S PA C E

FABRICS: LAYERED MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TEXTURAL

INSPIRING & 66

REFINED

PALETTE


LIVING

CONCLUSION & FEEDBACK

S PA C E

The final design was successful in finding a response to the changing way we work and live, while also delivering a design that can change

FLOORING THROUGHOUT

KITCHEN BASEMENT & 1ST FLR BATHROOMS

in and of itself in order to meet (immediate and future) changing needs. In this project I thought it was important to address the needs of as many different types of users as possible, and address as many functions as possible, and that helped with pushing the concept of adaptability further in the final design. I also

2ND FLR BATHROOMS

NATURAL

4TH FLR BATHROOMS

FRESH RELAXING MATERIALS

really enjoyed thinking about Lowell and the JAM area overall, and how this building could help to develop the area as a whole. I think that was influential in how I shaped the design of the building, being that the integration

Since both spaces used the existing hardwood floors throughout, I used this an inspiration starting point for the

into the community was so important for

rest of the materials selections. The wood and its natural warmth was a good balance for the industrial nature

countering isolation. One of the comments

of the building, and I decided to continue to play with that balance, adding warmth with certain materials, and

at the final review was that the project offers

countering it with something sleek. The kitchen in the living units displays this with the use of bright white subway

a bridge between suburban and urban living,

tile, Ceasarstone counters, and reclaimed wood as the three main materials. In the public space, since “warp and

offering amenities typically available in both. I

weft� was already established as a design language, I chose to celebrate this with furniture upholstered in fabrics

think this aspect adds another dimension to

(not vinyls or leathers). The fabrics chosen were also textural in their nature, really displaying their own warp and

the resolution, making it appealing to a greater

weft qualities, as well as being durable environmentally friendly. The palette for the workspace is a balance of

number of demographics, which always was a

calming colors and invigorating moments of color, to support a work environment that is both focused and inspiring.

main objective for the project.

67


Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Master of Interior Design Final Thesis Documents

DESIGN FACTORS Occupancy Classifications: R-3, A-3, B Square Footage Unit Basement Unit First Floor Unit Second Floor Unit Third Floor Unit Roof Community Space Basement Community Space First Floor Community Space Second Floor Community Space Third Floor Community Space Roof

570 Sq. Ft. 770 Sq. Ft. 820 Sq. Ft. 820 Sq. Ft. 680 Sq. Ft. 1863 Sq. Ft. (B), 833 Sq. Ft. (A-3) 237 Sq. Ft. (B), 963 Sq. Ft. (A-3) 2,788 Sq. Ft. 2, 788 Sq. Ft. 1, 892 Sq. Ft.

TABLE OF CONTENTS A000 A001-A004 A101 A102 A103 A201 A202 A203 A204 A205 A301 A302 A303 A304 A401 A402 A403 A404 A405 A501 A502 A503 A504 A601 A602 A701-A706 A801-A804

Cover Page Accessibility Standards Site Plan Exterior Elevations Exterior Elevations Basement Floor Finish Plan First Floor Finish Plan Second Floor Finish Plan Third Floor Finish Plan Roof Finish Plan Basement Reflected Ceiling Plan First Floor Reflected Ceiling Plan Second Floor Reflected Ceiling Plan Third Floor Reflected Ceiling Plan Basement Furniture Plan First Floor Furniture Plan Second Floor Furniture Plan Third Floor Furniture Plan Roof Furniture Plan Basement Power Plan First Floor Power Plan Second Floor Power Plan Third Floor Power Plan Building Sections Building Sections Interior Elevations Interior Details


Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Details Accessibility Standards Date

28 January 2014

Scale

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A804 A001


Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Details Accessibility Standards Date

28 January 2014

Scale

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A804 A002


Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Details Accessibility Standards Date

28 January 2014

Scale

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A804 A003


Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Details Accessibility Standards Date

28 January 2014

Scale

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A804 A004


Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Site Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/32" = 1' -0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A101


Roof Plan 52' - 11"

Third Floor 36' - 8"

Second Floor 23' - 4"

First Floor 8' - 9"

Basement 0' - 0"

1

South 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Exterior Elevations Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A102


1 A601

Roof Plan 52' - 11"

Third Floor 36' - 8"

Second Floor 23' - 4"

First Floor 8' - 9"

Basement 0' - 0"

1

Legend

East 1/8" = 1'-0"

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Exterior Elevations Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A103


20' - 0"

20' - 0"

77' - 4 3/4" 15' - 7 1/2"

1

2 A602

4' - 7"

Room 108

Storage 106

Offices 105

FL-1

FL-1

FL-1

FL-1

FL-1

4' - 10 1/2"

Room 110

Service Elevator

11' - 6"

4' - 8 1/4"

3

FL-1

UP

UP UP

UP

A701 5 FL-1

Bath 109

Bike Storage/ Trash 103

7' - 4" 6' - 4"

4 A701 11' - 8"

11' - 8"

Warming Kitchen 104

1 A701 2

Bath 111

20' - 10 1/4"

UP

12' - 10 1/4"

3' - 10 1/2" 28' - 2 3/4"

23' - 6 1/4"

A602

UP

43' - 3"

17' - 4 3/4"

FL-1

8' - 0"

16' - 7 3/4"

13' - 4 3/4"

UP

5' - 8 1/2"

5' - 8 1/2"

Mech 107 Storage Space

Storage Space

13' - 7 1/2"

15' - 0 1/4"

8' - 4 1/2" UP Gallery 102

1

Reception 101

A704

FL-2

1 A601 UP

15' - 3 3/8"

1

9' - 5 3/16"

15' - 3 3/8"

14' - 3 1/2"

63' - 1 1/4"

9' - 7 11/16"

Basement Floor Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

FL-1

Existing Wood Floor To Be Sanded and Stained

FL-2

Existing Concrete Floor to be Polished and Stained

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Basement Floor Finish Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A201


20' - 0"

20' - 0"

8' - 0 1/2"

47' - 4" 6' - 3"

22' - 0 1/4"

30' - 2 3/4"

10' - 10 1/4"

4' - 3 1/2"

4' - 3 1/2" 1

2 A602

DN

Room 208

FL-1

FL-1

15' - 0 1/4"

32' - 10 1/2" Hall 201

6 Bath 209

A706

6' - 0"

FL-1

8' - 0"

6' - 0"

DN

FL-1

Mens 206

UP

7' - 4"

Storage 205

FL-1

FL-1

5' - 10 1/2" Womens 207

7' - 11 1/2" 5' - 10 5/8" 5' - 10 5/8" FL-1

Room 213 1

DN

FL-1

Room 210

Open To Below

FL-1

A706 7

14' - 1 3/8" 15' - 3 3/8"

5' - 11 3/4"

A601

9' - 0 1/2" 14' - 3 1/2"

First Floor Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend FL-1

FL-1

5' - 3 1/4"

5' - 8 1/2"

1

FL-1

Storage 204

2

5' - 0 1/4" UP

Service Elevator

A704

6' - 7 3/4"

UP

Conference Room 202

FL-1

4' - 7"

16' - 9 1/2" Bath 212

Event Room 203

DN

FL-1

5' - 7 3/4"

11' - 8"

43' - 3"

DN

A701 6

4' - 7"

28' - 2 3/4"

3' - 10 1/2"

Room 211

21' - 10 3/4" 12' - 8 1/2"

8' - 4" UP

15' - 6 1/4"

A602

Key Plan Existing Wood Floor To Be Sanded and Stained

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

First Floor Finish Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A202


20' - 0" 4' - 9 1/2" 4' - 9 1/2"

5' - 5"

46' - 11 3/4"

2 A602

DN

FL-1

WC 313

12' - 2 5/8"

Work Area 306 A705 1

A702 3 Kitchen 311

5' - 6"

Quiet Room 304

Work Area 301 FL-1

Quiet Room 305

UP

UP

6' - 2 3/16"

3' - 9 3/8"

A601

FL-1

FL-1

Work Area 303 FL-1

WC 309 FL-1

8' - 0 1/2"

7' - 2 1/4"

UP

2

3' - 6"

14' - 5 5/8"

1

Living 312

FL-1

DN

Lockers

3 A705 7' - 7 3/8"

WC 308 Living 316

Printer Station

Kitchenette 307

9' - 4 15/16"

Lockers

6' - 2 3/16"

4

Closet

Closet

3' - 9 3/8"

A705

33' - 3 7/8"

9' - 2 7/16"

FL-1

WC 317

3' - 10 1/2"

7' - 3 3/4"

5' - 7 3/8"

8' - 3 1/4"

1 A702 2

5' - 9"

4' - 6 1/2"

3' - 10 1/2"

DN

UP

12' - 9 3/4"

Dining 310

4' - 8"

DN

11' - 11 3/4"

16' - 11 1/2"

1

Dining 314

4' - 7"

8' - 0 1/2"

A602

Kitchen 315 43' - 3"

77' - 4 3/4"

15' - 2 1/2"

17' - 0 1/4"

20' - 0" 15' - 2 1/2"

32' - 8 7/16"

Work Area 302

29' - 5 9/16"

33' - 6"

19' - 11 3/4"

7' - 5"

34' - 9 1/4"

1

Second Floor Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend FL-1

Key Plan Existing Wood Floor To Be Sanded and Stained

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Second Floor Finish Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A203


20' - 0"

8' - 0 1/2"

69' - 4 1/4" 8' - 3"

11' - 11 1/4"

14' - 10"

1

5' - 5 1/2"

Closet

1

FL-1

FL-1

A601

8' - 5"

Kitchenette 411

WC 412 Bedroom 417

UP

DN 5' - 3"

10' - 10 7/16"

Bedroom 422

Lockers

WorkPod

Quiet Room 404

6' - 5"

Bath 416

Work Area 401

WorkPod

Conference Rooms 403

FL-1

Quiet Room 405

3 A706 2

Quiet Room Quiet Room 407 408

FL-1

WC 413 FL-1

6' - 4 3/4"

FL-1

Shelving

Shelving

Bath 415

UP

A706

FL-1

Printer Stations 410

UP

1

Work Area 402

4' - 6"

DN

Shelving

Laundry

FL-1

FL-1

DN

4 A703

FL-1

10' - 10 7/16" 12' - 9 1/2"

11' - 7 1/2"

DN

Bath 421

UP

FL-1

Shelving

5' - 5 1/4"

Bath 420

3

Bedroom 414

A602

Laundry

11' - 7 1/2"

A703

5' - 5"

11' - 0 5/16"

FL-1

4' - 6"

4' - 4" 5' - 9" 3' - 9 3/4"

43' - 3"

Bedroom 419

2

3' - 10 1/2"

4' - 7"

11' - 11 3/4"

1 A703

2

4' - 0 1/2"

A602

34' - 4"

16' - 8"

20' - 0"

Quiet Room 406

Individual Work Stations 409

5 A706 4 17' - 3 1/2"

17' - 3 1/2" 2' - 8 1/2"

1

6' - 11"

25' - 2 1/8"

8' - 8 11/16"

7' - 0 1/8"

8' - 11 1/4"

6' - 2"

6' - 5"

Third Floor Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend FL-1

8' - 0 1/2"

2' - 8 1/2"

Key Plan Existing Wood Floor To Be Sanded and Stained

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Third Floor Finish Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A204


19' - 11 1/2"

73' - 1 1/16"

1

2

A602

A602

49' - 9 1/2" Roof Patio 503

Roof Patio 502

FL-3

FL-3

13' - 8 1/2"

7' - 7 1/16"

16' - 2"

9' - 8"

7' - 1 1/2"

Bar Rail

DN

FL-3

6' - 0"

Roof Patio 501

4' - 5 3/8"

19' - 2 3/4"

12' - 5"

4' - 1 1/16"

1' - 9"

DN 8' - 4"

4' - 1 1/16" 8' - 4"

12' - 5"

DN

20' - 2 1/2"

5' - 6 1/2" 4' - 1 1/2"

4' - 1 1/2" 5' - 6 1/2"

34' - 1 5/8"

8' - 3 1/4"

22' - 8 1/4"

9' - 8"

4' - 4 1/4"

ADA Rail

20' - 0"

1 A601

1

Roof Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend FL-3

Key Plan Wood Deck

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Roof Finish Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A205


1

2

A602

A602

8' - 2"

LT1 LS1

LS1 8' - 2"

TYPE 1

LS1

8' - 2"

LS1

LT1

LT1

LT1

LT1

LS1 LT1

8' - 2"

TYPE 1

LT1

LT1

LT1

LT1

8' - 2"

LS1

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

IW1

HS1

LS2 LS2

LS2 LS1

HS1

LS1

TYPE 1

LS1

LS1

LS2

LS1

7' - 0"

LT1

IW1 8' - 2"

LS1

LS1

7' - 0"

TYPE 1

LT1

LT1

LT1

8' - 2"

LT1

8' - 2"

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

LS1 7' - 0"

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

22' - 9"

TYPE 1

1

LS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

LS1

A601

1

Basement 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Basement Reflected Ceiling Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A301


1

2

A602

LR1

A602

LR1 10' - 0"

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1 IW2

IW2

LR1

LR1

LW3

IP3 FP1

TYPE 2

LR1 IW2

LP1

10' - 0" LP1

LR1

IW2

FP1

LW3

14' - 0"

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

TYPE 2

IW1

LR1

IW2

IW2

HS1 LR1

LS2 LS2 IW2

HS1

10' - 0"

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1 10' - 0"

TYPE 2

1 A601

1

LR1

LR1

IW2

LS2

IW1

LS2

10' - 0"

TYPE 2

10' - 0"

FP1

LW3

10' - 7"

LR1

10' - 7"

LR1

LR1

LW3

TYPE 2

LW3

LW3

LW3

LW3

LR1

LW2

LW1

LW1

LW1

LW1 IP2 IP1

LW1

22' - 9"

LW2 LR1

LR1

LW2

LW1 LW1

LW1

LW1

LW1

FP2

IP2 IP1 IP1

IP2

TYPE 1

TYPE 2

LR1

FP2

LP1

10' - 7"

TYPE 2

FP2

LR1 LR1

LW1

10' - 0"

FP2

LP1

TYPE 2

LR1

TYPE 1

FP1

LW2 LW2

TYPE 2

LR1

IP3

TYPE 2

LW3 LP1

10' - 0"

IP3

12' - 7"

LW1

IP2 IP1 IP1

IP1 IP2 IP1

IP2 IP1 IP1

IP1 IP2 IP1

IP1 IP1 IP2

First Floor 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

First Floor Reflected Ceiling Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A302


1

2

A602

A602

LR1

LR1

LR1

11' - 6"

LP1

LR1

LP1

LP1

11' - 6"

TYPE 2

LP1 FP4

LW1 LW1 9' - 0"

TYPE 2

FP4

FP4

LR1

LR1 9' - 0"

TYPE 2

LR1

IP2

9' - 0"

IP2

IP2

10' - 0"

LR1

LR1

LP1

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LP1

LP1

LP2

IP2

LP2

LR1

LR1

11' - 6"

TYPE 2

1 A601

1

LR1

LR1

LL1

LR1

LP2

LP2

LP2

TYPE 1

IP2

IP2

IP2

IP2

LP2 LP3

LP2

12' - 9"

LP1

FP4

LP2

LP2

TYPE 1

TYPE 2

LR1

LL1 12' - 9"

11' - 6"

FP4

IP2

LP2

LP2 LR1

FP4

TYPE 2

LP1

LP1

FP4

9' - 0"

TYPE 2

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

FP4

TYPE 1

LW1 LW1

TYPE 2

FP4

12' - 9"

TYPE 2

LR1

FP4

LR1

LL1

FP4

LL1 12' - 9"

LP1

FP4 LP2

FP4 LP2

FP4

LP3

LP3 LP3

LP2

TYPE 1

Second Floor 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Second Floor Reflected Ceiling Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A303


1

2

A602

A602

11' - 6"

11' - 6"

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LP2 LP1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LR1

LP2

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

LP2

LP2

FP3

FP3

FP3

FP3

LP2 12' - 5"

TYPE 2

LP2

FP4

LP2

FP4

LP2

FP4

LP1 10' - 0"

HS1

TYPE 2

LW4

HS1

10' - 0" TYPE 2

LP2

LP1

LW4 LP1

14' - 0"

14' - 0"

10' - 0" LW4

LP2

10' - 0" HS1

HS1

LW4

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

11' - 6"

11' - 6" TYPE 2

TYPE 2

LR1

LR1

LR1

LL1

LR1

LL1 14' - 0" TYPE 1

1 A601

1

LL1 LR1

LR1

LR1

LP2

LP2

IP2

LP2

IP2

IP2

LP2

LR1

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

IP2

LP2

LP1

TYPE 1

TYPE 1

IP2

LP2

LR1

LL1 14' - 0"

LP1

IP2

14' - 0"

TYPE 1

IP2

LW5 9' - 0"

14' - 0"

TYPE 2

TYPE 1

IP4

IP4

LW5 9' - 0"

IP2

TYPE 2

LP1

LW5 IP2

IP2

IP2

LP1

LW5 9' - 0"

TYPE 1

TYPE 2

IP4

IP4

IP4

LW5 IP4

IP4

IP4

IP4

IP4

LW5 LW5 9' - 0"

LW5 LW5 9' - 0"

TYPE 2

TYPE 2

Third Floor 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Third Floor Reflected Ceiling Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A304


1

2

A602

A602

UP

Warming Kitchen 104

Gallery 110

Bath 111

Room 108

UP

Storage 106

Offices 105

Bike Storage/ Trash 103

UP UP

UP

Bath 109

UP

CH-1

Mech 107 Storage Space

Storage Space

Gallery 102

Reception 101

1 A601

TB-1

BN-1

BN-1

TB-1

UP

1

Basement Furniture Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Basement Furniture Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A401


1

2

A602

A602

Event Room 203

DN

CH-2

CH-2 Conference TB-2

202

Storage 204

DN

CH-2

CR-1

Room 208

CH-2

CH-2 CH-2 Room CH-2

CR-1

CH-2

Room 211

BN-2

Hall 201 BN-2

Bath 212

Bath 209

Mens 206

Storage 205

Womens 207 Room 213

DN

Room 210

Open To Below

1 A601

1

First Floor Furniture Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

First Floor Furniture Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A402


CH-3A CH-3A

TB-3

TB-7

CH-4B

Quiet Room 305

TB-3

CH-4A

Work Area 301

SF-1 OT-1

OT-1 SF-1

SF-1

SF-1

1

WC 309

SF-1 SF-1

CH-4A CH-4B

CH-4B CH-4A

CH-4A

SF-1

Work Area CH-5B 303 ST-1

TB-6

SF-1

SF-1

CH-5A CH-5B CH-5A

TB-5 ST-1

SF-2

SF-2

SF-2 CH-5A CH-5B

CH-6 SF-2

ST-1 ST-1

CH-5A CH-5B CH-5A

Work Area 302

TB-5

ST-1 ST-1 CH-5B CH-5A CH-5B

A601

1

WB-1

CH-4A

PT-1

CH-6

TB-6

SF-1 SF-1

Living 312

TB-4

OT-1

TB-6

Living 316

TB-4

PT-1

CH-4A

CH-3A CH-3A

Kitchenette 307

WC 308

TB-4 CH-4B

TB-7

CH-3A

Kitchen 311

TB-4

CH-3A CH-3A

TB-3

TB-4

TB-7

Kitchen 315

WC 313

TB-4

CH-4B

WB-1

CH-4A

TB-7 TB-7

SF-2

SF-2

SF-2

SF-2

SF-2 SF-2

TB-7

WC 317

TB-7

TB-3

CH-4B

TB-7

CH-3A

TB-3

CH-4A

CH-4B

CH-3A

Work Area 306

CH-4B

TB-7

TB-3

Quiet Room 304

CH-3A CH-3A

WB-1

CH-3A

TB-6

Dining 310

TB-6

Dining 314

CH-4B

2 A602

CH-4A

1 A602

SF-2 SF-2

SF-2

Second Floor Furniture Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Second Floor Furniture Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A403


1

2

A602

A602

CH-4C

CH-4D

CH-4D

Work Area 401

CH-4C

Bedroom 414

CH-4C

Bath 415

CH-4C

CH-4C

Bath 420

CH-4D

CH-7

CH-7

CH-7

CH-7

CH-7

CH-7

CH-7

CH-7

CH-7

CH-4D DSK-1

Work Area 402

Printer Stations 410

CH-7

CH-4D

Bedroom 419

CH-4D

CH-4C

TB-6

CH-8

CH-8

A601

1

WC 413

CH-3B CH-3B

CH-3B

CH-3B

TB-7

Quiet Room 405 TB-7

CH-3B

CH-3B

CH-8

TB-7 TB-4

CH-3B

CH-3B

CH-3B

CH-3B

TB-4

CH-3B

Bedroom 417

CH-3B

Bedroom 422 1

TB-4

CH-3B

WC 412

CH-3B

Conference Rooms 403

Quiet Room 404

TB-6

Kitchenette 411

CH-3B

Quiet Room 406

CH-8

Quiet Room Quiet Room 407 408

Individual Work Stations 409 CH-9

CH-9

CH-9

DSK-2 DSK-2

TB-7

Bath 416

TB-7

Bath 421

DSK-2

Third Floor Furniture Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Third Floor Furniture Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A404


1

2

A602

A602

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

Roof Patio 501

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-3

ST-3

ST-3

ST-2

ST-2

SF-3

SF-3

ST-3 ST-3

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-2

ST-3

SF-3

SF-3

ST-3

ST-3

TB-9

TB-9

SF-3

ST-2

ST-3

TB-9

SF-3

ST-3 SF-3

SF-3

ST-3 SF-3

ST-2

SF-3

Roof Patio 502

SF-3

Roof Patio 503

TB-9 ST-3

ST-3

ST-3

1 A601

1

Roof Furniture Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Roof Furniture Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A405


1

2

A602

A602

UP

UP

D

T

D

T

T Warming Kitchen 104

Gallery 110

Room 108

Storage 106

Offices 105

Service Elevator

T

Bike Storage/ Trash 103

T T

UP UP

UP

T

UP

Bath 111

Bath 109

UP T T

Mech 107 Storage Space

Storage Space

UP Gallery 102

Reception 101

1 A601 UP

1

Basement Power Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Basement Power Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A501


1

2 A602

DN

Room 211

UP

Room 208 DN

Event Room 203

Conference Room 202 Service Elevator

DN

Storage 204

T

A602

Hall 201 DN

T

Bath 212

UP

Storage 205

T

Bath 209

Mens 206

T

UP T

T

D

UP

T

Room 213

T

D

DN

D T

Room 210

Womens 207

1 A601

1

First Floor Power Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

First Floor Power Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A502


1

2

A602

A602

T DN UP

DN T

Dining 310

Quiet Room 304

WC 317

Quiet Room 305

WC 313 T Kitchen 311

T

T Kitchen 315

Work Area 301

T

T

T

Work Area 306

T

T

T

T

T

DN Dining 314

DN

UP

Kitchenette 307

UP

T

UP

A601

1

Living 312

WC 309

Work Area 303 Work Area 302

T

Living 316 1

T

T

WC 308

Second Floor Power Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Second Floor Power Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A503


1

2

A602

A602

Bedroom 419

Bedroom 414

UP Work Area 401

Printer Stations 410

T Bath 415

T T

Bath 420

Work Area 402

T

T

DN

T

T DN

UP

UP Bath 421

T

T

T

WC 412

1 A601

1

Bedroom 417

Quiet Room 405

Conference Rooms 403

WC 413

T

Bedroom 422

T

T

T

Kitchenette 411

Bath 416

UP

DN

Laundry

T DN

T

Quiet Room 404

T Quiet Room 406

Quiet Room Quiet Room 407 408 Individual Work Stations 409

T

T

Third Floor Power Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Third Floor Power Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A504


1

2

A602

A602

Roof Patio 503

Roof Patio 502

DN

DN

DN

Roof Patio 501

1 A601

1

Roof Power Plan 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Roof Power Plan Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A505


Third Floor 36' - 8"

Second Floor 23' - 4"

First Floor 8' - 9"

Basement 0' - 0"

1

Section A 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Building Sections Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A601


1

Section B 1/8" = 1'-0"

Legend

Roof Plan 52' - 11"

Roof Plan 52' - 11"

Third Floor 36' - 8"

Third Floor 36' - 8"

Second Floor 23' - 4"

Second Floor 23' - 4"

First Floor 8' - 9"

First Floor 8' - 9"

Basement 0' - 0"

Basement 0' - 0"

2

Section C 1/8" = 1'-0" Key Plan

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Building Sections Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/8" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A602


P1

P1

Basement 0' - 0" 1

Basement 0' - 0"

Interior Elevation @Room 110 (East) 1/4" = 1'-0"

2

W1

W1

Interior Elevation @Room 110 (West) 1/4" = 1'-0" W1

W2

W2

Top-Hung Sliding Painted Glass Door Shower Beyond

Basement 0' - 0" 3

Interior Elevation @Bath 111 (South) 1/4" = 1'-0"

Basement 0' - 0"

Basement 0' - 0" 4

Interior Elevation @Bath 111 (West) 1/4" = 1'-0"

5

Interior Elevation @Bath 109 1/4" = 1'-0"

P1

First Floor 8' - 9" 6

Interior Elevation @Room 211 1/4" = 1'-0"

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Elevations Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/4" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A701


1 A601

P1

W3

P1

P1

Second Floor 23' - 4"

1

Interior Elevation @Dining 314, Kitchen 315, & Living 316 (West) 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 P1

P1

P1

A601

Second Floor 23' - 4" 2

Interior Elevation @Dining 314, Kitchen 315, & Living 316 (East) 1/4" = 1'-0" 1 P1

P1

W3

P1

A601

Second Floor 23' - 4" 3

Interior Elevation @Dining 310, Kitchen 311, & Living 312 1/4" = 1'-0"

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Elevations Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/4" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A702


1

1

A602

P1

A602

Existing Brick

Third Floor 36' - 8" 1

Interior Elevation @Bedroom 419 (North) 1/4" = 1'-0" W5

Third Floor 36' - 8" 2

Interior Elevation @Bedroom 419 (South) 1/4" = 1'-0"

W4

Third Floor 36' - 8" 3

Interior Elevation @Bath 420 1/4" = 1'-0" W4

W4

Third Floor 36' - 8" 4

Interior Elevation @Bath 415 3/8" = 1'-0"

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Elevations Date Scale

28 January 2014 As indicated

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A703


2 A602

P2

First Floor 8' - 9"

1

Interior Elevation @Reception 101 & Gallery 102 1/4" = 1'-0"

2 A602

P2

Retractable Benching By AudienceSystems

First Floor 8' - 9" 2

Interior Elevation @Event Room 203 1/4" = 1'-0"

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Elevations Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/4" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A704


P5

Second Floor 23' - 4" 1

Interior Elevation @Work Area 306 1/4" = 1'-0" 2 P3

1

A602

A601

W6

P3

W6

P2

Second Floor 23' - 4" 2

Second Floor 23' - 4"

Interior Elevation @Work Area 303 (North) 1/4" = 1'-0"

3

Interior Elevation @Work Area 303 (East) 1/4" = 1'-0"

2 A602

Second Floor 23' - 4" 4

Interior Elevation @Work Area 301 1/4" = 1'-0"

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Elevations Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/4" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A705


2 A602

Third Floor 36' - 8" 1

Interior Elevations @Work Area 401 & Work Area 402 1/4" = 1'-0" 1

2

1

A601

A602

A601

P3

P4

Folding Glass Walls by ModernFold

Third Floor 36' - 8" 2

Interior Elevation @Conference Rooms 403 (West) 1/4" = 1'-0"

Third Floor 36' - 8" 3

Third Floor 36' - 8"

Interior Elevation @Conference Rooms 403 (North) 1/4" = 1'-0"

4

Interior Elevation @Quiet Room 406 (East) 1/4" = 1'-0"

1 W7

P5

A601

W7

P4

Third Floor 36' - 8" 5

Interior Elevation @Quiet Room 406 (North) 1/4" = 1'-0"

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

First Floor 8' - 9" 6

Interior Elevation @Men's 206 1/4" = 1'-0"

First Floor 8' - 9" 7

Interior Elevation @Women's 207 1/4" = 1'-0"

Interior Elevations Date Scale

28 January 2014 1/4" = 1'-0"

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A706


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Details Date

28 January 2014

Scale

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Boston Architectural College

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A801


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Boston Architectural College 320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Details Date

28 January 2014

Scale

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A802


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Details PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Boston Architectural College

Date

28 January 2014

Scale

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A803


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

320 Newbury St. Boston MA

Interior Details Date

28 January 2014

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Boston Architectural College

Scale

109 Jackson St. Lowell MA

A804


HAMILTON MILL SPECIFICATIONS


FURNITURE Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery: Quantity:

BN-1 Bench Coalesse Together Bench, Straight with Back, 1.5” Offset COTO96WB15 H: 31” (Seat 18.5”) W: 96.5” D: 26.75” COM fabric FB-2 2

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model:

CH-1 Chair Herman Miller Eames Aluminum Group Management Chair EA334 H: 293.75” W:23” D:17” Polished aluminum base, polished aluminum frame finish, COM Fabric FB-1 Glides with manual seatheight adjustment 4

Model No.: Dimensions: Finish Upholstery: Specifications: Quantity:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery: Quantity:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery: Specifications: Quantity:

BN-2 Bench Phase Wired Bench H: 14” W: 60” D: 22” COM fabric top, Chrome plate steel base FB-3 2

CH-2 Chair B&B Italia/Teknion Studio Tulip 60 Sled Work Chair BBTCS Style B H: 27.5” W: 23.625” D: 21.25” Chrome Frame Finish, COM Fabric FB-5 Sled Work Base 8


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery:

CH-3 Chair Coalesse Wrapp Side Chair

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery:

CH-5 Chair Coalesse Bindu Low Back Side Chair

H: 28.75” (Seat 17.5”) W: 24.5” D: 20.25” Chrome base, COM Fabric CH-3A: FB-6 CH-3B: FB-24 Specifications: Sled base Quantity: CH-3A: 12 CH-3B: 15

H: 33.75” (Seat 17.75”) W: 25” D: 25” Trivalent chrome leg base, COM Fabric CH-5A Interior: FB-24 Exterior: FB-23 CH-5B Interior: FB-25 Exterior: FB-23 Quantity: CH-5A: 6 Ch-5B: 6

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery:

CH-4 Chair Hightower Happy Armchair SA-100 H: 35.5” (Seat 18”) W: 23.75” D: 23” Mirror chrome finish base, COM Fabric CH-4A: Interior Seat FB-9 Exterior Seat FB-8 CH-4B: Interior Seat FB-10 Exterior Seat FB-8 CH-4C: Interior Seat FB-12 Exterior Seat FB-11 CH-4D: Interior Seat FB-13 Exterior Seat FB-11 Specifications: Sled base Quantity: CH-4A: 9 CH-4B: 9 CH-4C: 6 CH-4D: 6 Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery: Specifications: Quantity:

CH-6 Chair Coalesse Bob Lounge Chair with Headrest H: 41.25” (Seat 17”) W: 35” D: 34.25” Polished aluminuml base, COM Fabric FB-21, Seat: FB-22 Swivel base, adjustable headrest 2


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery: Spedifications:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery: Quantity:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery: Specifications:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Dimensions: Finish: Specifications:

CH-7 Chair Stylex Sava SV464-01 H: 33” (Seat 16-21”) W: 27.5” D: 18.5” Polished Aluminum Frame, COM Fabric FB-27 Medium Back, Adjustable MultiTask Arms, Standard Upholstery Seat, Chrome Trim Soft Wheel Casters Quantity: 10

CH-9 Chair Teknion AL3 Executive Chair NALYG-S H: 42” (Seat 17-21.75”) W: 28.75” D: 28.75” Polished aluminum frame, COM Fabric FB-27 Upholstered back and seat, soft casters Quantity: 3

CH-8 Chair Hightower Shelter Lounge Chair GZ7950 H: 52.5” (Seat 16.25”) W: 33.75” D: 32.5” COM Fabric FB-25, FB-26 (Seat) 4

DSK-1 Desk Teknion Interpret Desking System H: 30” W: 96” D: 72” Platinum Leg Finish, Dark Walnut Worksurface Double-Sided Beginning Frame (WWSDB-A-S-28-72-96-7) Double-Sided Middle Frame (WWSDM-A-SR-28-72-96-7) Double-Sided Finish Frame (WWSDF-A-S-28-72-96-7) Wire Gap Work Surface (WWWRW-D-30-96-FD-9) (Qty. 3) Casual Space Division Sliding Screen Dividers (WWCSS22-60-FB-7) (Qty. 3) Quantity: 1


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish:

DSK-2 Desk Teknion Livello Table LVRW9-E-N-24-48-FD-9-FD-7-GC-N-E H: 22-48” W: 48” D: 24” Platinum Leg Finish, Dark Walnut Worksurface

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery: Quantity:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Upholstery: Quantity:

SF-1 Sofa Hightower Havana Sectional Series Lounge Chair S-8002 H: 28.75” (Seat 16.25”) W: 26” D: 27.5” Silver Powdercoat base, COM Fabric FB-20 11

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions:

OT-1 Ottoman Hightower Havana Sectional Series Ottoman S-8020 H: 16.25” W: 26” D: 26” Silver Powdercoat base, COM Fabric FB-20 2

SF-2 Sofa Hightower Monolog Sectional MT590S + MT590BA + MT590P H:15” W: 27.5” D: 27.5” Arm/Back: H: 25.5” W: 27.5” D: 7” Pillow: H: 15.75” W:27.5” Finish: COM Fabric Upholstery: Arm/Back FB-18 Seat FB- 18 Pillow FB-19 Quantity: 13


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

SF-3 Sofa Coalesse Emu Ivy Sofa and Cushion CO2586 H: 26” (Seat 14.5”) W: 75.5” D: 35.5” White Frame, Kona Cushion 11

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

ST-1 Stool Kartell One More Please Bar Stool 5895 H: 43.3” (Seat 29.5”) W: 15” D: 18.1” E6 Solid black 6

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model:

ST-2 Stool Malik Collection Moraga Stackable Indoor/Outdoor Bar Height Stool C-C-7451-BAR H: 29.5” (Seat 29.5”) W: 21.75” D: 14.25” Silk Grey Powder coat finish 21

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

ST-3 Stool Coalesse Emy Ivy Pouf CO2595 H: 15.75” DIA: 20.75” White 14

Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Dimensions: Finish:

TB-1 Table Phase Wired Complement Table H: 15” DIA: 24” Walnut solid wood top, chrome plate steel base Quantity: 2

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

TB-3 Table Coalesse Emu Round Table CO2473 H: 29.5” W: 31.5” D: 31.5” White Table Top, White Base 6

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish:

TB-2 Table Knoll Saarinen Dining Table - Large Oval H: 28.25” W:96” D:54” White base, Carrara Marble top 1

TB-4 Table Coalesse Akira Rectangle Fixed Top with T-Base AK7236RTC H: 28.5” W: 72” D: 36” 6090 Amber Cherry Wood Veneer Top, Polished Aluminum Base Specifications: 3” Diameter locking dual-wheel casters, Top with flat wood edge Quantity:


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish:

TB-5 Table 3Form Large Conference Table 650.06.02 H: 29” W: 96” D: 42” Chroma Pewter 1” Top, Anodized Aluminum Base Quantity: 2

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

TB-7 Table Vitra Nestable 12A76 H: 22.5-30.25” W: 19.75” D: 13.75” Basic dark 14

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish:

TB-6 Table Hightower Monolite Laptop Table MT6410C H: 26” W: 23.6” D: 12.5” Standard mirror chrome base, White laminate top Quantity: 7

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish:

TB-8 Table Coalesse Akira Rectangle Fixed Top with T-Base AK7230RTC H: 28.5” W: 72” D: 30” 6090 Amber Cherry Wood Veneer Top, Polished Aluminum Base Specifications: 3” Diameter locking dual-wheel casters, Top with flat wood edge Quantity:


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

TB-9 Table Coalesse Emy Ivy Rectangular Side Table CO2592 H: 11.75” W: 53.24” D: 29.25” White base, white powdercoat metal top

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

CR-1 Credenza Herman Miller H Frame Three-Unit Credenza JCH3-C2-C2-C2 H: 26.5” W: 92” D: 14” OU Walnut 2


FABRICS Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-1 Carnegie Edge 6252 Color: 2 100% Polyurethane 54” 100,000+ Double Rubs Wyzenbeek Test Complies with Calif. Bulletin #117E Qualifies for use in Class A and Class 1 areas

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

For Use On CH-1

FB-2 Maharam Monk’s Wool 457301 Color: 003 Slate 96% Wool, 4% Nylon 54” 45,000+ cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On BN-1

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-3 Maharam Alpaca Herringbone 465898 Color: 003 Graphite 35% Polyester, 30% Alpaca, 30% Wool, 5% Cotton 56” 20,000+ Double Rubs Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On BN-2

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-4 Maharam Metric 466014 Color: 026 Admiral 51% PI Recycled Polyester, 49% Polyester 54” 100,000+ Double Rubs Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 4.1& 4.2 (Recycled Content), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials)), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified PFOA-Free Stain Resistant For Use On Retractable Bench Seating (Room 203)


Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-5 Knoll Textiles Knoll Hopsak K1206/9 Color: Magenta 100% Wool 55” 80,000+ Double Rubs Wyzenbeek Test Passes Calif. Bulletin #117 NFPA 260 (UFAC Class 1) ASTM E-84 Class A Biodegradable 100% Natural Fiber Oeko-Tex Certified Greenguard Certified

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Repeat: Durability: Notes:

FB-6 Maharam Tailor 466173 Color: 013 Iron 100% Vinyl 54” 7” 100,000+ Double Rubs Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Antimicrobial Stain Resistant Finish For Use On CH-3A

For Use On CH-2

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Notes:

FB-7 Maharam Zoom by Kvadrat 282860 Color: 117 100% Trevira CS Polyester 66” Meets NFPA 701-1999 Test Method #1 Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use in Room 306, Privacy Curtains

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-8 Maharam Divina Melange by Kvadrat 460830 Color: 170 100% Wool 59” 45,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials)), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On CH-4A & CH-4B


Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-9 Knoll Textiles Hourglass K1523/11 Color: Tart 77% Recycled Polyester, 15% Polyester, 8% Nylon 56” 100,000+ Double Rubs, Wyzenbeek Method Passes Calif. Bulletin #117 NFPA 260 (UFAC Class 1) ASTM E-84 Class A Soil and Stain Repellant Finish Greenguard Certified May contribute to LEED certification

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-10 Maharam Hallingdal by Kvadrat 460760 Color: 420 70% Wool, 30% Rayon 51” 100,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On CH-4B

For Use On CH-4A

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Notes:

FB-11 Teknion Textiles Full Wool 4008-01 (F206) 100% Wool 69” CAL 117 Section E Martindale 50,000 Cycles For Use On CH-4C & CH-4D

Color: Fantasme

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-12 Maharam Tonus by Kvadrat 460800 Color: 132 90% Wool, 10% Helanca 51” 100,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified

For Use On CH-4C


Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-13 Maharam Hallingdal by Kvadrat 460760 Color: 563 70% Wool, 30% Rayon 51” 100,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

For Use In Privacy Booths

For Use On CH-4D

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Notes:

FB-15 Maharam Messenger 458640 Color: 040 Nile 78% PI Recycled Polyester, 15% Polyester, 7% Nylon 54” Meets ASTME 84 Unadhered flame 15, smoke 95 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 4.1& 4.2 (Recycled Content), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use in Room 301 and Room 401, Upholstered Walls

FB-14 Maharam Melange Tweed 461190 Color: 006 Summer 100% Wool 54” 50,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Notes:

FB-16 Maharam Messenger 458640 Color: 062 Ultramarine 78% PI Recycled Polyester, 15% Polyester, 7% Nylon 54” Meets ASTME 84 Unadhered flame 15, smoke 95 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 4.1& 4.2 (Recycled Content), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use in Room 301 and Room 401, Upholstered Walls


Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Notes:

FB-17 Maharam Messenger 458640 Color: 038 Depth 78% PI Recycled Polyester, 15% Polyester, 7% Nylon 54” Meets ASTME 84 Unadhered flame 15, smoke 95 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 4.1& 4.2 (Recycled Content), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

For Use On SF-1 (Back and Seat)

For Use in Room 301 and Room 401, Upholstered Walls

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Notes:

FB-19 Knoll Textiles Cato H800/42 Color: Blue 86% Wool, 14% Rayon 54” 1000,000+ Rubs, Martindale Method Passes Calif. Bulletin #117 NFPA 260 (UFAC Class 1) Greenguard Certified May contribute to LEED certification For Use On SF-1 (Pillows)

FB-18 Knoll Textiles Knoll Velvet K784/84 Color: Aviator 54% Cotton, 46% Mohair 54” 80,000+ Double Rubs, Wyzenbeek Method Passes Calif. Bulletin #117 NFPA 260 (UFAC Class 1) Greenguard Certified May contribute to LEED certification

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-20 Maharam Hallingdal by Kvadrat 460760 Color: 764 70% Wool, 30% Rayon 51” 100,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On SF-1 and OT-1


Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-21 Teknion Textiles Full Wool 4008-08 (F213) 100% Wool 69” CAL 117 Section E Martindale 50,000 Cycles

Color: Peridot

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Repeat: Durability: Notes:

For Use On CH-6

FB-22 Maharam Stripes 463980 Color: 003 Syncopated Stripe 92% Wool, 8% Nylon 56” 9.5” 75,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On CH-6 (Seat)

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Notes:

FB-23 Maharam Alpaca Herringbone 465898 Color: 002 Cinder 35% Polyester, 30% Alpaca, 30% Wool, 5% Cotton 56” 20,000+ Double Rubs Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On CH-5A & Ch-5B

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-24 Maharam Tonus by Kvadrat 460800 Color: 780 90% Wool, 10% Helanca 51” 100,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On CH-5A


Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-25 Maharam Tonus by Kvadrat 460800 Color: 636 90% Wool, 10% Helanca 51” 100,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On CH-5B

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content:

FB-22 Maharam Steady 465947 Color: 008 Tidal 45% PI Recycled Polyester, 45% Polyester, 10% Post Consumer Recycled Polyester Width: 54” Durability: 100,000+ Double Rubs Notes: Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 4.1& 4.2 (Recycled Content), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On Workpods (Seating)

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Notes:

FB-23 Maharam Campas by Kvadrat 281620 Color: 100 100% Trevira CS Polyester 55” Meets NFPA 701-1999 Test Method #1 Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use Workpods (Privacy Curtain)

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Repeat: Durability: Notes:

FB-24 Knoll Textiles Sutton K1750/6 Color: Lily Pond 56% Recycled Polyester, 44% Polyester 56” 3/4” Vertical, 1/4” Horizontal 100,000+ Double Rubs, Wyzenbeek Method Passes Calif. Bulletin #117 NFPA 260 (UFAC Class 1) Greenguard Certified May contribute to LEED certification For Use On CH-3B


Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-25 Maharam Tonus by Kvadrat 460800 Color: 210 90% Wool, 10% Helanca 51” 100,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On CH-8 (Back)

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Repeat: Durability: Notes:

FB-26 Maharam Wool Striae 466184 Color: 006 100% Wool 54” 5.25” H 40,000+ Cycles, Martindale Method Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Reduced Environmental Impact Contributes to LEED MR Credit 6 (Rapidly Renewable Materials), LEED IEQ Credit 4.5 (Low-Emitting Materials), Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On CH-8 (Seat)

Code: Manufacturer: Name: Content: Width: Durability: Notes:

FB-27 Maharam Pitch 466186 Color: 001 Alpine 100% Vinyl 54” 100,000+ Double Rubs Meets Calif. Bulletin #117, NFPA 260 Antimicrobial Stain and Ink Resistant Greenguard and Greenguard Gold Certified For Use On CH-7 and CH-9


FINISHES Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: Product No.: Series: Sheen: Color:

P1 Paint Benjamin Moore Natura No-VOC Paint 513 Classic Colors Eggshel 873 Baby’s Breath

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: Product No.: Series: Sheen: Color:

P2 Paint Benjamin Moore Natura No-VOC Paint 514 Color Preview Semi-Gloss 2122-60 Palest Pistachio

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: Product No.: Series: Sheen: Color: Notes:

P2 Paint Benjamin Moore Natura No-VOC Paint 514 Color Preview Semi-Gloss 2122-60 Palest Pistachio Finished with Idea Paint, Clear Create Series

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: Product No.: Series: Sheen: Color:

P4 Paint Benjamin Moore Natura No-VOC Paint 514 Color Preview Semi-Gloss 2138-70 Gray Lake


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: Product No.: Series: Sheen: Color: Notes:

P5 Paint Benjamin Moore Natura No-VOC Paint 514 Color Preview Semi-Gloss 2074-20 Summer Plum Finished with Idea Paint, Clear Create Series

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: SIze: Color:

W1 Tile Hammersmith Glazed Subway Tile Series 4” x 12” White

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: Size: Color:

W2 Tile Salerno Nova Varos Series 12” x 24” Madre Perla

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: Size: Color:

W3 Tile Roma Tile American Olean 3” x 6” Ice White A025


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: SIze: Color:

W4 Tile Takla Starlight Porcelain Through-Body Tile 12” x 24” Black Galaxy

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: SIze: Color:

W5 Tile Takla Starlight Porcelain Through-Body Tile 12” x 24” Light Comet

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: Color: Notes:

W6 Wall Covering Source One Rush Windsor Class A Fire Rating

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Product Name: SIze: Color:

W7 Tile Kaska Porcelain Tile-Rimini Series 12” x 24” Silk Black


SPECIALTY Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Specifications: Quantity:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

PT-1 Partition Molo Design Softwall (White Textile) SW-T-WT-06-12 H: 72” W: 2”-180” D: 12” Black Wall Mount Hook, Fabric Handle (2) 3

WB-1 Rolling Whiteboard Hightower Chat Board Mobile CB1250 H: 71” W: 47.25” D: 23.5” P-01 Pure White 3

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Specifications: Quantity:

PT-2 Partition Molo Design Softwall (White Textile) SW-T-WT-06-12 H: 72” W: 2”-180” D: 12” Black Wall Mount Magnetic Panel, Fabric Handle (1) 2


FIXTURES Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish:

LAV-1 Lavatory Kohler Traverse Vanity Top/Sink K-2955-0 H: 5.25” W: 30.5” D: 21.625” White 26

LAV-3 Lavatory Kohler Ladena Under-Mount Sink K-2215-0 H: 8.125” W: 23.25” D: 16.25” White Quantity: 9

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

LAV-2 Lavatory Toto USA Curva Vessel Lavatory LT185 H: 6.25” DIA: 18” #01 Cotton 26

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

LAV-4 Lavatory Kohler Parigi Pedestal Sink K-2175-4-0 H: 32.875” W: 19.75” D: 14” White 13


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

LAV-5 Lavatory Kohler Parigi Wall Mount Sink K-2176-4-0 H: 32.875” W: 19.75” D: 14” White 1

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

LAV-6 Lavatory Toto USA Larissa Vessel Lavatory LT523G H: 6.25” DIA: 17” #01 Cotton 40

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

LAV-7 Lavatory Kohler Purist Above-Mount Sink K-2314-0 H: 4.0625” W: 24” D: 23.5” White 1

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

SK-1 Kitchen Sink Kohler Poise Sink K-3160-NA H: 9.5” W: 33” D: 18” Stainless Steel 14


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

FC-1 Faucet Kohler Memoirs Wall-Mount Faucet K-T448-3S-CP H: 8.5” W: 8.125” D: 8” Polished Chrome 26

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

FC-2 Faucet Kohler Finial Traditional Faucet K-T343-4M-CP H: 7” W: 9.75” D: 8” Polished Chrome 26

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

FC-3 Faucet Kohler Purist Wall-Mount Faucet K-T11839-CP H: 4.8125” W: .875” D: 9.5” Polished Chrome 9

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

FC-4 Faucet Kohler Archer Faucet K-11076-4-CP H: 8.9375” W: 3.9375” D: 8” Polished Chrome 14


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

FC-5 Faucet Kohler Purist Wall-Mount Faucet K-T14412-3-CP H: 8.5” W: 8” D: 6.5” Polished Chrome 40

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

FC-6 Faucet Kohler Essex Kitchen Faucet K-8763-CP H: 15.5” W: 2.25” D: 9.25” Polished Chrome 14

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

SWR-1 Shower Base Kohler Archer Center Drain Shower Base K-9479-0 H: 3.6875” W: 60” D: 36” White 26

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

BF-1 Shower Faucet Kohler Devonshire Shower Faucet K-T396-4E-CP H: 7” W: 7” Polished Chrome 26


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

BF-2 Bath Faucet Kohler Revival Bath and Shower Faucet K-16213-4-CP H: 2.5” W: 8” D: 7.125” Polished Chrome 29

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

BTH-1 Bath Kohler Archer Alcove Bath K-1123-LA-0 H: 19” W: 60” D: 32” White 29

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

WC-1 Toilet Kohler Kelston Two-Piece 1.28 GPF Toilet K-3755-0 H: 30.5” W: 16.75” D: 30” White 70

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

WC-2 Toilet Kohler Highline Two-Piece 1.0 GPF Toilet K-3519-0 H: 31.25” W: 21.25” D: 31.125” White 9


LIGHTING Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

LS1 LED Ceiling Mount Light Fixture Fontana Arte Sole Square Wall Ceiling Light 9.4” UL4140/2/30K-94 Matte White LED 17/11 112

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

LS2 LED Ceiling Mount Light Fixture Fontana Arte Sole Square Wall Ceiling Light 4.7” UL4140/2/30K-47 Matte White LED 17/11 56

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity: Notes:

IW1 Wall Mount Fixture Hinkley Lighting Zina 4 Light Bath Bar 51564BN Brushed Nickel Halogen/Incandescent 60 14 UL Listed for damp locations

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity: Notes:

HS1 Ceiling Mount Shower Light Fontana Arte Kodo 3099 UL3099-120-CR-120 Chrome Halogen 40 14 UL Listed for damp locations


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Wattage: Quantity: Notes:

LT1 LED Track Lighting WAC Lighting Radiant 856 LED Low Voltage Track LHT-856LED-BN Brushed Nickel MR16 LED 6.4 15 Dims to 1% with electronic low voltage (ELV) dimmer

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

IP1 Pendant Fixture Tom Dixon Copper Shade Pendant 9.9” MSS25-PUSM-9.9IND Copper Incandescent 60 13

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

IP2 Pendant Fixture Tom Dixon Copper Shade Pendant 17.7” MSS25-PUSM-17.7IND Copper Incandescent 60 22

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity: Notes:

FP1 Pendant Fixture Fontana Arte Avico Suspension Lamp (Small) UL5564/OBI-White-5562/0 White Compact Fluorescent 100/23 4 With Bottom Diffuser


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

IP3 Pendant Fixture Moooi Square Boon Pendant ULMOLQB-B Black Incandescent 60 10

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity: Notes:

FP2 Pendant Fixture AXO Light USA Skirt 59” Pendant USSKR150E26-XX-BC BC-White Fluorescent 23 4 Trevira CS Firepoof Fabric

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity: Notes:

FP3 Pendant Fixture AXO Light USA Skirt 39” Pendant USSKR100E26-NE-BC BC-White W/ Black Outer Mesh Fluorescent 23 4 Trevira CS Firepoof Fabric

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

FP4 Pendant Fixture AXO Light USA Velvet 27” Round Pendatn USVEL-070-BC BC-White Fluorescent 23 17


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity: Notes:

LP1 LED Drop Fixture AXO Light USA Favilla UCEDL-U-2-105-1-04-1-3-90 Black LED 9 20 Suspension light includes a rigid stand and a 109 degree directional head

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

LR 1 LED Recessed Light Fixture WAC Lighting Model WR-6R1LD-T Six Inch Recessed Light WR-6R1LD-T White LED 29 428

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity: Notes:

LW1 LED Wall Mount Light Fixture CSL Lighting Orb LED Wall or Ceiling Light SS1042B-PC Polished Chrome LED 1 12 Rotates 120 Degrees Off Center 50,000 Hour Lifetime Bulb Rating

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity: Notes:

LW2 LED Wall Mount Light Fixture CSL Lighting Orb LED Wall or Ceiling Light SS1042B-BL Black LED 1 5 Rotates 120 Degrees Off Center 50,000 Hour Lifetime Bulb Rating


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

LW3 LED Wall Sconce & Costa Quantum LED Wall Sconce Quantum Wall #SPK-QUANTUM-LED-WALL-SCONCE White LED 5.5 9

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

LL1 LED Linear Fixture Cerno Vix 5 Light LED Linear Pendant Light 7-140-D-34 Oiled Walnut LED 3.2

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

LP2 Pendant Fixture Tech Lighting Pele Pendant FJ-PEL-W-C-LED Black LED 5.8 30

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

LP3 Pendant Fixture FLOS Lighting Aim Multipoint Pendant Light 5X-FU009030-5 Black LED 16 4


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

IP4 Pendant Fixture &Traditions Topan Pendant AT-207894 Black Incandescent 60 10

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

LW5 LED Wall Sconce Tech Lighting Revel Wall Sconce 700WSRVL-B-T-LED Gloss Black LED 10/24 13

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Finish: Lamp Type: Wattage: Quantity:

LW4 LED Wall Sconce Sonneman Lattice 5-Light LED Bath Bar 2321-25-C Satin Black LED 13 28


EQUIPMENT Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

EQ-1 Oven/Stove Range Bosh Integra 30” Self-Cleaning Slide-In Electric Convection Range HEI7282U H: 35.75” W: 29.25” D: 25” Stainless Steel 14

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

EQ-2 Range Hood Whirlpool 30” Convertible Range Hood GXW7230DAS W: 30” D: 20” Stainless Steel 14

EQ-3 Dishwasher LG 24” Built-In Dishwasher LDS5040ST H: 33.75” W: 23.75” D: 24.75” Stainless Steel 14

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model:

EQ-4 Refridgerator KitchenAid Pro Line Series 24 Cu. Ft. Counter-Depth Side by Side Refrigerator KSC24C8EYP H: 71” W: 35.5” D: 24.375” Stainless Steel 14

Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:


Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

EQ-5 Washer Whirlpool Cabrio Top Load 3.6 cu. ft. Washer w/ SeeThrough Tempered Glass Lid WTW5700AC H: 43” W: 27.5” D: 27” Chrome Shadow 14

Code: Category: Manufacturer: Style/Model: Model No.: Dimensions: Finish: Quantity:

EQ-6 Dryer Whirlpool Cabrio 7.4 cu. ft. HE Dryer WED5800BC H: 43.5” W: 27” D: 29.5” Chrome Shadow 14


ID Thesis Seminar Submitted: Fall 2012 Thesis Proposal


CONT ENTS

Preface

1

Thesis Abstract

1

Research

3

Terms of Criticism

5

Methods of Inquiry

6

Precedents

7

Site

13

Programming

16

Bibliography

17

Resume

18


P ROPOSAL

Preface The way we work and the way we live is a constantly evolving sytem that is influenced by technology and cultural needs. As the way we work changes along with these advances, we have the opportunity to shape the way we live in response to this. Thesis Abstract Workstyles are changing and a some trends are developing in response to changes in need and technology. One of the biggest changes today is the increase in nomadic workers and workers who stay at home. Companies are offering this increasingly as studies show that workers who work at home tend to be happier, cheaper, and more efficient. It seems to be a winning situation for employers. For employees, there is an opportnity to maximize live/work environments by creating spaces that respond to this trend. What is critical about a work/life space is the importance of boundaries. This thesis will explore the importance of boundaries on a macro and micro level, meaning between the building and the community, the live space and the work space, and boundaries within each specifically (both in public/private areas in the workspace, and public/private areas in the living units). It is my intent to use boundaries to create an occupiable threshold between spaces. Rather than a quick immediate transition between the two programs (work and live), adding a place to pause both mentally and physically en route from one to the other adds one more layer to the internal community, as well as a more deliberate and separated delineation between them. This ‘gray area’ between will separate, yet bond, the two spaces at the same time.

1


The importance of a community is an essential consideration for a building of this type. The goal is not to create a bubble for people to remain within, but to limit the necessity of transportation and wasted time and resources in order to engage in all types of living activity. Access to restaurants, shops, recreation, and opportunities to enjoy nature should be within a reasonable distance, and easy access to this will encourage people to use these resources. Fostering a community within the building as well will be an important aspect, not only for the importance of collaboration and fostering of ideas for the sake of work, but for the increase in the value of the everyday experience. Networking on a social level, with face to face contact, increases opportunities and relationships which this type of building can promote. As a building type that is being developed as a response to a trend, it is important to create the space to be able to respond to future trends. Easily moveable elements and modularity will help develop a space that can be easily manipulated as necesseary as needs change.

2


RESEARCH

& CULTURAL CONTEXT

Again and again research published indicating trends in workstyles cites an increase in mobile workers and workers telecommuting as a major change in the workforce today. Companies are seeing happier and more efficient workers as well as a decrease in overhead costs. Workers are more productive during the day and save resources (time and money) on their daily commute. The number of workersDatanow telecommuting fromamong home is dramatically andworkers is also revealed a high level of consistency the mobile worker population.increasing The majority of mobile themselves as: expected to continue over the next five to ten years. Ascharacterize published by Knoll in “The Voice of the Mobile Worker”: 4 Mature: 65% were more than 40 years old

“A recent benchmark study from Nemertes Research (2007) revealed staggering 4 Family-oriented: 82%that wereamarried or living83% with aofpartner organizations now consider themselves “virtual,” with workgroups across multiple locations 4 Hardworking: 75%spread were working more than 40 hours per week and geographies. In addition, 91% of company employees reportedly do some of their work outside of 4 Professionals: More than 80% held professional, managerial or executive positions traditional headquarter locations, and 96% use some form of realtime collaboration tools (e.g., instant Mobile workers are serious, career-oriented employees. 67% of respondents were employed in an organization with a 3. Productivity for a Mobile Worker messaging, web or audio/video conferencing). Indicative of widespread worker mobility, Nemertes formal mobile work program and had long-term employment at their company. 30% had been employed for 6 to 10 years, found that 43% of global organizations had a mobility with currently developing while strategy, more than 20% had another spent 16 to 26% 20 or more years at their organization. one.” Mobile workers do their best independent work at home. As outlined in Figure 2, more than 60% of respondents said they are most productive at home, with as much as two-thirds of their time spent on individual or independent work. Mobile workers find collaboration to be positive. When asked about working collaboratively with others in their organization, a small percentage of respondents had a negative (2%) or neutral (10%) experience. Indeed, working collaboratively was a positive experience for 88% of those surveyed.

This is in keeping with the understanding that mobile workers utilize their company-provided workspace primarily as a place to meet with clients and fellow workers within the organization.

Figure 2: Mobile Workers’ Most Productive Locations Other 2.43% Other offices, sites, branches 2.43%

Café/Restaurant 1.21%

Figure 1: Identified Roles of Mobile Workers 14

Hotel 0% Car 0%

12 10 8

Client Premises 8.01%

6 4

Primary Location 24.51%

Mobile Worker Requirements at Company-Provided Locations 1. Meeting Space

Mobile Worker’s Most Productive Locations

Mobile workers express the need for team space. The Study uncovered a general misalignment of resources in this regard: there is a disparity between required work settings and the types of spaces being provided to mobile workers. Respondents’ comments validated the perception that team rooms are sorely missing.

Published in The Voice of The Mobile Worker, Knoll Inc., 2007

3

More than 50% of mobile workers stated that they really needed conference room space at their employer’s office, but were having trouble getting it. Less than 5% of respondents had assigned collaborative space (see Figure 3). Mobile workers do not necessarily need individual space at employer locations. The majority (more than 60%) of those surveyed said they had an assigned workstation at their employer’s office (see Figure 4) but reported they did not need this type of space for independent work tasks, which are being completed at home. Few mobile workers have unassigned workstations. In comparison, only 17% of respondents said they were

2 0

Administrator Advisor Buyer Client Collaborator Competitor Comptroller Consultant Contractor Coordinator Designer Developer Evaluator Influencer Innovator Investigator Leader Marketer Mentor Partner Problem Solver Producer Regulator Researcher Seller Service Provider Subject Matter Expert Trouble Shooter Other

At home 61.41%

Identified Roles of Mobile Wokers

Published in The Voice of The Mobile Worker, Knoll Inc., 2007

2. Tasks of Mobile Work

Mobile workers reported that they network and collaborate inside the office, while other types of work tasks were generally performed at home. When working from their home base, mobile workers responded that their primary work tasks were: 4 Computer-based teamwork and correspondence


What these Trends Mean for Work and the Workplace Implication 1: The Continued Distribution of Workplaces

F U TURE WORK AND WORK TRENDS

These five trends will push work and workplaces to be more global across time zones, distributed within regions, and personalized. Centralized offices are not going away; however, they will be different, with a greater variety of work settings to support a greater diversity of need. The corporate office will transition to a meeting or collaboration center for critical face-to-face meetings, such as customer sales and training, intensive work sessions and social events.

Mobile Workers in the US

Corporate offices are already shifting away from emphasizing solo work, turning the percentage of personal space from 60% to 30% of the floor plan. This shift enables meetings of different degrees of formality and sizes with drop-in workstations for

Macro Trends The six macro trends include: meetings. The exceptions will be high-cost resources such as R&D laboratories and • Rise of the intangible economy customer sales centers. • Business in an instant • Embedding knowledge in design Implication 2: The Challenge of Keeping Workers Engaged and Connected • The sustainability imperative When I interviewed a senior demographics vice president of human resources for a large technology • Evolving workforce company about its remote workers, he asked, “How do we make sure that the • Globalization of work

Millions 70

checking email, doing some quick personal work, or making a phone call in between

60 50 40 30 20

employee in their fuzzy bunny slipper and pajamas is still engaged with his/her

10

co-workers and with our company?” Indeed, this may be a growing concern as more Implications for the Workplace

0

2008

2016 (projected)

By 2016, 63 million Americans are expected to telecommute, representing 43% of all US workers. Another study indicates that over next five years, white collar workers plan to increase their time working remotely by 50%, resulting in average white collar workers spending 30% of their time working out of the central office. Based on Forrester Research, US Telecommuting Forecast, 2009 and The Future of Work, Adobe Systems, May 13, 2009

workers spend part of their time away from the office. This is a problem from the To succeed in the future, companies must:

organization’s but it’sstyles a problem employeesmobility as well. People identify • Anticipateperspective, mobile work andforleverage themselves their workgenerations and with their work groups, and still want to engage with • Plan forbymultiple at work others, meet and“environmental to catch up on eachcontrol” others’ lives and families. The question is • Giveto people how and where they do this as as more workers work and rarely meet • Design thewillworkplace a resource not remotely a destination others face-to-face.sustainability • Incorporate

into the workplace • Provide healthy work spaces That senior vice president was right to be concerned about employee engagement. Work Workthat Trends InFrom our Future research, weand found 30% of the technology company’s employees were Publised by Dr. Michael O’Neill, Senior Director, Workplace Research mobile workers, and many rarely returned to the office once they were “untethered.” Knoll, Inc. 2009 As more and more people worked away from that company’s central office, there

were fewer and fewer colleagues left to visit. In response, the company is creating “magnet spaces” to entice employees: formal and informal collaboration areas, hoteling workstations, and destination resource centers with copiers, supplies, etc. To be successful, the initiative will need to link the physical design solution with

technological and work policies (as outlined in implication 4: “Adopting New Work Practices”). As many workers become tightly connected to globally dispersed work teams, where there is no convenient place to meet other team members, they will have to start relying more on technologies such as video conferencing and social media or plan occasional face-to-face meetings to keep in touch with others.

4


TERMS OF CRI T ICISM

1. The space offers to residents a separate work area where tenants can work at home, while not having to be in their private home (personal unit). 2. The space must discourage a feeling of isolation. Views, location, additional amenities, and circulation are part of what will be necessary to create a work/live building that does not become a vacuum. 3. The space must offer different levels of public and private spaces, catering to completely public, semi-public, and private, in both the work and living units in order to cater to the spectrum of needs for its users. 4. The building must offer a joint community space for users of both spaces, which does not isolate the two but offers a semi-public spatial buffer between them. 5. The furniture and layout should allow for ease in change as modifications become necessary. 6. The space should address the need for control by its users, by adapting to daily changes as necessary. Changes in levels of privacy and function should be easily attained.

5


MET HODS OF I NQ UIRY

1. Research the trend in working from home. What motivates this, who takes advantage of this, and how the average worker functions from home will all be essential to formulating the needs of this program. White papers and journal articles with up to date research will be the primary source for this. 2. Research multi unit living arrangements, and what kind of sense of community is achieved with different program combinations/offerings. 3. Research workspace design, and how the way we work today is changing the spaces we work in. Technology is a big part of this, and understanding what is needed to fully function in today’s marketplace will be necessary. 3. Survey workers who work at home, work in an office, and work in both. Ask questions about current work style, what works and what doesn’t, preferences, and open ended questions to determine their thoughts on working where they live. 4. Research the impact of traveling to and from work each day, and how cutting down on commuting can benefit the worker (decrease in mental and physical stress and use of resources, including financial and time).

6


P RECEDEN T: HUB (SEAT TLE)

HUB is a series of spaces in over 25 cities globally that are created as a central space for entrepreneurial thinkers, collaborators, and innovators. The goal of the project is not just to provide a space for people who are working on their own projects, but to create a space that facilitates this type of thinking with collaboration amongst others with the same spirited ideas. It is not just a workspace that is provided, but collaboration sessions and workshops, events, networking, and any other way they can foster a sense of community combined with forward thinking.

Open Atrium Community Area; Art Showing; Building Exterior and Context

7


Open Desking Area

HUB Seattle offers conferencing room, private work areas, private offices for temporary use, open work space, collaborative lounge environments, and large event spaces both for rent and for community use for HUB members. Typical events include networking, lectures, lunchs, pitch nights, flavor fests from local restaurants, game nigths, founder dating events, demo days, film screenings, photography showings, and more.

