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THE HUB - BATH’S CENTRE FOR YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS NICOLAS G. HEPPNER (FOR ISSUU)


BATH HUB - A CENTRE FOR YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS Where ideas develop into successful enterprises My project is called ‘BATH HUB’, a proposed centre for young entrepreneurs and a long term solution, which would act as phase 2 of the existing Bath Center of Innovation. It would serve as a catalyst for the West of England Partnership’s ‘City of Ideas’ Initiative and would be operated by Bath’s local and regional universities. It will form the heart of a proposed entrepreneurial micro-ecosystem. The cover image represents BATH HUB at the centre, streaming knowledge, ideas, and new businesses from regional local universities into the city of Bath and it’s enterprise zone.


CONTENTS PREFACE THE BRIEF CONTEXT OF BATH & THE SITE SITE ANALYSIS & MASTERPLAN KEY PRECEDENTS FORM DEVELOPMENT ELEVATIONS & SECTIONS PERSPECTIVES BUILDING LAYOUT ACCESS & EMERGENCY STRUCTURAL & ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY CONSTRUCTION DETAILS REFLECTION


PREFACE

“Where problems arise, entrepreneurs see opportunities and seek to solve them.” This quotation reflects the typical mindset of a young entrepreneur as said by Vinod Khosla. Using this entrepreneurial approach and recognising the city’s current socio-economic factors, my solution to Bath’s riverside is to build a facility dedicated to helping young students and adults transform ideas and inventions into successful business ventures. It provides all the necessary resources for accelerating business growth which in turn would prove to be a long term benefit to the regional economy. I have designed a building that is as much a contradiction to Bath’s typical facade as it is an appropriate continuation of it’s urban fabric. It explores the notion of communal and private spaces by applying elements of transparency as defined by Rowe and Slutzky. There is a clear rendition of hierarchy in the realm of entrepreneurship which is reflected phenomenologically and in terms of materiality. Entrepreneurs experience a journey through the various spaces depending on the stage of development of their business. The building is inheritently modern in design and reflects analogically, the surge of a new entrepreneurial spirit in a conservative city landscape. With it’s white external membrane and acute shape, it intends on being recognised as both an architectural intervention as well as an economic solution. It shall become an iconic addition to Bath’s landscape, remaining respectful to it’s surroundings but confidently asserting it’s presence.

LEFT - An acrylic painting of the communal interior space during the development stages of my project.

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THE BRIEF BATH’S ECONOMIC AGENDA BUSINESS INCUBATION IN THE UK THE PROGRAMME THE ENTREPRENEURIAL CYCLE BATH CONTEXT AND HISTORY

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BATH’S ECONOMIC AGENDA

Bath has a long-standing reputation for being a leading city in learning, innovation, and creativity thanks to two world-class universities which boasts a high number of excelling students. Bath also features a significant number of micro and small businesses making it an area which truly “[reflects] an “entrepeneurial spirit.”

Bath’s economic strategy calls for a more environmentally sustainable economy with increased local employment, less overall commuting and a reduction in the contribution made by commerce and industry to the carbon footprint of the area, and a strong low-carbon business sector.

“It is home to some critical business networks, which provide a source of information, support and guidance for start- up and small businesses in certain sectors. These include Silicon Southwest, Creative Bath, and the Bath and Bristol Enterprise Network. Lowcarbon Southwest, run from the innovation cen tre, is a regional network supporting businesses developing low-carbon solutions.”

It also recognises the need for a socially inclusive economy with continuing high levels of economic participation, a focus on lifelong learning, and increased and relevant workforce skills.

The district is home to about 12,150 highly-skilled self-employed people which accounts to 15% of total number of employees in the city, 32% of its total number of employees in rural areas. Given the economic context, the region is “increasingly attracting businesses from across the UK, keen to benefit from this pool of skilled workers.”

It calls for a place where knowledge-based workers can find jobs and where the innovation being developed at its leading education establishments can grow commercially. “Consideration must be given to creating a creative and technology “hub”, which could build on the existing work being done by the Innovation Centre in Bath. Since one of our priorities is to build the environmental techologies sector locally, a site could be allocated for a zero-carbon “hub”. Economic Strategy for Bath and North East Somerset

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BUSINESS INCUBATION

There are currently over 300 business incubators in the UK which support start - up businesses. They are often confused with business accelerators, which are similarly structured but only provide services for very early stage development which usually take only a year. Business incubations, on the other hand offer flexible office spaces, communication infrastructure such as high speed internet and telephones and most importantly, access to specialists, and experts. They are not investors themselves but provide a platform which attracts investors, people willing to start a business, students with business viable ideas and other externs who are interesed in providing funding.

Business incubator specialists help develop start-ups by consulting entrepreneurs and giving strategic advice. They also help to evaluate investment opportunities and put entrepreneurs in connection with potential investors.

The types of business start-ups that are usually best suited for such a business incubator environmnent tend to be high-tech, or knowledge based businesses. These businesses usually stay under a year until they move to their own facilities which are usually located in close proximity to the incubator. This area forms an entrepreneurial ecosystem and allows businesses that are still at the early stages to have access to accommodation and necessary resources.

The facilities are usually operated by the university of other business incubation organisations such as the UKBI which stands for United Kingdom Business Incubation. It is a membership association for professionals involved in enterprise, innovation, and sustainable economic growth.

Most business incubators are run on a non-profit basis, and are usually funded by public sector and universities for a limited time period of time before becoming self-sustaining. Their service to entrepreneurs is usually charged, where entrepeneurs apply for memberships and pay monthly fees depending on the service they wish to attain.

The ideal level of occupancy for a typical incubator is around 8090 % to allow clients to flexibly expand within the facilities if they need to.

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THE PROGRAMME

The PROGRAMME

SETSQUARED PARTNERSHIP

The proposed Centre for Young Entrepreneurs is a long term, multi-faceted solution for Bath. The new centre will act as phase two to the already successful Bath Centre of Innovation which was established over 10 years ago and has developed into one of the leading student driven business incubators in the world, “[attracting] more than $550 million in investment and [returning] more than $800 million to shareholders.”

SETsquared is the ‘leading’ business incubator outside of the USA and is partly based in Bath’s Innovation Centre. It is a collaborative organisation between numerous regional universities (University of Bath, University of Bristol, University of Exeter, University of Southhampton, and University of Surrey) which partners in enterprise activities and supports the growth and success of new business opportunities.

Prompted by the West of England Partnership’s ‘City of Ideas’ Initiative, the new HUB would serve as a catalyst for economic development and meet entrepreneurial requirements of Bath’s growing economic and academic sector. It is projected to support over 100 companies at once and would be located only a few meters from the existing Bath Centre of Innovation in Bath Quays North (Noted in the ‘City of Ideas’ Initiative as Zone 8). The SETsquared Partnership would be the main operator the facility with support from the University of Bath and Bath Spa University.

