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Nicole C. Blasetti

Assoc. AIA, LEED® AP | Graduate Architecture Student | Syracuse University 247 W Fayette Street, Apt 404 | Syracuse, NY 13202 | 215-901-9218 | ncblaset@syr.edu

Academic Experience

Professional Experience

Syracuse University

Catholic University Of America

Perkins+Will

Master of Architecture

Bachelor of Science in Architecture

Arch II (staff architect)

Awards/Honors:

Awards/Honors:

Robert W. Cutler Endowed Scholarship

Tau Sigma Delta

Syracuse, NY

Washington, DC

May 2012 ( expected ) Fall 2009 – Spring 2012 Cumulative GPA: 3.75

May 2006 Fall 2002 – Spring 2006 Cumulative GPA: 3.55

Summer 2011

Private Mixed Use Development

Honor Society in Architecture and Allied Arts

Fall 2005 Graduate Foreign Studies Competition

Re-Surfacing the Manufactured Landscape:

Recontextualizing Post-Industrial Residue of Baltimore Fall 2011 - Spring 2012 ( expected )

Undergraduate Foreign Studies

Spring 2006 Study-Abroad Semester based in Rome, Italy

Competitions:

Independent Design Studio

D+T Workshop: SO-IL

Summer 2011 on “Roofscapes” of Downtown Manhattan ( studying real estate potential and housing prototypes )

Research Intern

Spring 2011 to Victor Tzen, on step wells of India

Teaching Assistant

Fall 2010 to Sinead Mac Namara, on Structures II

Research Assistant

Spring 2010 to Julia Czerniak, on landscape architecture

Publications: D+T Publication, Graphic Design Summer 2010 Collaboration with Mark Linder

Graduate Session Interview

Spring 2010 Collaboration with: Taylor Hardee, Dayna Swaggerty, & Ryan Novi

After Autopia: Visions for Light Rail in the Motor City Fall 2011 Collaboration with Graduate Urban Design Studio

Commonwealth of Virginia, Office of Assembly Building

Richmond, VA Research & Production for Schematic Design, Design Development, Construction Document Graphic design of marketing packages

Saudi Arabia, UAE Research and Production for Design Development and Construction Document

Capital Commerce Center North

Spring 2011 Syracuse University, with Florian Idenburg & Jing Liu Collaboration with 1st- & 2nd-Year Graduate Students

D+T Workshop: Climatic Plasticity

Spring 2010 Syracuse University, with MOS Studio Collaboration with 1st- & 2nd-Year Graduate Students

D+T Workshop: Stripped Bare

Fall 2009 Syracuse University, with by Sean Lally Collaboration with 1st- & 2nd-Year Graduate Students

HUB Competition / Third Place Finalist

Fall 2010 Architecture for Humanity & AIA Charleston www.afhcharleston-competition.com Collaboration with: Irini Zhupa. Thomas Poore, & Nathan Aleskovsky

Classroom In Uganda

Abu Dhabi, UAE Research & Production for Schematic Design and Design Development Graphic design of marketing packages

Private Database Facility

Collaboration Research:

w/ focus in Core & Shell Architecture May 2006 – August 2009

Projects & Responsibilities:

Honorable Mention

Thesis:

Washington, DC

Washington, DC Graphic design of marketing packages for Concept Design & Schematic Design

Charles River Laboratories Reno, NV & Hollister, CA Construction administration

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Arlington, VA Construction administration

intensity

Affiliations: AIA Associate since 2006

without

density

LEED Accredited Professional since 2008

June 2009 Open Architecure Challenge Collaboration with: Perkins+Will Architecture Studio of Washington, DC

Active member of G.A.S.

( Graduate Architecture Students, Syracuse ) since 2010

Computer Applications graduate thesis MArch I [ Revit | AutoCAD | Rhino & V-Ray | Grasshopper | Adobe CS5 Suite | SketchUp | Ecotect ]


Nicole C. Blasetti

Assoc. AIA, LEED® AP | Graduate Architecture Student | Syracuse University 247 W Fayette Street, Apt 404 | Syracuse, NY 13202 | 215-901-9218 | ncblaset@syr.edu

Academic Experience

Professional Experience

Syracuse University

Catholic University Of America

Perkins+Will

Master of Architecture

Bachelor of Science in Architecture

Arch II (staff architect)

Awards/Honors:

Awards/Honors:

Robert W. Cutler Endowed Scholarship

Tau Sigma Delta

Syracuse, NY

Washington, DC

May 2012 ( expected ) Fall 2009 – Spring 2012 Cumulative GPA: 3.75

May 2006 Fall 2002 – Spring 2006 Cumulative GPA: 3.55

Summer 2011

Private Mixed Use Development

Honor Society in Architecture and Allied Arts

Fall 2005 Graduate Foreign Studies Competition

Re-Surfacing the Manufactured Landscape:

Recontextualizing Post-Industrial Residue of Baltimore Fall 2011 - Spring 2012 ( expected )

Undergraduate Foreign Studies

Spring 2006 Study-Abroad Semester based in Rome, Italy

Competitions:

Independent Design Studio

D+T Workshop: SO-IL

Summer 2011 on “Roofscapes” of Downtown Manhattan ( studying real estate potential and housing prototypes )

Research Intern

Spring 2011 to Victor Tzen, on step wells of India

Teaching Assistant

Fall 2010 to Sinead Mac Namara, on Structures II

Research Assistant

Spring 2010 to Julia Czerniak, on landscape architecture

Publications: D+T Publication, Graphic Design Summer 2010 Collaboration with Mark Linder

Graduate Session Interview

Spring 2010 Collaboration with: Taylor Hardee, Dayna Swaggerty, & Ryan Novi

After Autopia: Visions for Light Rail in the Motor City Fall 2011 Collaboration with Graduate Urban Design Studio

Commonwealth of Virginia, Office of Assembly Building

Richmond, VA Research & Production for Schematic Design, Design Development, Construction Document Graphic design of marketing packages

Saudi Arabia, UAE Research and Production for Design Development and Construction Document

Capital Commerce Center North

Spring 2011 Syracuse University, with Florian Idenburg & Jing Liu Collaboration with 1st- & 2nd-Year Graduate Students

D+T Workshop: Climatic Plasticity

Spring 2010 Syracuse University, with MOS Studio Collaboration with 1st- & 2nd-Year Graduate Students

D+T Workshop: Stripped Bare

Fall 2009 Syracuse University, with by Sean Lally Collaboration with 1st- & 2nd-Year Graduate Students

HUB Competition / Third Place Finalist

Fall 2010 Architecture for Humanity & AIA Charleston www.afhcharleston-competition.com Collaboration with: Irini Zhupa. Thomas Poore, & Nathan Aleskovsky

Classroom In Uganda

Abu Dhabi, UAE Research & Production for Schematic Design and Design Development Graphic design of marketing packages

Private Database Facility

Collaboration Research:

w/ focus in Core & Shell Architecture May 2006 – August 2009

Projects & Responsibilities:

Honorable Mention

Thesis:

Washington, DC

Washington, DC Graphic design of marketing packages for Concept Design & Schematic Design

Charles River Laboratories Reno, NV & Hollister, CA Construction administration

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Arlington, VA Construction administration

intensity

Affiliations: AIA Associate since 2006

without

density

LEED Accredited Professional since 2008

June 2009 Open Architecure Challenge Collaboration with: Perkins+Will Architecture Studio of Washington, DC

primary Active member of G.A.S.

advisor:

Julia Czerniak

( Graduate Architecture Students, Syracuse ) since 2010

in collaboration with:

Computer Applications the Culture Now project graduate thesis, MArch I [ Revit | AutoCAD | Rhino & V-Ray | Grasshopper | Adobe CS5 Suite | SketchUp | Ecotect ]


Table of Contents

Introduction pg 1.1 Discussion on Baltimore pg 2.1 Site Selection and Analysis pg 3.1 Deconstructing the Site pg Design Proposal pg Strategic Enclosure of the Manufactured Landscape pg Intensity without Density pg Bibliography pg

4.1

5.1

6.1

7.1

8.1


Introduction

As urbanism relies more and more upon flows – the intangible communication of information – the physical context associated with a place becomes less and less relevant to the network. The “center” of a metropolitan area is a temporal concept, manifesting itself in discrete momentary and ever changing locations. The specificity of one’s location is therefore appreciated by its ability to communicate with other destinations within the network. This enables increased horizontal occupation on the periphery of the formerly urban center. As Baltimore exists today, a collective movement towards the periphery has effectively dismantled the center.

1.1


Introduction

intensity without

density

1.2


Introduction

What is to become of the dismantled city center?

If a networked urbanism appreciates the constraints of time over the presence of place, does that necessitate moments of “placelessness” within the city network? Can Baltimore restore the intensity of the formerly urban city without the population density of the formerly urban density? Baltimore today is pervaded with pockets of placelessness, the evidence of the city’s deindustrialization or the leftover places which remain after an industrial process has been deployed upon a given site. They are the ignored, undervalued, unfortunate economic residues of the manufactured landscape. Dross, however, is inevitable. It is the symptom of an incompatibility between adjacent programs: the space resists public occupation, and the public likewise resists interaction with the space. There is truly no avoiding the creation of dross, however the physical presence of dross within an urban condition may be recontextualized to engage a positive public response.

