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PUBLICITE

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PUBLICITE

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welcome To Our WoRld !

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Basketball culture is omnipresent. In music, in fashion, in movies, in almost every visual aspect, in the United States and in Europe. This issue is about the different perspectives people in the United states have about basketball and urban culture in Europe. Differences are important, when a graffiti artist is asked to create something with a geometric composition, some would see straight lines, while others would see bold curves. Where some thought of simplicity, others saw complexe textures. But at the end of the day the most important is to understand that we all can learn from each others. Urban culture and spirit of basketball are everywhere. We just want to present to you all of the different styles in all their beauty. We are the Nation of Hoop and you are very welcome.

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MastHead

H O T A S H E L L C O L L A B O R AT O R S

Russel Westbrook He is known to be the most influent NBA player when it comes to clothes. In this issue he has select for you the best kepts secrets in the american fashion industry....

Marco BelinelLi The italian charisma at his best. He will assure the same role as his former teamate R. Westbrook, but he will do it for the old continent ! Stay tuned you will surprised !

Steve NasH He will be our sports redactor for this issu. He represent the best of the two world, he combines the modernity of the US and the values from Europe.

Boris DiaW The french touch ! Boris is a real passionate when it comes to Art and photography. In this issu he will be our guide in the best Art gallerys around the world.

Rachel Johnson Fashion mastermind Rachel is helping star athletes become style trendsetters. In this issu she will let us know a few good tricks and brands that no one exept her would known.


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AIN’ T NO

3 6 C HA M B E R S

Let’s Play ! K 1 X L O OK B O OK 2 0 1 5 .

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HA R DWO OD C L AS SIC - RU S SE L W E S T B RO OK

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HA R DWO OD C L AS SIC - J OA K I M N OA H

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DE F E N SE OF F E N SE : K 1 X L O OK B O OK 2 0 1 5 .

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Second Quarter DE F E N SE OF F E N SE : K 1 X L O OK B O OK 2 0 1 5 .

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DE F E N SE OF F E N SE : K 1 X L O OK B O OK 2 0 1 5 .

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Halftime RePort

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DE F E N SE OF F E N SE : K 1 X L O OK B O OK 2 0 1 5 .

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Money TimE DE F E N SE OF F E N SE : K 1 X L O OK B O OK 2 0 1 5 .

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Chicago Finest DE F E N SE OF F E N SE : K 1 X L O OK B O OK 2 0 1 5 .

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Nation Of Hoop // Summary

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FRESH LIKE D OWNY

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2 3 M E SH J E R SE Y

K I L L A M E SH J E R SE Y

O. D. M E SH J E R SE Y

TAG M E SH J E R SE Y

- 45$ -

- 45$ -

- 45$ -

- 45$ -

D C AC BAT I K

D C AC BAT I K

D C AC BAT I K

D C AC BAT I K

“Pur ple Z ebra”

“Blue R ain”

“O rang e Lig ht”

“Yellow L emon”

- 260 $ -

- 260 $ -

- 260 $ -

- 260 $ -

A N T R IG R AV I T Y

H I G H TOP

PA R A D OX U M

A N T IG R AV I T Y

“Street”

“ Wolf Gre y”

“Shiny”

“D enim”

- 110 $ -

- 120 $ -

- 100 $ -

- 125$ -

Nation Of Hoop // Style


Brand New

A N T IG R AV I T Y “Gre y D e nim” - 125$ -

Nation Of Hoop // Style

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J TRA1N

J TRA1N

J TRA1N

“Black Volt”

“Blue Mint”

“O rang e Lig ht”

J TRA1N “Shiny”

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

CS LE

CS LE

CS LE

CS LE

“D ark O reo”

“Cla ssic”

“Wolf Gre y”

“D ark Suede”

- 110 $ -

- 120 $ -

- 100 $ -

- 125$ -

D C AC BAT I K

D C AC BAT I K

D C AC BAT I K

D C AC BAT I K

“Pur ple Z ebra”

“Blue R ain”

“O rang e Lig t”

“Yellow L emon”

- 260 $ -

- 260 $ -

- 260 $ -

- 260 $ -

C A L I F OR N IA

C A L I F OR N IA

C A L I F OR N IA

C A L I F OR N IA

“Knicks”

“Yellow Gre y”

“Gree n Nav y”

“R ed C anva s”

- 60 $ -

- 60 $ -

- 60 $ -

- 60 $ -

Nation Of Hoop // Style


A N T IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

“All Black”

“Shiny

“Gree n Apple”

“Yellow L emon”

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

A N T R IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

“Street”

“Floral”

“D e nim”

“ Gre y D enim”

- 125$ -

- 125$ -

- 125$ -

- 125$ -

A N T IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

“Lig ht Blue”

“Black & Blood”

“ Techno”

“P ur ple L abel”

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

PA R A D OX U M

PA R A D OX UM

A N T IG R AV I T Y

A N T IG R AV I T Y

“Black F lag”

“Shiny”

“R ed Blood”

“O réo”

- 100 $ -

- 100 $ -

- 110 $ -

- 110 $ -

Nation Of Hoop // Style

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Brand New

N OH T- SH I RT “O ne Nation” - 35$ -

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Nation Of Hoop // Style


B L O OD T- SH I RT

HA R DE R T- SH I RT

B L I N K T- SH I RT

NAT I ON T- SH I RT

- 35$ -

- 35$ -

- 35$ -

- 35$ -

C OR E RW SH ORT

M I C RO M E SH SHORT

F L A M I N G O SHORT

L E O M E SH SHORT

- 45$ -

- 40 $ -

- 55$ -

- 45$ -

C O U RT PA R KA

VA R SI T Y JAC K E T

JAC K E T M K 2

P OAC H E R JAC K E T

- 160 $ -

- 120 $ -

- 90 $ -

- 350 $ -

WA R R IOR SNA P

F L OR A L 5 PA N E L

PA R K 5 PA N E L

K N I G H T SNA P

- 33$ -

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Nation Of Hoop // Style

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WA N NA G E T P R O P H O T O G R A P H T I P S ?

That’s the main question ! That folks ask me when seeking advice about

photography, all good. In fact, chances are you probably have more

photographing strangers on the street.