“The cluster has .. attracted high levels of investment from world-class research organisations including HP Labs, Motorola, Panasonic, ST Microelectronics and Toshiba Telecoms Research Europe and the Universities of Bath and Bristol.” In the last 5 years the SetSquared Partnership has successfully supported 650 companies, 88% of which are still operating 3 years on. “Over 200 technology companies have been supported into international markets creating jobs and wealth for the UK.” The partnership operates five ‘Business Acceleration’ Centres which support over 250 companies at a time.

Each centre provides students access to specialists, investors and business mentoring from centre based experts. “In the last six years, companies supported by the Centres have raised over £750m and created more than 1000 jobs. Over 100 businesses have ‘graduated’ from the Centres, typically after 18 months to three years.” Each year, an investment showcase is hosted in London, attracting over 150 high-profile investors where students can compete and present their business ideas. Setquared aims to further “develop industrial collaboration to deliver economic growth from the knowledge base of the universities,” and with the new facilities provided by the new BATH-HUB and the ‘City of Ideas’ project, the partnership will be able to grow exponentionally.

UNIVERSITIES AND ASSOCIATIONS INVOLVED

Facts & Quotations retrieved from SetSquared and the Bath Centre for Innovation.

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THE BATH ENTREPRENEURIAL ECOSYSTEM

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE BUILDING

In order perform successfully, the new centre for young entrepreneurs will require the proper amenities, and services. which will form what will be known as the Bath Entrepreneurial Ecosystem set across the remainder of the site covering Zone 2 and partially covering Zone 3. The ecosystem will directly support BATH-HUB through the development of new commercial space, office space, and housing. These will be of a high quality design and will be allocated carefully across the site.

The BATH-HUB is inclusive to all students and young professionals who wish to develop their business ideas with help and guidance from professionals. Students are formally inducted into the programme by applying and signing up for membership, allowing them to use the building’s facilities, participate in various workshops and presentations, as well as reside in member designated housing. Memberships can be extended to allow time for success and proper development of their business ideas. The existing Bath Centre of Innovation’s membership policy will be adopted and modified to suit phase 2. Members who create successful businesses but wish to vindicate themselves from the programme are encouraged to occupy on-site offices within the Bath Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in order to benefit from resources and amenities. These Alumni members will be beneficial in providing support to newcomers.

The proposed BATH HUB will continue to strengthen the importance of entrepreneurial development in Bath and attract students from local and regional universities as well as academic and business professionals to a pleasant environment where healthy and productive teaching, learning, and collaboration can occur.

I initially positioned the building to act as a continuation of the urban topography formed by the College of Bath before shift it to became the extension of Westgate.

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THE CYCLE OF A YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR IN BATH // STAGES

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NEW MEMBERS

LEARN

CREATE

Inspired by the performance of business creation and / or attracted by the facilities and programme , regional students or other young adults can apply to become new members of the BATH HUB by entering the Entrepreneurial Ecosystem and proposing an idea they wish to realise into a business. They usually begin at a learning stage, learning techniques and skills from successful entrepreneurs and professionals prior to starting the journey of creating and developing their own venture.

Learning is key to developing ideas effectively and beginning a successful enterprise. Learning is encouraged in various areas of the building; most importantly in the auditorium, which seats 158 people, or in the intentionally wide corridors which aim to induce collaboration between young business partners or novice and experienced entrepreneurs, and finally in the media library, where members can quickly find essential resources. Exchanging ideas is a vital aspect of this step which is also why the building features multiple communal areas spread across the building. The proposed Entrepreneurial ecosystem also boasts less conventional places for learning whether it’s on the bank steps along the river fringe or in Green Park.

The stage of creation is where the entrepreneur-to-be sets forth in grounding ideas and eventually transforming them into potentially successful and hopefully socially friendly businesses. This stage cherishes collaboration between peers and a constructive dialogue between new members and professional staff, or visiting successful entrepreneurs. Creation takes place in open, well-lit, and flexible work spaces and is recognised both as an individual or collaborative process which is why these flexible work spaces can easily be sectioned off and re organised to suit the desired floor plan

ESTABLISH

SHOWCASE

ALUMNI

Establishment follows creation. It is here where ideas become busiestablished businesses which potentially propel in growth. It is here where investment and support comes in to play as well as potential tax benefits and financial support from BATH HUB itself and external, the government or other external bodies.

Businesses which begin to expand and / or are recognised as being successful and exemplary usually attract attention from beyond the BATH HUB and the entrepreneurial ecosystem. It is here where businesses showcase their growth and success either by teaching new members or exhibiting to the press, buyers, investors, and the general public’s attention.

Members at this stage either continue to participate in helping to develop other ventures, or leave BATH HUB to further expand their business at a nearby office space within the entrepreneurial ecosystem or in the Enterprise Zone. Members at this stage are refered to as ‘Alumni’and may still use communal areas for networking and collaborating.


BATH’S CONTEXT AND ENTREPRENEURIAL DIAGRAM HISTORY

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BATH REGIONAL AND NATIONAL MAP

South Gloucestershire

Bristol

A46

North Wiltshire

A4

Edinburgh Glasgow

A4

North Somerset

Keynsham

BATH

West Wiltshire

Manchester

Rail Line

Birmingham

Norton Radstock Mendip

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Nottingham

Cardiff

Bristol BATH

London


BATH CONTEXT AND HISTORY

Bath is a city of cultural, historical, and academic significanc located 150 km west of London and 20 km south-east of Bristol. It is home to around 84,000 people and attracts around 3.8 million visitors a year, and offers an extensive range of cultural attractions, and has two world recognised universities. It is also important in media, publishing, and technology oriented industries. Surrounded by hills and a lush and preserved greenscape, Bath is nestled within the Bath Valley and sits along the Avon River. It is renowned for its unique Georgian architecture and masterplan attributes which it to become a World Heritage site in 1987. Bath was formerly known as Aquae Sulis, a name which derives from Roman Latin meaning ‘water of the god of sun and healing powers’. Sulis is a Celtic goddess: the name reflects the hot springs which are rich in minerals and thought to possess special healing powers. The Romans recognised the hot spring���s importance and developed a religious settlement, building a temple complex including a bath in around 60 BCE. Throughout history, the spring’s remedial qualities brought people seeking to be cured of their ailments. The settlement became a small town which eventually turned into a spa and resort city of Bath. During the Georgian period, it developed significantly to accommodate the increasing number of visitors. John Wood the elder and John Wood the younger designed a new masterplan for the city which would complement the city’s importance. The masterplan featured unique open spaces and squares enclosed by rows of buildings rendered in limestone which was sourced from nearby quaries.