I contend that the inevitable residue of the deindustrialized city is a latent opportunity to unify Baltimore’s fractured city center. By recontextualizing the margins of the abandoned manufactured landscape, empty space will operate as a platform for unscripted social activity, engaging the public to interact with the periphery and promoting interconnectivity with outlying communities. The field of residual space, when contained within a reactive public infrastructure, is the setting for intense public intervention. The strategic organization of the ground plane is not so concerned with the formal composition or branding of a site, rather it is concerned with the varying types of public activity for which the site must adapt, including programming for the unknown. The indeterminate programming of designed space allows the public users to collectively claim the territory for their private and ever changing interests.

1.3


Introduction

what is to become of the dismantled city center?

1.4


Introduction

The rise and fall of multiple industries have left an eerie footprint on the city: hollowed-out factory buildings, vast asphalt fields of parking, and shadowy underbellies of highway overpasses mark the vague threshold between disparate communities. The emptiness of the interstitial space severs communities, obstructing pedestrian accessibility despite an otherwise automobile-oriented network of transportation. My thesis considers an existing site on the East side of Baltimore, in which multiple municipal services converge, resulting in vast field of empty, non-programmed space. I identify site-specific urban conditions that are susceptible to the growing periphery of emptiness. Through a classification and categorization process, the properties of each condition are examined in an effort to establish a series of counter measures aimed to restore public presence. An exploration of instruments of communication, accessibility, and community assembly are integral in the design of an urban infrastructure that reintroduces active public occupation in the manufactured landscape. This proposal is shaped by the capacity for a place to support fluctuating and diverse programmatic convergence.

Hillen Train Station [ active 1876 - 1954 ]

1.5


Introduction

Hillen Train Station [ active 1876 - 1954 ]

1.6


Within the field of residual space a reactive public infrastructure is the setting for intense public intervention.

Site - 26-Acre Parking Lot [ Former Passenger Rail Yard ]

Problem - Insufficient Circulation for Pedestrian Accessibility


Introduction

Concept - Programmatic “Decking� to Improve Accessibility

Design Proposal - Strategic Enclosure of Residual Space

1.7


Discussion on Baltimore Shrinking City vs Plastic City

The industrial expansion which occurred in Baltimore during the World War and immediately thereafter was not due to the development of any one industry, but to growth in varied lines, and involved the investment of capital from many outside sources. This practical recognition of Baltimore's advantages, and the character of the expansion should contribute to future industrial stability, while the shipping requirements of the industrial plants serve to strengthen the commercial tradition. Baltimore is not a boom city. It is a major port and industrial center, the product of more than two hundred years of stabilized growth in which the calm progressiveness of its citizens and geographic environment have played leading parts. -Pearle Blood, 1937

Baltimore was never a one-industry city. Rather, it found prosperity in its capacity to host multiple industries through strategic occupation of a unique geography. The irregular profile of the Chesapeake Bay proved to be a great advantage to early settlers. The excessive jogging and twisting along the water’s edge results in a maximized waterfront within a small area. Thus maritime activity could be distributed according to traffic ferries, municipal piers, cargo receipt, ship building, marine terminals having railroad access, dry docks, etc. Baltimore’s proximity from the ocean provided yet another great advantage. Other port cities, such as Philadelphia and New York, were far closer to the ocean, making them likely ports for imported goods. However, being a greater distance from the ocean makes Baltimore nearer inland and far closer to domestic manufacturing cities. Baltimore became a preferred port for exported goods due to its close proximity to major industrial cities such as Detroit, Pittsburgh, Youngstown, Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Indianapolis. Once the emerging port city was made accessible to the Western agricultural regions following construction of the B&O Railroad in the mid 19th century, Baltimore’s manufacturing industry quickly advanced.

Early industries

included oil refineries, fertilizer plants, copper smelting, steel rolling mills, canning factories, electric cable plants, and automobile assembly plants. The popular exporting of tobacco was eventually replaced by the exporting of flour due to growing demand overseas. The city’s thriving commercial economy led to a boost in textile mills, breweries, tanneries, brickyards, iron goods, and agricultural processing, and by the late 19th century over one third of the city’s industrial labor was involved in the production of ready-made clothing. As industry grew, so did the city. Concentric rings of development occurred around Baltimore’s central business district. Company towns, owned and managed by the many textile mills, were established along the Jones Falls water way. Meatpackers and breweries settled along East Baltimore, while the Southern suburbs became home to

2.1


greater distance from the ocean makes Baltimore nearer inland and far closer to domestic manufacturing cities. Baltimore became a preferred port for exported goods due to its close proximity to major industrial cities such as Detroit, Pittsburgh, Youngstown, Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Indianapolis. Once the emerging port city was made accessible to the Western agricultural regions following construction of the Discussion on Baltimore B&O Railroad in the mid 19th century, Baltimore’s manufacturing industry quickly advanced. Early Shrinking City vs industries Plastic City included oil refineries, fertilizer plants, copper smelting, steel rolling mills, canning factories, electric cable plants, and automobile assembly plants. The popular exporting of tobacco was eventually replaced by the exporting of flour due to growing demand overseas. The city’s thriving commercial economy led to a boost in textile mills, breweries, th ceramic, glass, and brick was processing, a common site chemical car over works, tanneries, brickyards, iron factories. goods, andCanton agricultural and for by the late 19works, century onegas thirdworks, of the sugar city’s

refineries,labor and oil refineries. Thethecity’s prosperity was largelyclothing. founded on this multiplicity of industry.1 industrial was involved in production of ready-made Theindustry Fordist grew, factorysowas labor modelrings in Baltimore by theoccurred 1950’s, around however, productioncentral quickly halted As did athefamiliar city. Concentric of development Baltimore’s business following Company World War II. The textile proceeded to favor Southern and by the along mid 20 centuryFalls the district. towns, owned andindustry managed by the many textile mills, plants, were established theth Jones textile way. mills were bankrupt.and Thebreweries canneriessettled of Southeast Baltimore, consolidated the American water Meatpackers along East Baltimore, while theinto Southern suburbsCanning becameCompany home to ceramic, brick factories. was a common site for Ultimately chemical works, car works, gas works, sugar at the turnglass, of theand century, eventually Canton relocated production overseas. Baltimore’s most prevalent industrial 1 refineries, and oil refineries. prosperity was largely founded on this multiplicity of industry. plants transferred ownershipThe to city’s national or transnational corporations, resulting in overseas manufacturing and

devastating job loss to the city’s residents.2 The factory era, wasthere a familiar Baltimore by theof1950’s, production quickly In theFordist Post-Fordist was a labor pivotalmodel shift in the organization labor. however, As the manufacturing industryhalted was following WarbyII. theThe textileindustry, industry the proceeded to favor plants, andunder by theanmid 20th century the gradually World succeeded service work force wouldSouthern no longer operate individual governing textile millsRather, were bankrupt. The canneries of of Southeast Baltimore, into the American Company authority. an organizational network authorities ensuredconsolidated a well-operated system. The Canning movement from a at theofturn of the century, eventually relocated overseas. Ultimately Baltimore’s mostofprevalent state centrality to a distributed network canproduction be observed in the post-industrial development the city, industrial in which plants transferred to national or transnational corporations, resulting in overseas manufacturing and emphasis is placed ownership on communication of information rather than the specifics of an individual location. devastating job loss to the city’s residents.2 In her book What Should We Do With Our Brain?, theorist Catherine Malabou parallels the post-Fordist perception In the Post-Fordist era, there was a pivotal shift in the organization of labor. As the manufacturing industry was of labor to a common perception of the functioning of the human brain. “Domination and the crisis of centrality, in a gradually succeeded by the service industry, the work force would no longer operate under an individual governing merely seeming paradox, are perfectly matched with each other. The restructuring of capitalism… was accomplished authority. Rather, an organizational network of authorities ensured a well-operated system. The movement from a at the price of substituting control by self-organization for planning decided and overseen by a formal centralized state of centrality to a distributed network can be observed in the post-industrial development of the city, in which authority within the company… For this new organization, the network is the master term…”3 emphasis is placed on communication of information rather than the specifics of an individual location. Malabou suggests that a networked system of organization cannot be constrained to a central location, that the In her book What Should We Do With Our Brain?, theorist Catherine Malabou parallels the post-Fordist perception periphery of that network must be supple, adaptable to change.4 Centrality is similarly the crisis of the networked of labor to a common perception of the functioning of the human brain. “Domination and the crisis of centrality, in a city. A decentralized urbanism ought to adapt to shifting environments, and likewise mold its environment to merely seeming paradox, are perfectly matched with each other. The restructuring of capitalism… was accomplished evolving cultural values. In the following excerpt from her book, I deliberately substitute the “city” in place of the at the price of substituting control by self-organization for planning decided and overseen by a formal centralized “brain” as the subject of her thesis: authority within the company… For this new organization, the network is the master term…”3                                                             

1 Malabou suggests a Economic networked system ofofBaltimore, organization cannot be constrained to a13,central location, that the Blood, Pearle. “Factorsthat in the Development Maryland,” Economic Geography. Vol. No. 2, Apr 1937. 187-208.   periphery of that network must be supple, adaptable to change.4 Centrality is similarly the crisis of the networked 2

 Nandi, Arijit. Deindustrialization, Socioeconomic Deprivation, and Injection Drug use Cessation in Baltimore . ProQuest Dissertations and Theses; city. A2009. decentralized urbanism ought to adapt to shifting environments, and likewise mold its environment to 3 Malabou, Catherine. What Should We Do with Our Brain? New York: Fordham University Press, 2008. 41

evolving cultural values. In the following excerpt from her book, I deliberately substitute the “city” in place of the 4

 Ibid: 33 

“brain” as the subject of her thesis:                                                              1

 

Blood, Pearle. “Factors in the Economic Development of Baltimore, Maryland,” Economic Geography. Vol. 13, No. 2, Apr 1937. 187-208.