“street” in your blood than some of the “experts” out there… no joke. The photos I am using as examples here are mostly personal snaps that I

Though there’s no one simple answer to this question. It’s something

took last summer while working on a street-inspired branding campaign

that gets easier with practice and years of experience, similar to public

for a new hotel in Los Angeles’s Koreatown. (Yes, I occasionally leave

speaking, I’ve instead decided to compile a list of helpful tips, tricks,

San Francisco…)

and thoughts on street photography that may help you get your feet wet in the craft. We’ll dive into that here in a minute, but first some

Street photography really boils down to patience, a little bit of luck, and

back story…

being able to quickly analyze, compose, and pull the trigger all within a matter of seconds. However, no matter how prepared you are, you have

There’s been a lot of discussions online lately about what is and

to learn to keep your expectations low. What I mean is, don’t expect

isn’t considered “street photography.” While I feel that good street

to leave the house and kill it every time you hit the streets. That’s just

photography is a well-rounded mix of posed street portraiture and

not how this craft works. If you want keepers every time you shoot, I

candid street scenes, mixed with a dash of urban landscapes—these

suggest checking out Instagram-themed circle jerks or something…

images are great for resting eyes in the middle of a series, and there are

kinda-sorta kidding here.

folks out there who feel a photo needs to be completely candid to be a true “street photo.” I think that notion is silly, but will save that for

As an example, there are days where I’ll roam the streets for 8 hours

another discussion. Do whatever the hell makes you happy.

straight and come home with absolutely nothing to show for it. Sure, it’s fucking maddening, but that’s just how it works. I’ve learned to accept

Ultimately, what I’m getting at here is that, similar to skateboarding,

it. Sometimes, the energy on the street just isn’t there. You can’t force

there are no hard rules in street photography—only best practices (some

it. Street photography is very much like playing the slots—it’s a gamble,

of which I addressed in my first post). If you want to snap a photo of

it’s unpredictable. Some days the machine doesn’t hit, while other days

your special friend smoking trees in a tulip garden and call it street

you’ll get three or four bangers in a row… boom, boom, boom.

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Nation Of Hoop // On The Street Photography


A M E R IC A N WAY OF L I F E

Nation Of Hoop // Hardwood Classic

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Street photography is also by no means easy. I’d argue that it’s one of the most difficult genres in photography, so when you do get a photo you feel is pretty damn solid, it’s probably one of the most invigorating and rewarding experiences ever. Believe me, for every keeper I get, there were plenty of duds and near-misses before it. And that will never change. There’s no such thing as a perfect street photograph—which is part of what makes them beautiful.When you’re shooting on the street, you learn to embrace the practice of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic for finding beauty in imperfection. That’s what street photography is all about. Showcasing life as is, but doing so with the utmost pride, dignity, and respect. Remember, we’re dealing with REAL people here. I personally prefer photography that is more straight-forward: Documentary style, yet complex and packed with energy, emotion, motion, and risk. Moreover, they should showcase truthful outcomes, meaning the subject and environment is being presented in an accurate manner.And who really gives a damn if your image is a little crooked? I don’t. Symmetry gets boring. Mix it up. Play around with your framing, let loose.

I’ve said this several times before, but tools in photography are irrelevant. The best camera is the one you have access to. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.At the end of the day, photography all boils down to your eye, sensibility, unique vision, style, and understanding of light. Any yahoo —including my 5-year-old son— can put the lens on wide open and shoot a decent portrait with a blurred background.The first thing I do when looking at a photo is strip it of all bells-and-whistles, i.e. crafty shooting and processing techniques, any nostalgia factors (namely on older photos), and try and figure out what’s really going on in the frame and what, if anything, makes the frame interesting and unique.Often times, solid street photos are overlooked at first glance as they’re not easily consumed and digested, which is why they’re not popular amongst the tap-tap photography masses.A photographer, in my eyes, is an individual that can pick up any camera and, after tinkering with it for a bit, can “make” a unique image with the device. I suggest, finding a camera and lens setup that works for you and master it inside and out. I personally shoot in the 28-35mm range, using primes (fixed focal length lenses) in place of telephoto (zoom lenses).

Nation Of Hoop // On The Street Photography

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Though shooting photos on the street is far from dodging shellfire on the beaches of Normandy, good street photography, I believe, is done from a close proximity (28-35mm range) and with the camera at eye level, whether standing, kneeling, etc. I can’t stand looking at photos of people that were taken from down the street, or those that were clearly shot from the hip, resulting in an awkward mess. What’s there to be afraid of, seriously? We’re dealing with other human beings here… folks with whom we share the same air. Get close, be bold and let your nuts hang (literally for some, figuratively for others). If you’re shooting photos of people on the street, either candid or posed, you owe it to your subjects to make the best damn photograph of them possible. This goes along with the whole shooting with pride, dignity and respect. Show respect—get respect. Walk the streets with confidence. Stand your ground. You have every right to be out there with your camera, regardless of what anyone says. I’ve never seen anything good come out of being sneaky on the street. In fact, I’ve only seen it backfire, sometimes resulting in serious confrontation. Don’t get discouraged by bad experiences on the street. Dust yourself off and keep it moving. Again, think of delivering a speech in front of 100+ people. It can be both nerve-wrecking and invigorating at the same time, a feeling I’ve personally learned to embrace. In the end, just have fun out there. Street photography is not a contest, nor a race. Don’t worry about what other people are doing with their photography, or focus on shooting what’s currently trending—there are plenty of other folks on that hype. Focus on capturing what’s truly meaningful to you, regardless of what that may be. My personal satisfaction in photography comes from the handshakes, hugs and nods of respect I’m getting in the streets, not the internet… and that’s what motivates me to keep pushing.

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Nation Of Hoop // On The Street Photography


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OL D C ON T I N E N T TAS T E

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A M E R IC A N WAY OF L I F E

I N S I D E T H E N BA’ S N E W S T Y L E WA R S

The moment Russell Westbrook steps off the bus in Denver for the Oklahoma City Thunder’s game against the Nuggets, you get the feeling that something insane is going to happen tonight. He’s wearing red leather motorcycle pants, a Superdry bomber jacket, black Doc Martens with the laces undone, and his trademark superfluous eyeglasses. A meager runway gallery awaits him—just a few security guards, OKC’s team photographer, and me — but he still disembarks with purpose. Even in a league that’s warped from “pinstriped spinnaker on draft night” to “pure line cut slim enough to make Beckham look like a slob.” Russ is a radical: His style is a punk provocation, a sartorial troll, and most crucially a full-on style, not just a series of outré outfits that no other player has the guts to wear. He’s swinging a leather Dopp kit with his right arm in a repetitive motion that could only be described as swag —young, black, and Oi!— and generally looking like he’s striding out of Malcolm McLaren’s London SEX shop in 1976. Every element of hiscostume is an extension of the identity he projects: part worldly NBA superstar, part suedehead hooligan. A few hours later, in what NBA bloggers now refer to as “the queso incident,” Westbrook lives up to his look. It all starts during a time-out when Rocky the Mountain Lion, the Nuggets’ plushy yellow mascot, heaves up a perfect-looking half-court shot. If he makes it, everybody in the Pepsi Center wins a free side of queso

Photography - ESPN 2014

from Qdoba. But as the ball slo-mos toward the rim, Westbrook races over, leaps up, and pulls a supervillain move, intercepting it and inspiring the most scornful cascade of boos I’ve ever heard. Westbrook’s style-provocateur act has already become