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PICTORIAL SITE ANALYSIS

Just beyond the manicured Georgian city centre lies a relatively large parking terrain overtaken by cars and busses and a rugged garage block. Buildings seem to turn their backs on this area with the exception of the Mission’s theatre. For many commuters, tourists and inhabitants, this area of the city serves as convienient parking space in very close proximity to the city centre. It is definitely not underused, but has great potential to be used more efficiently and appropriately. The stretch of the site is defined by a busy commuter’s road which runs along the river’s green edge marking a clear barrier between nature and the edges of Bath’s urban fabric. Beyond Green Park Road, is a very serene Green Park where a large grass plain is protected by large decidious trees. However, access to the park seems derelict. Facing the park is a empty housing estate which presents great opportunity for regeneration. Across the river sits the old Newark Foundry compound which is currently off limits. There too is the opportunity to bring back life to the river’s edge. Keywords : Degenerate - Opportune - Green - Hopeful - Forgotten - Misused - Underused - Mysterious

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THE SITE

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SITE ANALYSIS & MASTERPLAN SITE ANALYSIS MASTERPLAN SITE PLAN SITE AXONOMETRIC EXTENDED CITY PLAN BUILDING IN CONTEXT

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SITE ANALYSIS

The site analysis of the Bath riverside reveals a part of the city which has slowly fallen into decay and neglect but presents great opportunity for new development which would prospectively revitalise the area and restitch the Avon River to the city fabric to create a more coherent topography throughout the western part of Bath’s centre.

GREEN PARK Bath’s riverside area features an attractive and strategic park area which is currently underused. It will undergo improvements to become more accessible and user friendly.

AVON AXIS BROWNFIELD SITES There are three main areas constituting potential sites for redevelopment. These include the Newark Foundry listed building, the housing estate along Green Park and the cluster of buildings along Arnbury Road. The Newark Foundry building will be renovated to a high grade building with a high quality design respectful of the building’s history and the architectural context of Bath. The Housing development along Green Park Road features an attractive facade which can be retained. The interior will be excavated to allow for a renovated housing development specifically aimed at students and young entrepreneurs.

Forming the clear divide between bustling urbanity and a quiet natural environment, the Avon axis will help guide the design of Bath’s entrepreneurial ecosystem materplan.

WESTGATE AXIS Once an important urban link to the Avon River, the Westgate axis is currently underused and undefined. New development should revitalise a former streetpath which will significantly improve the link between city centre and river fringe.

SUNDIAL SOUTH WESTERLY WIND Bath’s unique valley formation and exposure to the Gulf Stream result in occasionally strong south westerly winds which should be considered in the design of the building, especially it’s natural ventilation strategy.

The sundial shows three different sunpaths which represent the sun’s direct of exposure at four seasons.

RESIDENTIAL ZONE ARROWS OF EXTENSION The arrows represent zones of distinct topography which should be extended to restitch the Bath riverside with it’s city center appropriately.

BATH ABBEY The Bath Abbey is a key historical building and significant structures with an important identity which must be preserved and cherished. Views to / from the Abbey were considered during the design process of the main building.

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This area is characterised by mid / low density urban housing. It is a fairly quiet environment which has the potential to develop a more appropriate relationship with the Avon River.


LOCATION AND AXIS OF BATH ABBEY IN RELATION TO THE SITE AVON AXIS ATTRACTIVE BROWNFIELD SITE

UNDERUTILISED GREEN PARK

WEST GATE AXIS

QUIET / RESIDENTIAL

SUMMER SUN ATTRACTIVE BROWNFIELD SITE (BATH BUSINESS PARK)

URBAN EXTENSION?

LARGE CONCRETE PARKING GARAGE

REV

ITA

LISE

RIV

ER

SPRING / AUTUMN SUN

WINTER SUN

FRI

NG

E

GRE

EN

SOUTH-WESTERLY WIND PATH

PAR K

RD

(NO

ISY)

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MASTER PLAN

The proposed Bath Centre for Young Entrepreneurs is centrally located, marking the heart of the proposed Bath Entrepreneurial Ecosystem. It borders a flexible office and workspace complex and a new public square which would serve as a principal gathering space and partition from the proposed Arnbury Road bus station, and the existing urban fabric . The building also faces the edge of the Avon River. The masterplan is divided into three distinct zones. The following names have been adopted.

The site plan shows the extent of the masterplan and its relation to the existing city fabric. It also highlights the main building and it’s relation to the extended surroundings.

COMMERCIAL ZONING Constitutes proposed offices, cafes, retail.

ZONE 1 / ZONE 2 / ZONE 3 The first zone features a main public square which separates the main building from proposed high quality office comprising mix of cafes and small to intermediate sized businesses. The Avon River’s fringe will feature a new and improved river bank characterised by large steps to serve as an extension to the public realm and encourage a healthier public relationship with the river. The second zone will maintain a greener flair and will be recgnised as the residential district of the ecosystem. It will provide the proposed housing targeted specifically towards young entrepreneurs, student and and provide amenities for healthy living, recreation and a peaceful atmosphere. Green Park will undergo refurbishment and access improvement especially to and form the river banks. The third zone encompasses the Bath Business Park and will aim to suit the typical Bath businessmen and woman through high quality office space and cafes in a professional environment. This area will also serve as a direct addition to the Bath ‘City of Idea’s’ enterprise zones.

RESIDENTIAL ZONING Constitutes proposed housing (single / 2 bed / bed flats).

BATH CENTRE FOR INNOVATION The Existing student entrepreneurial Incubator.

BATH’S ENTREPRENEURIAL ECOSYSTEM PERIMETER The outline of the proposed extended masterplan.

PROPOSED BUS STATIONS

BUS ROUTE The proposed bus loop for park and ride services and university links. ZONE

ZONE

ZONE CYCLE ROUTE The proposed cycle route to connect with national cycle trails and provide an effective link to Bristol and Keynsham. SERVICES ROUTE As the proposed masterplan calls for a fully pedestrianised development. Services and emergency vehicles may access buildings using the following routes.

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SITE PLAN 1 : 2000

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SITE AXONOMETRIC

COMMERCIAL / OFFICE ZONE RESIDENTIAL ZONE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION STATIONS EXISTING CENTRE FOR INNOVATION GENERAL PUBLIC ENTREPRENEURS INVESTORS

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EXTENDED CITY PLAN The extended City Plan gives an indication of the proximity of the proposed Entrepreneurial Ecosystem to the University of Bath and the perimeter of the city of Bath.

UNIVERSITY OF BATH PERIMETER

PROPOSED BATH ‘CITY OF IDEAS’ ENTERPRISE ZONE

BATH’S ENTREPRENEURIAL ECOSYSTEM PERIMETER

CYCLE ROUTE

The outline of the proposed extended masterplan.

