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NICOLE ABERNETHY Bachelor of Landscape Architecture • MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies


C U R R I C U L U M V I TA E EXPERIENCE

NICOLE ABERNETHY Through coursework during the first year of my undergraduate degree I became increasingly interested in the interactions of humans and the natural environment -- the idea that spaces can be designed to suit the needs of people and the wider environment. History--both cultural and environmental-plays a central role in my projects as I aim to discover how the past can be used to solve current and future problems. I am a firm believer that resilient solutions are dependent on a thorough understanding of place-based knowledge and history. Recently, my works have had a specific focus on the benefits of Toronto’s urban ecosystems and how they may be used to solve the city’s most pressing problems. This work is summarized in my graduate dissertation that examines the role of restored natural systems in mitigating climate change effects in urban centres. This portfolio represents a select range of works from my undergraduate and graduate studies. While the majority of projects presented are of my own endeavor, some projects have been completed in collaboration with firms and peers, as noted.

Landscape Architecture Intern NAK Design Strategies Toronto, ON

2014, 2015 Collaboratively worked alongside principals and associates in designs for a range of clients including large-scale developers, private residential, and public projects. Assisted in the creation and finalization of hand and computer based drawings (AutoCAD), illustrative graphics and renderings (Adobe Suite), planting plans, and spearheaded the completion of the office’s electronic plant data base.

Landscape Design Consultant Ben O’Hara Design Guelph, ON

2015 Solely responsible for the design and final presentation of a pollinator garden at the Earth Rangers Organization in Woodbridge, Ontario. Plant selection and target species were carefully selected through extensive ecological research.

Landscape Architecture Intern Durante Kreuk Ltd. Vancouver, BC

2014 Collaborated with a leading associate in the design, rendering, and construction of private and public spaces. Most notably, aided in the consultation and presentation of large-scale public artwork in a Vancouver heritage site.

Events and Promotion Marsh Canada Ltd. Toronto, ON

2013 Developed the graphic design and creation of promotional material for trade shows, conferences and corporate events in the Canadian sector. Facilitated the purchasing and distribution of promotional materials nationwide and worked on local budgets and expense reports.

E D U C AT I O N , AWA R D S & A C H I E V E M E N T S Master of Philosophy in Architecture and Urban Studies University of Cambridge Cambridge, UK

2015-2016 • Winner of the 2016 Boat Races, “Blondie” Coxswain (2016) • Awarded two Half Blues, one Team Colour and a Full Blue, Cambridge University Women’s Blues Committee (2016) • Cambridge Trust Scholarship, Patron HRH the Prince of Wales (2015)

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (Distinction) University of Guelph Guelph, ON

2011-2015 • Hellen Kippax Memorial Scholarship (2012, 2014) • OSSGA Student Design Competition, 1st Place (2014) • Blackburn Scholarship (2013) • Class of O.A.C. ‘59 Experiential Travel Grant (2013) • Novice Oarswoman of the Year, Guelph Gryphons (2012)

International Baccalaureate Diploma and OSSD Branksome Hall Toronto, ON

2004-2011 • Domenique Chevalier Award for Service to Slogan (2011) • Pippa Harris ‘72 Award for Visual Art (2011) • Wiley Award for Outstanding Athlete in Senior Year (2011)

(416) 907 4686 • nicole.j.abernethy@gmail.com • nicolejabernethy.wix.com/portfolio


Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis)

a guide to creating wildlife habitat

Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) -Berries a forage for birds + insects through winter -Insects forage during bloom (April) -Associated with cedar waxwing -Nesting for birds and small mammals -Excellent windbreak -Winter interest

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Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis

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TORONTO’S HIGH PARK: RE-IMAGINED, RESTORED, REMEBERED ad Ro

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Pin Cherry (Prunus pensylvanica) -Berries foraged by birds, insects + small NANABOUJOU mammals, blooms attract insects (Anishanaabe Spirit) -Nesting material for birds + small mammals -Slope stabilizer -Specimen tree with showy blooms (May-June)

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JIIBAYKONA (Milky Way / Spirit Path)

MOOZ (Moose)

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MISHI BIZHIW -Suggested to be installed on site (Underwater Panther)

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-Prime nesting for fish hawks that forage Lake Belwood or Turkey Vultures -A symbol of the ecological possibilities for visitors at the dump

educate

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inspire

BUGONAGIIZHIG (Hole in the Sky)

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BELWOOD, NATURALLY: A GUIDE TO CREATING WILDLIFE HABITAT

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birds + small mammals -Slope stabilizer -Nesting material forGIWEDIN’ birds ANUNG (Cheif Star/ North Star) -Showy flowers (April - May) - Spacing : 1.5m

RedStem Dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) -Berries forage for insects, birds + small mammals -Showy blooms forage for insects (MayJune) -Excellent nesting material for birds BIBOONKEONINI Maker) -Winter and summer(Winter interest -Spacing: 1m

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Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)

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MAANG (Loon) Downy Serviceberry (Amelanchier aborea)

Nesting Platform

SANDUSTEE PARK: PENETANGUISHENE

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OJIIG -Blooms and berries forage for insects, (The Great Fisher)

Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)

Fish Hawk (Pandion haliaetus)

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Old logs MADOODISWAN -Suggested to be brought on site (Sweat Lodge) -Excellent habitat for insects + amphibians -Possibility of fungal growth for increase AJIIJAK NOONDESHIN BEMAADIZID (Crane) in animal (Exhausted Bather)forage

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Many native shrubs, trees and ground-covers provide excellent habitat and food for birds. Berrying plants provide an immediate food source for many songbirds. These plants also attract insects which a number of birds feed on, as well as small mammals which are prey for larger birds. Ensuring a variety of plants that produce blooms and fruit in both summer and winter will allow for the birds to forage longer in the season. Dense planting creates a secure nesting space for smaller birds as well as increases materials for nesting. Many of the plant species most beneficial to wildlife are very showy and can be planted in both natural and formal settings. The planting plan suggested features showy shrubs, trees and ground-cover that are easily maintainable. If maintained infrequently, the bright blooms and winder interests allow for the site to look neat and aeshetically pleasing throughout the year.