Nation Of Hoop // Hardwood Classic

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two best teams, appears regularly on nationally televised games—where coverage of that short catwalk from the bus to the locker room is de rigueur —and is expected to return to the NBA’s fashion week, the Finals, in June. But he is only one point of light in the league’s new style-savvy firmament, just one Instagram account in a sea of vanity-mirrored baller selfies. After all, the Thunder are merely watching the Heat’s (bespoke-tailored) throne. While Kobe Bryant can stand outside the Lakers locker room and proclaim to me, “I’m the Valentino of the NBA,” as he explains that he’s leaving “the preppy-hipster look” to the younger generation, Miami’s swaggy Big Three —L eBron James, D w yane Wade, C hr is B osh— Not in a league where Amar’e Stoudemire can be found posting up in the front row of the Lanvin show at Paris fashion week, where

f rom Ok la homa to L a s Ve g a s… Rajon Rondo’s retinue is trying to persuade Givenchy to pour a custom mold exclusively for his size 13 feet, where Steve Nash can pull the faux-disaffected Clooney, brushing off my questions about his style with an “I don’t take it that seriously” while going Gatsby (that’s Kobe’s nickname for him) in a suit from a Canadian made-to-order Internet clothier that he has a financial stake in. A few days later, Westbrook’s publicist tells me that within certain rarefied fashion circles, RW is known as “the Kate Moss of the NBA.” Evidently somebody at Vogue wrote this to her in an e-mail. When I ask Russ how he feels about being compared to a female British supermodel famous for making heroin chic and saying things like “Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels,” he assures me he’s cool with it. “It’s a little different,” he says. “But I think it got said because some people are not afraid to do certain things or wear certain stuff. You have to have a certain swagger about you.” Even if Russel Westbrook has his own limits, of course — Kanye’s infamous leather kilt, for instance. Though in his next breath Russ allows that he’d “be open to it if it were a slimmer fit.” The NBA has had fashion moments before— Clyde Frazier wearing his wide-brimmed Borsalino on the cover of Esquire, the introduction of the Air Jordan in the mid-’80s, Allen Iverson bringing cornrows, baggy jeans, and garish jewelry from the

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Nation Of Hoop // Hardwood Classic

Photography - NBA Photography - NBA 20132012

renowned in the NBA, because he stars on one of the league’s


FeW NumBerS S. 14/15

28 7.3 8.6 PTS/G

REB/G

ASS/G

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hood to the hardwood in the late ‘90s—but the sine waves of high fashion and locker-room style have never synced up quite like they do right now. More than in any other sport, basketball showcases the individual; we can see each player’s tics and idiosyncrasies when he’s on the court, and that’s how we begin to decide who we think he is. And at least as far back as Frazier, no sport has been more enmeshed in the allure of black culture

w hen e ver y b o dy wants to b e li ke mi ke… and style. But recently, whether it’s sparked by the explosion of social media or the imposition of David Stern’s corporatefriendly dress code, or whether it’s just the logical outcome of the ongoing gene splice of NBA superstars to multinational apparel companies, the players are more self-aware than ever, more cognizant that personal style is a prerequisite for personal brand. Whether they actually love fashion or not, they understand the need to be perceived as style leaders, at least of some kind, in order to maximize their shoe-company contracts. Compared to the NBA’s established style kings, Durant is still on the climb, newly intrigued, still searching for his look. “I always wanted to be fly,” he tells me outside a Barneys in Santa Monica, where he can’t find one piece of off-the-rack clothing to fit his super-elongated limbs. “I always put stuff together,” he says. “But it was hard for me to find clothes,

Photography - ESPN 2014

since I was so tall, my feet were so big, my arms were so long.”

Nation Of Hoop // Hardwood Classic

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Photography - Letters Agency 2015


OL D C ON T I N E N T TAS T E

RESPECT THE GIRL, A N D L O V E T H E WO M E N . . .

Nation Of Hoop // Letters Do It Better

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Photography - Letters Agency 2015

girl


girl Okay... I like basketball, I like models, and I like wine too. I like wines that bring basketball models to shoots ! Wait, what ? Seems that the wine was a little too strong... It was my first time meeting the girls casting for the next K1X shooting, and from the moment I met they I knew we were going to get along. Mainly because they brought wine to the shoot‌

Nation Of Hoop // Letters Do It Better

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Jokes aside, the girls were fantastic human beings. Not only was their fun to be around, but also fantastic to photograph. We had a Rendezvous after her castings at my friend’s place in West Hollywood, and I couldn’t be happier with the results. Basketball, girls and wine (not sure about the order), it was a hell of a day !

Photography - Letters Agency 2015

Thanks K1X !

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Nation Of Hoop // Letters Do It Better


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OL D C ON T I N E N T TAS T E

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Miller, as one would, enjoys running amok in L.A. But he moved there in June of 2012 because he found that it freed him creatively. He originally flew to California in the spring of that year to film an episode of the rebooted Punk’d, and while he was there started on sessions for his stopgap mixtape Macadelic.

But Miller makes his home in L.A. now, in a Hollywood Hills mansion.

Dope Family, the MTV reality show that

This relocation isn’t exactly a bold move — California will lure the

aired earlier this year, though in keeping

young and rich until the day it’s engulfed by the Pacific Ocean. What is

with genre convention, that’s not exactly

surprising, though, is that Miller hasn’t just escaped into sunshine and

an accurate portrayal of his life. The show, recently renewed for its

clouds of legal pot smoke. He has instead become, improbably, a central

second season, fits an easy storyline: young rapper blows up, makes

figure in the ongoing artistic renaissance of indie-leaning underground

millions, moves to L.A. with his friends, and generally picks up

rap music on the West Coast. The difference between his new album,

where Richie Rich left off. Each episode is loosely structured around

June’s Watching Movies With the Sound Off, and its predecessor, 2011’s

a plainly contrived event (planning his Mom’s birthday, going deep-

Blue Slide Park, can be gleaned from the credits alone. Whereas the

sea fishing, visiting Las Vegas) and is padded out by scenes of Miller

former featured no other rappers, WMWTSO has guest verses from an

and his team of hometown friends — including his close friend and

enviable roster of Cali collaborators — members of Kendrick Lamar‘s

business partner, Q, who’s also hanging around the Rostrum office

T.D.E. crew (represented by Schoolboy Q and Ab-Soul) and Odd Future

— doing everyday things like getting flu shots or playing tennis.

(Earl Sweatshirt and Tyler, the Creator contribute production), plus beat-music auteur Flying Lotus. Those guys likewise had a hand in

“I work nonstop — this album, I was completely isolated from the

Miller’s personal evolution; but the second-biggest rapper in Pittsburgh

world,” he says. “If it wasn’t for the MTV show, everyone probably

history (following friend and frequent collaborator Wiz Khalifa) was

would have forgotten about me. I was just in the studio, just

first drawn to California for another quite typical reason: the Zen.

wanting to step back from everything.”