The proposed cycle route to connect with national cycle trails and provide an effective link to Bristol and Keynsham.

BUS ROUTE

RAILWAY LINE

The proposed bus loop for Odd Down & Lansdown park and ride services, University of Bath links, and services to regional cities.

Convenient & efficient rail service to London, Bristol, Cardiff, and regional cities.

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BUILDING IN CONTEXT 1:500

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FORM DEVELOPMENT FIRST MODEL IN CONTEXT DEVELOPING A SITE SECTION MODEL DEVELOPING THE FORM CREATING A NEW GATEWAY TO THE CITY ENHANCING THE FORM VIEW FROM ALEXANDER HILL LE CORBUSIER AND TRANSPARENCY BY ROWE & SLUTZKY 1 : 20 CONCEPT MODEL TRANSPARENCY STUDY IN CONCEPT MODELS LIGHT STUDY FINAL BUILDING FORM

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FIRST MODEL

Using coloured mount board, I began shaping the building to correspond with the avon axis and the westgate axis to form an urban extension off of Bath College. The foam buildings on the right side signify an extension of the urban fabric to form a new public square adjacent to the main building.This would set the facade of the Mission theatre centrally.

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DEVELOPING A SITE SECTION MODEL

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DEVELOPING THE FORM

It is here where I restablish the connection between the city centre and the river whilst going beyond and forming a building respectful of the incline of Alexander Hill.

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CREATING A NEW GATEWAY TO THE CITY

This 1 : 500 site model mimics the shape of the building’s final form. It was essential to include the Bath Abbey to show how the proposed building does not challenge its dominance and respects the horizontality of the city.

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ENHANCING THE FORM

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VIEW FROM ALEXANDER HILL

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LE CORBUSIER AND TRANSPARENCY BY ROWE AND SLUT

After reading the essay on Transparency by Rowe and Slutzky, particularly focusing on their attention towards the work of Le Corbusier, I found the opportunity to form a notional link between the characterstics of architectural transparency with elements of the business incubating process. The following diagrams and texts explain the interpretation of Le Corbusier’s design principles, with regards to transparency in the context of a centre for young entrepreneurs in the city centre of Bath.


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1 : 20 CONCEPT MODEL

Transparency was one of the first guiding themes which really began to define the shape and internal hierarchy that a business incubator would require, especially in such a potentially busy location near the city centre. I explored this theme through various models in order to determine the most appropriate solution. At this point in the development of my scheme, it was clear to have the facade gradually become less transparent from the ground up to reflect the the process of incubation and the different stages of starting a business: keeping it away from the public in the beginning and then finally exposing it to the masses. For the 1:20 elevation model I attemtped to apply contextual tones and architectural traits which were inherent to Bath Georgian and contemporary buildings, though it was later evident that context could be respected differently. Nevertheless, it is important to understand the key feature feature of this 1 : 20 model which is the use of a random pattern of glass or cloth sheets / panels which would be tightened across the facade of the building. I initially wanted to create a courtyard facing a proposed square which then later evolved into a fully isolated courtyard. The image on the far right corner of the next page clearly represents hierarchy created by the facade of the different levels: The top level hiding the activities within, providing small openings which offer vistas across the city, the intermediate level which was semi-transparent and partly reveals an environment where work is in progress, and finall the ground level where developed enterprise gain attention and full awareness.

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TRANSPARENCY STUDY IN CONCEPT MODELS

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1 : 100 CONCEPT MODEL

The idea of creating a semi transparent ‘breathing membrane around the auditorium led to the concept of having louvres open and close during speeches depending on the formality of the event. Opening the louvres would allow spectactors to crowd around the auditorium and look down towards the stage. The auditorium would remain compact and appropriately sized for such a business incubator environment.

In this sketch model the suspended auditorium begins to take shape. The aim was to design a stage set above the building’s entrance and have the seats of the auditorium mimic the staircase leading up to the first floor. Thus, an uninterrupted stream of displacement would start at the waterfront and proceed through the building and continue towards the city centre.

Xaveer de Geyter’s auditorium design for the University of Gent’s Economics Faculty in Belgium influenced the circulation strategy of my scheme.

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LIGHT STUDY

The light study of the model helped determined the scale of the interior spaces, and the proximity between the external facade and the internal facade of the courtyard as well as the structural grid that would be required to support the building.

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FINAL BUILDING FORM

NORTH WEST FACADE

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WEST FACADE

SOUTH WEST FACADE


SOUTH FACADE

EAST FACADE

SOUTH EAST FACADE

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PERSPECTIVES THE EXTERIOR THE INNER COURTYARD THE EXHIBITION AREA / ENTRANCE THE AUDITORIUM A JOURNEY THROUGH THE BUILDING

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EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE # 1

Restoring a once dynamic area between the Avon River and the city centre of Bath is key to this project. This perspective is only suggestive of the environment that is aimed along the river fringe. A large opening through the PTFE membrane of the building allows a glimpse inside from the path along the river. From within, young entrepreneurs can enjoy the view of Alexandra Park.


EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE # 2

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INTERNAL COURTYARD

From the inner courtyard the building’s interior begins to reveal itself. The facade of the auditorium’s stage suggests an impactful halt to the Westgate. It can be viewed as a grand window which looks straight up towards the city centre. Beyond this point, Westgate diffuses underneath the body of the building towards the Avon River. When it rains, the cantilevers offer protection and the circulation is uninterrupted.

This is a render of the initial design of the inner courtyard. It has since then evolved and acquired a more realistic modular glazed opening system which handles ventilation more effectively and brings more focus to the auditorium.

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EXHIBITION AREA / ENTRANCE HALL

The exhibition space - Looking towards the entrance of BATH HUB and its inner courtyard

The exhibition area is unavoidable as it also acts as the entrance hall of the building. Exhibtions benefit from adequate exposure to the outside. The staircase, placed in the centre acts as the threshold, dividing the public realm from the more exclusive realm on the first floor.

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THE AUDITORIUM // WHERE SUCCESS IS SHARED AND IDEAS ARE GENERATED

Rendered view of the auditorium from the footbridge.


THE AUDITORIUM // WHERE SUCCESS IS SHARED AND IDEAS ARE GENERATED

Rendered views of the auditorium timbre louvres.

The main auditorium is located at the core of the centre for young entrepreneurs and is supported by slanted columns above the exhibition area. It seats 158 people comfortably. There protective curtains which create a simple and effective sound barrier and light barrier on either side of the auditorium. There are also timber cladded rotating louvres which can be opened and shut depending on the occasion and the level of privacy that is desired. These louvres are generally left opened to allow for passive ventilation to occur.