2.2


devastating job loss to the city’s residents.2 In the Post-Fordist era, there was a pivotal shift in the organization of labor. As the manufacturing industry was gradually succeeded by the service industry, the work force would no longer operate under an individual governing authority. Rather, an organizational network of authorities ensured a well-operated system. The movement from a

Baltimore state of centrality to a distributed network can be observed in the post-industrialDiscussion development of on the city, in which emphasis is placed on communication of information rather than the specifics of an individual location. Shrinking City vs Plastic City

ceramic, glass, andShould brick factories. Canton was a, common site for chemical carthe works, gas works, sugar In her book What We Do With Our Brain? theorist Catherine Malabouworks, parallels post-Fordist perception 1 refineries, oil ofrefineries. city’s prosperity largely founded on“Domination this multiplicity of laborinteraction to and a common thesurroundings functioningwas ofinstead the human brain. and of theindustry. crisis centrality, form in a “The theperception [city] The withof its acts as a commanding authority, whoseof unknown “The interaction of the [city] with its surroundings instead acts as a restructuring commandingofauthority, whose unknown form merely seeming paradox, are perfectly matchedofwith each other. Thefunctional was accomplished and location disrupt the traditional geography government. The plasticitycapitalism… of the [city] deconstructs its and location disrupt the traditional geography of government. The functional plasticity of the [city] deconstructs its The factory wasorgan a control familiar labor model Baltimore thedecided 1950’s, however, production quickly halted at theFordist price of substituting self-organization forofplanning and overseenpresent by a formal centralized function as the central and by generates theinimage a by fluid process, somehow everywhere and th 3 function as the War central and this generates the imagetothe offavor a fluid process, somehow following World II. organ Theoutside textile industry proceeded by present the mid everywhere 20 century and the authority company… For new network is theplants, master term…” nowhere, within whichthe places the and theorganization, inside in contact bySouthern developing an and internal principle of cooperation, nowhere, which places the outside and the inside in contact by developing an internal principle of cooperation, 5 textile mills and wererepair, bankrupt. canneries of Southeast Baltimore, consolidated into the American Canning Company assistance, and anThe external principle of adaptation and evolution.” 5 Malabou suggests that a networked system of organization cannot be constrained to a central location, that the assistance, andtherepair, andeventually an external principleproduction of adaptation and evolution.” at the turn of century, relocated overseas. Ultimately Baltimore’s most prevalent industrial 4 Centrality is similarly the crisis ofmetropolis. the networked periphery of that network must be supple, adaptable to change. In this transferred manipulationownership of Malibou’s text, I am reifying a common perception of theincontemporary As plants to national or transnational corporations, resulting overseas manufacturing and In this manipulation of Malibou’s text, I am reifying a common perception of the contemporary metropolis. As city. A decentralized urbanism ought flows to2 adapt to intangible shifting environments, and likewise mold its physical environment to urbanism relies more and more upon – the communication of information – the context devastating job loss to and the city’s residents. urbanism relies more more upon flows – the intangible communication of information – the physical context evolving cultural In the following excerpt her book, deliberatelyThe substitute thetherefore “city” in isplace of the associated with values. a place becomes less and lessfrom relevant to theI network. “center” temporal, In the Post-Fordist era, there was a pivotal shift in the organization of labor. As the manufacturing industry was associated withsubject a place becomes and less relevant to the network. The “center” therefore is temporal, “brain” as the of her thesis: less and manifesting itself in discrete momentary ever changing locations. gradually succeeded by the service industry, the work forcelocations. would no longer operate under an individual governing manifesting itself in discrete momentary and ever changing “The interaction ofantheorganizational [city] with itsnetwork surroundings insteadensured acts as aa well-operated commanding authority, whose unknownfrom forma authority. Rather, of authorities system. The movement                                                               In his writing on Drosscape , Alan Berger discusses the inevitable decentralization of the networked city. “As 1 Blood, Pearle. “Factors in the Economic Development of Baltimore, Maryland,” Economic Geography . Vol. 13, No. 2, Apr 1937. 187-208. and location disrupt the traditional geography of government. The functional plasticity of the [city] deconstructs its Drosscape , Alan Berger discusses the inevitable decentralization of the networked city. “As In his writing on state of centrality to a distributed network canprimary be observed post-industrial development thefuture city, incosts which communication replaces transportation as the mode inof the connection between people andofthe of   2 function as the central organ and generates the image of a fluid process, somehow present everywhere and communication replaces transportation as the primary mode of connection between people and the future costs  Nandi, Arijitis. placed Deindustrialization, Socioeconomic Deprivation, Injection in Baltimore . ProQuest Dissertations and of emphasis communication of the information rather thanDrug the use specifics of an individual location. communication moveonsignificantly lower, exodus and from older parts ofCessation the city (where operating costs and personal Theses; 2009. nowhere, whichmove places the outside andthe theexodus inside from in contact by developing an internal principle of and cooperation, communication significantly lower, older parts of the city (where operating costs personal 3 Malabou, Catherine. What We lower) Do with to Ournewer Brain? outlying New York: Fordham University Press, 2008. 41 and services greater) expenses areWhat higher and Should services areas (where lands isparallels inexpensive 5 In her book Should We Do With Our Brain? , theorist Catherine Malabou the post-Fordist perception assistance,are andhigher repair, and an external principle of adaptation and (where evolution.” expenses services lower) to newer outlying areas lands is inexpensive and services greater) 4 6and  Ibid: 33  will likely increase.” The specificity of one’s location is therefore appreciated by its to communicate of a common6 perception of theoffunctioning of theishuman brain. “Domination andability the crisis of centrality, with in a willlabor likelyto increase.” The specificity one’s location therefore appreciated by its ability to communicate with other destinations within the network. This enables increased horizontal occupation on the periphery of the former In this seeming manipulation of Malibou’s text,matched I am reifying a common perception of the contemporarywas metropolis. As merely paradox, are network. perfectly with each other.horizontal The restructuring of on capitalism… accomplished other destinations within the This enables increased occupation the periphery of the former “urban center.” This theupon familiar symptom of Baltimore as decided it exists today, whereinby collective movement urbanism relies moredescribes and more flows – the intangible communication of information –a the physical context at the price of substituting control by self-organization for planning overseen formal centralized “urban center.” This describes the familiar symptom of Baltimore as it exists and today, wherein a acollective movement towards the periphery hasbecomes effectively dismantled center. to the network. The “center”3 therefore is temporal, associated with a place less andorganization, lesstherelevant authority within the company… For this new towards the periphery has effectively dismantled the center.the network is the master term…” manifesting itself in discrete momentary and ever changing locations. Malabou suggests that a networked system of organization cannot be constrained to a central location, that the 4 In his writing onnetwork Drosscape , Alan Berger adaptable discussestothe inevitable decentralization thecrisis networked city. “As periphery of that must be supple, change. Centrality is similarlyof the of the networked

communication replacesurbanism transportation primary mode of connection between peoplemold and its the environment future costs to of city. A decentralized ought asto the adapt to shifting environments, and likewise communication significantly lower, the exodusfrom fromher older parts of the city (where operating costsinand personal evolving culturalmove values. In the following excerpt book, I deliberately substitute the “city” place of the expenses services “brain” as are the higher subjectand of her thesis:lower) to newer outlying areas (where lands is inexpensive and services greater) 6 will likely increase.” The specificity of one’s location is therefore appreciated by its ability to communicate with                                                               other destinations within the network. This enables increased horizontal occupation on the periphery of the former 1 Blood, Pearle. “Factors in the Economic Development of Baltimore, Maryland,” Economic Geography. Vol. 13, No. 2, Apr 1937. 187-208.

“urban center.” This describes the familiar symptom of Baltimore as it exists today, wherein a collective movement  

2

 Nandi, Arijit. Deindustrialization, Socioeconomic Deprivation, and Injection Drug use Cessation in Baltimore . ProQuest Dissertations and towards2009. the periphery has effectively dismantled the center. Theses; 3 Malabou, Catherine. What Should We Do with Our Brain? New York: Fordham University Press, 2008. 41

                                                              4 5 Ibid: 33                                                                 Ibid: 35  5 6 6

 Ibid: 35   Berger, Alan.  Drosscape: Wasting Land in Urban America.  New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006.  64   Berger, Alan.  Drosscape: Wasting Land in Urban America.  New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006.  64 

2.3


Discussion on Baltimore List of Terms

The Mechanical Corollary

• to understand the particular mechanics of technology and communications that generated a landscape (or landscape element) having great cultural significance.

Post-Fordist Capitalism

• to value control by self-organizational network over control by formal centralized authority.

Delocalization

• no longer having a center but rather discrete assemblies forming mobile and momentary centers.