“I just loved being in a new environment,” Miller says of Los Angeles, while chatting in the lavish downtown Manhattan

He recorded a handful of tracks and took to the new environment,

offices of his label, Rostrum Records (Ted Danson lives in

eventually constructing two studios in his house — one a converted

the space above), a few thousand miles from his new home.

pool house, the other an offshoot of his bedroom — which have grown into a hub for famous young L.A. creatives like Earl Sweatshirt,

“I stayed out there and [then] moved out there. Everything really

Schoolboy Q, and Thundercat. Miller toured last summer and fall before

started with me having my own studio. That’s when everything

holing up in his sanctuary in the hills, making music through the winter

really got real. That’s when I started to make records, from scratch,

with his newfound friends, sometimes going days without showering.

by myself.”

Miller needed the seclusion. By his count, he had been on the road for almost the entirety of the previous two-and-a-half years. He

He is sitting at a large wooden table, fiddling with a pack

took three months off to record Blue Slide Park, which was released

of Parliaments and messing with a bucket hat, a wardrobe

in the first week of November 2011, while he was touring. The

staple that links him with his newfound L.A. brethren.

album sold well (buoyed by a surprise No. 1 debut on the Billboard

You can see the aforementioned mansion on Mac Miller and the Most

album chart), but it also made Miller a punch line in some circles.

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Nation Of Hoop // Mike Miller


Photography - Def Jam 2015

A M E R IC A N WAY OF L I F E

Mac Miller never pictured himself in Los Angeles. Born Malcolm McCormick, the 21-year-old rapper grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with New York City looming as hip-hop’s holy land. His early music — most notably the 2010 mixtape K.I.D.S., which landed him his record deal — was the decades-long residual runoff of New York’s classic boom-bap period as regurgitated by an eager white teen who grew up firmly Anno Eminem. Miller’s first viral hits featured him rapping excitedly about middle-class comforts over classic Golden Age instrumentals: “Nikes on My Feet” — currently at more than 36 million YouTube views — swiped the beat from Nas’ “The World Is Yours (Remix),” while “Kool Aid & Frozen Pizza” — 25 million views — lifted the production from Lord Finesse’s “Hip 2 Da Game.” (The latter’s homage didn’t yield solely positive results: Last year, Finesse sued Miller for copyright infringement; the two settled out of court this past January.)

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Miller needed the seclusion. By his count, he had been on the road for almost the entirety of the previous two-and-a-half years. He took three months off to record Blue Slide Park, which was released in the first week of November 2011, while he was touring.

But Miller makes his home in L.A. now, in a Hollywood

wooden table, fiddling with a pack of Parliaments

Hills mansion. This relocation isn’t exactly a bold move

and messing with a bucket hat, a wardrobe staple

— California will lure the young and rich until the day

that links him with his newfound L.A. brethren.

it’s engulfed by the Pacific Ocean. What is surprising,

You can see the aforementioned mansion on

though, is that Miller hasn’t just escaped into sunshine

Mac Miller and the Most Dope Family, the

and clouds of legal pot smoke. He has instead become,

MTV reality show that aired earlier this year,

improbably, a central figure in the ongoing artistic

though in keeping with genre convention, that’s

renaissance of indie-leaning underground rap music

not exactly an accurate portrayal of his life.

on the West Coast. The difference between his new

The show, recently renewed for its second season,

album, June’s Watching Movies With the Sound Off,

fits an easy storyline: young rapper blows up, makes

and its predecessor, 2011’s Blue Slide Park, can be

millions, moves to L.A. with his friends, and generally

gleaned from the credits alone. Whereas the former

picks up where Richie Rich left off. Each episode

featured no other rappers, WMWTSO has guest

is loosely structured around a plainly contrived

verses from an enviable roster of Cali collaborators —

event (planning his Mom’s birthday, going deep-

members of Kendrick Lamar‘s T.D.E. crew (represented

sea fishing, visiting Las Vegas) and is padded out by

by Schoolboy Q and Ab-Soul) and Odd Future

scenes of Miller and his team of hometown friends

(Earl Sweatshirt and Tyler, the Creator contribute

— including his close friend and business partner, Q,

production), plus beat-music auteur Flying Lotus.

who’s also hanging around the Rostrum office — doing everyday things like getting flu shots or playing tennis.

“I stayed out there and then moved out there.

Miller, as one would, enjoys running amok in L.A. But

Everything really started with me having my own

he moved there in June of 2012 because he found that

studio. That’s when everything really got real, when I

it freed him creatively. He originally flew to California

started to make records, from scratch, by myself.”

in the spring of that year to film an episode of the rebooted Punk’d, and while he was there started on

48

Those guys likewise had a hand in Miller’s personal

sessions for his stopgap mixtape Macadelic. He recorded

evolution; but the second-biggest rapper in

a handful of tracks and took to the new environment,

Pittsburgh history (following friend and frequent

eventually constructing two studios in his house — one

collaborator Wiz Khalifa) was first drawn to

a converted pool house, the other an offshoot of his

California for another quite typical reason: the Zen.

bedroom — which have grown into a hub for famous

“I just loved being in a new environment,” Miller says

young L.A. creatives like Earl Sweatshirt, Schoolboy

of Los Angeles, while chatting in the lavish downtown

Q, and Thundercat. Miller toured last summer and

Manhattan offices of his label, Rostrum Records (Ted

fall before holing up in his sanctuary in the hills,

Danson lives in the space above), a few thousand

making music through the winter with his newfound

miles from his new home. He is sitting at a large

friends, sometimes going days without showering.

Nation Of Hoop // Mike Miller


“I was an easy target,” he acknowledges now. “If you listen to ‘Party on Fifth Ave.’” — the cheery Blue Slide Park single — “you’re gonna think that I’m a little, fucking… whatever,” he says, cutting himself off mid-sentence. It was the first time that many mainstream outlets had bothered to cover him, and most panned the album, sometimes viciously. (Here, I am far from blameless: I wrote perhaps the most scathing review, giving the album a 1.0 at Pitchfork.) The negativity chipped away at the armor that Miller had developed as a teenaged white rapper who had risen far above those who had assured him he was crazy to try and make it as an MC. Arthur Pitt, Miller’s manager and the vice president of Rostrum (which also launched Wiz Khalifa), told me that Miller called him at 4 a.m. in disbelief at Pitchfork’s obscenely low score. “I work nonstop this album, I was completely isolated from the world,” he says. “If it wasn’t for the MTV show, everyone probably would have forgotten about me. I was just in the studio, just wanting to step back from everything.” The reviews contributed to (though didn’t cause, Miller is careful to note) a delirious period as 2011 bled into the new year. The rapper built and sustained his fanbase on the road, but the road also broke him down. Miller recalls that his mom demanded that management force her son to take a break — she “is still pissed about that to this day,” he says about his relentless schedule — but there was money on the table that, he says, he didn’t know how to turn down. “Everyone thinks that I read and then got addicted to drugs. It wasn’t like, ‘Fuck, what do I do, oh my god, let’s do drugs,’” he mocks. “The drugs thing had been a part of my life since I was young as hell. I just didn’t talk about it as much.” There were also drugs, and contrary to other media reports, Miller insists that negative reviews didn’t send him into a spiral of lean addiction. When I first met Miller, Pitt introduced me to people around the office as “the guy who got Mac addicted to drugs,” which was a more joking approach to our shared history than the one Miller eventually took.