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THE JOURNEY

The journey to creating a successful entreprise is one that occurs every day at BATH-HUB. Interested young adults and students are either encouraged by professors or simply attracted by the facilities and the the business that it helps incubate and create. Using an exemplary startup named ‘Ebee’ (A start-up which installs electric car charging pointson light posts) I aim to tell the story of an idea that gradually becomes a success story business thanks to the support and facilities of this centre for young entrepreneurs.

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THE JOURNEY

INCUBATION ZONE (SECOND FLOOR) - IDEA DEVELOPMENT

AUDITORIUM - BUSINESS PITCH

The journey to seriously becoming an entrepreneur begins on the second floor where newly accepted members begin developing business ideas with help and guidance of staff and visiting professionals. This is a bright and clean environment with minimal furniture and little decoration as the pipelines running across the ceiling suggest. It is functional space, open for flexibility and re-arrangement of chairs desks and other temporary furnishings such as the printer which has been placed in the left hand corner to print out a set of product catalogues or brochures to distribute at the next business pitch. On the white board in the background, one can see the development of a electric car charger which would be fitted to a light post.

In order to raise capital from investors, young entrepreneurs come to the auditorium to pitch their business plans. They may choose to close the curtains to create a more private and quiet environment or leave everything open to attract attention. The general public has the opportunity to view into the auditorium and participate in the presentation if the curtains are left open. Here, the founders of ‘Ebee’ present their prototype product to investors seeking more funding in order to grow their business. Some students join in and are given the opportunity to learn from the negotiations, others simply stand at the steps of the ramp and spectace temporarily.

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THE JOURNEY

Once capital is acquired from investors and the business begins to grow exponentially, businesses willing to further advertise their product to the general public can move to the ground floor where investors and prospective investors can meet with entrepreneurs more easily. The ground floor is bound to attract a lot of attention as it is semi-sheltered and serves as convenient crossing point for people commuting from and to the city centre / Avon River. One can clearly see the changing in level of transparency of what occurs within the building. On the second floor the external facade is set back behind the PTFE membrane, on the first floor this facade comes closer to the edge, and finally, for businesses that are ready to be shown to the masses, the ground floor is very transparent. People can look into the space from both sides. Here, the “Ebee� start-up seems to finally become an establish name within this community and has moved to Show case Unit 17 to continue growing. It has even displayed their product on the interior and exterior column of the building to bring the product closer to the masses. Meanwhile a young woman lets her picture be taken after recently selling her venture which she started here.

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BUILDING LAYOUT SCHEDULE OF ACCOMMODATION GROUND FLOOR LAYOUT & DESCRIPTION FIRST FLOOR LAYOUT & DESCRIPTION SECOND FLOOR LAYOUT & DESCRIPTION ROOF PLAN

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SCHEDULE OF ACCOMMODATION

GROUND FLOOR

FLEXIBLE SHOWCASE OFFICES 12 INDIVIDUAL SHOWCASE UNITS MEETING ROOMS x2 SHOWCASE UNITS TOILETS x2 CAFE CAFE STORAGE CAFE TOILET EXHIBITION AREA ADMINISTRATION STAIRWELL (WITH ELEVATOR SHAFT) # 1 STAIRWELL (WITH ELEVATOR SHAFT) # 2 STAIRWELL

FIRST FLOOR

2

AUDITORIUM

233 m2

FLEXIBLE WORK AREAS

430 m2

FLEXIBLE WORK AREAS

430 m2

LIBRARY

142.4 m2

SMALL AUDITORIUM

151 m2

INFORMAL GATHERING SPACE

176 m2

COLLABORATION BOOTHS

97 m

COLLABORATIVE WORK AREA

160 m

CAFETERIA

200 m2

LOCKER ROOM

40 m2

KITCHEN

38.68 m2

TOILETS (MALE) + x 1 DISABLED TOILET

42 m2

COLLABORATIVE WORK AREA

160 m2

TOILETS (FEMALE) + x 1 DISABLED TOILET

42 m2

LOCKER ROOM

40 m2

CIRCULATION AREA / CORRIDORS

733.17 m2

TOILETS (MALE) + x 1 DISABLED TOILET

42 m2

STAIRWELL (WITH ELEVATOR SHAFT) # 1

40.4 m2

TOILETS (FEMALE) + x 1 DISABLED TOILET

42 m2

STAIRWELL (WITH ELEVATOR SHAFT) # 2

40.4 m2

CIRCULATION AREA / CORRIDORS

853.37 m2

STAIRWELL

38.6 m2

STAIRWELL (WITH ELEVATOR SHAFT) # 1

40.4 m2

STAIRWELL (WITH ELEVATOR SHAFT) # 2

40.4 m2

STAIRWELL

38.6 m2

650 m 2

52 m

2

17.9 m 2

3m

2

86.2 m 2

4.2 m

2

3.8 m

2

347.4 m 2

91.5 m

2

40.4 m

2

40.4 m

2

38.6 m

SUB - TOTAL : 1390.3 m2

FIRST FLOOR

2

SUB - TOTAL : 2408.25 m2

2

SUB - TOTAL 1883.57 m2

TOTAL : 5,680.12 m2

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GROUND FLOOR // A PLACE OF SHOWCASE AXONOMETRIC PLAN

FLOOR PLAN 1:400


GROUND FLOOR // A PLACE OF SHOWCASING The ground floor forms a micro urban topography which is accessible to any member of the public. It serves as a continuation of Westgate allowing people to traverse freely from the city centre towards the Avon River.

FLEXIBLE SHOWCASE OFFICES The showcase offices are sectioned into individual showcase units for small business to temporarily reside and present their growth and success to the general public. There are window facades facing the interior of the building and the exterior for maximum exposure and full transparency. There are also two meeting rooms which the young entrepreneurs can use for more intimate / private discussions and meetings. In addition, there are two small toilets and a small kitchenette located centrally among the showcase units. CAFE The Cafe would be managed independently and serve the general public and other members of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. It aims to attract attention to the building and can be used to meet and discuss ideas and business plans less formally. The cafe is equiped with a kitchen, small storage area, and WC. EXHIBITION AREA The exhibition area encompasses the main entrance of the building and is a space where more publicly oriented events can take place to showcase ideas and host events that should draw more public attention or are best held in closer proximity to entrepreneurs on the ground floor. ADMINISTRATION The administration office holds a small office for building operations and serves as an information point for the general public as well as prospective applicants of the entrepreneurial experience.