Individualization

• the deregulation and privatization of modernizing tasks and duties. • the responsibility for social advancement shifting decisively towards the self-assertion of the individual.

Empty Spaces

• the leftover places which remain after an industrial process has been deployed upon a given site. • the result of a friction between the manufactured infrastructure and the surrounding context.

Dross Space

• the ignored, undervalued, unfortunate economic residues of the manufactured landscape.

Plasticity

• the capacity for adaptability.

Organizational Suppleness

• to adapt to shifting environments, and likewise to mold our environments to our evolving cultural values.

Peripheral Sites

• ambiguous areas that are caught between enclaves of urban development. • interstitial landscapes that are characterized by their placelessness.

Urban Ground Plane

• a surface that is activated by the transient occupation of the public. • a field that hosts both fixed and changing public processes in the city.

Architectural Alterity

• the otherness that occurs when the function of design is both central yet undetermined.

2.4


ing issues

planning government agencies

of

baltimore

Biking in Baltimore

planning program

Pavement Preservation Program

Reisterstown Road Project

Innovative Technology Fund

Innovative Technology Fund

Restoration Funding

Chesapeake Bay Program partners are focused onChesapeake reducing pollution from the four primary sources: agriculture, Bay Program partners are focused on reducing pollution from the four primary sources: agriculture, wastewater, urban and suburban runoff, and air pollution. Thisurban assessment reportsrunoff, on ecosystem conditionsThis andassessment reports on ecosystem conditions and wastewater, and suburban and air pollution. the efficiency of restoration actions. the efficiency of restoration actions.

Bay Barometer: A Health and Restoration Assessment of theand Chesapeake BayAssessment of the Chesapeake Bay Bay Barometer: A Health Restoration

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) Theissued National a request Fish and forWildlife pre-proposals Foundation for large-scale (NFWF) issued restoration a request for pre-proposals for large-scale restoration projects that use innovative, sustainable and cost-effective projects that approaches use innovative, to accelerate sustainable the reduction and cost-effective of nutrientsapproaches and to accelerate the reduction of nutrients and sediments in targeted Chesapeake Bay sub-watersheds. sediments Funding in targeted for these Chesapeake projects comes Bay sub-watersheds. from the EPA ChesaFunding for these projects comes from the EPA Chesapeake Bay Program Office. peake Bay Program Office.

Restoration Funding

This report presents the environmental indicators This contained reportinpresents EPA''s national the environmental level reportindicators and then contained provides in EPA''s national level report and then provides information about these indicators specific to Region information 3. about these indicators specific to Region 3.

Indicators Presenting Data for EPA Indicators Region 3 Presenting Data for EPA Region 3

The state of Maryland and the EPA have partnered Thewith statetheof University Maryland ofand Maryland the EPA tohave develop partnered an innovative with the University of Maryland to develop an innovative program that promotes investment in new research program and technologies that promotes thatinvestment address water in new quality research problems and technologies and that address water quality problems and accelerate Bay restoration. The EPA has providedaccelerate funding toBay therestoration. university’s The Maryland EPA has Industrial provided Partnerships funding to the university’s Maryland Industrial Partnerships Program, and the state has partnered with MTECH Program, Ventures andtothe create statea has seedpartnered capital fund. with MTECH Ventures to create a seed capital fund.

CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability, and Compensation Act

CERCLA

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability, and Compensation Act

The Baltimore City Zoning Code was last updatedThe in 1971. Baltimore The economic City Zoning realities Code of was thelast Cityupdated have evolved, in 1971. and The the economic realities of the City have evolved, and the current code is no longer able to move Baltimore current forward.code Theisgoal no longer of the revised able to move code isBaltimore to preserve forward. the long-term The goal of the revised code is to preserve the long-term economic health of the City ofeconomic Baltimore.health of the City of Baltimore.

Transform Baltimore: The Zoning Code Transform RewriteBaltimore: The Zoning Code Rewrite

The purpose of this report is to provide the public,The policy purpose makers, of this researchers, report is toand provide publicthe health public, officials policywith makers, researchers, and public health officials with measures that improve the environment and reduce measures the rates that of improve environmentally-related the environmenthealth and reduce conditions the rates in of environmentally-related health conditions in children. The report summarizes environmental contaminants children. Thethat report havesummarizes affected children''s environmental health.contaminants that have affected children''s health.

Maryland's Children and the Environment Maryland's Children and the Environment

roadway resurfacing and repairs; sidewalk repairs; roadway ada improvements; resurfacing and install repairs; pedestrian sidewalk facilities repairs; such adaasimprovements; accessible install pedestrian facilities such as accessible pedestrian signals & countdown signals; landscaping; pedestrian upgrade signals traffic &signal countdown timing signals; and equipment; landscaping; provide upgrade bicycletraffic signal timing and equipment; provide bicycle lanes. lanes.

Reisterstown Road Project

This project will provide streetscape around the US This40project corridor willfrom provide Fulton streetscape Street to Calhoun around the Street, US 40 which corridor wouldfrom Fulton Street to Calhoun Street, which would enhance existing communities, serve as a catalystenhance for newexisting development, communities, and integrate serve as planned a catalyst improvements for new development, such and integrate planned improvements such as the MARC Parking Lot Expansion and the RedasLine the Transit MARCStudy. Parking Lot Expansion and the Red Line Transit Study.

West Baltimore Pedestrian/Bicycle West Loop Concept BaltimorePlan Pedestrian/Bicycle Loop Concept Plan

Roadway improvements for an 11 block area which Roadway will include improvements trees, lighting for an enhancements, 11 block areasidewalk which willrepair, include trees, lighting enhancements, sidewalk repair, roadway resurfacing, and possibly bump outs androadway planted resurfacing, medians. and possibly bump outs and planted medians.

North Avenue Improvement Project North Avenue Improvement Project

Roadway improvements for major Northwest gateway Roadway which improvements will include significant for major Northwest traffic flow gateway upgrades,which trees,will include significant traffic flow upgrades, trees, planted medians, and resurfacing. planted medians, and resurfacing.

Reisterstown Road Improvement Project Reisterstown Road Improvement Project

The ongoing initiative is designed to implement routine The ongoing maintenance initiative on isroads designed that are to implement in fairly good routine condition maintenance by on roads that are in fairly good condition by preventing them from being in further disrepair. By preventing implementing them afrom planned beingstrategy in further of cost disrepair. effective By implementing treatments, a planned strategy of cost effective treatments, the city's roadway infrastructure will be preservedtheincity's orderroadway to avoid infrastructure more extensive willand be costly preserved repairs.� in order to avoid more extensive and costly repairs.�

Pavement Preservation Program

Create structure to implement the Bike Plan goalsCreate and objectives. structure toInstitute implement newthe policies Bike and Planprocedures goals and objectives. in the Institute new policies and procedures in the Departments of Transportation and Planning to support Departments Bike Master of Transportation Plan goals. and Update Planning streettoand support trail repair Bike Master and Plan goals. Update street and trail repair and maintenance practices to ensure bicyclists safety and maintenance comfort. practices to ensure bicyclists safety and comfort.

Biking in Baltimore

planning program planning issues

sp or tat ion

s

vir on m

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En

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ro tec tio n

Ag en cy

B De altim pa or rtm e en City to fH Ba ea lth Pla ltim an nn or d ing e C M en De ity tal pa rtm Hy gie en t ne

B De altim pa or rtm e en City to fT ran

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r

B De altim pa or rtm e en City to fH Ba ea lt Pla ltim nn or ing e C De ity pa rtm en t

B De altim pa or rtm e en City to fT ran


Restoration Funding

Restoration Funding

B

e

fH

the efficiency of restoration actions.

B Climate Action Plan: Interim Report Climate to the Governor and Interim Maryland Assembly Action Plan: Report toaythe Governor and Maryland Assembly P D and forecastroforg the state of Maryland. This report provides an emissions inventory and This forecast for provides the state an of emissions Maryland. inventory report ram (M epar ar tme yla n nd t o Baltimore City Data Collaborative Baltimore City Data Collaborative) f th e Enfield This is a growing network of communities, individuals, international groups interested furthering the of This isand a growing network of communities, and groups interested in furthering the field of Ba in individuals, vinternational l iroprogress toward long term results for change. developing community indicators systems for usedeveloping in measurecommunity progress toward longsystems term results for change. indicators for use in measure t Al im liacities.o nm Currently there are over 400 member cities. Currently there are over 400 member nc re en e Ne t i g Baltimore Sustainability Plan Baltimore Sustainability Plan hb or By improving Baltimore's ability to offer healthy air water, Baltimore's varied transportation, options, job opportunities Byand improving ability to offer air and water, varied transportation, options, job opportunities with ho with Nahealthy odretain planning can help Baltimore attract and retain good growth potential, and clean, safe recreationalgood spaces, sustainable cansafe Baltimore attract andsustainable growth potential,planning and clean, recreational spaces, tio Rhelp e I n nd more residents, businesses, and investment. more residents, businesses, and investment. se al ica ar C ch en tor an ter s d fo Ed r S Int u ca ma eg tio rt rat n Gr ion ow an th d Ap p lic M ati Ch ary on an lan Ne ge d tw Co or mm k iss Co ion Co mm on ns un Cl or ity im tiu ate m Ind ica tor B s Su altim sta or ina e O bil ffic ity e of

Cish needed Dissolved oxygen is essential to the survival of allDissolved these organisms; watertoclarity aquatic oxygen isgood essential the survival of allforthese organisms; good water clarity is needed for aquatic grasses, which are habitat and nursery areas for grasses, aquatic organisms; and lowand chlorophyll aeslevels balanced and low chlorophyll a levels indicate a balanced which are habitat nursery areas aquatic aorganisms; ap forindicate ecosystem, which benefits both humans and aquatic species alike. threeboth indicators into aalike. hese three indicators are incorporated into a ecosystem, whichhese benefits humansare andincorporated aquatic ea species ke Water Quality Index. Water Quality Index.

