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Nicholas Paley 09138698

ARBOR

UK

STORE

ARCHITECTURAL

DESIGN

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MABLETHORPE S U S TA I N A B L E

BEACH

DESIGN

HUTS

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NOTTINGHAM I N T E G R AT E D

LACE

DESIGN

G A L L E RY

PROJECT

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A R B O R

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U K

S TO R E


Arbor is an environmentally friendly clothing, skateboard and snowboard company originating from Venice Beach California. The brand creates alternative urban products from materials such as bamboo, sustainably sourced wood and soy based inks. Furthermore the company is keen to promote their local artist program, an initiative that supplies the products with a unique artwork and ties the company to the community.

The intentions for this UK flagship store is create an outpost for the company to design, print and sell their bamboo apparel. The store will create a connection to the city of Lincoln by extending the artist network program. Additionally the store aims to become a literal ‘thorn in the side’ for the opposition, Primark.

The eco fabric industry whilst on the rise is still no competition to the cotton industry.The major setback for the industry is a general lack of awareness with regards to bamboo and hemp as materials. In order to transform this costly niche produce into the ‘norm’, companies such as Arbor fight to raise awareness. Screen printing this message by local artists is the medium to take this stand.

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The design will incorporate: design studio/office space screen preparation/ink mixing room print room storage retail store


This photograph montage depicts the battle between the mass production cotton industry and the environmental. On the left, cotton is shown wraught with the history of the slave trade, factories and the monopolisation of clothing by companies. The right pictures a far more expressive youthful eco industry.The two sides are armed in bias, comparatively to the power of their respective industries.

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This site (teal) was chosen due to its close proximity to the Lincoln High Street (red). The position of the shop is far enough away from the high street for the noisier side of screen printing,

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yet close enough to still provide a store within easy walking distance. Located adjacent to Primark, it provides the ultimate location for Arbor to initiate their eco campaign.


THE SITE

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Around the site, the red bricks and wrought iron is reminiscent of those materials found in the traditional cotton industry. Commercial buildings and retail outlets surround the area including the great masses of Primark and M&S either side. These two buildings accentuate the long drawn out characteristic of the site, forming shadow over the south side of the canal. The heights of the surroundings oppress the waterway and the small building between. The proposed structure will need to ease this compression by standing as low as possible. In addition, the facade will have to take focus away from the dull brick facades of its surroundings.


Primarily, the site is a passageway, connecting the highstreet with the Brayford Pool and University. The map shows the number of people entering and exiting the area, as well as their paths in a five minute period. These photographs were taken using a long shutter speed and torches to represent each person. The strong linear flow between the West and East, which as a primary access route to the high street must be well maintained.

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9. GARMENT MANUFACTURE

10. SCREEN PRINTING

8. NATURAL ORGINAL BAMBOO FIBRE 6. BIOLOGICAL ENZYME DEGUMMING

5. CRUSHING

4. STEAMING OF BAMBOO STRIP

2. RAW BAMBOO

3. BAMBOO STRIP

1. ORIGINAL BAMBOO FIBER

7. FIBRE CARDING

BAMBOO TSHIRT MANUFACTURE PROCESS

The production of bamboo cloth is a process that transforms high volumes of raw bamboo to viscous fibres for weaving by crushing and decomposing. It is essential that the fabric is made in close proximity to the source as the transportation of bamboo to the UK negates its environmental benefits.


S C R E E N P R I N T I N G P RO C E S S

October Print is a Nottingham based screen printing business visited to establish the spatial requirements for the project. Though the premises had not been designed specifically for screen printing, the large open plan space provided allowed the firm to print with their supplies in reach. Separated from a main print room were a screen preparation area and a ink mixing room.The facility also had a full size loading bay and design office.

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S PAT I A L M A P P I N G

The form of the building has to conform to a long norrow plot. The retail store is positioned at the eastern end to be closest to the highstreet. It will be divided from the print room by a wall permiable to light and

sound. The additional requirements are placed to form the same production flow found at October Print: screen prep - inks mixed - garments printed - accessable storage - separate design office.