Black Throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens)

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Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus) -Berries a big attraction for birds + insects -Nesting material for birds , insects + small mammals -Blooms attract pollinating insects (June-July) - Spacing : 1m

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2. know your neighbours

Understanding the foraging and nesting habits of different bird species will help to customize a habitat for them. Many of the birds that will be attracted to the site will travel from the surrounding vegetated patches. Different types of bird species require different types of habitats. Here are a few: Birds of Prey: - Usually a lone species. -Forage on small mammals, fish and other birds. -Require high platforms to build their nests. -These platforms can be man made. -Usually found in wooded areas near open fields or bodies of water where they can forage for smaller prey. Scavengers: -Primarily vultures are found in large community groups called a committee. -Feed only on carrion (dead animals) and in North America, are found near highways or roads where a number of road kills occur. -Nest in large groups usually on tall dead trees, but have been found to nest on man made structures. Woodpeckers: -Feed primarily on insects and few berries -Prefer old growth forests where decaying trees provide opportunity for burrowing insects. -Make their nests in tree cavities and do not migrate during the winter. Songbirds: -Forage on berries, nuts, insects and fruits. -Live in small thickets or trees and build nests out of varying natural materials. -Prefer dense vegetation where they feel secure.

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Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)

POLLINATEAIR: FROM PLIGHT TO FLIGHT

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Winterberry (Ilex verticulata) -Berries a forage for birds + insects through winter -Prone to wet soil conditions -Beautiful winter attraction with bright red berries -Spacing: 2.5m

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RE:FORMATORY: REVISITING HISTORY AND ITS PLACE IN THE URBAN FABRIC

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Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus)

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The Belwood Landfill Site is surrounded on three sides by a densely vegetated old growth forest regulated by the Grand River Conservation Authority. To the south is Belwood Lake and to the west is a larger forest with a river edge. These spaces prove prime habitat for many species by providing both forage and nesting grounds. While the site is surrounded by a wire fence, creating a constraint for land dwelling animals, it provides an opportunity for the introduction of bird friendly vegetation. Goal: To better connect the site into the existing forest corridor and establish the Belwood Landfill Site as a steward for ecological habitats Objectives: - Introduce bird and insect friendly native plant species -Educate and involve the surrounding community in habitat efforts to spark a greater

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1. know your site

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Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis) -Host to many insects -Berries and blooms forage for birds + insects -Specimen plant with showy berries and blooms (May-Sept) -Spacing: 0.5m

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CONTENTS belwood naturally

Bitternut Hickory (Carya cordiformis) -Forage and larval host for number of insects -Excellent nesting for birds -Does well on drained hillsides

Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis)

Red Breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)

Doors Open Fergus & Elora is an annual community event that allows for the public to tour civic properties for one day a year. This event provides an opportunity for the public to safely tour the landfill site and see the ecological benefits that have been implemented. The public will be educated by the tour guide on the types of plants used and the various animal and insect species that have found habitat on site. While including the landfill site in the greater context of the community, this event also raises awareness on the types of planting that can be done in any location to improve ecological habitat.

PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

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Teaming up with the GRCA adjacent to the site, the landfill can be used as a satellite teaching space for the Lands for Learning program with local school. Students being taught bird identification and habitat restoration would be welcomed to the site with an instructor to identify bird and plant species and experience a working ecosystem. This opportunity would provide valuable educational experience as well as illustrate the ecological work being done with the landfill.

Playing off of musical inspirations of the Elora festival, bird calls can be recorded on site and played during the festival to represent the natural sounds of music. While creating a unique attraction to the festival, the public will be educated on the rich diversity of songbird species active at the landfill site. This event will contribute to the ecological heritage of Elora while also illustrating the landfills natural significance.

PERSONAL WORKS

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Smooth Aster (Symphyotrichum laeve) -Attracts high number of insects -Showy purple flowers (Aug-Nov) - Spacing: 1.5m

Nicole Abernethy November 28, 2013 LARC * 3060

ADDITIONAL ACTIVITIES: THE BOAT RACE

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TORONTO’S HIGH PARK Location: High Park, Toronto ON Project: Undergraduate Design Thesis (LARC*3500), 2015 Professors: Sean Kelly and Nadia Amoroso My undergraduate capstone project looked at challenge of restoring the historic connection from High Park’s Grenadier Pond to Lake Ontario. The design focused on this connection in two realms: the physical ecological connection that existed in the late 1800’s, and the historic human connection to Toronto’s natural spaces as a place of culture and identity. Furthermore, this project examined how the proposed restoration could aid in the mitigation of climate change related flooding. The design objectives were realized through a proposed elevation of existing roadways that would allow for an extension of natural and public space below. A comprehensive phasing and feasibility plan was developed to account for varying scales and budgets. The projected retention volumes and their potential ecological value was calculated for each phase. The location of the site allowed for the proposed connection to ongoing waterfront projects and aided in identifying the West End’s place of identity along the Martin Goodman Trail.

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A University of Toronto botany class explores the High Park wetlands. (1910). Toronto Archives, Online.