Chesapeake Bay Report Card 2010Chesapeake Bay Report Card 2010

initiatives. The purpose of this resource is to monitor 8 categories of Maryland''s growth.is to monitor 8 categories of Maryland''s growth. initiatives. The purpose of this resource

En vir on Citywide Vital Signs: Urban Environment/Transportation Citywide Vital Signs: Urban Environment/Transportation me Air Quality; Mitigation of Air Pollutants AssociatedAirwith Transportation; to Expand TreenCanopy Coverage Quality; Mitigation Campaign of Air Pollutants Associated Transportation; Campaign to Expand Tree Canopy Coverage tawith lP ro tec tio n Ag Maryland Smart Growth Indicators Maryland Smart Growth Indicators e This online resource allows users to select an indicator pertinent to Maryland''s landto use andansmart growth This online resource allows users select indicator pertinent to nMaryland''s land use and smart growth cy

This program is a pollution “diet” to restore and protect the Bay. This program is a pollution “diet” to restore and protect the Bay.

Maryland's Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation PlanBay Watershed Implementation Plan Maryland's Chesapeake

the efficiency of restoration actions.

nta ep ar BayAssessment lH Bay Barometer: A Health and Restoration Assessment of theand Chesapeake Bay Barometer: A Health Restoration of the Chesapeake Bay tm yg en pollution from Chesapeake Bay Program partners are focused onChesapeake reducing pollution from the four primary sources: agriculture, Bay Program partners are focused on reducing the four primary sources: agriculture, i e t andassessmentnereports on ecosystem conditions and wastewater, urban and suburban runoff, and air pollution. Thisurban assessment reportsrunoff, on ecosystem conditionsThis wastewater, and suburban and air pollution.

arestoration lth a request for pre-proposals for large-scale restoration The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) Theissued National a request Fish and forWildlife pre-proposals Foundation issued Pla foraltlarge-scale im(NFWF) anapproaches projects that use innovative, sustainable and cost-effective projects that approaches use innovative, to accelerate sustainable thenreduction and of nutrients and to accelerate the reduction of nutrients and ocost-effective r n d for these projects comes from the EPA Chesaingfromethe sediments in targeted Chesapeake Bay sub-watersheds. sediments Funding in targeted for these Chesapeake projects comes Bay sub-watersheds. EPA ChesaFunding M C i peake Bay Program Office. peake Bay Program Office. e D ty

2010

e Ba y

Pr og ra

Ag en cy

D (M epar m ar tme yla n t nd of ) the En Ba vir Al ltim on lia o me nc re nt e Ne igh bo rh N oo d Re ation Ind se al ica ar C ch en tor an ter s d fo Ed r S Int uc m eg ati ar rat on t G ion ro wt an h d Ap pl i M ca tio Ch ary n an lan Ne ge d tw Co or mm k iss Co ion Co mm on ns un Cl or ity im tiu ate m Ind ica tor B s Su altim sta or ina e O bil ffic ity e of

sa pe ak

Ch e

cti on

Discussion on Baltimore

2011

ECONOMIC STIMULUS

CLIMATE CHANGE

LAND USE

WATER RUNOFF/POLLUTANTS

SPECIES CONSERVATION

PUBLIC HEALTH & SAFETY

ECONOMIC STIMULUS

TRANSIT ACCESSIBILITY

CLIMATE CHANGE

AIR QUALITY

LAND USE

Government Planning

Agencies of Baltimore

2009

2008

2007

2006 2011

national program

2010

“region 3” scope

2009

maryland state

2008

baltimore city

2007

chesapeake bay

2006

local neighborhood

2011

PUBLIC HEALTH & SAFETY

2010

TRANSIT ACCESSIBILITY

2009

AIR QUALITY

2008

SOIL CONTAMINANTS

2007

2006

2.5

sa pe ak

e

Ba y De (M par ar tme yla n nd t of ) th Ba Al ltim lia o nc re e Ne igh b Na Re tion se al ar C ch en an ter d f Ed Int uc eg a rat ion an d A M Ch ary an lan ge d Co mm C Co omm ns un or ity tiu m Ind ic Ba Su ltim sta or ina e O bil ffic ity e

Ch e


The progression of industry in Baltimore is indicated by the extent of the Western Maryland Rail Road lines.

early industries of

baltimore [ railroad tracks ]

baltimore city


Discussion on Baltimore Displacement and the Pursuit of Progress

What is to become of the dismantled city center? If a networked urbanism appreciates the constraints of time over the presence of place, does that necessitate moments of “placelessness” within the city network?

What is to become of the dismantled city center? If a networked urbanism appreciates the constraints of time over Baltimore today is pervaded with pockets of placelessness. These pockets are the evidence of the city’s transformation the does ground-plane into a living, connective tissue between disparate fragments and the presence of ofplace, that necessitate moments of “placelessness” withinincreasingly the city network? deindustrialization, the 9leftover places which remain after an industrial process has been deployed upon a given site. What is to become of the dismantled city center? If a networked urbanism appreciates the constraints of time over unforeseen programs.” Lars Leruptoday terms moments of placelessness as ofthe“placelessness” “dross.” These Theywithin are the Baltimore issuch pervaded pocketsmoments of placelessness. pockets are network? the undervalued, evidence of unfortunate the city’s the presence of place, does that with necessitate theignored, city

7 Dross, however, is inevitable. It is theupon symptom an economic residues the of leftover the manufactured landscape. deindustrialization, which remain industrial process beencomposition deployed a givenofof site. The “strategic organization” of places the ground plane is after not soanconcerned with the has formal or branding a Baltimore today is pervaded with pockets of placelessness. These pockets are the evidence of the city’s incompatibility between adjacent of programs: the space resists public occupation, and theundervalued, public likewise resists Lars such moments placelessness as the “dross.” They arewhich the ignored, site, Lerup rather terms it is concerned with the varying types of public activity for the site must adapt,unfortunate including 7 deindustrialization, the leftover places which remain after an industrial process has been deployed upon a given interaction with the space. however,programming is inevitable.of designed It is the space symptom ofsite. an economic residues the manufactured landscape. programming for theofunknown. Wall suggests that theDross, indeterminate allows the Lars Lerup terms such moments of placelessness as the “dross.” They are the ignored, undervalued, unfortunate incompatibility programs: the their space resists public occupation, and the public likewise resists public users to between collectivelyadjacent claim the territory for 7 private and ever changing interests. “Such investment by the Dross, however, is inevitable. It is the symptom of an economic of might the manufactured landscape.sidewalk At the subsequently localresidues scale, shadowy interaction with theone space. users ensures aconsider long andthe affectionate occupationrunning of publicalongside space.”10a highway overpass as dross. It is incompatibility between adjacent space resistsThepublic occupation,beneath and thea public likewise resists an urban condition which tendsprograms: to repel the public activity. environment highway overpass is

interaction the space. characteristically dark, havingconsider limited outward visibility due the bulky alongside infrastructure overhead. Thereasisdross. little orIt no At the localwith scale, one might the shadowy sidewalk running a highway overpass is presence natural vegetation due toto the obstruction of sunlight, the space isbeneath often noisy due to traffic volume. an urban ofcondition which tends repel public activity. Theand environment a highway overpass is At the local scale, one might consider the shadowy sidewalk running alongside a highway overpass as dross. It is The combination of these factors results in a sense of insecurity an concern for one’soverhead. safety. The negative characteristically dark, having limited outward visibility due the bulky infrastructure There is littlereading or no an urban which tends repel environment a highway overpass is of the highway overpass creates ofpublic emptyactivity. orThe dross. presence ofcondition natural vegetation duea periphery toto the obstruction ofspace, sunlight, and the space isbeneath often noisy due to traffic volume. characteristically dark, having limited outward visibility due the bulky infrastructure There is littlereading or no The combination of these factors results in a sense of insecurity an concern for one’soverhead. safety. The negative presence of discussion natural vegetation dueaheperiphery toasks the obstruction ofspace, sunlight, andarchitects the spacetoisconsider often noisy due topotential traffic volume. In the Berger’s oncreates dross, architects landscape the latent of the of highway overpass of emptyand or dross. The combination of these factors results in a sense of insecurity an concern for one’s safety. The negative reading peripheral drosscape. “It requires designers to think strategically of themselves as charged with identifying the of the highway aheperiphery ofurban emptyregion space, or dross. undervalued andoverpass overlooked potentials of the within which they to liveconsider and work. It further suggests In Berger’s discussion oncreates dross, asks architects and landscape architects the latent potential of thea move awaydrosscape. from the heroic, modernist master to planner the advocacy designeraswho engenders inventiveness, peripheral “It requires designers think toward strategically of themselves charged with identifying the 8 asks architects and landscape architects to consider the latent potential of the In Berger’s discussion dross, he entrepreneurialism, and on visioning.” There is truly avoiding the which creationthey of dross, however physicalsuggests presencea undervalued and overlooked potentials of the urbannoregion within live and work. the It further peripheral drosscape. “Itcondition requires designers to think toward strategically ofa positive themselves aswho charged with identifying the of dross within anthe urban may be recontextualized to engage public response. move away from heroic, modernist master planner the advocacy designer engenders inventiveness, 8 undervalued and overlooked potentials of the urbannoregion within live and work. the It further entrepreneurialism, and visioning.” There is truly avoiding the which creationthey of dross, however physicalsuggests presencea move away from heroic, modernist master planner toward the advocacy designer engenders Alex Wall foresees the tactical use of be multi-functional infrastructure a means of who deploying publicinventiveness, services and of dross within anthe urban condition may recontextualized to engage aaspositive public response. 8 entrepreneurialism, visioning.” Thereof isa truly no avoiding of dross, the physical presence programmatic needsand within the context challenging site. the“Acreation renewed concernhowever with infrastructure, services, of dross an urban conditionuse may be recontextualized to engage positive public response. role mobility, and with the of offlexible, multifunctional servicesaaspromises aofrevitalized the design Alex Wallwithin foresees the provision tactical multi-functional infrastructure a means deploying publicforservices and professions. needs The grafting instruments and equipment strategically surfaces allows for a programmatic within of thenew context of a challenging site. “Aonto renewed concernstaged with infrastructure, services, Alex Wall foresees the tactical use of multi-functional infrastructure as a means of deploying public services and transformation of thetheground-plane a living, connective tissue between increasingly disparate fragments                                                               ofinto mobility, and with provision flexible, multifunctional services promises a revitalized role for the design 7