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Print

Paint Mix

Screen Prep

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Spatial Volumes are given a minimum height of 2500mm, reduceing the overall height of the building so that is does not assimilate Primark’s scale.

The spaces, deducted from an overall volume creates the double height negative space required for circulation. Left to right, the production process to retail can be performed during the day.

The spaces are divided, separating the design studio and a secondary overflow storage loft above the print space.They will not be walled so to lessen this division.

Lowering the printroom floor increases ceiling height in the screen prep room and storage, The production process can reverse after production hours, as the product can be exported.

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These images picture the crushing of raw bamboo from its natural solid form, down to the pulp used to make fabric. As the cloth making process was not a feasible option for the production facility in the UK, the buildings facade was to replicate the crushing instead. The fibres in their various forms are lengthened to interact with the building’s edges. Vertical elements pictured in teal, form the layer responsible

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for vertical loads. The horizontals in red, form the second bracing layer. The various stages of crush are positioned left to right, forming a cronological narrative, reflecting the linear flow of the site as well as the production process. These two layers would themselves be glazed either side to form an airtight, waterproof shell. The striking, jagged facade acts a literal ‘thornin-the-side’ to the Primark giant.


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FINAL CRIT

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S U S TA I N A B L E 23

D E S I G N


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M A B L E T H O R P E G RO U P W O R K The approach taken to the Mablethorpe masterplan was to respect the existing community and heritage whilst integrating new rejuvenating ideas for the area. The notion of the old fashioned British holiday was instantly established and we felt that it was this stereotype that we wanted to overcome. Our sustainable initative was to boost local economy by injecting a new culture that would influence a fresh crowd of visitors to the coast. In order to maintain some of Mablethorpe’s past, many of the selected new buildings were adaptations of timely ideas, juice stalls as opposed to ice cream stands, cycle stops instead of arcades and a skate park instead of fun fair. A summary of the key ideas we wanted to convey: The introduction of a coastal cycle path, connecting mablethorpe with other towns affected by the UK tourism slump. Bring the natural beauty of the sand dunes to the North down into the site in order to link the site better to the sea. Create individual zones in order to cater for different people using the site. Invent a new centre of town to give pre-existing areas (the site, the high street, fun fair...) a greater purpose and place.

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This zone was to be designed as the cultural quarter for an older grown-up crowd. Its strong diconnection to the rest of the site in addition to its robust concrete material palatte would allow us to designate the area without causing much change to the coastal defence. It would house an art gallery, artist beach huts, accommodation and a bar. The wide concrete promenade would also be a part of the cycle route.

MABLETHORPE MASTERPLAN SITE MAP

To the North are the protected sand dunes. No structures were planned for this region as it is strictly protected. However, we were influenced by the natural beauty of the spot, and believed that this was the message that the British coast should convey. To this end we intended to bring a lot of the grasses and shrubbery found here down into the site path network.

The central zone will house a new skate park for the youths in addition to a bicycle pitstop and a new toilet block. It is also the designated new centre of the town. Here open space will be promoted for markets and festivities.

A new network of paths will be created linking the various entrances of the site to buildings and zones. These paths are defined directions of travel as opposed to absolute walkways. Along them will be a raised decking network of repeated elements, surrounded by dune shrubbery. This to create a more sensory environment as opposed to the barren open space that exists now.

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R I G I D I T Y A N D T H E C OA S T The Mablethorpe coast presents a strong rigid, parallel line, dividing the solid mass of the UK from the shifting enviroment of the sea. It acts as the primary sea defence and therefore could not be altered. We chose instead to polish the concrete on the promenade and insert a string of sunken lights to break up straight lines. Benches of concrete are also to be introduced, jutting out of the back wall.

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FLUIDITY AND THE DUNES These photographs show an experiment we conducted with sand and water. The forms identified in the sand influenced the walkways connecting individual projects. pictured bottom right.