Miller needed the seclusion. By his count, he had been on the road for almost the entirety of the previous two-and-a-half years. He took three months off to record Blue Slide Park, which was released in the first week of November 2011, while he was touring. The album sold well (buoyed by a surprise No. 1 debut on the Billboard album chart), but it also made Miller a punch line in some circles.

49


Photography - Def Jam 2015

He also was getting paid to play 8,000-person capacity venues that he

experiences though pretty standard as far as teenagers go unite them.

then had trouble selling out — something he only feels comfortable

His downstairs studio also appeals to his friends on a functional

disclosing now. He seems more resigned than regretful about this

level, providing a rare halo of comfort.“It’s a real tranquil studio, very

whirlwind time, but nonetheless, the grind had taken its toll. When he

welcoming,” explains Matt Martians, one half of the Odd Future-affiliated

got off the “Macadelic” tour at the beginning of last October, he retreated.

group the Internet. “You don’t feel like you have to do something.” Similarly seduced is Ab-Soul, who, at 26, has a half-decade on

“ 2013 was me screaming, Stop! I got a spot and huddled into a cave.”

most of this crew. “The studio’s so crazy, the vibe in there,” he says, speaking on the phone from his home in Carson, California. “There’s this kind of red lighting with beanbags, candles burning,

Miller first linked up with T.D.E. when he toured alongside Lamar,

and all of these things. But you’re still going to find a case of

Schoolboy, and Wiz for 2012’s “Under the Influence of Music” tour.

Heinekens there, you know what I mean? We go over there, all

He’s also grown close with Odd Future since settling in L.A., in particular

of the rappers, and we just gather around and have fun and rap.”

with Earl Sweatshirt. Earl has reportedly recorded a sizable portion of his upcoming debut album, Doris, in Miller’s downstairs studio, a space where the duo spends hours together just messing around. Ab-Soul, Miller tells me, is also scheduled to track his newest album at Miller’s home.

“We’re just homies and we just support each other,” Miller says. “We look out for each other and keep that as number one. That’s our way of life.”

A few years ago, the idea of this constellation of rappers forming around Miller would have seemed like a joke. Compared to Odd

In addition to finding the right peer group, Miller also has simply grown

Future’s first songs particularly Earl’s “Earl” or Tyler’s “French”

up. Musically and personally, the signs are obvious: His face and neck

Miller’s early tracks and visuals were not just peachy, but dull.

are now covered by a scraggly orange beard, and his arms, which each

Nor did he have the effortless cool or inherent swagger of Lamar’s

sported a single tattoo two years ago, are completely smothered in ink.

cohorts. But look closely enough and you can see strands of teenage

Earlier this year, he raged quietly against, as he puts it, “The business

boyhood stitching these groups together: Miller’s and Odd Future’s

of Mac Miller,” by releasing songs on Soundcloud under the alias Larry

pre-fame videos depict kids getting high and creating their own

Fisherman. Watching Movies With the Sound Off reflects this inevitable

fun in hometowns that had begun to feel constrictive. Those shared

maturity, too.

50

Nation Of Hoop // Mike Miller


I ask Miller what he and Earl Sweatshirt do on a day off. He volleys the question to Earl, who says “Sea World.� Miller is mostly distracted during the conversation. Aside from the acceptance, he has a group of friends who fulfill him spiritually and creatively. He now has respect, or at least a version of it, and a little bit of perspective, too.

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Nation Of Hoop // Burshido


OL D C ON T I N E N T TAS T E

It began last week, when Bushido released a new music video, “Stress Ohne Grund,” (“Stress Without Reason”) in which he rapped about murdering the Greens’ leader (“I shoot at Claudia Roth and she gets holes like a golf course”) and the Free Democratic Party’s Serkan Tören (“I want Serkan Tören to bite the grass”). The song also features a homophobic line directed at Wowereit, who is gay. The video, which quickly drew complaints, was pulled from YouTube and politicians went on the attack.

While the rap scene in Germany is smaller and less

FDP politician Tören added that he would file a complaint

culturally relevant than in countries like the United States

with the Berlin prosecutor’s office, and said that

or France, it has become more prominent in recent years, with Bushido among its best known figures. Bushido,

«it must be investigated if the lyrics are a death threat

who grew up in the Tempelhof area of Berlin and has a

or a call to murder. A person who wishes for the death

Tunisian father, has spoken openly about his drug dealing

of a politician is no role model.»

past. His 2008 autobiography, “Bushido,” was turned into a feature film.

The scandal has reverberated throughout Germany’s pop culture scene as well. Heino, the phenomenally popular

While some of his early songs, were banned from live

singer of German Schlager music from the ‘70s and

performance for being offensive, he has, in recent years,

‘80s -- who once renounced his own Bambi Award as

become more accepted by the German mainstream and

a protest against Bushido -- has spoken out, saying that

even German politicians. In 2011 he was given a Bambi

Bushido “must be stopped.” Singer Karel Gott, who once

Award for being a “role model” of integration, and in 2012

recorded a duet with the rapper, told the tabloid Bild that

he completed an internship at the German parliament.

he “would not work with him again.”

«Even artistic freedom has its limits.» Roth has said

Although he initially seemed to welcome the controversy

his song is a «clear incitement to commiting

-- tweeting “I’m making headlines, yeah” -- he has since,

violence and murder.»

perhaps because of the impending threat of litigation, become more apologetic. He appeared in a TV interview

But he has remained controversial. In 2012 he caused

on Monday in which he said that his song was “in no way

a small political uproar when he tweeted a map of the

a call to violence” and that “if he shoots with anything,

Middle East in which Israel did not exist, along with the

it’s words.” But that may not make much of a difference

words “Free Palestine.” And this spring, newsmagazine

for his impending legal battles -- Wowereit has already

Stern ran a story claiming he had connections to

initiated a claim against the rapper.The latest controversy

a Palestinian-Lebanese mafia in Berlin.The latest

may land Bushido in legal trouble. Germany has strict

controversy may land Bushido in legal trouble. Germany

regulations when it comes to “hate speech” and the artist

has strict regulations when it comes to “hate speech” and

may have gone too far.

the artist may have gone too far.”Bushido has overstepped the law,” Interior Minister Friedrich told TV station N24.

illustration - Bushido 2014

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PUBLICITE

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PUBLICITE

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Doin’ It In The Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC is an independent documentary directed by Bobbito Garcia and Kevin Couliau. The film explores the history, culture, and social impact of New York’s summer b-ball scene, widely recognized as the worldwide “Mecca” of the sport.

With 700 playgrounds, 500,000 players and 8 million stories, New York

Kenny Anderson, Kenny “The Jet” Smith, Smush Parker and Julius “Dr.

City is the perfect petri dish for street ball culture to thrive in. The

J” Erving all make appearances.”New York City pickup basketball is the

sound of a basketball hitting asphalt is as common as a car horn in the

essence of basketball. I don’t know if you can be a basketball player

Big Apple.

without experiencing pickup basketball,” said Pee Wee Kirkland, a street ball legend who is rumored to have scored 465 points in eight games Amid the grit of the five boroughs,

while in prison.

street ballers have been flourishing for decades. Their story is told in

“We speak this language everywhere and that’s why this film is so

“Doin’ It in the Park,” a documentary

powerful, because we can take it across countries and everyone still

co-directed and 100 percent self-

understands.”

funded by Kevin “Ze Frenchmen” Couliau and hip-hop cultural icon

Co-directors Kevin “Ze Frenchmen” Couliau and Bobbito “Kool Bob

Bobbito “Kool Bob Love” Garcia.

Love” Garcia took their camera throughout the five boroughs to find

The film uncovers the street ball

out who had game. It wouldn’t be a street ball film if it didn’t include a

movement through playground

cast of colorfully nicknamed players like M&M, the Blenda, Homicide,

legends, NBA athletes and average

Mookie, Headache, Black Jack, the Latin Assassin, Shammgod and White

players. Starting in 2010, Couliau and

Chocolate.But the style of play in “Doin’ It In The Park” isn’t the flashy,

Garcia visited 180 courts throughout

high-flying and insanely dribbling-focused play from the popular AND1

NYC primarily by bicycle, carrying

basketball tournaments. Instead, the documentary focuses on average

video equipment and a basketball in

people putting differences aside to worship in the church of basketball.

their backpacks to find out who had

Garcia stresses the importance of the inclusive nature of the game. A

game.

street ball game is probably the only outdoor environment in New York where you could find a parolee, a priest, a Wall Street banker, a homeless

“The beauty of playground ball in

person and a college women’s basketball player working together.

New York is that our scene has its own culture, own behavior patterns, dress codes, forms of mentoring;

«It’s basketball, so as long as you show out you get respect,»

and in the film we explored all those things,” Garcia said. said Niki “The Ratchet” Avery, 26, a professional baller from Harlem For 85 minutes, viewers are treated to scenes as vivid as the city streets,

who appears in the film. Jack “Black Jack” Ryan, a street baller and

played out to a soundtrack of hip-hop groups like the Roots and the

NBA halftime performer, added, “There are only a certain amount

familiar beats of Latino culture. NBA players and New York City legends

of elite street ballers in New York but the number of people who are

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Nation Of Hoop // Doin’ It In The Park


OL D C ON T I N E N T TAS T E

just average Joes or just a notch or two under the NBA is huge. That’s

From attire (no official rules, but don’t be overly matchy) to nicknames

why we are doing a movie on the thousands of players who make this

(you can’t come up with your own) to trash talk (de rigueur), this

culture what it is.” Being New York City, there’s plenty of showmanship

cheerful slice of city life is broken down by a wide range of local

on display. Players with superior dribbling skills are said to have the

legends, including a few who’ve gone on to NBA careers. Interesting

“bop bop,” “disco” or “boogie,” which leaves defenders stunned and

sub-subcultures include a Rikers Island inmate game, a deaf-only court

is often accompanied by trash talk, making for great asphalt theater.

and what it’s like to be the rare female or white-guy player. Daunting

Garcia said.Garcia has done the ultimate crossover by taking his “bop

though it may be for the aspiring pick-up entrant, this is a fun and

bop” style from the court to audiences in screenings around the world.

worthwhile ode to one of New York’s greatest summer pastimes.

“Doin’ It in the Park” won the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

Co-directors Bobbito Garcia and Kevin Couliau visited 180 courts

at the 2012 Urbanworld Film Festival.The two directors are currently

throughout NYC’s five boroughs to create their debut documentary.

pushing for commercial release of the film. Because the “Doin’ It in the Park” movement is already worldwide and thousands strong, Garcia

“You can play high school or college for four years.

said selling the movie would be easier than “an alley-oop on an eight-

You can play Pro for a decade. You can play pick-up … for life.”

foot rim” for any distributor who picks it up. Distribution and a major motion picture release would be the ultimate assist for the ballers-

They traveled to a majority of the locations by bicycle, carrying camera

turned-filmmakers, because the goal of the film is to spread the story

equipment and a ball in their backpacks. The film’s title refers as much

of, not just legends, but everyday New York City basketball culture.

to the subject matter as it does to the method of filmmaking, providing an unprecedented perspective on urban America’s most popular, and

“At the core, I’m an advocate of outdoor basketball,” Garcia said.

accessible, free recreation.A labor of hoophead love by Bobbito Garcia

“Creating this movie was not a niche desire. This is what I’ve been doing

and Kevin Couliau, “Doin’ It in the Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC” is a

my entire life. “I’m a ballplayer ‘til I die.”In New York City, pick-up

survey of New York’s outdoor courts and the players who live on them.

basketball is not just a sport. It is a way of life. There are 700+ outdoor courts, and an estimated 500,000 players, the most loyal of which approach the game as a religion, and the playground as their church. “When you’re a New York outdoor ballplayer, you have a tendency to be a crowd pleaser because on any given day you could have 35 to 40 people hanging on the fence watching you,”

Doin’ It In The Park lovingly uncovers this movement through the voices of playground legends, NBA athletes, and most importantly the common ballplayer who all day looks forward to calling “next” game at their local schoolyard.For a sport with such a carefree name, this is one fierce subculture. In “Doin’ It in the Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC,” co-directors Bobbito Garcia and Kevin Couliau — both first-time feature documentarians with roots in the scene — harness the infectious energy of the players who do battle on the city’s public courts, of which there are more than 700.


Mr. Garcia, who wrote and narrates the tour, says that they visited 180 courts in all five boroughs in 75 days last year. Paced by Eddie Palmieri’s up-tempo, percussive score, “Doin’ It” bounces like a crossover dribble, gliding swiftly and surely through interviews, videos and history lessons, then transitioning to today’s dedicated ballers and playground culture. The film, an exuberant introduction to the rich lore of the city game, teaches some basics, recounts some stories and talks with some of the most famous asphalt gods. «The beauty of playground ball in New York is that our scene has its own culture, own behavior patterns, dress codes, forms of mentoring; and in the film we explored all those things,» “Doin’ It” showcases the tournaments at Rucker Park in Harlem and “the Cage” at West Fourth Street in Greenwich Village. But it’s just as knowing about lesser courts, including one at Rikers Island where inmates hunger for their chance to play.Mr. Garcia speaks with pros who honed their games on New York courts; Kenny Smith won two N.B.A. championships but says his “most vivid” basketball memory remains the first time he won a three-on-three game at his playground in Queens. Blacktop legends like Fly Williams and Pee Wee Kirkland recall their glory days; Earl Manigault, a k a the Goat, is hailed as the best streetballer ever and remembered for his influence.

« Streetball ? That’s where i learned my skills. You got to earn your spot. That’s where i got all my toughness, that’s where i got my game from. » One complaint: Of the hundreds of shots “Doin’ It” shows — spectacular jumpers, hard-earned layups, power dunks — only a handful ever miss. Intimidating, for sure. Still, after seeing this film, it’s hard not to want to work on your spin move. Who’s got next?

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Nation Of Hoop // Doin’ It In The Park


Photography - Doint It In The Park 2015

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Nation Of Hoop // Lookbook 2015


OL D C ON T I N E N T TAS T E

T H E “ O . D . PA C K ” B Y K 1 X . After all, isn’t the full focus on offense as well as on defense the hallmark of every great player ? The new spring line is held almost exclusively in black and white, taking cues from the congeneric game of chess, which also relies on the balance between attack- and avert-modes. The use of the knight and rook icons symbolize K1X’s affection towards both offensive and defensive dynamics: Lakers Showtime and the Detroit Bad Boys… James Harden and Serge Ibaka…Finger roll and flagrant foul. A L L - O U T L I K E A N OV E R D O SE …


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Winter Jacket Navy / Grey 180 $

Nation Of Hoop // Lookbook 2015

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Stars Short Black /White 45 $

Warrior Shirt Black / Black 80 $

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Nation Of Hoop // Lookbook 2015


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College Jacket Purple / White 110 $

Nation Of Hoop // Lookbook 2015

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Play Hard Shirt Multicolor 35 $

Pattern Leggin Green / Blue 45 $

Nation Of Hoop // Lookbook 2015

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M U LT I C U LT U R A L I T Y AT H I S B E S T

While it’s typical for those who make it to the NBA to brag about their gritty roots —the tough playground courts of Newark or the South Side where they honed their moves— Noah, the son of French tennis star Yannick Noah and a former Miss Sweden, Cecilia Rodhe, has a unique background that spans the globe. “Everybody looks at me like, ‘Who is he?’” says Noah, relaxing after practice at the kitchen table in his home in Deerfield. “I’m from a lot of different environments. You can’t put me in a box. I come from different cultures, I have different beliefs, I talk like I’m from New York, I speak fluent French, I’m African, I’m Swedish. So I come from all these different places, and I understand all these cultures pretty well. They make me who I am, but at the same time, I’m not one thing; I’m all these things.” One thing Noah isn’t is ostentatious—he’s not inclined to show off the fancy features of his crib, nor does he drip with bling. “You won’t see me wearing diamonds. I would never come home with a big diamond watch,” he says. (“We would throw you out of the house,” adds his mother, sitting next to him.) He’s more likely to be found in his favorite African beaded necklaces. “I don’t wear Gucci,” he says. “I’ve had my same car since my rookie year.” While it’s typical for those who make it to the NBA to brag about or the South Side where they honed their moves— Noah, the son of French tennis star Yannick Noah and a former Miss Sweden, Cecilia Rodhe, has a unique background that spans the globe.

70

Nation Of Hoop // Hardwood Classic

Photography -- ESPN Photography ESPN2014 2014

their gritty roots —the tough playground courts of Newark


OL D C ON T I N E N T TAS T E

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www.kickz.com/us/nbajersey 72

Photography - ESPN 2014

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“Everybody looks at me like, ‘Who is he?’” says Noah, relaxing after practice at the kitchen table in his home in Deerfield. “I’m from a lot of different environments. You can’t put me in a box. I come from different cultures, I have different beliefs, I talk like I’m from New York, I speak fluent French, I’m African, I’m Swedish. So I come from all these different places, and I understand all these cultures pretty well. They make me who I am, but at the same time, I’m not one thing; I’m all these things.” One thing Noah isn’t is ostentatious—he’s not inclined to show off the fancy features of his crib, nor does he drip with bling. “You won’t see me wearing diamonds. I would never come home with a big diamond watch,” he says. “We would throw you out of the house,” adds his mother, sitting next to him.” He’s more likely to be found in his favorite African beaded necklaces. “I don’t wear Gucci,” he says. “I’ve had my same car since my rookie year.”

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Photography - ESPN 2014

A N D L I V E L I K E A N H UM B L E M A N …


K 1 X x P E D R O OYA R B I D E BRISTOL - UNITED KINGD OM

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OL D C ON T I N E N T TAS T E

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OL D C ON T I N E N T TAS T E

F ROM S T R E E T W E A R TO TAT TO O S Barcelona is known for its beaches, tapas, and imaginative architecture, but it is also becoming increasingly known as a destination for tattoos. Thanks, in part, to LTW, an avant-garde tattoo shop that was founded in 1996 just four years after the Olympics transformed the city, and planners added, among other things, the beach that Barcelona is famous for today.

First of all, thank you to answer this few questions for this new Nation Of Hoop magazine. So...tell me about your connections to K1X ?

What makes your shop stand out from others in Barcelona ? Why Barcelona ? First of all, we are one of the oldest ones in the city and we focus on the

Our connection with K1X started around 2005, when Carlos, owner

customer. We want to offer to our customers the best designs according

of LTW opened Trust Nobody Store in Barcelona. We were focused on

to their needs. We hear what they want and we guide them into the

bringing new streetwear brands to Barcelona. The store was a mix of

styles and artists we have, especially if they are new customers and

sneakers, skate, and streetwear. Nowadays, it is nothing new, but in ’05

they are getting their first tattoo. We like to give to our customers the

that was something really new.

opportunity to get tattoos from a lot of different artists and styles.

We heard from K1X we checked the blog and we fell in love

The other fundamental thing in LTW is that we are a studio that is open

instantly with the brand. Then we placed our first order and started

for guest spots. We like to bring people from around the world to tattoo

the relationship with them.Twice a year we had the Bread & Butter

in LTW; we like to give to our customers the possibility to get tattoos

tradeshow in Barcelona where a lot of brands came to the city. It was

from different people that we like.We are a big group of individuals in

there when we met Bobby, Ben, and Scotty. Scotty also came by LTW

LTW and we like all sorts of things, and all this culture, like the graffiti

to get a tattoo from Javier Rodríguez —a rose in the armpit. We had

or calligraphy, is present in our works.

memorable nights during Bread & Butter. We even did a collab with

When did LTW open ? Why ?

What artists work there ? Are they mostly from Barcelona ? How would you describe their styles ?

Carlos opened LTW in 1996. At that time, he was a piercer and saw the

Now we have 12 artists working at LTW. All of them are specialized

opportunity to open one of the first tattoo studios in Barcelona. LTW

in different styles. Their names are Javier Rodriguez, Rodrigo DC, Jon

has in been in business for almost 20 years and a lot of artists have

Pall, Alexis, Cisco, Norte One, Jorge Terán, Manu, Emerson Ventura,

worked here and learned with us like Tomas García, Javier Rodríguez ...

Dennis, Rafa Decráneo, Rafa Serrano. To check the amazing works they

We also like to have guests from around the world,

do the best think you can do is to check the website.

K1X x LTW with a Javier Rodriguez design.


Are you still involved in the streetwear scene or community? How so? Streetwear is something that is present in our lifestyle. We are still connected with a company called Reversible where Carlos (owner) and Antonio Boixader (manager of the store) are partners. The company is in charge of Sneaker Freakers Spain and the marketing for brands like Lacoste L¡ve and New Balance.

What are some of your five favorite places in Barcelona? Restaurant: La bodega 1900. Owner Ferran Adrià. Tapas with a twist. Store: The New Balance store. One of the biggest ones in the world. Beach: Barceloneta, next to the W Hotel. Neighborhood: Sant Antoni. Thing to do: Run with the LTW team every Thursday night. It’s a good way to know the city with a different point of view.

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Nation Of Hoop // LTW Tattoo


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NEW YORK CITY


A M E R IC A N WAY OF L I F E

Whenever I am out in N.Y. and running around with 13th Witness, chances are we are going to end up at Fun City Tattoo. Located at St. Marks Place in Manhattan, it has become a sort of Cheers if you will for 13th and Jason Goldwatch. It has an amazing vibe to the shop that, at first, can be a little intimidating, but once the ice is broken, it is full of dry and witty sarcasm, smiles, laughs, and good times. Run by Big Steve, who now has been tattooing since 2003 and apprenticed under the the original owner of Fun City, Jonathan Shaw, he’s kept the heart and soul in Fun City which is apparent by the work done there and the clientele who keep returning.


Spending one week-end in Paris

Heading through to Paris the weekend following Fashion Week was always going to be a little bittersweet for me. Had I been there seven days earlier, this would have been a blog post about how I snuck into the listening session for the new Yeezy album, or stage-dived onto Cara Delevigne with Travi$ Scott, or signed to G.O.O.D. Music under my rap game alias Yung Flame Emoji – but alas, it wasn’t meant to be. So, in no particular order. Here’s our scattered weekend in Paris. Enjoy!

First things first, we nailed our accommodation using Airbnb. Pardon

rude to start the day without a cliché as hell croissant and coffee. We

my French, but it cost us ‘fuck all’ – which I believe translates to ‘not

found this sweet little café across the road from our apartment, which

much at all.’ We had a balcony view across town towards the Sacré-

was really handy, but it also meant I couldn’t shout the

Cœur (which we’ll get to later) and we were within walking distance to both Be Street Weeknd and the city centre. Like I said – nailed it.Our

‘Hurry up with my damn croissants!‘

host, Eric, was a pretty dope guy who happened to be interested in photography, fashion and design – you know – all the pretentious

lyric from “I Am A God” at the waitress because she knew where we

shit that we’re into. He had around a million issues of Vogue in the

were staying. I could have been Vine-famous, guys. There was free WIFI

apartment which was both hella impressive and played into my ‘if a

at the café, so naturally I checked my DM’s to see if I’d received any

French girl falls for my bullshit, I can just bring her back here and

booty photos since leaving the apartment 5 minutes previously. ‘No new

pretend I own the place’ plan. As with any trip to France, it would be

messages.’ Sad face emoji. Next up, we cut across town in the direction

I know it was maybe the most ‘cliché’ thing to do when you are in Paris but since I was a Child i always wanted to order some croissant and a real french coffee in Paris. So one more thing I don’t need to dream about no more.

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of the Sacré-Cœur. En route, we crossed paths with this guy, who was evidently loving life. This thing about Paris is: It’s fucking beautiful. I wasn’t even pissed to be walking up hills when this was my perspective. After finally making our way to the summit of Rue Maurice Untrillo, we finally reached Sacré-Cœur.We had planned the trip over to Paris around several things, but the main focus was on checking out Be Street Weeknd for the first time. Going into its third year, the event is one of Europe’s premier celebrations of street culture – covering all bases; from streetwear & skate through to street art & music. There was also a bumper car rink sitting as the centrepiece to the madness, because what better way to get a cute Parisian girl to notice your fire alphet than by driving a small electric car at her?

Montmartre and the ‘Sacré Coeur’ was maybe the part of Paris that was the most impressiv for me and my friends . A mix between religion, modernity, tourism and tradition I am not really use to this kind of things in the US...

Benny Benichou, better known as Benny Be Street, started Be Street Weeknd as the annual embodiment of Be Street magazine – a quarterly street culture publication that was born back in ’08. The urban festival runs over two days (in case the Weeknd bit didn’t give it away already), with the focal point being the brand exhibition area that sees young, up

and coming companies selling their goods alongside some of streetwear’s more established brands. All the names are here, including Billionaire Boys Club / Ice Cream, HUF, Stüssy, Nike SB, Mishka, Diamond Supply Co. and a little-known brand called The Hundreds. They’ve got this weird cartoon bomb as mascot. It will never catch on. Comparable to how Yo’Hood operates, it’s got a similar format to a fashion tradeshow, except it’s open for the public to attend. Brands are out here selling their current range, rather than previewing upcoming seasons to wholesale buyers and it’s all pretty chill. And that’s a wrap! Au revoir, mon ami !

Nation Of Hoop // Paris

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- REQUIEM Lino Six years later this album is more than just a comeback for most of french hiphop lovers. Lino is one of the only rap ar tist that put so much streng th and smar tness in his ly rics.

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E . U H I P- H O P 2 0 1 5

- UNS Curse

- S K E P TA Skepta

- L E BRU I T DE MON Â M E Ka a r i s

- L’A P É R O AVA N T L A G A L E T T E Yo u n g T h u g

- CCN Bushido

- G U E R R A E PA C E Fa b r i F i b r a

- P O Z D R AV I Z G R A S S C HA N I C E Frenkiev

- EIGEN WERELD Opgezwolle

- SENVIÇO PUBLICO Va l e t e

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U. S H I P- H O P 2 0 1 5

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- SHEDDING SKIN Ghostpoet

- T H E P O W E R S T HAT B Death Grips

- DA R K S K Y PA R A D I S E Big Sean

- BA R T E R 6 Yo u n g T h u g

- C H E R RY B O M B Ty l e r T h e C r e a t o r

- B 4 . DA . $ $ Jo e y B a d a $ $

- E AT P R AY T H U G He e m s

- M R . WO N D E R F U L Ac t i o n B r o n s o n

- L U DAV E R S A L Ludacr is


A M E R IC A N WAY OF L I F E

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- T O P I M P A B U T T E R F LY Ke n d r i c k L a m a r This is the story behind how Kendrick becomes t h e m a n w e s e e o n t h e a l b u m c o v e r, l e a d i n g t h e r e v o l t , u n i t i n g b l a c k Am e r i c a , a n d b e c o m i n g t h e man he truly has the potential to be.

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Bye


Nation Of Hoop