 Lerup, Lars. “Stim and Dross: Rethinking the Metropolis,” Center 14: On Landscape Urbanism. Austin: The University of Texas, 2007. 9 programmatic needs within thenew context of a challenging site. “Aonto renewed concernstaged with infrastructure, services, unforeseen programs.” professions. The grafting of instruments and equipment strategically surfaces allows for a 101.  8  Berger, Alan.  Drosscape: Wasting Land in Urban America.  New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006. 241.  mobility, and with the provision                                                               of flexible, multifunctional services promises a revitalized role for the design 7

 Lerup, Lars. “Stim and Dross: Rethinking the Metropolis,” Center 14: On Landscape Urbanism. Austin: The University of Texas, 2007. professions. The grafting of new instruments and equipment onto strategically staged surfaces allows for a The 101.  “strategic organization” of the ground plane is not so concerned with the formal composition or branding of

                                                              the varying types of public activity for which the site must adapt, including  Berger, Alan.  Drosscape: Wasting Land in Urban America.  New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006. 241.  site, rather it is concerned with 7 9 Lerup, Lars. “Stim and Dross: Rethinking the Metropolis,” Center 14: On Landscape Urbanism. Austin: The University of Texas, 2007.  Wall, Alex. “Programming the Urban Surface,” Center 14: On Landscape Urbanism. Austin: The University of Texas, 2007. 183  8

programming for the unknown. Wall suggests that the indeterminate programming of designed space allows the 192.  10 101.   Ibid: 8

 Berger, Alan.  Drosscape: Wasting Land in Urban America.  New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006. 241. 

public users to collectively claim the territory for their private and ever changing interests. “Such investment by the users subsequently ensures a long and affectionate occupation of public space.”10

2.6


Manufacturing Industries in Baltimore Baltimore Copper [ copper smelting ] B&O Railroad [ railroad ] Gambrill’s Woodberry Company [ textile mill ] Stone Hill [ company-town ] Poole and Hunt Foundry [ textile mill equipment ] Crown Cork and Seal Company [ bottling ] Noxzema Chemical Company [ cosmetics ] The Hooper mills [ cotton mill ]

Schenuit company [ tire manufacturers ] Stieff Silver factory [ silver smith ] American Can Company [ canning ] Clipper Mill [ textile mill ] Meadow Mill [ textile mill ] Druid Mill [ textile mills ] General Motors [ automobile manufacturing ] Standard Oil Company [ oil refinery ]

Tire Company [ tire manufacturing ] Domino Sugar [ sugar refinery ] NGK-Locke [ high-voltage insulators ] Ferris Browing [ refuse systems ] Baltimore Sunpapers [ newspaper ] G. Krug & Son, Inc [ iron works ]

early industries of

baltimore no longer in use

still in use life span of industrial site

poole and hunt foundry

2000

stieff silver co

druid mill

1800 clipper mill

manufacturing industry

hooper mills noxema chemical co

baltimore city schenult rubber co

woodberry / meadown mill

stone hill company town

american can co

standard oil co

early industries of

crown cork and seal co

westinghouse electric

baltimore

domino sugar

baltimore copper smelting co

general motors

no longer in use

baltimore sun newspaper publishers

ferris browing refuse systems

ngk-locke high-voltage insulators

wal mart tire lube

still in use life span of industrial site

poole and hunt foundry

2000

druid mill

1800 clipper mill

manufacturing industry

hooper mills noxema chemical co

baltimore city schenult rubber co

stieff silver co


Discussion on Baltimore

2.7

Mapping the City’s De-industrialization

Major employers of the manufacturing industry are conveniently located along the railroad tracks.

poole and hunt foundry

stieff silver co

druid mill

clipper mill

hooper mills noxema chemical co

schenult rubber co

woodberry / meadown mill

stone hill company town

american can co

standard oil co

crown cork and seal co

westinghouse electric

domino sugar

baltimore copper smelting co

general motors

ferris browing refuse systems

baltimore sun newspaper publishers

ngk-locke high-voltage insulators


Service Industries in Baltimore Baltimore Gas and Electric [ gas & electric company ] Constellation Energy Group [ gas & electric company ] Loyola University Maryland [ education ] JHU Krieger School of Arts & Sciences [ education ] JHU School of Education [ education ] JHU Whiting School of Engineering [ education ] JHU School of Nursing [ education ]

JHU School of Medicine [ education ] JHU Bloomberg School of Public Health [ education ] JHU Peabody Institute [ education ] JHU Carey Business School [ education ] University of Maryland, Medical System [ medical ] Mercy Medical Center [ medical ] Johns Hopkins Hospital [ medical ]

Maryland General Hospital [ medical ] Saint Agnes Healthcare [ medical ] Harbor Hospital Center [ medical ] Good Samaritan Hospital [ medical ] Kennedy Krieger Institute [ medical ] Bank of America [ bank ] M & T Bank [ bank ]

early industries of

baltimore no longer in use good samaritan hospital of maryland still in use life span of industrial site

loyola university 2000

1800

service industry johns hopkins school of arts and sciences school of engineering

baltimore city johns hopkins school of education

kennedy krieger institute johns hopkins peabody institute johns hopkins school of medicine

maryland general hospital

baltimore gas and electric

m&t bank

johns hopkins school of nursing school of public health

Mercy Medical Center

constellation energy group

University of Maryland Medical System

johns hopkins hospital

bank of america

early industries of

baltimore

saint agnes healthcare

johns hopkins carey business school

no longer in use

good samaritan hospital of marylan harbor hospital center

still in use life span of industrial site

loyola university 2000

1800

service industry johns hopkins school of arts and sciences school of engineering

baltimore city johns hopkins school of education


t agnes healthcare

Discussion on Baltimore Mapping the City’s De-industrialization

Manufacturing was dramatically replaced by service industries (ie, medical and higher education employers) good samaritan hospital of maryland

loyola university

johns hopkins school of arts and sciences school of engineering

johns hopkins school of education

kennedy krieger institute johns hopkins peabody institute johns hopkins school of medicine

maryland general hospital

baltimore gas and electric

m&t bank

johns hopkins school of nursing school of public health

Mercy Medical Center

constellation energy group

University of Maryland Medical System

bank of america

johns hopkins carey business school

johns hopkins hospital

2.8


Vacant Industrial Storage Facilities [ based on data collected October 2011 ]

currently unoccupied

industrial space 100,000 sf + 10,000 sf - 100,000 sf 1,000 sf - 10,000 sf

baltimore city

currently unoccupied

industrial space 100,000 sf + 10,000 sf - 100,000 sf 1,000 sf - 10,000 sf


Discussion on Baltimore Mapping the City’s De-industrialization

Today, empty rail yards, warehouses, and staging lots occupy the gaps in this evolving city center.

2.9


Converging Neighborhoods 1 - Mount Vernon Also known as the cultural district, Mount Vernon is a high-density area known for its attractive nightlife, buoyed by its large amount of bars, clubs and lounges and its historic multi-story townhomes (most of which have been transformed into apartments) and traditional apartment buildings.

2 - Penn-Fallsway The Baltimore Prison / Correctional Center has occupied the North area of Penn-Fallsway since the 19th century. Various public works institutions are located along the South end of the district, including Baltimore Gas & Electric and Housing for the Homeless.

3 - Oldtown Old Town Mall is a pedestrian plaza, opened in the 1960s, catering to the area’s poor population. It is surrounded by public housing or privately owned subsidized housing. The mall caters to this and offers goods and services at discount prices.

