Issuu on Google+

             

www.NiallStrickland.com   

Dealing with Mediocrity in Business     Summary/Description  Do  you  have  a  strong  work  ethic  and  can‐do  attitude?  Does  it  frustrate  you  when  you  have  to  engage  with  colleagues, subordinates, suppliers, customers or business associates that do not share these core values? Is this the  norm or is there a way to change their attitudes?    ______________________________________________________________________________________________    How many times have you phoned or emailed someone and sought a commitment from them to do something and  they have let you down, despite promising to deliver? I know that it happens to a lot of people quite frequently. Is it  a  work  ethic  problem  or  is  the  person  you  are  dealing  with  so  busy  with  other  things  that  they  simply  do  not  prioritize properly? In fact, it could be either of these variables. It may even be that you are a nice guy and it is easier  for them to break a commitment to you than to someone else who is more likely to tear out their jugular.    It  seems  to  be  a  sign  of  our  times  when  everywhere  we  go  we  seem  to  be  asking  the  same  questions  about  the  availability of good help. I believe that it is down to the culture of the organizations in question. You will notice with  excellent companies that no matter who you deal with therein, you get the same level of responsive and respectful  service. Nothing is too much trouble and you will often get a call just to tell you that everything is on track. You are  not required to chase anybody to discover the status quo.    If you have some employees on your own team that do not see quality service as the life blood of the business, then  you are failing to inculcate these values into the culture of the business. It should not be necessary for the boss to tell  someone  that  their  attitude  is  wrong;  their  colleagues  should  be  shouting  it  from  the  rooftops.  One  or  two  poor  players on the team can seriously damage a business. If they cannot get with the program, they should be shipped  out.    This culture of can‐do should not just be outward facing to customers. It should be endemic within the company as  well. Failure to meet commitments to colleagues is equally disrespectful. So how do you get this positive work ethic  to be part of the business culture? It is simple. It needs to become part of the reward structure.    When setting objectives or goals for employees as part of a performance management system, you must set specific  targets  at  least  once  per  quarter.    Remember,  what  gets  measured  gets  done.  It  is  imperative  that  you  carry  our  reviews of performance against agreed objectives every quarter with each employee. Pay and benefits need to be  driven  by  performance  and  subpar  performance  needs  to  be  felt  in  each  employee’s  pocket.  Similarly,  excellent  performance must be adequately rewarded. If a can‐do attitude is not yet a part of your company’s culture, it will  quickly become so if you follow these simple steps.    You may not be able to change the culture and work ethic of suppliers of goods and services into your business but  you do have the power to vote with your feet. Never accept mediocrity as the norm. 

Visit www.NiallStrickland.com to download other Business Articles, to view Business Advice Videos or to Discover the full range of products and services available   


www.NiallStrickland.com   

  BIO Resource Box  Niall Strickland is an MBA with more than 20 years of business coaching and management consulting experience  working  with  CEO’s  in  small  and  medium  businesses.  He  can  provide  additional  information  about  common  business issues and how to resolve them at www.NiallStrickland.com.   This article has also been published on www.EzineArticles.com 

Visit www.NiallStrickland.com to download other Business Articles, to view Business Advice Videos or to Discover the full range of products and services available   


Dealing with Mediocrity in Business