This High Park sequence was developed using archived surveys and maps that illustrated the extent of human impact on the site’s water bodies. In intervals of roughly 30 years, the introduction of vehicular routes and the extension of the lake-shore clearly depicted how Grenadier Pond became severed from Lake Ontario. (2015) Abernethy

REMEMBERING HIGH PARK A wide range of archived documents were sourced for this project, including maps, surveys, photos, and news articles from Toronto’s settlement to present day. These documents revealed the rich cultural and historic value the site held for native populations, early settlers, and Torontonians over the past decades. As part of the project, educational activities and programming were built into the site to revive and pay homage to these past uses, including canoe docks, ski trails, skating rentals, and nature walks. Especially notable was the reestablishment of the Forest School, reflecting the values and structure of its predecessor that allowed classes to be held outside in the High Park arboretum in the early 1900’s.

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RE: FORMATORY Location: Yorklands, Guelph ON Project: Landscape Architecture III (LARC*3070): Design Project, 2014 Professors: Nadia Amoroso and Lise Burcher Group Member: Alex Weber The loss of historic buildings and landscapes in the face of urban development have left the city of Guelph with an identity crisis. The Guelph Reformatory District project identified this issue and proposed to set the historic value of the reformatory lands above that of urban development in an attempt to preserve the last untouched landmark in the city. The Reformatory Lands were once home to the Guelph Correctional Facility, an innovator for social reform and a point of pride for the province. The bucolic landscapes were reflected in Guelph postcards, images, and articles scattered throughout the city’s archives. While the correctional facility is no longer operational the waterfalls and picturesque grounds built by the inmates themselves continue to be admired and explored by residents. The proposal for residential and commercial development in the site saw the destruction of this historic landscape through design projects proposed by peers. In contrast, our proposal displays a layered development of the past and future that synthesizes historic and innovative aspects of the site. The design accommodated the density and volume standards of development set out by the Yorklands Greenhub whilst maintaining the integrity of surrounding landscapes to be protected for recreational use.

RE:FORMATORY

COMMERCIAL HUB The Victoria Road intersection will house both mixed-use developments and open space to integrate a better-connected community hub for surrounding residential developments. Predominantly, the built form will act as a commercial hub offering both retail and dining facilities as well as residential units. Large rooftop spaces will utilize the opportunity for green roofs and unique patio spaces with view focused towards the historic reformatory buildings.

VICTORIA ROAD Along Victoria Road, bike lanes will be restored to allow for better connection with the city, while an improved Eromosa River Trail will be connected across the bridge to further integrate the sites recreation and walk ability. This commercial hub will act as a mediation buffer between the site and the surrounding uses, as it filters from commercial and residential use to open and recreational spaces.

REVISITING THE VALUE OF HISTORY AND ITS PLACE WITHIN THE URBAN FABRIC

EXTENSIVE NATURE TRAILS Linking together the existing Eramosa River Trail to the west of Victoria Road, and the Beltline Trail to the south of the Eramosa River, an extensive nature trail will wind through the protected natural forest and wetlands on site allowing for recreation and ecological education. The trails also enhance linkages to larger trail networks around Guelph, optimizing on connections to adjacent residential developments. The trails will feature unique educational signage to further enhance the visitors experience and understanding of Guelph’s natural heritage.

A city’s identity comes from its past. The history and the landmarks that have shaped Guelph are disappearing, and with them, the unique identity that once formed the image of the city. As landscape architects, it is our responsibility to preserve this identity, while finding solutions to allow for the expansion of urban density. Our answer for Guelph’s identity crisis is the Reformatory District.

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT Understanding the plans for future residential development within the current Turfgrass Institute lands lead toward a number of strategic design decisions, including the preservation of large areas of natural and green space. Our goal is to ensure the Reformatory District remains one of the last green spaces along the Eramosa as future development moves beyond the boundaries of the city.

TheReformatory District will be the predominant meeting place of Guelph’s past and its future: a site unlike any other in the city where historic and cultural landscape features are set amongst future sustainable innovative initiatives. Our vision sets the historic value of the reformatory lands above that of urban development and we aim to preserve the last untouched landmark in the City of Guelph. Seen through numerous postcards from the early 1900’s are the bucolic landscapes created by the inmates that helped establish the city; a place of pride and identity for Guelph, the waterfalls and picturesque grounds held a special meaning to the surrounding residents. Our proposal sees a layered development of the past and the future, to synthesize historic and innovative aspects of the site. While we aim to restore and maintain historic landmarks, such as buildings, stone walls and waterfalls, we layer on integrative programmatic elements that reflect the forward thinking of the Guelph Innovation District and Yorklands Green Hub. Through select design devices including form system and building aesthetics, we aim to reflect the historic elements of Guelph while integrating future developments and uses. Understanding the potential of the Yorklands for a major sustainable residential development, we further distinguished the need for preservation, as the Reformatory District provides open recreational opportunities for future generations.

PAST AESTHETICS Research through the cities archives revealed an architecturally rich Guelph in the past two decades. Unfortunately, little is left of these buildings due to development after WWII. Our goal is to restore the awareness of these architecture styles, including Beaux Arts, Gothic, Italianate & Renaissance Revival, Aberdeen Bond, and Victorian styles through built forms along York Road. Rather than recreate these relics, we aim to use a synthesis of design principals with a modern element to cohesively integrate both the past and the future of the city. Additionally, we aim to restore and preserve the picturesque elements on site including the streams and waterfalls built by the innmates.