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FIRST FLOOR // A PLACE FOR INSPIRATION AND DEVELOPMENT AXONOMETRIC PLAN

FLOOR PLAN 1:400


FIRST FLOOR // A PLACE FOR INSPIRATION AND DEVELOPMENT. The first floor can be regarded as the powerhouse of BATH HUB where ideas are grounded and businesses slowly begin to develop. It is also a place for learning and teaching which can become busy and hectic at times. AUDITORIUM A place for pitching ideas, spreading knowledge, motivating and inspiring young minds. The auditorium draws everyone and is the largest space in the building which aims to encourage presentations, collaborative discussions, and motivational speeches. It seats 158 people and can be fully enclosed by closing the timber louvres and pulling the acoustic dampening curtains . SMALL AUDITORIUM The main auditorium’s smaller sibling is a more intimate place to present pitches or collaborate in smaller groups it features double heighted columns, and can seat about 80 people comfortably. There is also a small bar and kitchenette when this space is used for special events or gatherings. The view from the auditorium looks on to West Gate, and the Mission Theatre. FLEXIBLE WORK AREAS Relatively high ceilings, minimal decoration and significant natural lighting characterise this productive environment. Entrepreneurs can enjoy open, clean spaces which reflect clear and productive minds. The space is large and flexible for entrepreneurs to customise and arrange depending on their mood state and business venture. CAFETERIA The cafeteria can seat between 28 - 38 people. It mainly serves the entrepreneurs, visitors, staff and building operaors. It can also be used for larger events which take place in the building. KITCHEN The kitchen is organised as a snack bar and can accommodate a 4 meter long buffet. It also has a storage and the necessary kitchen appliance for catering services and daily use. COLLABORATIVE WORK AREA This area is similar to the flexible work areas but can be closed off to create a more private and uninterrupted environment for collaborations which require tables or desks. This area is ideal for seminars where there is an interplay of ensemble discussions and small group workshops. COLLABORATION BOOTHS Facing the balcony fronted to the river are collaboration booths which are circular pods where small groups can come to hold quick meetings or work individually in a different environment with attractive views of the Avon River and the rest of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. LOCKER ROOM The locker room allows entrepreneurs to store their belongings into lockers. There is also a small kitchen for storing chilled foodsand having coffee breaks and two toilets which are disabled friendly.

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FIRST FLOOR // A PLACE FOR BEGINNINGS AXONOMETRIC PLAN

FLOOR PLAN 1:400


SECOND FLOOR // A PLACE FOR BEGINNINGS The second floor is a quieter environment for young entrepreneurs who need the peacefulness to develop ideas, and brainstorm. Ideas are floating about on the top level which is why it is dedicated to idea development. FLEXIBLE WORK AREAS Similar to the flexible work areas on the first floor this space has high ceilings, minimal decoration and significant natural lighting where entrepreneurs can enjoy open, clean spaces which reflect clear and productive minds. The space is large and flexible for entrepreneurs to customise and arrange depending on their mood state and business venture. Additionally, they have access to a long balconies; the change of environment can help think more clearly. LIBRARY The library is compact and stocked with only the most essential resources. It allows young entrepreneurs to retrieve media resources such as entrepreneur related magasines and journals. On summer days, they can be enjoyed on the terrace which sits adjacent to the library. INFORMAL GATHERING SPACE This waterfront space allows entrepreneurs to sit comfortably, relax, or partake in very informal discussions (as they wish) and enjoy the view of the Avon River and beyond. It is open and flexible and can be used to host specific events in connection with the auditorium. As people exist the auditorium on the second floor they immediately enter this space. COLLABORATIVE WORK AREA This area is similar to the flexible work areas but can be closed off to create a more private and uninterrupted environment for collaborations which require tables or desks. This area is ideal for seminars where there is an interplay of ensemble discussions and small group workshops. It is very similar to a studio environment. LOCKER ROOM The locker room allows entrepreneurs to store their belongings into lockers. There is also a small kitchen for storing chilled foodsand having coffee breaks. It gives entrepreneurs a small storage space and informal and miscellaneous gatherings. There are two toilets which are disabled friendly.

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ROOF PLAN 1:400

ROOF PLAN The roof is accessible from the stairwell shafts of the left wing allowing access for servicing of the mechanica fans and the green roof as well as cleaning and maintenance of the roof light window openings. The green roof has a depth of 200 mm which promotes the growth of a micro biodiversity for wildlife and small plants.


ACCESS / EMERGENCY BUILDING WIDE ACCESS / CIRCULATION FIRE ESCAPE STRATEGY & PRECAUTIONS

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BUILDING ACCESS The building’s socially inclusive approach results in a variety of access methods.

Circulatory and vertical access are a key aspect of the design of this building. There are three stairwells which run through the ground, first, and second floor, two of which are located adjacent from the entrance of the auditorium. From the ground floor, these stairwells (& elevators) only serve in case of emergency or for special deliveries and services. The wide staircase of the entrance located under the auditorium should be used to ascend to the first floor. There is also an elevator which meets specifications for disabled use.

Individuals who dare enter the building are immediately enthralled by entrepreneurial ‘work in progress’, success stories and other inspirational elements on the ground floor’s exhibition space. They may choose to proceed to the first floor where they may come in closer contact with members of the programme, especially in the auditorium, where inspirational and motivational speeches of success and business opportunity spark their interest even further.

The general public passes either willingly or spontaneously through and around the building’s pervious ground floor, allowing for an unavoidable glance(s) at exemplar entrepreneurial ventures. Some individuals move very quickly, commuting from the Bath’s riverside to the city centre or the bus station. Others may stop and observe the works of exemplar entrepreneurs, judge their performance, gather inspiration, or seek potential investment opportunities. The micro urban environment created by the building’s ground plan serves as an appropriate extension to Bath’s vibrant urban fabric.

Members who have just recently joined the programme begin initial thoughts on the second floor, where the open plan of the work spaces allow for solo development or unconventional collaboration between peers and strangers. It is here where ideas become potential businesses. Once, a solid and potentially successful idea has been established, the person proceeds to the first floor.

Those individuals with ideas and / or entrepreneurial drive become members of this micro entrepreneurial community. They sign up and begin developing their vision and concept with the help and optional supervision of successful businessmen / women, acclaimed tutors, and other more advanced young entrepreneurs. Their success story begins on the second floor.

In the workspaces of the first floor, the member continues developing their idea into a potential business with continued aid and mentorship from visiting and on-site advisers. There is a perceived energy and livelyhood. Members overcome hurdles and see the beginnings of success. They show progress and development to recently admitted members in the smaller auditorium and to investors and other members of the public in the main auditorium. Entrepreneurs who realise significant growth move to the ground floor to begin exposing and advertisting their venture to the general public and to potential investors in the exhibition area or in flexible showrooms. Throughout the building are spaces for all members to access in order to collaborate and communicate with each other.

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Successful entrepreneurs, investors, and businessmen / women are invited to motivate and inspire members and others. They would proceed to the main auditorium to give speeches, lectures, and seminars. They may also communicate with others in the communal spaces provided around the main auditorium.