Penn-Fallsway Mount Vernon

Oldtown

Pleasant View Gardens

Jonestown

Central Business District


Site Selection & Analysis 4 - Pleasant View Gardens 5 - Jonestown Pleasant View Gardens is a public housing In the last half of the 20th century, Jonestown has neighborhood. shifted from a predominantly Eastern European and Jewish neighborhood into a predominantly African American neighborhood. Public housing replaced many of the former rowhomes and townhouses of the area.

6 - Central Business District City Centre is the historic financial district in Baltimore that has increasingly shifted eastward. Hundreds of businesses are found here, and it remains the center of life in Baltimore. City Centre is also home to the majority of Baltimore’s skyscrapers.

Post-industrial vacancy rises in Downtown Baltimore, where disparate neighborhoods and economies converge.

Jon es Fa lls

Ex pre s

sw a y

1

3

2

4

6

5

3.1


Site - 26-Acre Asphalt Parking Lot Post-Industrial Residual Space

Jon es Fa l ls

Ex pre s

sw a y

[ site ]


Site Selection & Analysis Families Below Poverty Level [ per neighborhood ] 1 - Mount Vernon

10-20%

2 - Penn-Fallsway

0-10%

3 - Oldtown

30-40%

Jon es Fa lls

Ex pre s

4 - Pleasant View Gardens 5 - Jonestown 6 - Central Business District

sw a y

1

3

2

4

6

5

+50% 30-40% -10%

3.2


Residential Communities “...Identity centers; it insists on an essence, a point... “

Jon es Fa l ls

Ex pre s

sw a y

Mount Vernon

Latrobe Homes

Oldtown

[ site ] Pleasant View Gardens

Jonestown


3.3

Businesses and Institutions of Public Works “ ... as the sphere of influence expands, the area characterized by the center becomes larger and larger, hopelessly diluting both the strength and the authority of the core.” - Rem Koolhaas “The Generic City”, S M L XL

Jon es Fa lls

Ex pre s

sw a y

wn

Site Selection & Analysis

Baltimore Correctional Center

[ site ]

Laurence Dunbar School

U.S. Post Office

Central Business District


Mapping of Annual / Seasonal / Temporary Event Space a - Station North Arts & Entertainment Festival b - Art Scape c - Dr Martin Luther King Jr Parade d - Seton Hill’s “La Fête Francais” e - Baltimore Book Festival f - Baltimore Farmers Market g - Sonar [ music venue ]

h - Holiday Craft Market i - Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower Open House j - Baltimore Boat Show k - 4th of July Festival l - Inner Harbor [ year-round activity ] m - St Patrick’s Day Parade n - Fell’s Point Fun Festival

Jon es Fa l ls

a Ex pre s

y

b

sw a

c e [ site ]

d

g f h

i

m k j

l n


Site Selection & Analysis Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan Like many historic East Coast cities, Baltimore has narrower rights-of-way, variable street and intersection patterns, and diverse street parking conditions.

The overall planning and policy framework for future development of bicycle facilities in the City calls for the implementation of standard on-street bicycle facility design.

Jon es Fa lls

Ex pre s

sw a

planned bicycle lane undetermined bicycle lane

3.4

y


“Captial Improvement Projects” as defined by Board of Estimates policy...

Goals:

A Captial Improvement is “… any physical betterment or improvement and any preliminary studies and surveys relative thereto, including, but not limited to, any property of a permanent nature, and equipment needed in connection with such improvement, when first erected or acquired.

Jon es Fa l ls

Ex pre s

- Create Clean, Green, and Healthy Neighborhoods - Embrace a Growth Agenda that supports Economic Opportunity, Economic Empowerment, and Economic Development - Reestablish Neighborhoods as the Organizing Principle in Community and Human Development

sw a y

2009 Fiscal Year

2010 Fiscal Year

2011 Fiscal Year

2012 Fiscal Year


Site Selection & Analysis

3.5

“East Baltimore Development” with Baltimore Development Corporation (BDC) • Capital funds support streetscape design and improvement in Oldtown, Berea, South Clifton Park, & Fells Point

Ten Baltimore neighborhoods to benefit from the program:

and National Trust for Historic Preservation • “Main Streets Initiatives” makes grants to small businesses for facade and streetscape improvements as a way of attracting more business and foot traffic to certain areas of the city.

Jon es Fa lls

Ex pre s

• • • • •

Belair-Edison East Monument Street Hamilton-Lauraville Pennsylvania Avenue Pigtown

• • • • •

Brooklyn Federal Hill Fells Point Highlandtown Waverly

sw a y Oldtown Main Street Initiative


Proposed Site: Former Rail Yard Hillen Train Station [ active 1876 - 1954 ] The booming manufacturing industry in Penn-Fallsway thrived due to the convenience and accessibility of the tracks of the Western Maryland Rail Road.

Building Footprints

Penn-Fallsway, 1914

Penn-Fallsway, 1944

Penn-Fallsway, 2011

Penn-Fallsway, 1944

Penn-Fallsway, 2011

Extent of Rail Road Tracks

Penn-Fallsway, 1914

Western Maryland Rail Road


Site Selection & Analysis History of the Site Historic Sanborn Maps indicate that this parking surface was the

[ ie, steel rolling mills, paper publishers, glass plants, iron works,

site of the Hillen Train Station. It serviced passenger rail as well

creameries, whiskey distilleries, coal yards, & automobile plants ]

as industrial shipping/receiving. The periphery of the site was

The public bath house was also adjacent to the lot, and the main

primarily warehouse storage as well as various types of industry.

thoroughfares were lined with independent merchants of textiles and artisinal productions.

4

1

3 2

Above: 1 - Station and Platform

2 - Warehouse

3 - Warehouse

4 - Round House / Turn Table

3.6


Organizational Constraints Mapping the juxtaposition of clashing street grids that converge at the site. The empty parking lot is a termination point for many residential streets and alleyways. As such it is embedded with potential to become an urban destination point.

greenmo

way

unt st

the falls

monument st

t

hil

s len

center st

] for t es

ite [s

st

s ea ts t

orleans st

ns

lvi

co t

ex r ete st

saratoga st

igh

nh st

t

ts

ron nf


Site Selection & Analysis Ground Plane

Lawn or garden is maintained and open for public use.

Empty lot, no longer maintained and overgrown with grass.

Asphalt parking lot (typically East of Jones Falls)

Mapping the Scope of Public Lawns and Semi-Public Green Space

1 - Washington Monument

2 - Preston Gardens Park

3 - Paul Laurence Dunbar High School Athletic Field

3 1

ite [s

2

]

3.7


Building Context Mapping Institutions of Public Works 1 - Baltimore Correctional Center

4 - Department of Transportation

2 - Old Town Fire Station

5 - Healthcare for the Homeless

3 - Baltimore Gas & Electric

6 - United States Postal Service

To the North, the lot faces the Baltimore City Detention Center. The original prison buildings have occupied this site since the 19th century. To the Northeast sits the Baltimore Gas & Electric facility, which has occupied this site since the early 20th century. On a small triangular block just East of the lot is the Oldtown Fire Station. (Throughout most of the 20th Century this site was occupied by a brewery.)

1

3

2

4 ite [s

]

5

6


Site Selection & Analysis Building Context Mapping commercial activity and pedetrian traffic. 1 - Oldtown Mall

4 - Bourbon Street Live

2 - Fire Station Museum

5 - Club 347

3 - Sonar

6 - Buddies Jazz Club

Several music venues in the Central Business District utilize the empty space beneath the Jones Falls Expressway for outdoor performance space. The “pop-up� programming of the site is important to the local arts community.

7 - An Die Musik

1

ite

[s

] 2

7 5

4 6 3

3.8


Organizational Constraints Topographic mapping of the ground plane

+ 50 ft

+ 90 ft

+ 20 ft

+ 110 ft

+ 30 ft + 0 ft


Site Selection & Analysis Implications of the Existing Urban Fabric

N

3.9


Implications of the Existing Urban Fabric Identifying primary physical site constraints • obstructive overpasses crossing at the Southeast corner of the site • clashing orientations of multiple city grids • dramatic change in topography from East to West

Orleans Street Viaduct & Jones Falls Expressway

Asphalt Parking Lot [ Primarily used by Public Works ]

Building Density by Footprint

Site Topography

N


Site Selection & Analysis Supporting Agencies for Community Investment Programs for Integration:

Funding and Sponsorship:

“Baltimore Bicycle Master Plan” “Main Street Initiative” “East Baltimore Development”

Department of Transporation (DOT) Baltimore Development Corporation (BDC) Capital Improvement Program (CIP)

DOT’s Bicycle Master Plan

DOT (current location)

BDC’s East Baltimore Development & Main Street Initiative

3.10


Identifying Post-Industrial Typologies The “Clearing” erases the identity of a site 1. Abrasion [raking the ground plane of its footprint]

Type 1:

The “Clearing”


Deconstructing the Site Identifying Post-Industrial Typologies The “Clearing� erases the identity of a site 2. Lamination [capping the ground plane with a topping surface]

4.1


Identifying Post-Industrial Typologies The “Container” creates a deliberate visual barrier usually surrounding its entire lot.

Type 2:

The “Container”


Deconstructing the Site Identifying Post-Industrial Typologies The “Setting” constructs a framework to support another industry or public works assembly.