FORM SYSTEM MOSAIC To pixelate the landscape we devised a system of four major nodes which are characterized by dominant scales, materials and aesthetics. The sizes were determined by a hierarchy of uses which would be found throughout the site. A grid of 5 metre squares was drawn over the area to develop the scales.These scales were then translated into ratios from which they were implemented into the greater fabric of the form system. The locations of these nodes were determined by past uses we wished to preserve and future programming we designed for the Reformatory District.

REPURPOSED RAILWAY The existing railway line, that fragments the west end of the site, poses an opportunity for integrative programming throughout the city. As it’s tracks span from the cities easterly extents to its downtown core the opportunity for historic tourism is highly potential. Creating a four-season attraction to the Reformatory District allows for ample commercial value while adding to the awareness and education of Guelph’s history and it’s bright, sustainable future. When not in operation, the train may be parked on the site and opened as a unique dining experience to draw visitors from outside the city.

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RIPAREAN EDGE To best preserve the integrity of Clythe Creek with the expansion of York Road, a dense riparian edge was added to block solid pollutants from entering the waterway. Using native grasses, a physical yet natural barrier protects the ecological zone. While still maintaining views from York Road to the Reformatory, these grasses additionally add habitat and increase native biodiversity.

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The second layer farmland plots rep District. The site w dictate the size of determine key nod aethetics, scale an system developed which to develop a

BY: ALEX WEBER & NICOLE ABERNETHY

PAST USE The Guelph Reformatory was built upon the theory that outdoor work, especially farming and industrial labour, could instill pride and encourage positive interactions amongst the inmates. The facilities on site offered a wealth of programming, from dairy farming to carpentry, and was considered one of the most prosperous farms in the province in the early 1900’s. Looking back to these activities, we propose a revival of the trades lost over decades to encourage pride within the city of Guelph.

FORM SYSTEM D Using a wealth of was developed in

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YORK ROAD STORMWATER MANAGEMENT Storm water will be channeled in drains under the York Road crosswalks to deter harmful contaminants from Clythe Creek. These channels will be directed to aquatic planters along the adjacent commercial properties, creating aesthetic street design as well as filtering out pollutants through aquaponic processes. The road design further features a vegetative boulevard to increase forest cover and buffer the edge between bucolic landscape and built form. Bike lines will be divided from the roads with vegetative strips to increase cyclist saftey and allow easy access to commercial entrances.

PASSIVE PROGRAMMING STRUCTURED BUILT ECOLOGICAL 5:5 PROGRAMMING PROGRAMMING PROGRAMMING Large scale open space 3:3 3:3 1:1 defined by vegetative Human-scaled space Human-scaled space Small scaled natural spaces boundaries. dominated by man made dominated by built form and dominated by natural aesthetics and strong defined by architectural features with little to no boundaries. references. manmade features. defined by dense vegetation.

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The final layer rep and was develope prior to the constr owners, each dist The Allan district s intersection and fe in the middle is co spaces with few s along the York and form and passive the Yorklands Gre


A visual composition of the human history of the site. Rather than punished, inmates were taught employable skills such as carpentry, metal work, stone masonry and farming. During the 1940’s, the farm on site was praised for its productivity and was able to produce food for all of the prisons in Ontario. All images are sourced from the City of Guelph Archives.

PRESERVATION THROUGH INNOVATION

YORK ROAD The highlighting feature of the Reformatory District will be the transformation of York Road into a model for sustainable streetscape and commercial front design. Featuring uniquely integrated bike lanes, pedestrian oriented spaces and stormwater management, the improved York Road offers an iconic and easily recognizable district that may be used a precedent for other cities’ developments. Commercial development will occur only on the north side of York Road to preserve the open, pastoral views that are associated with the reformatory lands and to preserve the sightlines of the iconic reformatory building. The buildings will not exceed 3 stories, to ensure sightlines are preserved while varying setbacks and breaks allow for permeability into the adjacent residential areas.

MAIN ENTRANCE A re-purposed legion building will house art exhibition and events, including an adaptable lawn for public outdoor shows to facility the large art community in Guelph. The adjacent historic farmhouse will be restored to its former glory, and act as a community workshop for lost folk arts such as lace making, leather working and spinning, all of which was once practiced by the inmates on the site.

DEVELOPEMNT historic and future uses, our form system three distinctive layers:

ovement form was developed off the patterns mosa River as it bends through the site. This sentes the fluidity of people within the space sed circuit loop to maximize the use of the

A visual composition of the city and reformatory’s design aesthetics. Guelph was once home to a wealth of architecturally significant buildings that were slowly replaced with higher density accommodations as the city grew. The reformatory grounds are home to the last remains of the original Guelph aesthetic and warrant historic value that deserve protection. All images are sourced from the City of Guelph

The basis of the Reformatory Lands design

was based off of the patterns found in presenting the past use of the Reformatory was pixelated into four distinctive uses that f each area. This method was used to des for which to develop approporiate nd programming. Furthermore, this form d the location of the node boundaries for an appropriate edge aesthetic.

was founded on the systematic ranking of

presents the three major districts of the site ed from the plots of the original landowners ruction of the reformatory. Named after the trict features unique ueses and aesthetics. sits along the Victoria and York Road eatures heavily built spaces. The Farr district omprised mainly of natural and passive open structured elements. The Matthews district d Watson intersection features a mix of built open space, integrating programming with een Hub.

historic value. Aspects of the sites including buildings, landmarks, and ecosystems were ranked on cultural significance and present day value to allow for justified preservation. VIBRANT CROSSWALKS The implementation of wide and visually vibrant crosswalks encourage a walkable interface between the Reformatory District and the adjacent commercial strip. These crosswalks additionally promote saftey among pedestrians.