GROUND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

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FIRE ESCAPE STRATEGY The diagram to the left suggests the most efficient fire escape routes in case of an emergency drill.

The building has been conciously designed to comply with the subcategories of part B of the UK building regulations. to allow for an effective evacuation in case of a fire emergency or drill. The provision and careful placement of necessary vertical circulation allows people to exit the building quickly and efficiently. B1 - Means of escape The building has a total of four stairways, three of which are isolated and lead directly to the exterior of the building. Two of the stairways located on either side of the main auditorium’s first floor entranceways allow for quick and efficient exiting of this occasionally crowded area. The third stairway, located alongside the smaller auditorium allows for quick and efficient exiting of the northern section of the building. All fire escape routes are under 25 meters to fire escape stairways, and under 40 meters of the building’s exterior. B2 - Internal fire spread prevention All internal finishes and fixtures are fire retardant. Chosen material has low flammability. A fire sprinkler system using harvested water from the green roof aids in preventing a fire outbreak. B3 - Internal fire spread Emergency stairway cavities are made of fire retardant material and can be closed off from the main internal space of the building. They provide a prolongued safe area in case of a fire emergency. The building has three sub compartments on the first and second floor which discourage the spread of a potential onset of fire and of fumes, Fire retardant doors automatically shut to contain fire outbreaks. The building’s reinforced concrete structure helps to prevent the spread of fire B4 - External fire spread The building is a stand-alone structure which meets the minimum distance from other buildings required. The use of PTFE, a non-combustible material, may serve extremely usefully in the unlikely event of a fire and may contain the fire within the perimeter of the building. B5 - Access and facilities for the fire service. The building is designed to be conveniently accessible to the fire brigade. As noted on page 97 fire brigade can access all sides of the building using service only roads of the pedestrianised zone.

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GROUND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

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STRUCTURAL / ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY AXONOMETRIC STUDY OF CONSTRUCTION SEQUENCE MATERIAL / QUANTITY / COST FIGURES MODULAR GLAZED OPENING SYSTEMS PTFE MEMBRANE STUDY VENTILATION / THERMAL STRATEGIES VENTILATION STRATEGY DIAGRAM

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AXONOMETRIC DISPLAY OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS

FIRST FLOOR SLAB

REINFORCED CONCRETE ROOF SLAB AND GREEN ROOF

GROUND FLOOR COLUMNS & ELEVATOR SHAFTS

SECOND FLOOR COLUMNS & ELEVATOR SHAFTS

SUSPENDED AUDITORIUM SECOND FLOOR SLAB

ASSEMBLED BUILDING

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FIRST FLOOR COLUMNS & ELEVATOR SHAFTS


ROOF LIGHTS / VENTILATION FAN / ROOF ACCESS

SUPPORTING STEEL STRUCTURE x3

SEQUENCE OF CONSTRUCTION The assembly of the building is laid out in the axonometric diagram to the left. Following the construction of the foundation, the suspended auditorium will be the first structure to be erected. Reinforced concrete columns are positioned slanted to distribute the eventual load of the auditorium. A reinforced concrete slab will rest on these columns. The timber framing and louvres will follow at a later stage. The first floor will be erected concurrently to the auditorium and will be constructed of in situ reinforced concrete. This process will continue throughout the first and second floor and lastly for the concrete roof. The installation of integrated heating and cooling pipes as well as the screed follows the in-situ concrete. Then the window openings can be installed on the ground, first and second floor level.

PTFE MEMBRANE

Afterwards, the PTFE membrane and it’s steel structure are mounted to the external sides of the building’s reinforced concrete. They will wrap around the external facades of the first and second floor of the building. At this stage, insulation can be fitted and covered.

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MATERIAL / QUANTITY / COST FIGURES

The table of figures provides estimated figures for the chosen materials’ total mass, embodied energy, and embodied carbon. These calculations are based on ratios set out by Greenspec. Estimated cost ratios were retrieved from Building Cost Information Service of RICS. It should be understood that estimated total figures exclude services, appliances, and furniture. For this reason, a total cost has not been summed up as it would neglect appliance costs, electrical costs, building costs, labour costs, taxation and other unforeseen events. Therefore, only the costs of the total for each material has been listed to give a good indication of the building’s primary structure costs.


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MODULAR GLAZED OPENING SYSTEMS The choice of floor to ceiling window openings supports the building’s theme of transparency, it’s ventilation strategy and it’s need for well lit environment. These openings are modular and feature opening vents on the top row for expelling warm air and optionally on the lowest row for allowing cool fresh air to enter the interior spaces. All vertical glazed openings are triple glazed units with fully integrated opening vents. They are pre-fabricated off site. Glazing options meet requirements of building regulations’ part N. The exterior facade of the panels can be cleaned by accessing the steel support structure of the PTFE membrane.

WINDOW FRAME # 3 The third window opening option is to be installed along the outer facade of the building; facing the PTFE membrane. The membrane creates a shield from strong winds and allows for steady ventilation to take place.

WINDOW FRAME # 2 These openings are to be installed on the facade facing the internal courtyard for a mix of uninterrupted views from inside as well as square openings at the center of the opening frame for stimulating natural ventilation.

WINDOW FRAME # 1 This modular framing system will be applied to the ground floor facade for allowing enough fresh air to cross ventilate the space and supporting the whilst not interrupting the public’s view into the interior space.

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This render represents the facade grid structure that is created using the proposed modular glazed opening system for the internal courtyard.

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PTFE MEMBRANE // PROPERTIES There are several reasons for choosing a ptfe membrane to enclose the primary facade of the building. PTFE is the abbreviation for Polytetrafluoroethylene which is a teflon coated glass cloth made of carbon and fluorine. IN KEEPING WITH THE THEME PTFE creates a visual barrier and supports the idea of semi transparent facade. From the exterior a view into the building is deflected because of glare and the reflectance of the material. The general public is therefore not able to fully see what particular interactions occur within the building. From inside, the membrane seems to create a white film which brightens the perception of the exterior and helps brighten the interior spaces of the building. At night, when the lights are on, the building resembles a tame light bulb which serves to represent the creation and development of ideas. PERFORMANCE PTFE has a number of advantages as a building material. - It is non flammable. - It provides some acoustic protection which is particularly useful for buffering noise from the buildings immediate surroundings such as bus traffic noise. - It requires little to no cleaning as this naturally occurs when it rains. Though ideally it is recommended to clean the facade surface once every 4-6 years which can easily be done as the membrane is accessible from the internal steel structure. - It also has an solar performance, reflecting about 70% of direct sunlight which allows activities to take place uninterruptedly.

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Image taken of the Fritz Lipmann Institute in Jena, Germany. To the left are the glazed window panels and to the right is the PTFE membrane which is supported by a steel structure fixed to the reinforced concrete of the building.