Type 3:

The “Setting”

4.2


Baltimore Correctional Center


Deconstructing the Site Visualizing the Streetscape and its Adjacencies

North-South Section

Madison Street

Baltimore Gas & Electric

4.3


Deconstructing the Site Visualizing the Streetscape and its Adjacencies

Hillen Street

Independent Shops & Cafes Oldtown

North-South Section

4.4


Central Business District


Deconstructing the Site Visualizing the Streetscape and its Adjacencies

East-West Section

Saratoga Street

Jones Falls Expressway Baltimore Farmers’ Market

Orleans Street Viaduct

4.5


Orleans Street Viaduct


Deconstructing the Site Visualizing the Streetscape and its Adjacencies

East-West Section

Jones Falls Expressway

Department of Transportation

Jones Falls Expressway

4.6


This proposal calls for an infrastructure that segments the ground plane in order to establish a highlyadaptable urban plaza.

A complex weaving of pedestrian and vehicular connections is articulated through a

network of strands that expand and contract in response to desired circulation along the periphery of the site.

Pockets of residual surface remain physically unaltered, yet uniquely contained within the striated bands of circulation. The lot will be translated into an urban plaza, engaging the public along its periphery and celebrating the pockets of residual space that occupy its interior.


Design Proposal The Urban Plaza in the Formerlu Urban City

Proposed Section

5.1


“… the Parc de la Villette awoke designers to the difficulties of dealing with large-scale abandoned tracts of land in the city, especially when the intentions of the commissioning agency were both ambitious and uncertain. The 121 acres of land were left over from the old nineteenth-century slaughterhouse complex that once occupied the site… The surface had to be equipped and staged in such a way as to both anticipate and accommodate any number of changing demands and programs.” alex wall on OMA’s Park de la Villette (“programming the urban surface” Center 14: On Landscape Urbanism)

x

x5

collec


Design Proposal The Urban Plaza in the Formerlu Urban City

Programmatic Analysis: Learning from Parc de la Villette koolhaas & oma competition entry 1983

forest areas large parkscapes sales kiosks refreshment areas playgrounds

x 30

picnic areas

x 15

x 25

x 15

x5

mobile space collective space

5.2


The “strategic organization�

of the ground plane is not so concerned with the formal composition or

branding of a site. Rather, it is concerned with the varying types of public activity for which the site must adapt, including programming

for the unknown.


Design Proposal The Urban Plaza in the Formerlu Urban City

1,165,000 SF

[ 26 Acres ]

475,000 SF

[ 11 Acres ]

5.3


Proposed Site Plan


Strategic Enclosure of the Manufactured Landscape Residual Space: the Platform for Unscripted Public Intervention

6.1


Proposed Site Plan


Strategic Enclosure of the Manufactured Landscape Residual Space: the Platform for Unscripted Public Intervention [ Strands of programmatic intensification enclose pockets of existing residual space. ]

Container Walls programmatic decking determined by routes of pedestrian circulation

Enclosed Program occupies the thickness of the container walls

Existing Ground Plane with stormwater collection within asphalt landscape

6.2


Programming Studies I operate exclusively along the site’s network of circulation. I am not interested in operating upon the residual surfaces that remain contained throughout the site.

Expose the asphalt.

Let it crack and weather,

for no amount of weathering can negate the inherent potentials which are ensured by its strategic enclosure.

11 acres [ scope ]

26 acres [ footprint ]


Strategic Enclosure of the Manufactured Landscape Residual Space: the Platform for Unscripted Public Intervention

Existing Ground Plane with stormwater collection within asphalt landscape

6.3


bike storage facilities

700 sf, 1000sf, 2500 sf, & 900sf 72,000 sf 68,000 sf

parking garages

85,000 sf 75,000 sf 20,000 sf

Department Of Transportation offices

9,000 sf

laundromat

9,000 sf

Sectional Studies

2,500 sf 2,500 sf

1,200 sf

restaurant / cafe 2,500 sf

bike / skate rental shop

9,000 sf 700 sf

600 sf

5,200 sf

600 sf

seasonal markets & vendors

1,300 sf 2,500 sf

7,500 sf - queuing

5,000 sf - storage

2,500 sf - mech

music venue

7,500 sf - stage 2,000 sf - toilet rooms

5,000 sf - ticketing

sheltered bus pick-up area

1200 sf, 1400 sf, & 1700 sf

t

0f

100

750

ft

t

0f

50

t

0f

25

biking paths running paths

playground / park / picnic area

8 acres [ 270,000 sf ]

walkable

surface


Strategic Enclosure of the Manufactured Landscape Residual Space: the Platform for Unscripted Public Intervention

Container Walls programmatic decking determined by routes of pedestrian circulation

Running Path Biking Path Walking Path Playground / Park & Picnic Area

6.4


11 acres [ scope ]

Sectional Studies

26 acres [ footprint ]

bike storage facilities

700 sf, 1000sf, 2500 sf, & 900sf 72,000 sf 68,000 sf

parking garages

85,000 sf 75,000 sf 20,000 sf

Department Of Transportation offices

9,000 sf

laundromat

9,000 sf

2,500 sf 2,500 sf

1,200 sf

restaurant / cafe 2,500 sf

bike / skate rental shop

9,000 sf 700 sf

600 sf

5,200 sf

600 sf

seasonal markets & vendors

1,300 sf 2,500 sf

7,500 sf - queuing

5,000 sf - storage

2,500 sf - mech

music venue

7,500 sf - stage 2,000 sf - toilet rooms

5,000 sf - ticketing

sheltered bus pick-up area

1200 sf, 1400 sf, & 1700 sf

t

0f

100

750

ft

t

0f

50

t

0f

25


Strategic Enclosure of the Manufactured Landscape Residual Space: the Platform for Unscripted Public Intervention

Enclosed Program occupies the thickness of the container walls

Laundromat

Parking

Bike Storage

D.O.T. Restaurant

Seasonal Markets Fixed Markets

Fixed Markets Music Venue Bike Rental Parking

6.5


Sectional Studies

N

parking

vertical garden

picnic area

laundromat

parking

plaground bleacher seating


Intensity without Density Programming the Manufactured Landscape

[ Fixed Programming ]

sheltered vendor space bicycle lane pedestrian lane

existing ground plane

automobile lane sheltered vendor space

7.1


Sectional Studies


Intensity without Density Programming the Manufactured Landscape

[ Annual / Seasonal / Temporal Programming ]

7.2


Sectional Studies

N

bicycle parking

media screen

picnic area


Intensity without Density Programming the Manufactured Landscape

[ Fixed Programming ]

sheltered bus stop

basketball courts

parking garage

ampitheater

enclosed market

outdoor market

bike lane

7.3


Sectional Studies


Intensity without Density Programming the Manufactured Landscape

[ Annual / Seasonal / Temporal Programming ]

7.4


Sectional Studies

N

“board walk� mezzanine

bike path

bleacher seating

parking garage

asphalt field


Intensity without Density Programming the Manufactured Landscape

[ Fixed Programming ]

elevated parks

performance platform walking path

bicycle parking

bike path

running path enclosed market facility

7.5


Sectional Studies


Intensity without Density Programming the Manufactured Landscape

[ Annual / Seasonal / Temporal Programming ]

7.6


Sectional Studies

Seasonal Activity

Festival Activity


Intensity without Density Programming the Manufactured Landscape

Schematic Site Plan

7.7


Circulation Analysis

Vehicular Traffic Lanes & Parking Surfaces


Intensity without Density Programming the Manufactured Landscape

Pedestrian Walking Paths

Bus Lanes

Bicycle Lanes

7.8


Occupancy Analysis

Weekday After-School Activity


Intensity without Density Programming the Manufactured Landscape

Weekend Night-Life Activity

Weekend Market Activity

7.9


Bibliography

Barthes, Roland. “Plastic,” Mythologies. New York: Farrar,Straus and Giroux, 1972. Bauman, Zygmunt. Liquid Modernity. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2000. Berger, Alan. Drosscape: Wasting Land in Urban America. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006. Blood, Pearle. “Factors in the Economic Development of Baltimore, Maryland,” Economic Geography, Vol. 13, No. 2, Apr 1937. 187-208. Driemeyer, Laura B. “Baltimore’s Alley Houses: Homes for Working People since the 1780s,” Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum. V 17, N 1, Spring 2010. 106-109. Koolhaas, Rem, and Bruce Mau. S M L XL: OMA. New York: Monacelli Press, 1998. Lerup, Lars. “Stim and Dross: Rethinking the Metropolis,” Center 14: On Landscape Urbanism. Austin: The University of Texas, 2007. 94-107. Malabou, Catherine. What Should We Do with Our Brain? New York: Fordham University Press, 2008. Manuel Castells. The Informational City. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1999. Mau, Bruce. Massive Change. New York: Phaidon Press , 2004. Nandi, Arijit. Deindustrialization, Socioeconomic Deprivation, and Injection Drug use Cessation in Baltimore. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses; 2009. Putnam, Robert D. Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000. Rieser, Jesse. Atlas of Novel Tectonics / Reiser + Umemoto. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006.

Talk to Me (exhibit). Jul 24 – Nov 7, 2011. Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY. http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2011/talktome/ Wall, Alex. “Programming the Urban Surface,” Center 14: On Landscape Urbanism. Austin: The University of Texas, 2007. 182-193.

8.1



Nicole Blasetti Graduate Thesis