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M A B L E T H O R P E A RT I S T B E A C H H U T S

The North Western end of the water front was designated in the masterplan as a cultural quarter. In an attempt to break with tradition and draw a new crowd to the coast, an artist studio community was chosen. The community would be sustainable due to its modular form and repetitive elements, which could be moved, rearranged and added to in fitting to requirements. Land is a very fixed and rigid state controlled by human beings. Inversely, shifting sands and rolling waves present a very opposite fluid, uncontrollable state. The modules, based on a 3 x 3m cube, decay and scatter as they move away from the fixed as if to float away on the sands. The further away they move, the less amenities and the more excluded they become. Those huts that require services are situated on the promenade itself to make use of the pre-existing plumbing and electricity found in the current beach huts.

studios

kitchen

toilets

bedroom

utility

recycling

storage

This is an example of a possible layout for the huts.

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Concrete pad foundation

Torsion Resistant Sigma Frame

Pre - assembled floor panels slot into the framework

Layers of polycarbonate sheeting or requisite windows and doors are added

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An additional polycarbonate roofing panels added

Completed light, moveable module


The sigma node module is taken from the Christ Pavillion by Von Gerkan, Marg & Partners. It is a wedge shaped slotter connector that resists axial and rotational forces. This is used so that the structure may be quickly taken apart if required.

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The walls consist of a 40mm x-type polycarbonate 4 wall. 60mm of wacotech semi transparent insulation. 10mm polycarbonate double wall. Connectors consist of the 70mmx70mm drawn aluminium frame and a variety of aluminium U shaped trays to hold the polycarbonate.

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Roof Construction consists of a 10mm polycarbonate double wall, DPM, 44mm x 100mm timer joists housing insulation, 20mm rendered plywood bracing.

Floor Construction consists of 20mm wooden floorboards, 50mm x 120mm timber floor joists housing 120mm insulation, 20mm plywood Bracing, DPM. The floor panel rests on the aluminium frame by an additional L shaped through fixed to the inside of the base.

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This is a copy of the final presentation page.The project was presented in the style of an airfix model as I wanted to convey that the beach huts were a kit form building, but also to accentuate the expected nature of the beach holiday. If a traditional beach holiday is stereotyped in such a way, then this would certainly be an unexpected suprise.

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A R C 2 0 0 3 M


I N T E G R AT E D

D E S I G N

P RO J E C T


Anne Wilson is a Chicago based artist who explores the unique characteristics of lace form and relates it to social and architectural ideology. Her vast work shown here is entitled ‘typologies’ and represents macro views of the urban sprawl and the organization of city structures. An uncertainty of string forms invent both the chaotic and organized urban systems, whilst steel nails lock them to the earth. Lace creates an apt model for reflecting society as it invokes connotations of gender, sexuality, death, propriety, class and economics. Nottingham provides the ideal location for Anne Wilson to further explore her art. With its rich historical lace industry and its contemporary modern transformations, the city in its own right can be graded as an enormous version of ‘typologies’. The Nottingham lace gallery will include gallery spaces which will couple as an archive for traditional lace in addition to creating open space for Anne Wilson. In addition, the gallery will accommodate a restaurant and bar to revitalise the South-Eastern part of the city centre.

‘While our society faces a growing fragmentation and specialization that seems at times to alienate us all, we have also started to view our world as a series of integrated, even entangled networks. One way we can begin to understand this contradictory state is as a matrix of field phenomena – repetitive patterns of texture, growth, turbulence, sound, light, etc., within a given system or space’. Douglas Garofalo, Architect

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The site is located on the edge condition between the historic lace district and a partially run down industrial belt. It lies at a low level in the cityscape geographically but also by the endearing height of the buildings close by. The location receives a high level of traffic, being at the Northern end of the A60, a major transport link into town. However footfall is low and purely transtional, despite the nearby railway and tram links. Recent building revolves around imposing residential blocks. These photos were shot on 35mm, and demonstrate the industrial heritage of the area in addition to a lack of maintenence.