8


P RECEDEN T: FACTORY 63

Factory 63 is a current project at 63 Melcher St., Boston (in the Innovation District) being developed as a work/live project for entrepreneurs. Created by the co-founder of Hub Seattle, this approach is to create the same type of community for entrepreneurs in a building that also provides apartments geared toward the same demographic, specifically smaller size living spaces that equate to affordable rent. In addition to typical and artisty-style loft living, the first floor plan includes a shared area upon entry for: Shared work space Conference rooms Guest access Online networking

Community Area 9


LIVE

WORK

LIVE

WORK

LIVE

Observations: These units do not have clear definition in the boundary between live and work space. Instead of them being divided by any means, they are open to each other but offset to create a boundary. The units that do not have work space still benefit from this feature as it is available on the first floor. The first floor is the only space in the building that offers community work areas. It is immediately off teh entry and so use is encouraged through typical circulation. The building was specifically design to be built in the Innovation Distric of Boston MA, which is a hotpot of new ideas and businesses. As a place for entrepreneurs to live, it is ideal in that they have access to a developing neighborhood both for their benefit as well as to encourage economic growth in the area. 10


P RECEDEN T:

COT TON MILLS STUDIOS A former cotton mill, the largest west of the Mississippi, was transformed to house 74 work/live studio lofts for artisans and small business owners on four floors. While a majority of the residents seem to be made up of artists, the units are open to non-artists as well. Lofts range in size and layout throughout the building, so different options are available. While the building does not have many community-oriented amenity spaces, other than the promise of a future roofdeck for tenants, it does house a small museum on the first floor dedicated to the history of the building. It is located past the first apartment in the building, which means it is not accessible directly off the street. This implies that the museum is more for the tenant’s appreciation rather than passer-bys. This makes sense, since the building is located on a major highway slightly off from a mixed-use industrial neighborhood, not in a location where there is major pedestrian activity. Some of the units also offer private access, which is both beneficial for the private needs of tenants, yet possibly takes away from the the idea of building a community within the building. I think however this is an example of how ‘forcing’ community rather than letting it happen naturally means not necessarily controlling pathways, but offering reasons to interact in ways people want to.

WORK

LIVE

Interior of single unit 11


Interior of single unit

Hall where events take place

In researching information about this building, I found the personal blog of one of the tenants who lives in a corner unit. He posted information about his moving process and part of his excitement for the new space is the sense of community he says lives in the building. Quarterly events to display artist’s work is part of the reason he says the building tenants have such a strong rapport amongst each other. The displays are usually housed in the hallways of the building, which is an interesting location for community space. It enlightens on the idea that there is no place where ‘community’ shouldn’t be a consideration. In studying the layout of the building, it was helpful in looking at everyday circulation as well, and how people might interact during non-event times. Proportionally, I was surprised at the small amount of community space for a place where a current tenant says there is a vibrant sense of community. This is an example of quality over quantity. From thinking about his comments, it seems that promoting interaction through circulation is not how the tenants of this building have created a community. It goes beyond that and so it has helped me consider the other ways beyond physical proximity the building can promote community relationships.

12


SI T E

LOWELL, MA

Vacant industrial building on Jackson St. Less than a five minute walk to the heart of downtown Lowell. An up and comming community, the area houses restaurants, bars, shops, art centers, fitness centers, historical sites and parks, coffee shops and small food markets, and other cultural and recreational opportunities.The site is actually two sister buildings, both vacant. The southern quarter is occupied by Metta Health Center, the rest of the building is unoccupied. The first half of the building can be used for my thesis project, with the rest up for futher development. The building lies on a quiet street on the long side, and is about 500 ft from a bustling street on the short end. There are parking lots accross the street on the long end, and another formerly renovated factory building on the north long side. N E

W S

13


South side

North side

South side window conditions

Entry Tower

South side facing Central St 14


Surrounding area: neighborhood establishments, typical buildnigs, parks and ammenities. The growing city of Lowell offers a rich living experience. 15


P ROGRAMMI NG

Studio Units (8 each) ..... 2800 sq ft. 1-BR Units (8 each) ..... 5200 sq ft 2-BR Units (8 each) ..... 6000 sq ft 3-BR Units (4 each) ..... 3400 sq ft Open Workspace ..... 1600 sq ft Private Work Areas ..... 1600 sq ft Childcare Facility ..... 1000 sq ft

Programming has been developed to offer both living units to a variety of potential users. Since anyone from single 20-somethings to parents and families would potentially habitate this building, it was important to offer a spectrum of options. Additionally, ammenities that are offered in the immediate area were not offered in the building in an attempt to promote economic growth and community ties to the exising establishments. Ammenities that are not offered but would be important to tenants, specifically childcare, were included. The community area and event space will be the tie betweent the two major programmatic elements of the building, in order to promote community within and encourage interaction. The space should bridge between the work users and areas and the individual living units.

Community Area/Event Space ..... 1000 sq ft Retail Area ..... 500 sq ft Total: 23100 sq ft

16


BIBLIOGRAPHY Dolan, Thomas. Zero-Commute Housing. John. Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ: 2012. Dietsch, Deborah K. Live/Work: Working at Home, Living at Work. Abrams, NY, NY: 2008. Ouy, Joe Aki, Ph.D. Five Trends That Are Changing the Workplace. Knoll Workplace Research, NY, NY: 2008. Venezia, Camille D. The Voice of Mobile Workers: Translating Practices, Relationships, and Components into Effective Workplaces. Knoll Workforce Research, NY, NY: 2007. Bloom, Nicholas, James Liang, John Roberts, and Zhichun Jenny Ying. Does Working From Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiement. Stanford University, July 2012. Worthington, John. Reinventing the Workplace. Architectural Press, Burlington, MA: 2006. Vischer, Jacqueline. Space Meets Status: Designing Workplace Performance. Routledge, NY, NY: 2005. Grech, Chris and David Walters. Future Office: Design, Practice, and Applied Research. Routledge, London: 2008. Mahmood, Atiya N. Work and Home Boundaries: Socio-Spatial Analysis of Women’s Live-Work Environments. Journal of Housing and Society. Volume 34 No. 1. p Andreou, Andreas, Christine Barber, Elizabeth Riordan, and Erik Lucken. The 2008 U.S. Workplace Survey. Gensler, 2008. Hoskins, Diane, Erik Lucken, Evelyn Fujimoto, Gervais Tompkin, James Williamson, Jane Brown, John Parma, Kate Kirkpatrick, and Thomas Vecchione. The Gensler Design and Performance Index. Gensler, 2006.


219 Washington Ave. #2 Chelsea, MA 02150 732-580-4022 NLaPietra7@gmail.com

CONTACT

2012 Co-Chair, New England Interior Design Career Day

Student Representative to the Board, 2012 ASID New England Chapter

Vice President, 2011-2012 BAC Interior Design Society

BAC Team Leader, 2011-2013 IIDA New England Fashion Show

President, 2012-2013 BAC Interior Design Society

LEADERSHIP

Revit, AutoCad, Sketchup, Adobe Creative Suite

Computer

Flexible team member who thrives in situations requiring the ability to effectively prioritize and manage multiple projects simultaneously.

Personal

SKILLS

2001-2005 Bachelor of Science in Marketing

The College of New Jersey

2009- Jan. 2014 Master of Interior Design Program

Boston Architectural College

EDUCATION

To translate my experiences, both professional and educational, into an interior design position that uses my technical and creative skills and allows me excel an essential asset to project teams and contribute to the success of the company as a whole

OBJECTIVE

December 2010 - March 2011, Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel, Boston Worked with clients and industry partners to design, build, and install an interior intervention experience reflective of a given theme for the client’s annual fundraising event

New England Conservatory Feast of Music Gala Event Design

September 2010 - January 2011, Boston, MA Conducted research into current trends in workplace design, and the impact of design on business success and methods of operation Implemented research into a design proposal based on emerging trends

Teknion WorkplaceOne Design Competition

PROJECTS

Conducted financial needs analysis, consulted on financial planning, and tax deferred savings strategies, and recommended products tailored to clients’ need

Financial Representative, Northwestern Mutual Financial Network March 2006 - March 2007, New York, NY

March 2007 - July 2008, Princeton, NJ Worked with clients to help preserve, grow, manage and transfer assets Assisted Senior Financial Consultant with marketing and compliance

Licensed Financial Sales Associate, PNC Financial Services Group

June 2011 - May 2012, Chestnut Hill, MA Worked with clients to determine furniture needs through space planning, needs analysis, and budget breakdown and analysis Created customized orders and managed placement with vendors

Furniture Sales Associate, Crate&Barrel Furniture

October 2011 - March 2012, Boston, MA Organized and managed sample and information library Assisted in design proposals, mock-up presentations, and materials selection

Intern, Teknion LLC

April 2011 - September 2011, Boston, MA Assisted with a redesign proposal for the Hyannis Courtyard Resort timeshare facility in Cape Cod, MA Responsible for concept design and space planning in multiple spaces

Interior Design Assistant, Hyannis Courtyard Redesign Proposal (Ranere Associates Inc.)

April 2012 - February 2013, Boston, MA Developed design solutions in concept, schematic, and design development phases that translated clients’ branding strategies into effective spatial experiences Worked as an integral part of a small collaborative design team to produce design concepts, presentation graphics, construction documents, and attend presentations Participated in construction administration and routinely visited construction sites Responsible for materials, furniture, and finish research and selection, purchasing and procurement, communication with vendors and manufacturers, directing logistics of FF&E items, and drafting Coordinated with lighting, millwork, and other members of the project team Manged materials library and acted as primary contact with product representatives Strengthened company branding with responsibilities related to marketing and social media, website development, networking, and graphics development

Interior Design Assistant, StudioTyak/Tribeca Builders

EXPERIENCE

NICOLE LAPIETRA


Thesis book