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preservation, innovative design solutions were used to layer past aesthetic with future use. One such area of the site saw

CLYTHE CREEK To ensure the Reformatory District remains as closely restored as possible, a great deal of value was placed on ensuring the Clythe Creek remained intact and in its original location, even after a proposed expansion of York Road. Our design features the creek in its orignial location with original stonework and water features, an icon of the Reformatory District.

INTEGRATIVE FARMLANDS To restore the once prosperous agricultural lands on site, three types of agricultural uses are proposed. The first will be an edible forest, planted with native edible vegetation to educate in the lost art of foraging, practiced by the first nations before settlement in the 1800’s. The second will be traditional agriculture with a focus on dairy cows, a successful venture within the reformatory in the 1900’s. The third will be permaculture, representing sustainable food practices of the future. .

the reintroduction of farm lands that would meet community needs, while educating the

GUELPH PUBLIC ART GALLERY A uniquely programmed building offering open space to local emriging artists. The gallery works on a wonthly basis where each artist is given a 30-day lease in which they may exhibit as they please. This space is also flexible for evening functions that transition into the site use adjacent.

public about the site’s history. In addition to

accommodating

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farming

methods, the area also featured more innovative techniques such as hydroponics SCALE 1:2500 N

EXHIBIT LAWNS During warmer months, artists may lease sections of the lawn as exhibit spaces in which they may display performace or sculptural art pieces. The transitioning space creates a dynamic and ever changing atmosphere to attract residents and visitors from surrounding cities.

WELCOME PLAZA A large entrance plaza creates opportunity for flexible programming at the mouth of the site. Incorporating large entry signs and water features, the plaza aditionally acts as a declared entrance into the City of Guelph. .

and insect cultivation. SCALE 1:250 N

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POLLINATE AIR Location: LaFarge Extraction Pit, London ON Project: Landscape Architecture II (LARC*3060): OSSGA Student Design Competition, 2013 Professors: Karen Landman and Shirley Hall Group Members: Emilio Martinez Lara, Amelia Kebbel & Jenna Matthews Awarded First Place in the Ontario Sand Stone and Gravel Association’s (OSSGA) Student Design Competition. The goal of this project was to develop a retired gravel pit into Canada’s first native pollinator research and tracking facility. Designed as a “pollinator airport,” the site achieved three objectives: re-instate and preserve native pollinators (birds, bees, butterflies, etc.) in Southern Ontario; bring national and global interest to the rehabilitated site; and improve the London community’s social and cultural realms. Central to the plan was a LEED-certified pollinateAIR terminal, which would serve as the hub for the site, house community and research spaces, and featured an interactive control tower where visitors could get a unique view of the site and its inhabitants. Surrounding highlights included a forest walk, wetland boardwalks and a research park for biologists, entomologists, environmentalists and students. PollinateAIR’s submission also included a detailed funding and partnership plan that outlined in full how PollinateAIR would encourage a transformation “from plight to flight.”. MASTERPLAN As a retired gravel pit, the site featured challenging topography with steep, bowllike slopes. This topography was seen as an opportunity by our design team as it provided a wind-protected foraging area for the desired pollinator species. Furthermore, the site design featured a re-introduced black oak savannah habitat that required controlled burns to maintain. The protection from the surrounding banks would allow for such burns to be carried out safely in a fairly contained area, thus minimizing risks to neighboring properties. The masterplan was rendered to reflect this dramatic topography though the visual overlaying of contour lines that depict a clear understanding of where

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each element lies in relation to the slopes.


LIVE POLLINATOR TRACKING One of the main functions of the PollinateAIR project was to establish a live pollinator tracking facility from which the migration patterns of target pollinator species could be studied in depth. The tracking would be displayed within the community centre on site and allow the public to follow in the journeys. The interactive aspect of pollinator tracking would increase public interest and improve knowledge and appreciation for the value of native pollinators in the community. Furthermore, this project would look to bridge the gap between academic research and public action by directly incorporating the community into ongoing research projects.

PROPOSED FEASIBILITY PLAN The site was proposed to be donated to the Upper Thames River Conservation Authority who would oversee the primary construction of the terminal and maintain the site’s rehabilitated ecosystems. The site would be a partnership with the University of Guelph’s Ridgetown Campus and act as a research facility for associated programs. As a public university, the partnership would open the door for public funding from government grants on pollinator research. Following a model similar to the Centre for Pollination Research at Penn State, PollinateAIR could gain funding from non-profit organizations, industry

supported

ventures,

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proposals and corporate sponsors.

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SANDUSTEE PARK Location: Champlain-Wendat Rotary Park, Penetanguishene ON Project: Landscape Architecture I (LARC*3050) - Penentanguishene Park Revitalization, 2012 Professor: Stefan Bolliger Group Members: Emilio Martinez Lara, Jenna Matthews, Sara DeKorte, Jonah Rannie & Michael Jursevskis Sandustee Park was envisioned to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Champlain’s arrival at the shores of Penetanguishene. It’s design reflected the combined histories of the native Wendat people, the French explorers, and English settlers. To showcase the town’s rich history, design elements were placed chronologically along the Trans Canada Trail where it crossed through the site, promoting education and appreciation of Penetanguishene on a regional scale. Where the original site lacked identity, the proposed Sandustee Park aimed to transform the space into a recognizable landmark for tourists and locals. The design was presented to the town committee for consideration in their park redevelopment project and was received quite favourably. The park is currently under development and includes two design elements from our team’s original proposal. (See below).

TOP: My personal renderings

Waterwall Entry Feature

Interactive Waterfront Statue

and designs. BOTTOM: Renderings from the

park’s

redevelopment

plan, created in 2013.

THE MEETING An interactive statue designed to pay homage to the meeting between Champlain and the Wendat chief. Created with solar positioning studies, the shadows of the statues pass over symbolic plates in front, representing the impact this event had on a number of cultural groups.

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BELWOOD, NATURALLY Location: Belwood Landfill Site, Bellwood ON Project: Landscape Architecture II (LARC*3060) - Belwood Landfill Design, 2013 Professor: Karen Landman Tasked with transforming a retired landfill site, the Belwood, Naturally project envisioned an opportunity for ecological habitat in a space that prohibited human entry. The project took into consideration the local landscape and proposed to use the adjacent natural spaces as a wildlife corridor to the site. The foraging and nesting patterns of native birds were studied in order to create a naturalized setting that was favourable to a variety of species and included elements such as nesting platforms and hibernacula (to attract prey). To generate a community interest in the site, a number of programming opportunities were proposed such as educational tours and field trips that allowed supervised access to the otherwise restricted site. A new style of graphic rendering was used for this project to display a more playful and user-friendly aspect to the presentation panel. Displayed as a “how-to” guide, the Belwood, Naturally project exemplified my creative take on a small scale project to promote the establishment of a wildlife habitat in an array of spaces.

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Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis

3. know your plants

Many native shrubs, trees and ground-covers provide excellent habitat and food for birds. Berrying plants provide an immediate food source for many songbirds. These plants also attract insects which a number of birds feed on, as well as small mammals which are prey for larger birds. Ensuring a variety of plants that produce blooms and fruit in both summer and winter will allow for the birds to forage longer in the season. Dense planting creates a secure nesting space for smaller birds as well as increases materials for nesting. Many of the plant species most beneficial to wildlife are very showy and can be planted in both natural and formal settings. The planting plan suggested features showy shrubs, trees and ground-cover that are easily maintainable. If maintained infrequently, the bright blooms and winder interests allow for the site to look neat and aeshetically pleasing throughout the year.

Winterberry (Ilex verticulata) -Berries a forage for birds + insects through winter -Prone to wet soil conditions -Beautiful winter attraction with bright red berries -Spacing: 2.5m

5 10 15 20 25m

Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus) -Berries a big attraction for birds + insects -Nesting material for birds , insects + small mammals -Blooms attract pollinating insects (June-July) - Spacing : 1m

Ro

ad

19

Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus)

Pin Cherry (Prunus pensylvanica) -Berries foraged by birds, insects + small mammals, blooms attract insects -Nesting material for birds + small mammals -Slope stabilizer -Specimen tree with showy blooms (May-June)

on

Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)

W

2. know your neighbours

Understanding the foraging and nesting habits of different bird species will help to customize a habitat for them. Many of the birds that will be attracted to the site will travel from the surrounding vegetated patches. Different types of bird species require different types of habitats. Here are a few: Birds of Prey: - Usually a lone species. -Forage on small mammals, fish and other birds. -Require high platforms to build their nests. -These platforms can be man made. -Usually found in wooded areas near open fields or bodies of water where they can forage for smaller prey. Scavengers: -Primarily vultures are found in large community groups called a committee. -Feed only on carrion (dead animals) and in North America, are found near highways or roads where a number of road kills occur. -Nest in large groups usually on tall dead trees, but have been found to nest on man made structures. Woodpeckers: -Feed primarily on insects and few berries -Prefer old growth forests where decaying trees provide opportunity for burrowing insects. -Make their nests in tree cavities and do not migrate during the winter. Songbirds: -Forage on berries, nuts, insects and fruits. -Live in small thickets or trees and build nests out of varying natural materials. -Prefer dense vegetation where they feel secure.

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0

gt

The Belwood Landfill Site is surrounded on three sides by a densely vegetated old growth forest regulated by the Grand River Conservation Authority. To the south is Belwood Lake and to the west is a larger forest with a river edge. These spaces prove prime habitat for many species by providing both forage and nesting grounds. While the site is surrounded by a wire fence, creating a constraint for land dwelling animals, it provides an opportunity for the introduction of bird friendly vegetation. Goal: To better connect the site into the existing forest corridor and establish the Belwood Landfill Site as a steward for ecological habitats Objectives: - Introduce bird and insect friendly native plant species -Educate and involve the surrounding community in habitat efforts to spark a greater

el lin

1. know your site

Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis)

Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) -Berries a forage for birds + insects through winter -Insects forage during bloom (April) -Associated with cedar waxwing -Nesting for birds and small mammals -Excellent windbreak -Winter interest

d

site

Old logs -Suggested to be brought on site -Excellent habitat for insects + amphibians -Possibility of fungal growth for increase in animal forage

Black Throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens)

Downy Serviceberry (Amelanchier aborea) -Blooms and berries forage for insects, birds + small mammals -Slope stabilizer -Nesting material for birds -Showy flowers (April - May) - Spacing : 1.5m

Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)

Nesting Platform -Suggested to be installed on site -Prime nesting for fish hawks that forage Lake Belwood or Turkey Vultures -A symbol of the ecological possibilities for visitors at the dump

RedStem Dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) -Berries forage for insects, birds + small mammals -Showy blooms forage for insects (MayJune) -Excellent nesting material for birds -Winter and summer interest -Spacing: 1m

Fish Hawk (Pandion haliaetus)

Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)

Invite

educate

inspire

Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis) -Host to many insects -Berries and blooms forage for birds + insects -Specimen plant with showy berries and blooms (May-Sept) -Spacing: 0.5m Bitternut Hickory (Carya cordiformis) -Forage and larval host for number of insects -Excellent nesting for birds -Does well on drained hillsides

Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis)

Red Breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)

Doors Open Fergus & Elora is an annual community event that allows for the public to tour civic properties for one day a year. This event provides an opportunity for the public to safely tour the landfill site and see the ecological benefits that have been implemented. The public will be educated by the tour guide on the types of plants used and the various animal and insect species that have found habitat on site. While including the landfill site in the greater context of the community, this event also raises awareness on the types of planting that can be done in any location to improve ecological habitat.

Teaming up with the GRCA adjacent to the site, the landfill can be used as a satellite teaching space for the Lands for Learning program with local school. Students being taught bird identification and habitat restoration would be welcomed to the site with an instructor to identify bird and plant species and experience a working ecosystem. This opportunity would provide valuable educational experience as well as illustrate the ecological work being done with the landfill.

Playing off of musical inspirations of the Elora festival, bird calls can be recorded on site and played during the festival to represent the natural sounds of music. While creating a unique attraction to the festival, the public will be educated on the rich diversity of songbird species active at the landfill site. This event will contribute to the ecological heritage of Elora while also illustrating the landfills natural significance.

Smooth Aster (Symphyotrichum laeve) -Attracts high number of insects -Showy purple flowers (Aug-Nov) - Spacing: 1.5m

Nicole Abernethy November 28, 2013 LARC * 3060

A unique and illustrative rendering style was developed to portray a whimsical and playful tone, one often not associated with landfill sites. As the planting design took a naturalized approach, colour and patterns were added to clearly differentiate species where a ‘realistic’ style could not. The bird renderings, created in AutoCAD and illustrator, tie together the panels aesthetic and help to familiarize the viewers with the native bird species projected to visit the site.


CAMBRIDGE DISSERTATION & ESSAYS My studies at the University of Cambridge resulted in a collection of works that expanded my thinking from visual design to evidencebased research. The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies is a programme of advanced studies in which students were to pursue research in areas of personal interest. My chosen focus was on the city of Toronto, and how its past topography, climate, culture, and ecosystems may be used to better prepare the city for predicted climate change threats. Three essays were developed within my area of focus that drew insights from lectures, seminars, and meetings attended in both the architecture and engineering departments. The culmination of my degree was presented through a final dissertation that explored how the reintroduction of Toronto’s lost rivers and coastal marshes could help to mitigate climate change related flooding events. *A copy of all essays and final dissertation may be provided upon request. THE WIGWAM AS AN OBSERVATORY The first essay took a slightly different area of research and explored the vernacular architecture of Toronto’s first inhabitants.

SMOKE HOLE Sole source of light and smoke ventilation

The goal was to determine how they were able to manage livable conditions in a

BARK / MAT MEMBRANE Secured to frame with sticks and cord

harsh climate through passive ventilation and locally sourced materials. Research into

SNOW SUPPORTS In winter weather snow is piled to add structural and thermal support

BE

NO

VE

M

BER

DECEMB

ER JA

R

NANABOUJOU (Anishanaabe Spirit)

ARY

OC

SEPTEM

BRU

BER

FE

AJIIJAK (Crane)

MAANG (Loon) OJIIG (The Great Fisher)

MARCH

MOOZ (Moose)

detailing

of

the

records indicated significant flaws within the design that questioned the sole intent of

BUGONAGIIZHIG (Hole in the Sky)

AP

RI

L

BIBOONKEONINI (Winter Maker)

understanding of the Ojibwe culture and beliefs, it was theorized that the wigwam

GU

ST

Alongside

the structure as a shelter. Through a deeper

MISHI BIZHIW (Underwater Panther)

AU

housed in the UK) as they were the sole

wigwam construction and materials, the

JIIBAYKONA (Milky Way / Spirit Path)

GIWEDIN’ ANUNG (Cheif Star/ North Star)

JU

Y MA

LY

JUNE

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to the “Jesuit Relations” * (conveniently

language.

AR

MADOODISWAN (Sweat Lodge)

NOONDESHIN BEMAADIZID (Exhausted Bather)

the construction of wigwam structures lead

records for a culture with no written NU

Y

FIR BOUGH / MAT FLOORING Deters moisture and used as bedding

Reconstructed temperatures for North America illustrating a drastic drop in the 1600’s. (2016) Wadhams.

CENTRAL FIRE Sole heat source within the Wigwam

TO

SAPLING FRAME Bent poles, placed approx. 2 feet apart, are planted into the ground

Reconstructed star map depicting the lost Ojibwe constellations. (2016) Abernethy.

was also used as an observatory from which to view constellations and share knowledge regarding their environment and history. * The Jesuit Relations are the reports of the Jesuit missions in New France and are considered the first ethnographic documents of the Native American culture.


THE REINTRODUCTION OF RIVERS AND COASTAL MARSHES IN TORONTO TO MITIGATE FLOODING EFFECTS The final two essays were used as precursors to my final dissertation. The first examined how the gridiron urban system of Toronto poses a barrier to innovation and increases the city’s vulnerability to climate change. The

second

explored

multi-disciplinary

approaches to ecological reintroduction and

the

benefits

of

multi-functional

spaces in urban centers. The dissertation cumulated A century comparison of Toronto maps illustrate the extent of changes to the natural shoreline and watercourses. Left: (1793) Atkin. Right: (1908) City of Toronto.

these

explorations

into

an

comprehensive research topic of naturebased climate adaptation through ecological reintroduction. The dissertation was broken into four main sections: 1) Why Toronto Floods: Examining Toronto’s history, projected risks, and current measures for addressing flooding issues. 2)

Literature

difference

Review:

between

Examining ecological

the and

engineered resilience and how natural systems prove to be more successful in reducing risk. 3) Case Studies: Comparing Toronto’s LEFT: Population densities with overlay of lost watercourses from 1858. (2016) Abernethy RIGHT: Risk map with overlay of lost watercourses from 1858. (2016) Abernethy

strategies to New York and Rotterdam and condensing successful resilient approaches. 4) The Once and Future Rivers: Exploration into possible methods and strategies for reintroducing rivers and coastal ecosystems based on historical mapping data. The dissertation highlighted the key issues in Toronto’s current climate change resilience plans and provides a strong basis from which to carryout further studies into the topic of nature-based climate adaptation.

A progression of urban development on Toronto waterfront from 1790-2010. Green & blue represent natural space, red & black represent urban development. (2016) Abernethy


PROFESSIONAL WORK Working for a collective twelve months in a professional setting has allowed me to generate a more practical skill set in the areas of plan and detail rendering, model building, proposal development,

and

package designs. As a part of two different firms across Canada I have been able to learn different software such as Vectorworks, AutoCAD and the Adobe Suite, among others. Although employed as an intern, I was consulted on a number of projects, most notably a large scale art installation in Vancouver, of which three of my designs were modeled and presented to the client. *References may be provided upon request.

LEFT: A condominium courtyard depicting the layers of landscape designs including streetscape, private courtyard, rooftop amenities and green roofs. Completed in Photoshop and Illustrator.

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TOP: A transit hub that combines hard-scape with naturalized and ornamental landscape design. Completed in Photoshop and Illustrator.


TOP & MIDDLE LEFT: Sections detailing soft and hard-scape over an underground structure. MIDDLE CENTRE: Section detailing typical conditions at the building edge including a snow melt walkways, curb and solar roof panels. MIDDLE RIGHT: Section detailing typical roof conditions that include a metal fence post, solar roof pavers and a standard sedum system. BOTTOM: The planting and detail plan of a rooftop terrace. * Plans and details are not to scale.

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PERSONAL WORK Beyond my academics and professional work, I am an avid painter and sculptor and focus my works on the subjects of the natural world. My works are primarily comprised of acrylic on canvas, however, I have recently explored wood and ink, natural materials, wax, and bronze. I often depict my subjects on an unadorned background so that the viewer may focus on the figure itself. Through these pieces I aim to share my personal appreciation of animals to the viewer and allow the anatomically detailed figures speak for the natural creativity that can be found in every creature. While the majority of my works were completed for my high school fine arts class and at the Parson’s School of Fine Art Program, I have also had a number of commissioned paintings expanding my portfolio into the professional realm. I also find interest in graphic design work, seen throughout the creation of panels for design projects, event and marketing promotional material, and most recently in promotional material for my peers.

TOP LEFT: White Tailed Deer. Ink and varnish on reclaimed wood. (2011) BOTTOM LEFT: Grizzly Bear. Ink and varnish on reclaimed wood. (2011) TOP: Inland Rainbow Trout. Ink, varnish and acrylic on reclaimed wood. (2011)

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LEFT: Strawberry Poison Dart Frog. Acrylic on watercolour paper. (2009) TOP LEFT: Study of a Jump. Bronze. (2010) TOP: Monarch Butterfly Larvae. Etching in a tropical leaf. (2010)

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THE BOAT RACE

“The University of Cambridge hereby challenge the University of Oxford to row a match at or near London each in an eight-oar boat during the Easter vacation” - W. Snow, 12th March, 1829

Rowing has been a large component of my life for the past 9 years. Starting in high school and continuing throughout university, the sport taught me about dedication, teamwork, perseverance and determination. It was clear that when I was accepted to study at the University of Cambridge that my goals were set on racing in the historic Oxford vs. Cambridge Boat Races. The Boat Race is a 4.2 mile race on the Thames that has taken place annually for the past 187 years. The event has become one of monumental significance, both historically and athletically, as it represents one of the most prestigious rowing races in the world. Being selected to race in both the lightweight and womens reserve race placed me as the first cox to do so in the history of the races. Furthermore, our victory against the Oxford crew signified the first ever victory for a Cambridge women’s crew on the Tideway.

17

An underground poster advertising the 78th Boat Race. The image depicts

TOP: Cambridge Lightweight Women’s Crew (2016)

the full Championship Course. (1926)

BOTTOM: Cambridge Women’s Reserve Crew (Blondie) (2016)


TOP LEFT: Cambridge Lightweight Women’s Crew, Henley-on-the-Thames (2016) TOP MIDDLE: Cambridge Men’s Crew (1926) TOP RIGHT: Cambridge Women’s Reserve Crew (Blondie), crossing the finish at the 162nd Boat Race (2016) BOTTOM LEFT: Cambridge Women’s Reserve Crew (Blondie), passing under Hammersmith Bridge half a length ahead of Oxford (2016) BOTTOM RIGHT: Cambridge Men’s Crew passing under Hammersmith Bridge (1928)


The supporting images throughout this portfolio were sourced from engravings in Webster’s International Dictionaries. Nearly all of the engravings depicted were created in the early nineteenth-century and represent a time when colonialism and exploration were igniting curiosities of the undiscovered world. The use of the images throughout this portfolio are intended to create a sense of discovery and appreciation for the natural world.


Nicole Abernethy - Landscape Architecture Portfolio