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Top Left - shows the site underneath an arc representing edge condition. The centre of this arc was chosen as town hall as it represents the middle of town. Historically, the lace industry was split between machine made lace and hand woven lace, perfection and imperfection. This narrative assimilates to the current situation between the central developments and the dilapidation beyond this line. Top Right - the dispersion of residential and industrial buildings. The separation mimics the curve of edge condition. Rather than keep tacking new housing to an pre-existing centre, it should be promoted to invent a new node of public life in accordance to Chistopher Alexander in a Pattern Language. Bottom Left - Topography in the area is scarce, but still exists. This should be accentuated. Unfortunatly the site is currently covered in concrete from a disused petrol station. New segments of greenery will promote some peace in the traffic calamity. Bottom Right - the site sits on a major transportation interchange. As a primary access point by car or rail, this part of town is under utilized as a public space.

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Nottingham sits upon a complex network of underground caves. These caverns have historically been used to store lace in the past and it seems fitting to continue this long lost tradition. The caves mainly lie under the lace district. Major landmarks in the cityscape act to pull upon any inherent dominance as found in Anne Wilson’s typologies. Rather than forcing a new focal point into the skyline, the Lace Gallery will sink into the urban fabric and allow the chimneys, walls and highrise flats to pull upon its threads.

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Above - a sketch showing the combining of a bobbing lace making process interacting with a cave ridden landscape. Left - illustration miniaturising the Nottingham cityscape (top) to Anne Wilson’s macro typologies. The landscape (bottom) is represents the cushion used to afix the lace geometry. Between the two lies the urban fabric, ready to be punctured to accommodate the masterplan.

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The urban fabric of Nottingham in relation to the Lace Galley soon becomes a figurative expression of typologies. Structures are connected by links and abstractions, creating a geometric network between that within the edge boundary - machine lace, contemporary, residential and that outside - bobbin lace, dilapidisation, industrial. The site in between is tugged at both ends.

The photos below, inverted and colourized create the same irregular effects formed in Anne Wilson’s studies. They are in fact the electrical cables supported above the Nottingham trams.


Lace making was originally performed by hand in a process known as bobbin lace making. As technolog y advanced, machines were able to increase the precision and quantities of lace produced. However cottage hand lace making still oc-

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cured on the outer fringes of the industr y. A geographic comparison between the hear t of the city and the urban fringe/edge shows a decline of technolog y, an acceptance of traditionalism and a imergence of lace appreciation as craft.


These models represent an initial study taken to view the interaction between needles and the cushion in the bobbin lace making process. The needles provide a relationship between above and below, through a fabric surface. In the Lace Gallery, they are used to pull light from the open space down into the cave spaces.


The steel rods in this model represent the loactions of Nottinghams caves. As they remain a hidden entitiy under the city, clear perspex was used to reveal the potential of the underground space, piercing the surface to mimic the needles.


This light fixture is a derivation of a standard honeycomb lace stich, chosen for its regularity. The light was designed so that the power cables would themselves become the lace. Nails were spaced evenly to create a grid to which the cables could be arranged. Within the building, they hang from a chainlink cage in the ceiling of the underground galleries. This will create a sense of an overhead urban fabric at ground level, as well as provding light for the exhibitions below.

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This model represents the pulling apart of machine made lace to a less perfect hand made lace. The machine lace is influenced by the lighting object, whilst the handmade draws upon the contemporary work of Anne Wilson. The nails are significant points in the Nottingham landscape, such as the Contemporary, the town hall or the cave network. Each string forms a construded geometric pattern pulled apart by these different geographic locations.

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The pattern formed from the model can be overlayed on the site, creating a frame work for breaks in the surface and landscaping. Between the layers of lace, rationalized forms are integrated to create volumes for the galleries and restaurant.


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Architecture Second Year Portfolio