PTFE MEMBRANE // DIAGRAMS & NIGHT PERSPECTIVE

AXONOMETRIC REPRESENTATION OF THE BUILDING’S PTFE MEMBRANE.

IT IS AT NIGHT WHERE THE BUILDING BEGINS TO EXPOSE ITS INTERNAL STRUCTURE THROUGHT THE PTFE MEMBRANE. THE THINK TANK REVEALS ITSELF TO THE PUBLIC.

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VENTILATION / THERMAL STRATEGY (PART F & L of the UK Building Regulations) The building is designed to comply with part L and F of UK building regulations. It boasts several ventilation methods including forms of natural ventilation and mechanical ventilation to accelerate the distribution and exchange of air, particularly in the larger interior spaces. The building depends partly on the contextual prevailing south-westerly winds. The ventilation diagram on the right represents the points at which cool air enters the building and gradually converts to warmer prior to being expelled.

CROSS VENTILATION

MECHANICAL (FORCED) VENTILATION

This occurs mainly on the ground floor level where internal spaces have two facades facing the exterior. Fresh air induced mainly by prevailing winds is forced through the space and is expelled out. This south westerly wind creates a funnel effect through the externally exposed corridors which run through the groundfloor of the building, creating a stream of cool fresh air which travels across . Cross ventilation also occurs on the first and second floor, along the two work space wings facing the internal courtyard.

In order to comply promply with conditions set out by part L of the UK building regulations, two mechanical air fans are to be installed on the roof structure of the building. Their purpose is to propel the ventilation process even further particulary in and around the auditorium and gathering area by injecting cool air to the first floor and funneling out warm, risen air from the second floor thus increasing the air flow rate. These are not air conditioning units, only propulsion units and are to be fully automated to perform depending on air quality and the performance of natural ventilation.

PASSIVE VENTILATION This type of ventilation begins in the exhibition area of the ground floor, where cool air enters and gradually begins to rise as air heats, it is propelled by the opening roof lights of the internal double height corridors, of the auditorium and of the mechanical vents. Air also enters the the work spaces on the first and second level and travel across towards the core of the building as it heats. Some of this air will be expelled directly from the workspaces and will create a single sided ventilation system. The use of reinforced concrete aids in creating an efficient passive ventilation system especially during the summer months because of the thermal gain during the day which precipates ventilation during the night as cooler air enters the building. MECHANICAL (FORCED) VENTILATION In order to propel the ventilation process even further, especially in the relatively wide internal space of the building, there are a two mechanical air fans which inject cool air to the first floor and funnel out warm, risen air from the second floor thus increasing the air flow rate. These are not air conditioning units, only propulsion units and are to be fully automated to perform depending on air quality and the performance of natural ventilation.

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INTEGRATED HEATING AND COOLING PIPES The building features a wet heating and cooling pipes to aid in natural ventilation and control the thermal and air quality of the interior space. These pipes provide up to 70 % radiant heat. Water is warmed in through a heat pump and distributed across the building’s floors.


VENTILATION STRATEGY DIAGRAM 1:200

MECHANICAL FANS

PASSIVE VENTILATION

CROSS VENTILATION

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CONSTRUCTION DETAILS CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1 : 1 CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1 : 100 OF 1 / 2 CROSS SECTION CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1 : 20 OF THE CANTILEVER CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1: 20 OF THE EXTERNAL FACADE AND GREEN ROOF DESIGN CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1 : 20 OF THE DOUBLE STOREY CORRIDOR ROOF LIGHT CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1 : 20 OF THE AUDITORIUM ROOF LIGHT CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1 : 20 OF THE SUSPENDED AUDITORIUM STRUCTURE

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CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1:100 1/2 CROSS SECTION THROUGH WORKSHOPS & SUSPENDED AUDITORIUM

NOTE: Reinforced concrete column structure: Column Grid: 7.50 m / 6.00 m & 6.00 m / 6.00 m. Reinforced concreate slab 300 mm, Reinforced concrete column 400 mm (diameter).

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CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1:20 SUSPENDED AUDITORIUM STRUCTURE

Suspended Auditorium facade 30 mm Plywood board (mounted on insulation) 70 mm Acoustic insulative material 180 mm Concrete 30 mm Plywood board (mounted to concrete facade) Prefabricated vertical timber louvres fixed to concrete with rotational mechanism

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CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1:20 // THE CANTILEVER

First Floor Cantilever from top to bottom: 50 mm screed, 50 mm screed with integrated heating / cooling pipes, 300 mm reinforced concrete, 200 mm insulation, 20m masonry or poly carbonate cladding (fixed to reinforced concrete) PTFE mesh facade: ptfe fibre mounted with top / intermediate / bottom mounting. Fibre is tightened by a frame and made flexible through pressure springs attachments. Fixed to metal rail, bolted to reinforced concrete slab.

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CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1:20 // THE EXTERNAL FACADE & GREEN ROOF DESIGN

Planted Roof (Extensive vegetation) construction from top to bottom: 200 mm soil / growing medium , 80 mm filter sheet , waterproofing iayer, 200mm Insulation , vapour barrier, 50 mm screed with integrated heating / cooling pipes. 300 mm reinforced concrete (Also: rain outlet for grey water / water recycling) Substrate Roof from top to bottom: 30 mm light substrate, waterproofing layer, 200 mm insulation, vapour barrier, 50 mm screed heating / cooling pipes. Further Considerations: Triple glazing openings with openable top frame.

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CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1:20 DOUBLE STOREY CORRIDOR ROOF LIGHT

The pitched roof light rests partially on insulation and mainly on a steel beam structure fixed to the reinforced concrete frame. Double glazed openings (length: 2000mm) are fully automated and open to induce natural ventilation. They require a opening mechanism which is to be fixed on the reinforced concrete frame.

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CONSTRUCTION DETAIL 1:20 AUDITORIUM ROOF LIGHT

The large pitched roof light of the auditorium features double glazed window openings (length : 2000mm) on either edge of the reinforced concrete frame. These are fully automated and form part of the building’s natural ventilation strategy. An automatic opening mechanism is required and thus fixed along the concrete frame. The double glazed window openings at the center of the roof light (length : 1150mm) are fixed to the structure. Insulative material is placed between the glazed window openings. The entire roof light is supported by a steel beam structured fixed (beam width : 200mm) to the reinforced concrete frame. Interior cladding is also supported by reinforced concrete frame.

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In short, my 4th year studio experience has taught me to be the following: sensible, and regardful. It is these two traits that have made my final year the most challenging but also the most rewarding. My research into entrepreneurship and its semantic relationship to architecture has enabled me to become more aware of the importance of designing for the specific activities that should take place in a building, not only materially but also phenomenalogically and experientially.

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THE HUB - A CENTRE FOR YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS