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P R E V I E W S O F W O R K S F O R S A L E AT U P C O M I N G S H O W S C O A S T T O C O A S T

ISSUE 135

JANUARY 2017

WATCH V IDEO S IN THIS IS S U E

AMERICAN

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ARCADIA CONTEMPORARY at the Los Angeles Art Show

Presents the U.S. Premiere of

ALEX RUSSELL FLINT

“The Burial”

Oil on Panel

25" x 39"

January 11-15, 2017 Booth #701/800

TOWN PLAZA

© 2017 Arcadia Contemporary

9428 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (424) 603-4656

www.arcadiacontemporary.com info@arcadiacontemporary.com


ARCADIA CONTEMPORARY at the Los Angeles Art Show

Presents the Los Angeles Art Show Premiere of

JEFFREY RIPPLE

“Tortoise”

Oil on Paper

12.5" x 26"

January 11-15, 2017 Booth #701/800

TOWN PLAZA

© 2017 Arcadia Contemporary

9428 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (424) 603-4656

www.arcadiacontemporary.com info@arcadiacontemporary.com


ARCADIA CONTEMPORARY at the Los Angeles Art Show

Presents the Los Angeles Art Show Premiere of

ANNIE MURPHY-ROBINSON

“Dragonfly Eyes”

Charcoal on Paper

17.5" x 21.5"

January 11-15, 2017 Booth #701/800

TOWN PLAZA

© 2017 Arcadia Contemporary

9428 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (424) 603-4656

www.arcadiacontemporary.com info@arcadiacontemporary.com


ARCADIA CONTEMPORARY at the Los Angeles Art Show

Will Premiere New Works By NICK ALM MALCOLM T. LIEPKE JOHAN BARRIOS JEREMY LIPKING CASEY BAUGH MICHAL LUKASIEWICZ DANIEL BILMES STEPHEN MACKEY JOHN BROSIO MIGUEL ANGEL MOYA MICHAEL CHAPMAN BRAD OVERTON MATTHEW CORNELL DAN QUINTANA DANIEL COVES JULIO REYES STEPHEN FOX JOHANNES WESSMARK JAMES NEIL HOLLINGSWORTH JOHN WENTZ BRAD KUNKLE ARON WIESENFELD AND OTHERS January 11-15, 2017 Booth #701/800

TOWN PLAZA

© 2017 Arcadia Contemporary

9428 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (424) 603-4656

www.arcadiacontemporary.com info@arcadiacontemporary.com


EDITOR’S LETTER

JANUARY 2017 / MONTHLY VINCENT W. MILLER / Publisher EDITORIAL

New Beginnings I

SUBSCRIPTIONS 877 9470792

t’s certainly hard to believe that this is our January 2017 issue—another year, another beginning, more artists to cover, more galleries to focus on, more artwork to get out to all the collectors who use this magazine each month to help them find the art they want to buy. It’s a wonderful cycle to see take its course and we love every moment of it. I have to say, I’ll never tire of bringing to light all the incredible art being created by contemporary artists today. It literally takes my breath away. I especially love seeing the work of artists who’ve I’ve never seen before. I swear, there is so much beauty being created by artists today that it’s hard to keep up with it all. So, if you are an artist, a gallery owner or a collector and you are participating in an exhibition, have an exhibition or know about an exhibition that you’d like to see on the pages of this magazine in 2017, please email me the basic details to editor@americanartcollector.com and I will consider it for publication in the magazine. I don’t want to miss anything. I want American Art Collector to stay on top as the only magazine dedicated entirely to showcasing the best work created by today’s top artists. I spend a large portion of my time visiting art galleries, museums, art events and art destinations to find out what is happening in the market today and I’m pleased to report that there certainly is a buzz in the air about this coming year and all it has to offer. I have a very strong feeling that it’s going to be an amazing one for every one of us!

EMILY YEE / Subscriptions Manager service@americanartcollector.com

Sincerely,

JOSHUA ROSE / Editor editor@americanartcollector.com ROCHELLE BELSITO / Managing Editor rbelsito@americanartcollector.com MICHAEL CLAWSON / Deputy Editor ERIN RAND / Associate Editor JOHN O’HERN / Santa Fe Editor FRANCIS SMITH / Contributing Photographer ADVERTISING 866 6190841 LISA REDWINE / Senior Account Executive lredwine@americanartcollector.com CHRISTIE CAVALIER / Senior Account Executive ccavalier@americanartcollector.com ANITA WELDON / Senior Account Executive aweldon@americanartcollector.com TRAFFIC AMY ROSENBERG / Traffic Manager traffic@americanartcollector.com PRODUCTION ADOLFO CASTILLO / Multi Media Manager TONY NOLAN / Art Director AUDREY WELCH / Graphic Designer KEVIN KING / Junior Designer

Copyright © 2017. All material appearing in American Art Collector is copyright. Reproduction in whole or part is not permitted without permission in writing from the editor. Editorial contributions are welcome and should be accompanied by a stamped self-addressed envelope. All care will be taken with material supplied, but no responsibility will be accepted for loss or damage. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the editor or the publisher. The publisher bears no responsibility and accepts no liability for the claims made, nor for information provided by advertisers. Printed in the USA. American Art Collector 7530 E. Main Street, Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 Telephone (480) 425-0806. Fax (480) 425-0724 or write to American Art Collector, P.O. Box 2320, Scottsdale, AZ 85252-2320

VIDEO

Scan the Icons Throughout This Issue to Watch Videos Don't Have A Scanner App?

We recommend SCANLIFE Available on Android and IOS Devices

Get Social!

JAIME PEACH / Accounts Receivable jpeach@americanartcollector.com JESSICA HUBBARD / Subscriptions Coordinator admin@americanartcollector.com

Scan for

Joshua Rose Editor P.S. Are you taking advantage of all the information this magazine has to offer? Remember, look for QR codes throughout the magazine to watch videos about the artists at hand. In our digital issue, free to all subscribers, just click on the links, sit back and watch artists create their work or discuss their newest offerings.

Single copies $6.95. Subscription rate for one year is $36. To place an order, change address or make a customer service query, please email service@AmericanArtCollector. com or write to PO Box 2320, Scottsdale, AZ 85252-2320. Periodicals postage rates paid at Scottsdale, AZ, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to American Art Collector, P.O. Box 2320, Scottsdale, AZ 85252-2320

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AMERICAN ART COLLECTOR (ISSN 1547-7088) is published 12 times a year by International Artist Publishing Inc. CANADA: American Art Collector Publications Mail Agreement No. 40064408 Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to Express Messenger International PO Box 25058, London BRC, Ontario, Canada N6C 6A8 www.AmericanArtCollector.com

ON THE COVER Yana Movchan, Floral with Pink Cockatiel, oil on linen, 30 x 24". Available at Lotton Gallery, Chicago.

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www.AmericanAr tCollector.com

AmericanArt Collector


Yana Movchan

DaviD Lotton

“Pink Clematis Bowl with Cobalt Hollyhocks,” Blown Glass, 6 x 5.5"

“Masha in the Phlox,” Oil on Linen, 20 x 10"

“Bright Aqua Clematis Bowl with Lip,” 5 x 5.5", Blown Glass

Lotton gaLLerY

“Dog in the Vineyard,” Oil on Linen, 20 x 10"

900 north Michigan ave. LeveL 6, chicago, iL 60611 (312) 664-6203 www.LottongaLLerY.coM


ANATOMY OF THE MAGAZINE Use this magazine to help you become the first to acquire new works for sale at upcoming shows coast to coast COASTTOCOAST COVERAGE Find out what’s happening across the nation. This is the first magazine to provide coast-to-coast coverage of upcoming shows from artists and galleries specializing in traditional fine art paintings and sculpture—the art that collectors want.

PREVIEWS

COLLECTOR HOMES

In the Preview pages, we reveal new works about to come available for sale by the country’s leading galleries.

Our nationally recognized interior design consultants take you inside the homes of major art collectors to show how the collections have been hung.

ART SHOW LOCATIONS ART MARKET INSIGHTS

At the top of each Preview page you’ll see the destination where the upcoming exhibition is showing, the dates, and the gallery address and contact details so you can make inquiries about new works— before they go on sale to the general public.

Find out everything the discerning collector needs to know. Each month a group of art experts share their behind-thescenes knowledge of how the art market works.

ARTIST FOCUS PAGES These one-page articles are bonus Previews and focus on additional exhibitions taking place each month. Artist Focus Pages also show new works available for purchase, providing another valuable resource for finding more one-of-a-kind works of art.

SOLD! Read our monthly SOLD! pages to find out who’s buying whose art they first saw in this magazine.

ART LOVER’S GUIDES Broaden your horizons by reading about the fabulous new art to be shown in some of the country’s most exciting and stimulating art destinations.

VIRTUAL ART WALK Visit www.AmericanArtCollector.com to see our sensational Virtual Art Walk. When a show announcement catches your eye, click on it and the art image will enlarge. Click again, and you will be linked directly to the gallery hosting the upcoming show.


B o n n e r D a v i d Galleries Traditional x Contemporary

Michael Carson

“The After Party� / oil on panel / 46" x 36" 7040 E. Main Street x Scottsdale, AZ 85251 x www.bonnerdavid.com x art@bonnerdavid.com x 4 8 0 . 9 4 1 . 8 5 0 0


25in25

25 Museum Shows in 25 Years Tucson Desert Art Museum – 2017 Rockwell Museum – 2018 Haggin Museum – 2018 Steamboat Art Museum - 2019 Booth Western Art Museum – 2020

The Little Visitor by Ann Kraft Walker, oil, 20" x 30"; Amaranthine by Krystii Melaine, oil, 48" x 28"; Puma Prowl by Rosetta, bronze, 8" x 20" x 6"; Black Coat by Laurel Stern Boeck, Oil, 12" x 16"

Did you know that even though women make up 51% of visual artists today, in the U.S. only 5% of work on museum walls is by women? — NATIONAL M USE U M OF WOM E N I N TH E ARTS

Join us as we launch a 25-year initiative to bring the work of women artists into American art museums. With an AWA membership you can enter our juried museum shows, participate in professional development opportunities and enjoy the camaraderie of over 800 painters and sculptors across the United States and Canada.

Join Us!

American Women Artists Inspiring, Celebrating, and Encouraging Women in the Visual Arts contact@americanwomenartists.org www.americanwomenartists.org


B o n n e r D a v i d Galleries Traditional x Contemporary

Peregrine Heathcote

“The Faraway Nearby� / oil on canvas / 22" x 18"

7040 E. Main Street x Scottsdale, AZ 85251 x www.bonnerdavid.com x art@bonnerdavid.com x 4 8 0 . 9 4 1 . 8 5 0 0


For 27 years, the Celebration of Fine Art has been the place where art lovers and artists connect. Meet 100 of the finest artists in the country, watch them work and share in the creative process.

1

parking

OPEN DAILY 10 AM - 6 PM

exit 35 HAYDEN RD

LOOP 10

JANUARY 14 - MARCH 26, 2017 Loop 101 & Hayden Rd Exit 35 • Scottsdale, AZ N

LOOK FOR THE BIG WHITE TENTS!

CelebrateArt.com/american • 480.443.7695


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CONTENTS JANUARY 2017

46 UPCOMING SOLO & GROUP SHOWS ARIZONA • Scottsdale CALIFORNIA • Los Angeles FLORIDA • Naples GEORGIA • Atlanta MARYLAND • Rockville NEW YORK • New York • Sag Harbor SOUTH CAROLINA • Charleston

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www.AmericanAr tCollector.com


SPECIAL SECTIONS

EVERYDAY BEAUTY

54

CELEBRATION OF FINE ART

62

THE ART LOVER’S GUIDE TO COLLECTING FINE ART IN SCOTTSDALE & VICINITY

65

Collecting Still Lifes

38 72

84

96

MICHAEL CARSON

NABIL MOUSA

ANNA KINCAIDE & JUAN CARLOS COLLADA

Scottsdale, AZ

The dangerous warmth

Atlanta, GA

Veil of ignorance

76

86

JUDITH PECK

A GRAND SHOWCASE

Rockville, MD

The reachable shore

80

New York, NY

BENNETT VADNAIS Unexpected beauty

Scottsdale, AZ

PEREGRINE HEATHCOTE

90

Charleston, SC

ATTENTION TO DETAIL

Realistic paintings

94

Sag Harbor, NY

EARTHLY DELIGHTS Roster of gallery artists

FE AT U R E S KERRY JAMES MARSHALL: ART & HISTORY

38

SEASONAL CELEBRATION

OLD AND NEW

46

Kickoff to 2017 exhibitions

D EPA R T M EN T S

100

ART FAIR PREVIEW

30

CALLING COAST TO COAST

32

98

Naples, FL

By John O’Hern

Montreal, Canada

TO BE ANNOUNCED

Pushing limits

AWARD WINNER

102

ARTIST FOCUS PAGE

103

MARINA DIEUL

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Escapism

Gallery exhibition at LA Art Show

Nature abstracted

CO N TE N TS

82

Los Angeles, CA

Naples, FL


Gary Babb contemporary

impressionist

Old World Charm, 14 x 11, oil on board

Peasant Fare, 11 x 14, oil on board

Princesses Rule, 30 x 36, oil on board

www. garybabb .com


S U N S E T A RT G A L L E RY O F A M A R I L LO

Friendliest Gallery in Texas

Don Webster, “Gulls in Motion”, Bronze

Featuring Don Webster • JIM GILMORE • DON WEBSTER • DON REITZ Sculptors: CATHEY DELISLE El Jefe Y Nueve Estrellas / The Boss and Nine Stars, 60"x60", pastel

Painters: •

GUIDO FRICK

RAMON KELLEY

WES HYDE

V. NOE

BENJAMIN KELLEY

Featuring Larry Blissett  

ANITA LOUISE WEST

BRADLEY CHANCE HAYS

RICHARD ALAN NICHOLS

BUD HEISS

LARRY BLISSETT

CHARLES BUNNELL • RANDY PIJOAN

BARBARA BARRETT

CECY TURNER

Sculptors: CATHEY • RT JIMWA THOMAS FIR S T F RDELISLE I DAY A L K A P•RDON I L 1WEBSTER , 2 0 1 6 •5 -JIM 9 PGILMORE M 3 7 0 1 P L A I N S B LV D # 1 2 2 , A M A R I L LO , T E XA S 7 9 1 0 2 ( 8 0 6 ) 3 5 3 5 7 0 0

WBARBARA W W. S U NBARRETT S E TA RTG L L E RYOALAN FA M ANICHOLS R I L LO. C•OBENJAMIN M Painters: V.NOE • •A RICHARD KELLEY

CECY TURNER • ANITA LOUISE WEST • BUD HEISS • BRADLEY CHANCE HAYS • WES HYDE • PETER HANSEN GUIDO FRICK • CHARLES BUNNELL • RAMON KELLEY • BEN KONIS •AUDIE DURHAM

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK JANUARY 6TH, 2017 5-9 P.M. 3 7 0 1 P L A I N S B LV D. , S U I T E 1 2 2 A M A R I L L O , T E X AS • ( 8 0 6 ) 3 5 3 - 5 7 0 0 W W W. S U N S E TA RT G A L L E RYO FA M A R I L L O . C O M


CINDY SORLEY-KEICHINGER www.goldenkstudio.com

Misty Dawn 11x14" acrylic

Golden K Studio ALBERTA CANADA 780-847-2294 goldfarm@telusplanet.net www.goldenkstudio.com

PICTURE THIS GALLERY 959 Ordze Rd. Sherwood Park, Alberta T8A 4L7 1-800-528-4278 www.PictureThisGallery.com

www.natureartists.com/artists


Contemporary Masters

EWOUD DE GROOT

DON RAMBADT

MARK EBERHARD

LYNN BOGGESS

Astoria Fine Art • Jackson Hole, Wyoming • 307-733-4016 • www.astoriafineart.com


iant Kelp, 36” x 36”, oil on canvas

original photo by Lew Milligan

BARBARA FRACCHIA ART STUDIO

COPPER VASES, 28 x 24

oil on board

F L O R A L S A N D G L O W I N G C O P P E R VA S E S C o n ta C t

t h e a r t i s t at

mfracchia@comcast.net • 510-525-7057 •

www.barbarafracchia.com


ORIGINAL ART DELIVERED TO YOUR DOORSTEP Top emerging artists. Free shipping and returns. “One-of-a-kind fine art – at truly attainable prices.” - Forbes

w w w. u g a l l e r y. c o m 415.742.8417 | info@ugallery.com


C HUCK

MID D LEKA UF F

Five Balls, Two Strikes

BETSY SWARTZ FINE ART Bozeman, Montana betsyswartzfineart.com 406-580-4510

GRAND TETON GALLERY Jackson, Wyoming grandtetongallery.com 307-201-1172

40 x 30

Acrylic on Canvas

PARK CITY FINE ART Park City, Utah parkcityfineart.com 435-649-3583

CHUCK MIDDLEKAUFF STUDIO Austin, Texas chuckmiddlekauff.com 512-447-3567


SAT ISF Y YOUR

PALETTE

An exclusive look inside the studios of the world’s best artists. www.InternationalArtist.com

Covering the entire market for historic American art. www.AmericanFineArtMagazine.com

The only monthly resource dedicated to the entire western art market. www.WesternArtCollector.com

Showcasing new work by today’s best artists at galleries across the country. www.AmericanArtCollector.com

A d ve r t i s i n g ( 8 6 6 ) 6 1 9 - 0 8 4 1 • S u b s c r i p t i o n s ( 8 7 7 ) 9 4 7 - 0 7 9 2


ANTAL GOLDFINGER Transcendental Realism

"Lady in Blue” Oil, 33x25 inches

ASPEN GROVE FINE ARTS 525 E Cooper Avenue, Aspen, CO 81611

970 925 5151 courtyard@aspengroveart.com www.aspengroveart.com 


Lorena Kloosterboer

Meet Artists Working in Studios 480-837-7163 ArizonaFineArtEXPO.com 26540 N Scottsdale Rd January 13 - March 26 10-week Season Pass $10; Military/Seniors $8 • Open Daily 10-6

SCULPTURE

& WINE FESTIVAL IN FOUNTAIN HILLS JAN 13-15 Ave of the Fountains, Ftn Hills

CAREFREE

FINE ART & WINE FESTIVAL JAN 20-22 101 Easy Street, Carefree WATERFRONT FEB 10-12 CAREFREE MAR 17-19

SURPRISE FEB 17-19 FOUNTAIN HILLS MAR 24-26

Meet renowned artists, stroll throughout juried fine arts, enjoy sipping fine wines and listening to live music. $3 Admission • Held Outdoors • 10-5 Tempus ad Requiem V

Acrylic on Canvas

31½ x 15¾ inches

w w w. a r t - l o r e n a . c o m

ThunderbirdArtists.com • 480-837-5637


SCOTTSDALE

Vibrant Contemporary Botanicals

ARTWALK Every Thursday

bethzinkart.com

Night 7pm – 9pm

Local Edge Thursday, January 26th, 2017

6:30pm – 9:30pm

This Gold Palette ArtWalk brings together the crème de la crème of emerging, cutting edge artists working in various mediums and platforms presenting their work on the street and in temporary one night only presentations. As the art world continues to morph and change with technology, materials and mediums, often blurring the lines of traditional and contemporary, SGA will bring together some of the valley’s leading and interesting artists fusing these elements. This specific Gold Palette ArtWalk continues the story and discussion of DEMONSTRATE! and appeals to all demographics and audiences giving them insight and highlights from emerging, edgy artists to the seasoned, fine artists on display in the galleries.

R e d B u c k h o r n B e a u t i e s , 3 6" x 4 8 "

Sponsored by the City of Scottsdale and the SCVB.

Celebration of Fine Art Studio 209

480-980-3848

www.scottsdalegalleries.com

April 20-23, 2017 Call for Entries The Portrait Society of America invites artists from all over the world to enter the 19th annual International Portrait Competition. Our goal is to create an exhibition, in conjunction with our annual conference, of the finest portrait and figurative work being created today. Mark your calendar for March 2, 2017, the online entry deadline.

Awards & Categories 2016 First Place Sculpture Alicia Ponzio Portrait Study l: Mr. Koch 20x10x10”, plaster on wooden base

Over $94,000 in prizes and awards will be presented in categories recognizing Painting, Drawing and Sculpture. Visit our website for full details or call toll-free for your prospectus.

2016 First Place Drawing Olga Krimon, Yin and Yang 18x24”, charcoal and graphite

Exhibition The selected finalists are required to exhibit their original artwork and be present at the prestigious The Art of the Portrait® conference in Atlanta, Georgia, April 20-23, 2017 for awards presentation.

To enter, register or for membership information: C a l l t o l l - f r e e 1 - 8 7 7 - 7 7 2 - 4 3 2 1 i n f o @ p o r t r a i t s o c i e t y. o r g w w w. p o r t r a i t s o c i e t y. o r g


MARGARET MCWETHY

JR EASON

“Peonies” 16x20 oil on board LADY IN RED, BRONZE, LIMITED EDITION OF 15, TABLETOP

406-360-5766

E G E L I G A L L E RY 382 Commercial Street, Provincetown, MA 02657 (508) 487-0044 • www.egeligallery.com

Oil on Canvas ©

jreason @blackfoot.net

www.jreason.com MORE WORKS ALSO AVAILABLE IN SCOTTSDALE, AZ AT “THE CELEBRATION OF FINE ART” AND “THE SIGNATURE GALLERY”.

JREason QP.indd 1

SALLY RUDDY

10x8 inches

POETIC

EXPRESSIONISM STILL LIFE NEW CREATIONS

“Jade Plantlet”

www.sallyruddy.com

Member of: NAWA, Audubon Artists, OPA

11/28/16 3:43 P


GAIL FAULKNER gfaulkner@iswest.com

gailfaulknerstudio.com

Clementine 12 x 16 watercolor

Tartaglia Fine Art tartagliafineart.com 307 E Ojai Avenue Suite 102, Ojai, CA (805) 646-0967


Pat Bailey www.pbailey.com

(602) 684-7825

BVI Water Study, oil on canvas 16 x 44

Represented by Sheldon Fine Art, Naples FL; and Dean Day Gallery, Houston, TX

p-bailey4@cox.net

Pat Baily.indd 1

11/29/16 2:19 PM

Paul Rhymer 301.980.4429 • paul@rhymerstudio.com www.rhymerstudio.com

Come see Paul at Celebration of Fine Art January14-March 26 Daily sculpting and bronze casting demonstrations!

“El Diablo” Life size Roadrunner Bronze on onyx


LA ART SHOW When: January 11-15, 2017; January 11, 7-11 p.m., Patron Reception; January 11, 8-11 p.m., Opening Night Premiere Party Where: Los Angeles Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa Street, West Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90015 Information: www.laartshow.com

Show Preview

Global Experience

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LA Art Show returns for its 22nd year with more than 100 galleries from over 20 countries.

O

ver the past 21 years the LA Art Show has solidified its place as one of the nation’s leading art fairs and even saw 70,000 attendees pass through its doors in 2016. The event has a global focus as participating galleries hail from all around the world, with the 2017 show including more than 100 exhibitors from over 20 countries—its most international roster to date. Also this year, the LA Art Show will place a new focus on post-war modern and contemporary artwork and will launch ROOTS, a curated section of historic art dealers. “As Los Angeles takes its place at the vanguard of the global art scene, our ability to adapt and evolve to meet the art 030

www.AmericanAr tCollector.com

market’s current trends and provide strong civic support is vital,” says LA Art Show producer and partner Kim Martindale. “The evolving role of the art fair as a fulcrum for art commerce, connecting galleries, artists, curators and international and multigenerational collectors drives our program.” LA Art Show returns January 11 through 15 in the West Hall of the Los Angeles Convention Center. Kicking off the show will be the Opening Night Premiere Party on January 11, with a portion of the ticket proceeds benefitting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Typically a star-studded event, last year’s opening was hosted by

Anne Hathaway and Adam Shulman. The opening party is also the first chance collectors have to walk through the fair and purchase works of art from the exhibitors. Among those participating for 2017 are Arcadia Contemporary and Maxwell Alexander Gallery—both located in California; Blue Rain Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico; MS Rau Antiques of New Orleans; SM Fine Art Gallery, with locations in New York and Soeul; Acacia Gallery of Cuba; Beijing-based Asian Art Works; Fun Year Art Gallery from Taiwan; Rebecca Hossack Gallery of London; and Pigment Gallery of Madrid, Spain. The artwork presented by the galleries


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1 In 2016, LA Art Show saw more than 70,000 attendees. 2 Stephen Fox, Monster in the Woods, oil on canvas, 29 x 30". Courtesy Arcadia Contemporary. 3 Jeremy Mann, NYC #33, oil, 36 x 36". Courtesy Maxwell Alexander Gallery. 4 Alex Russell Flint, Waiting, oil on canvas, 24 x 18". Courtesy Arcadia Contemporary. 5 Johannes Wessmark, Surfacing, oil and acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30". Courtesy Arcadia Contemporary.

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A R T SH OW P RE VI E W

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will range in medium, style and genre and includes everything from paintings, sculpture and drawings to videos, installations and performances. For the third consecutive year, LA Art Show will present an exhibition highlighting the art of Dansaekhwa. Curated by SM Fine Art Gallery, Dansaekhwa III: Formation and Recurrence features multilayered monochromes by Kim Tae-Ho and water drop paintings by Kim Tschang-Yeul. LA Art Show will be open January 12 through 14 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on January 15 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. American Art Collector is a proud media sponsor of the fair.

6 Josh Elliott, The Hills of Home, oil, 15 x 30". Courtesy Maxwell Alexander Gallery.

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Calling Coast to Coast

We ask leading galleries from coast to coast what their thoughts are on the market and where it might be headed.

OWNER

DIREC TOR

Clayton Sammons

Tressa Williams

Fredericksburg Art Gallery Fredericksburg, TX

George Billis Gallery Los Angeles, CA

Even with the rising confidence in the art market, selling fine art has never been the easiest endeavor. Collectors are not going to justify aspects of a painting or sculpture they don’t respond to, they simply will walk by looking for a better fit. With the overly saturated art market collectors must be hypercritical of their decisions. There are only a few kinds of collectors that walk in the door of most galleries: the collectors looking for art to fill a particular spot in their home, taking a level of importance away from the art and putting it primarily on the format; the collector only looking for potential returns on their investments; and the preferable collector buying art for their emotional connection. Our gallery strives to provide the newest and most unique ideas, while maintaining a certain level of history and tradition. Fredericksburg, Texas, is a tourist attraction with a strong local,

“Our gallery strives to provide the newest and most unique ideas, while maintaining a certain level of history and tradition.”

Los Angeles continues to gain momentum as an art destination with Culver City at the heart of its gallery scene. Over the 12 years since we opened in the Culver City Arts District, we’ve seen a very exciting increase in collector interest in Southern California artists. Working in a variety of mediums, our Southern California artists have found

“Over the 12 years since we opened in the Culver City Arts District, we’ve seen a very exciting increase in collector interest in Southern California artists.”

national and international cliental, encouraging the need for a diverse art scene within the community. Being located right in the heart of Texas’ iconic Hill Country has long inspired local painters to capture its rough beauty, in turn, cultivating a strong collector base for Texas regional and traditional landscape painting, originally putting Fredericksburg on the map in the art world. Since then, large amounts of contemporary artist have emerged in the area bringing in new ideas and collectors, indicating a strong and diverse future.

new collectors throughout the United States and abroad. The economic slowdown has rippled through the art world and very few galleries have been immune to the effects. The unexpected benefit of this experience is that collectors are making very thoughtful decisions about the work they want to expand their collections with and the direction they’d like their collections to go in. Often this means exploring the work of new artists, new mediums and new genres, which is truly fantastic. We’ve specifically seen strong collector interest in the work of young realist painters. We have a group of very talented young oil painters, including Danny Heller, Christopher Stott and Sarah Williams, whose paintings are unique and contemporary and who excel in the very technically challenging medium of oil. Their chosen medium is deeply rooted in history but their subject matter and style are fresh and very much of today.

Fredericksburg Art Gallery Fredericksburg, TX | (830) 990-2707 | www.fbgartgallery.com

George Billis Gallery Los Angeles, CA | (310) 838-3685 | www.georgebillis.com


SUBSCRIBE TODAY! 1 2 I S S U E S P E R Y E A R w w w. A m e r i c a n A r t C o l l e c t o r. c o m

Discover New Art Available For Sale The new art of today’s major artists is in big demand, and if you’re serious about acquiring it you need to know about it sooner. When you subscribe to American Art Collector magazine you’ll be the first to know because each

month we’ll email you the link to the latest issue online. You’ll have instant access to the latest issue immediately when it is published. You’ll see the art coming available for sale before the shows even open.

Coast-To-Coast Coverage See new art being created by major living artists from the East Coast to the West Coast and everywhere in between. Many readers travel across the country to acquire pieces from galleries showing new work in this magazine.

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MINIMALISM THE CRAFTSMAN-STYLE HOME OF THIS LONG ISLAND COLLEC TOR IS ADORNED W I T H F I N E R E A L I S M PA I N T I N G S . BY JOHN O’HERN PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANCIS SMITH

Our Art Lover’s Guides alert you to the peak season for art destinations around the nation. You’ll find details of all the major shows opening around the country with images of new work and dates of upcoming shows. Our user-friendly Art Walk Maps help orient you before you visit and show you where the major galleries are located.

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1 Daniel Graves’ Storm on the Plain, 2013, oil on board, hangs at the foot of the stairs. Sarah Lamb’s Old Books, 2013, oil on canvas, is above the bookcase in the living room.

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ToBeAnnounced

EDITOR’S NOTE: Sarah will scour the country for the best and brightest emerging artists on the scene and then interview them about their work. Sarah has a wonderful eye, and I'm sure you will enjoy what she is able to discover. Artists, if you want your work considered, hashtag all your social media posts #tobeannounced #americanartcollector.

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hen first meeting Los Angelesbased artist Ryan McIntosh, one would conclude that he’s a shy rather pensive guy with an infectious smile and a studio full of witty, minimalistic art. Upon further investigation, it becomes apparent that while McIntosh may have a shy side to his personality, it’s unquestionably over shadowed by his apparent conceptual provocation. Most of his work contains an underlying sense of diminution, derision and cleverness. Poking fun at just about everything, and everyone, including himself, McIntosh has set himself apart from most other conceptual artists of our time. Creating socially relevant multimedia installations of unnerving works exploring the spectacle of catastrophic events with gallows humor, in which the viewer ponders

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Interview with

Ryan McIntosh by Sarah Elise Abramson

their own mortality and its inevitability. He can usually be found tirelessly creating his newest body of work at his Brewery Arts Complex studio or on some epic excursion to Iceland or other alluring places. He returns with an abundance of beautiful images and fresh new ideas that shift and shatter and eventually help mold his new works. If there is one thing to be said for McIntosh’s art, it’s that it makes you consider, and it makes you excogitate, and it (hopefully) makes you laugh. His art elicits feelings. Therefore, he is a true and original artist and he has something to say. When and where did you start making art? In my apartment bathroom during college in Tucson, Arizona. I had been doing photography for a couple years, but it wasn’t until I started developing my own largeformat, 8-by-10-inch film in the bathroom that I truly felt as though I was “making” something worthy of any artistic expression.

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What’s your background? Both the backgrounds on my iPhone and my laptop are solid black. I love the minimalist look of it, and I have this theory that it helps my phone battery last longer since less pixels are illuminated. I just really dislike all the stock background photos. There are actually multiple stock


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1 Adrift, 2015, Polaroid photographs 2 Ryan McIntosh 3 Relentless Envy, 2016, 7-color silkscreen on 28 panels, 24 x 18" each 4 Inability to Exist In the Present Moment, 2016, 7-color silkscreen on panel, 24 x 18"

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5 Beyond a Shadow of a Doubt, 2016, silkscreen on canvas, 34 x 26"


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GIFs of a fish wiggling its butt around on the new iPhone OS, can you believe that? How have you seen your work evolve over the last 10 years? Almost gone full circle. Ten years ago I was doing purely traditional black-and-white darkroom photography. I got sick of the limitations of the medium, so I pretended to be a painter for several years, making colorful photorealist oil paintings of airplane crashes until that got me on the “No Fly” list for being a possible terrorist suspect. Around that time I picked up some printmaking skills, particularly screen printing, which is now my primary medium. The newest work reflects back on my older photography and it’s also primarily black-and-white. There’s something about the medium of photography that I desperately tried to escape 10 years ago, but now I have fully embraced it with a greater understanding of its role in my art. 036

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How do you expect it to continue evolving? I’ll probably get bored of things soon, as I usually do, and get the urge to paint large color fields or some things completely unrelated. There’s no point in following a good idea. When the work starts making too much sense, I get bored. I honestly don’t see how some artists can just keep making the same painting over and over again for their whole career, like they are trying to get it absolutely perfect but it keeps falling short. I admire that commitment, but I personally need diversity in my work. Hopefully when someone looks back at the course of my art, it will look like a f****d up

6 Angel Wings, 2016, photograph on aluminum, 20 x 40"


Some random things you’ve been finding fascinating lately are…? Reading conspiracy theorist websites and blogs from people that truly believe the earth is flat. Can you tell us a little about your most recent exhibition, Relentless Envy? The centerpiece of the show was a sculpture containing an authentic piece of coal that was recovered from the 1912 Titanic shipwreck. The sculpture had a fuel tank and torch attached to it, which continuously burnt away this large lump of coal for the duration of the show. Scientists recently said a rare form of rusteating bacteria is rapidly eating away at the Titanic and in about 20 years it will become nothing more than a rust stain on the ocean floor. However, the millions of pounds of coal from the shipwreck is pure carbon and nothing eats it, nor can it dissolve in the water, so it remains fully intact. Maybe in millions of years all these pieces of carbon will turn to large diamonds. I quite like the idea of that. Where did you acquire these artifacts from the World Trade Center, such as the key? The key was found at “ground zero” in the rubble after 9/11. It’s still encrusted in dirt and ash. Many of the artifacts I found for sale on eBay, but some were obtained on black market websites where people buy and sell illegal artifacts. For example, artifacts from the Titanic are not permitted for sale, as they are all protected under a salvage law that says they must be used for historical exhibition only. The research and hunt for these things becomes an extension of the art in a way.

road map of my life, but clearly show how I got from point A to point B.

Contact at www.ryanmcintosh.net

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Sarah Elise Abramson is a contemporary fine art photographer based in San Pedro, California—a mysterious post-industrial enclave whose offbeat countercultural history and proliferation of unusual sights, sounds and citizens is tailor-made for Abramson’s obsession with everyday surrealism. In both her own photography and in her curatorial and editorial approach to exhibition projects and independent publications, her emphasis is on discovering the eccentric beauty in the things most people overlook. Found objects, hidden messages, secrets of the universe that hide in plain sight—throughout her studies at Parsons The New School for Design and Brooks Institute of Photography, and later at LaChapelle Studios, her work has evolved from finding to intuitively creating original daydreams and shared cosmologies.

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Why the use of words, sayings, icons, etc? What significance do they hold for you? Text started creeping into my work shortly after leaving grad school at RISD in 2011. It really came out of a desire to communicate beyond what an image alone could convey. With the newest

work, the text acts as a signifier, often providing an entry point into the image. In some ways it’s like a meme…you have two disconnected subjects, the image and the text, but put them together and they elevate each other to a whole new level. I really feel in 100 years they will look back at this period of art and notice a huge influence that memes had on this generation of artists work.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever been given? My high school art teacher pulled me aside after class toward the end of the school year after seeing I was quite serious about pursuing art. She said, “DO NOT pursue a career as an artist…you will fail miserably and live a horrible life.” I clearly didn’t take her advice.


ART & HISTORY THE MET BREUER PRESENTS A RETROSPECTIVE FOR THE 35YEAR CAREER OF KERRY JAMES MARSHALL THROUGH JANUARY 29. BY JOHN O’HERN

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1 De Style, 1993, acrylic and collage on canvas, 104 x 122". Los Angeles County Museum of Art, purchased with funds provided by Ruth and Jacob Bloom. ©Kerry James Marshall. Digital image: ©2015 Museum Associates / LACMA. Licensed by Art Resource, NY. 2 Kerry James Marshall in his studio. Photo by Kendall Karmanian.

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n his book Invisible Man, published in 1952, Ralph Ellison wrote, “I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids—and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me.” Ellison read voraciously—English and Russian novels, works from Twain to Proust—and brought the experience and the acquired knowledge of form and structure to creating his pivotal book. His protagonist is invisible because he is visibly black. Kerry James Marshall draws on art history to place the black experience firmly within that history. The exhibition Kerry James Marshall: Mastry continues at the Met Breuer in New York through January 29, having debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. The exhibition’s curator, Ian Alteveer, says, “Marshall’s work illustrates the American experience as unimaginable without black history and culture. Through the tropes of traditional painting—portraiture, landscape and other


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narrative modes—he builds a conversation around visibility and invisibility. The result is a stunning body of work that is both intimate and monumental.” One of the most intimate works is the first in the exhibition, an 8-by-6½-inch egg tempera painting, Portrait of the Artist as a Shadow of His Former Self, 1980. Marshall mastered (“Mastry”) the ancient technique of egg tempera and the principles of classical portraiture to create a portrait of an essentially invisible man. In his talk at the exhibition at MCA, Marshall said, “You don’t rely on ‘natural ability’ or talent when you’re engaged in a world as complex as the world we are engaged in. You go at it self-consciously, analytically and always intellectually.” Reading Ellison’s novel was “the moment in which I figured out how to start using blackness as a rhetorical device…within the context of a classical idea of what it takes 040

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to make a painting or what it takes to make a picture.” He wrote, that Ellison’s “notion of being and not-being, the simultaneity of presence and absence, was exactly what I had been trying to get at in my artwork.” Citing all he learned from studying classical Italian Florentine painting he said, “I used that to make that picture. It has all the information but doesn’t look anything at all like a Raphael painting… You could deploy the knowledge and the principles but it didn’t have to turn out looking like something that you’d copied from somebody else.” Portrait of the Artist… is nothing like a classical egg tempera portrait—although all the elements are there. The man’s eyes, teeth and shirt stand out in the darkness in a kind of caricature of a man in black face in a minstrel show. The man is both there and not there, just as the black figure is both present and absent in art history.

Throughout his career Marshall’s figures have been blacker than black, almost featureless. He explained in his talk, “One of the reasons that the figures in my paintings are as black as they are is that that becomes a given, that once you see the picture and you identify that figure as black as it is then that’s something you don’t have to talk about any more. It just is...Then you can start thinking about it in relationship to everything else that’s happening within the picture space.” He acknowledges that determination and a “fairly extreme sense of self-confidence” have made it possible for him to rock the art world. Yet, “[t]here were always doubts. Doubts come from the fact that most museums, most institutions, they have done quite well without the presence of black people for hundreds of years.” The exhibition contains 80 works, 72 of which are paintings. They range from


4 The Academy, 2012, acrylic and glitter on PVC panel, 7213/16 x 61". Collection of Dr. Daniel S. Berger. ©Kerry James Marshall.

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3 Untitled, 2009, acrylic on PVC panel, 611/8 x 727/8 x 37/8". Yale University Art Gallery, purchased with the Janet and Simeon Braguin Fund and a gift from Jacqueline L. Bradley, B.A. 1917. ©Kerry James Marshall.

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5 School of Beauty, School of Culture, 2012, acrylic and glitter on canvas, 1077/8 x 1577/8". Birmingham Museum of Art, museum purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth “Bibby” Smith, the Collectors Circle for Contemporary Art, Jane Comer, the Sankofa Society and general acquisition funds. ©Kerry James Marshall. Photo by Sean Pathasema.

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6 A Portrait of the Artist as a Shadow of His Former Self, 1980, egg tempera on paper, 8 x 6½". Steven and Deborah Lebowitz. ©Kerry James Marshall. Photo by Matthew Fried, ©MCA Chicago.

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7 Souvenir 1, 1997, acrylic, collage, silkscreen and glitter on canvas, 108 x 156". Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Bernice and Kenneth Newberger Fund, 1997.73. ©Kerry James Marshall. Photo by Joe Ziolkowski, ©MCA Chicago.


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some of its more recognizable members, Piet Mondrian and Gerrit Rietveld. The rectilinear cabinets in primary colors could have been designed or painted by either of them. In The Second Sex, Simone de Beauvoir wrote, “The category of Other is as original as consciousness itself. The duality between Self and Other can be found in the most primitive societies, in the most ancient mythologies…No group ever defines itself as One without immediately setting up the Other opposite itself…Village people view anyone not belonging to the village as suspicious ‘others.’ For the native of a country, inhabitants of other countries are viewed as ‘foreigners’; Jews are the

‘others’ for anti-Semites, blacks for racist Americans, indigenous people for colonists, proletarians for the propertied classes.” Marshall makes significant headway in making the absence in presence more evident and the Other less so.

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL: MASTRY When: Through January 29, 2017 Where: The Met Breuer, 945 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10021 Information: (212) 923-3700, www.metmuseum.org

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John O’Hern, who has retired after 30 years in the museum business, specifically as the Executive Director and Curator of the Arnot Art Museum, Elmira, N.Y., is the originator of the internationally acclaimed Re-presenting Representation exhibitions which promote realism in its many guises. John was chair of the Artists Panel of the New York State Council on the Arts. He writes for gallery publications around the world, including regular monthly features on Art Market Insights and on Sculpture in Western Art Collector magazine.

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the intimate portrait to the monumental. The tiny Portrait of the Artist… appears in a 62½-by-52½-inch painting Portrait of the Artist & a Vacuum. The title, when said aloud, almost becomes Portrait of the Artist IN a Vacuum. The Academy’s media are “acrylic and glitter on PVC panel,” not what you’d expect from a 19th-century academy. The model’s pose recalls the raised fists of Tommie Smith and John Carlos at the 1968 Olympics—raised in a “human-rights salute,” Smith explained. Barack Obama recently called it a “powerful silent protest.” The drapes behind the figure are the colors of the red, black and green of the Pan-African flag, which appear throughout Marshall’s career. The dangling, glittering rope belies the ways in which dangling ropes can be used. The figure in The Academy has hair that could have been modeled by the barber in De Style, 1993, which is over 8 by 10 feet and is in the collection of Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The barber’s shop is “Percy’s House of Style” but the title of the painting immediately brings to mind the Dutch art movement De Stijl and


OLD AND N EW U S I N G N AT U R A L W O O D AS A GUIDE, COLOR ADO COLLEC TORS TRANSFORM AN UNREMARKABLE HOME I N T O S O M E T H I N G T H AT SPEAKS TO THEM. BY JOHN O’HERN PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANCIS SMITH 1


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1 Louisiana Bendolph’s Shared Legacy, 2007, soft ground aquatint, edition 9 of 50, is on the wall. On the Borge Mogensen (Denmark) 1950s teak sideboard are, left to right, Stephen Magsig’s Last Light Soho N.Y., 2007, oil on canvas; Tom Gregg’s Bank, 2005, oil on panel; Jill Moser’s CH 7, 1998, casein on handmade paper; and Tom Nussbaum’s Crow Man, 1998, acrylic on resin. The Luna Chair, by Odd Knutsen (Norway), is a reproduction from a 1970s design.


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hen Lisa Hatchadoorian and Steve Keim moved to Colorado they weren’t looking to buy a house right away. Lisa had become director of the Fort Collins Museum of Art and Steve was spending time in New York where he coordinates student choral and instrumental groups performing at Carnegie Hall. They happened upon an open house one day and decided to take a look. The house had been very unremarkable until it fell into the hands of Rucker and Rebecca Hill of Rucker Design Build in Fort Collins. Built in 1957, it was redone in 2015. The Hills describe their aesthetic as a “mélange of old and new,” which perfectly describes the tastes of Lisa and Steve. They bought the house. There is a variety of woods in the house as there is in the couple’s collection of furniture—from the quartered oak of an early-20th-century Arts & Crafts bookcase to a midcentury Danish teak sideboard. 048

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Their tastes in furniture evolved. Lisa had grown up with Danish furniture but thought nothing of it. “Steve taught me furniture,” she says. “I started out with Ikea furniture. When Steve saw it he said, ‘What are you doing?’ Today if it takes years and years to find the right piece, it takes years and years.” B e fo re b e co m i ng a s c ho o l superintendent, Steve’s father had been a high school shop teacher. “There was always woodworking going on,” he remarks. “I went through my Arts & Crafts stage 25 to 30 years ago, but I began moving away from heavier stuff and began looking for something more fluid, mostly midcentury modern. What will interest me is the wood. Maybe I’ve been influenced by what we were looking at in art, too.” Since he grew up in Upper Bucks County, Pennsylvania, I asked him about George Nakashima, the great woodworker who lived near New Hope. “The Michener Museum in Doylestown has a Reading Room

2 On the left in the living room is Jackie Tileston’s Bellagio Drawing #21, 2005, mixed media on paper. To the left of the fireplace is Sharon Louden’s Tangled Tips (Lines from Zion), 2000, ink on paper. Paul Henry Ramirez’s Untitled (from the Elevatious Transcendsualistic Series), 2001, acrylic and flash on paper, is on the mantle with a collection of Dansk teak pepper mills, 19561966, by Jens Quistgaard. A 1950s Ball Clock by George Nelson for Herman Miller hangs above a circa 1910-1920 oak Arts & Crafts bookcase from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Stephen Magsig’s, Untitled, 2001, oil on antique crayon box, is on the bookcase. The Bentwood Siesta Lounge Chair, 1970, is by Ingmar Relling (Norway). The teak table from the 1960s is by the Danish designer Grete Jalk. 3 Above the painted washstand is Kate Petley’s Headwind, 2009, mixed media on paper. On the floor is Smurf #86, 2005, Italian Lasa marble, by Venske and Spänle. The pieces on the washstand are, left to right, Jim Kopp’s Cracker Box, 2007, paint on cracker box; Josh Dorman’s Wyoming, 2009, mixed media on panel; and Nina Levy’s Untitled (Baby Head), resin.


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4 David Levinthal’s Untitled (Clown), 2004, Polaroid Polacolor ER Land Film, hangs above an unmarked Danish teak Armchair, crica 1960s; and a Footstool, 1985, oak and twine, by William E. Keim, Steve’s dad. 5 Stephen Magsig’s Untitled, 2001, oil on antique crayon box. 6 Rucker and Rebecca Hill of Rucker Design Build in Fort Collins, Colorado, remodeled the couple’s home in 2015. Photo by Katie Jenkins Photography. Courtesy Rucker Design Build.

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designed by his daughter, Mira, featuring his furniture. My father was on the board of the Pearl Buck Society and he met Mira. We went down and were able to walk though the studio. I always liked his work,” he continues, “but I wasn’t involved enough at the time. It was not quite where I was.” Lisa has been purchasing the art of people with whom she has worked in her professional career. “A lot of artists I worked with on exhibitions,” she explains. “I was thinking a lot about their work and wanted to keep it with me. When I’m curating I either see an artist’s work I really like or things I want to say about it. I feel it physically. This artwork means something incredible to me. It’s doing something out in the world and I want to be part of that, intellectually and emotionally, extending the conversation about the subject or topic. I want to be invested in their work. Relationships tend to form over the years. We get to know what artists’ work means in their lives. “I follow artists as they change and am often part of it. We talk about it. I met Stephen Magsig when I worked at George Billis. He does different size paintings, but almost always urban scapes. I love the way he puts paint on paper. “I have been a corporate curator, in academia and in nonprofit museums,” she continues. “The Fort Collins Museum of Art isn’t a collecting museum. Here, I want to open up access to experiencing new types of art, to local, regional and national art, getting people to trust exploring.”


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While Steve is drawn to color, Lisa is drawn to line. She points out Kate Petley’s Headwind. “At that time,” she says, “Kate was working with resin, which gives the work a sculptural quality. I’ve always been interested in mark making, paint brush marks, and the integration of photography, collage and digitization. I wanted a work of hers, especially a work on paper. In part of the design there’s a tie to the landscape I fell in love with in Colorado and Wyoming.” On the floor next to a painted washstand they found at an antiques show in Pennsylvania is, in startling contrast, Smurf #86, a marble sculpture by Venske and Spänle. “We saw the shows in New York by these young German artists and loved what they did with the material. It’s like a liquid blob and it relates to the

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7 Two oil on paper pieces, Untitled (New York), by Stephen Magsig hang above the bookcase 8 Spring Tale, circa 2008, oil on linen over panel, is by Gabe Brown.

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9 Mine Support, 2005, gouache on paper, by Laura Sharp Wilson, is on the wall. Bill Davenport’s Ranch Style Beans, circa 2009, mixed media is on the ledge.

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Lisa waxes poetic when she describes a piece by Paul Henry Ramirez and its “arabesque of a line.” Always interested in mark making and line, her thoughts came together at an exhibition of Van Gogh drawings at the Metropolitan Museum in 2005. Van Gogh thought drawing was “the root of everything” but it is his paintings that are most known. Lisa remembers “It was an emotional show. You could see his ways of creating a line, the rhythm. It got me thinking about what line means to artists.”

COLL E C TOR HO M E

Their friends got started when they were asked to chip in on a wedding present, Louisiana Bendolph’s soft ground aquatint Shared Legacy. “She is a Gee’s Bend quiltmaker who broke out into printmaking. We fell in love with another print at Art Basel Miami,” she says, “but the dealer said it was the last of the edition and he couldn’t sell it. Later, she made another similar print, which is the one we asked our friends to buy for us. We like the piece itself and it’s a bonus that it came from the quilters.”

body. It’s an outlier in the collection,” Lisa says. Another outlier is photography, which “doesn’t come naturally” to the collectors. There is one major exception in a large Polaroid Polacolor by David Levinthal that was commissioned by the couple. The clown figurine was in their collection along with other similar figures. “In grad school,” Lisa says, “I thought of having my thesis/curatorial project be about working with artists in the studio. I went to Levinthal’s studio but eventually decided on a different topic. Five years later we still had the figurines around and commissioned him to make an artwork. I wanted that piece to be represented by him in the Polaroid process.” Several pieces in the collection have been gifts.


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Beauty Everyday

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till lifes have been found on the tombs of Egyptian pharaohs and on floor mosaics unearthed in Pompeii. To the Romans, these decorative illustrations of everyday items, including the now-common motif of fruit displayed in a glass bowl, were seen as a sign of hospitality in upper class homes, as well as a celebration of life. People have continued to be interested in still lifes from ancient to modern times because they reflect in the beauty in ordinary objects—whether those be flowers in a vase, a sumptuous display of food or tools of a trade. Though many people might overlook these small instances of elegance, artists have the opportunity to amplify that beauty so others may also appreciate the little things. Though painting a still life might seem mundane to some, artists must have complete control of their environment as to not overlook any miniscule detail such as a shadow of a glass or a blemish on an apple. The pages of this special section spotlight a selection of still life works from artists and galleries across the country, showcasing both traditional and contemporary works.

LORENA KLOOSTERBOER

www.art-lorena.com

Dutch-Argentine artist Lorena Kloosterboer paints contemporary realist still lifes in which she seeks to capture the fascinating interactions between colors, light, shadows, textures and reflections, and unite them in visual poetry. Her detailed approach is meditative yet methodical—each brushstroke and gesture purposely build up substance through multiple glazes. Kloosterboer’s aim is to portray subject matter in such a way that it looks photographic from afar, yet shows her hand from up close. Beauty and balance are important components in her compositions. To date her art has participated in well over 100 exhibitions in art galleries and museums in 11 countries.

LOTTON GALLERY

900 N. Michigan Avenue, Level 6, Chicago, IL 60611 (312) 664-6203, www.lottongallery.com Lotton Gallery, located on Chicago’s famous “Magnificent Mile” for 18-plus years, features some of the finest living contemporary masters.

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1 Lotton Gallery, Vibrant Floral, oil on linen, 36 x 48", by Yana Movchan.

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2 Lorena Kloosterboer, Silent Rhapsody II, acrylic on wood panel, 7¾ x 11¾" 3 Lorena Kloosterboer, Tempus ad Requiem XIV, acrylic on canvas, 11¾ x 11¾" 4 Lotton Gallery, Red & White, oil on linen, 36 x 48", by Yana Movchan. 5 Lotton Gallery, Floral with Pink Cockatiel, oil on linen, 30 x 24", by Yana Movchan. 6 Gail Faulkner, The Feathered Pot, watercolor, 9 x 16" 7 Pat Bailey, Marbles #27, oil on canvas, 48 x 60" 2

Yana Movchan elevates the gallery’s collection with her incredible detailed floral and still life paintings. Movchan’s magical work is unmatched in skill and talent in this genre. Her newest oil, Floral with Pink Cockatiel, showcases her delicate handling of the flower petals, her expert prowess portraying birds and a brilliant combination of palette. Vibrant Floral, a recent large piece, is bursting with tropical birds and flowers and dancing butterflies, allowing imaginations to run wild. Red and White features a hairless cat as the star and a furry Persian cat, hiding under a basket. The dichotomy of the two cats fashions a sense of humor and irony, only Movchan could create.

GAIL FAULKNER

(805) 652-0065, gfaulkner@iswest.com www.gailfaulknerstudio.com www.tartagliafineart.com Gail Faulkner loves the challenge of detail. A contemporary realist, Faulkner is inspired by the objects that surround her in her life and in nature. Her soft, yet precise 056

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watercolors capture the colorful detail and textures of fruit, flowers and objects of nature, complemented by beautiful ceramic pieces, wood and basketry, and her controlled, realistic style leaves many viewers wondering if it is really watercolor. Please visit her website and take a closer look. Faulkner is represented by Tartagalia Fine Art.

PAT BAILEY

(602) 684-7825, p-bailey4@cox.net www.pbailey.com For some years, Pat Bailey has sought to create abstract compositions utilizing familiar objects in a realistic style. His first subjects were marbles. “Spheres are the perfect shape and the visual properties of glass are fascinating to work with,” says Bailey. “I find I smile a lot when painting marbles and the finished works are fun to live with.” Bailey’s next subjects were beach stones and then beach balls. He has now gravitated to painting water. Bailey is represented by Sheldon Fine Art in Naples, Florida, and Dean Day Gallery in Houston, Texas.

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ASPEN GROVE FINE ART

525 E. Cooper Avenue, Suite B Aspen, CO 81611, (970) 925-5151 www.aspengrovefineart.com

Like most Americans, Aspen Grove Fine Art artist Antal

Goldfinger remembers exactly where he was and what he was doing when he heard about the 9/11 attacks, and his painting Resurrection is a reflection of his feelings at that time, though it took him

13 years to get his response down on canvas. The painting creates the impression that a glass cover is cracked from the impact, much like the psyche of the United States immediately after the attacks,

but the glass never came close to completely shattering. Goldfinger’s works are held in private and celebrity collections throughout the world, as well as at museums and the White House.

CHUCK MIDDLEKAUFF

Austin, TX, (512) 447-3567 www.chuckmiddlekauff.com

Being a kid growing up in the ’50s and ’60s and watching cartoons, Westerns and superheroes on TV, and being a grown-up taking countless road trips across America with Rand McNally and his wife, Carol, has driven Chuck Middlekauff to paint soda machines, signs, diners, cowboys, toys, gas pumps and almost everything in between. All of these weathered and quickly vanishing icons have become the focus of his artistic journey. Pop art, new country music, old rock and roll, and his own eccentricities have further inspired him to juxtapose those images and develop 8

8 Aspen Grove Fine Art, Resurrection, oil on linen, 19 x 15", by Antal Goldfinger. 9 Aspen Grove Fine Art, Silver and Gold, oil, 33 x 25", by Antal Goldfinger. 10 Pat Bailey, Beach Balls Study #2, oil on canvas, 18 x 36"

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11 Chuck Middlekauff, Got Milk?, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 30" 12 Gary Babb, Timeless Treasures, oil on board, 11 x 14"

For artist Gary Babb, none of nature’s, or man’s, subjects is off limits as potential subject

is an art, and the pleasure of well done still lifes is an unstoppable magic.

BARBARA FRACCHIA

(510) 525-7057, mfracchia@comcast.net www.barbarafracchia.com “As in figure painting, there is the posed model and the action/ candid figure,” says Barbara Fracchia. “I like to think of still life in those terms.” Copper Vases was a posed setup with proper lighting on the

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14 Chuck Middlekauff, Happy Meal, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20"

GARY BABB

(480) 204-8820, art@garybabb.com www.garybabb.com

matter when painting still lifes. Babb tries to make his viewers see past the top layer of clarity when painting, to make them think and feel. He tries to clear the way for something kinder and wiser than the eyes see alone. He aims to prompt the moment when his viewer has that shock of recognition, that moment of excitement and self-discovery. Like all forms of love, it is hard to explain, but Babb hopes that viewers will know it when they feel it. For him, enjoyment

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13 Chuck Middlekauff, She Loves You, acrylic and collage on canvas, 16 x 20"

fun concepts, puns and twists. Using water media, Middlekauff applies vivid colors to create patinas, textures and shadows to capture the fading fragments of his generation in a new light. With a smile.

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15 Sally Ruddy, Double Delight, oil on canvas, 7 x 5" 16 Gary Babb, Gary’s Apples, oil on board, 17 x 40" 17 Gary Babb, Girl’s Night Out, oil on board, 13 x 20"

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18 Barbara Fracchia, Copper Vases, oil on board, 28 x 24" 19 Barbara Fracchia, Front Yard Display, oil on board, 9 x 12" 20 Egeli Gallery, Honey, honey?, oil on board, 8 x 6", by Margaret McWethy. 21 Sally Ruddy, Toddler Tennies, oil on canvas, 11 x 14" 18

key areas of the composition. Although it took time to set up, this arrangement is a vast difference from the plein air composition of Front Yard Display. Copper Vases is smooth and sleek, a stark

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contrast to an old railroad wagon with pots, weeds and whatever else is piled up in the front yard. Front Yard Display caught Fracchia’s attention while she was with a group in

Mendocino one weekend. While everyone was painting the ocean, her attention was this still life. She enjoys variety in her paintings and likes the contrast between the two paintings.

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EGELI GALLERY

382 Commercial Street, Provincetown, MA 02657, (508) 487-0044 www.egeligallery.com Margaret McWethy has three qualities that make a great still life painter:


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Soft brushstrokes and an airy, effortless blending of colors contribute to a heavenly environment focused on emotional response and personal

narrative. Omitting fine details in the scenery, Ruddy creates a setting that is otherworldly, transporting her viewers into her intimate memories of family and self.

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SALLY RUDDY

(239) 403 7787

GardnerColbyGaller y.com

386 & 365 Broad Avenue South ★ Gallery Row ★ Naples, FL 34102

GardnerColbyQP.indd 1

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Sally Ruddy’s expressive, expansive body of work encapsulates the little joys and treasures of life, reflecting the beauty within. There is a tenderness that permeates each painting, filling the edges and corners with a resolute sense of visceral emotion. Every moment is frozen in time for the viewer to experience; each painting holding its breath and awaiting the next moment that is just out of reach.

Anna Kincaide, “Hesitating” 60x48" oil

info@sallyruddy.com www.sallyruddy.com

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impeccable drawing skills learned from Cedric Egeli; a full grasp of impressionist color learned from Henry Hensche; and, most important, she understands that a still life is not just a random arrangement of objects on a table, but a careful design of color and shapes that delight the eye with its variation. And more, these objects have meaning as a group that goes beyond the abstract design, bringing a poetry to the painting.

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CELEBRATION OF FINE ART

Show Preview

When: January 14-March 26, 2017, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Where: Hayden Road and the Loop 101, Scottsdale, AZ 85255 Information: www.celebrateart.com

Making Connections Collectors can interact with and purchase work from 100 artists during the 27th annual Celebration of Fine Art in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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or the past 26 years, Celebration of Fine Art has provided collectors a unique opportunity to view and purchase art in working studios of 100 artists. The show, which takes in Scottsdale, Arizona, under its signature 40,000-square-foot “big white tents,” will return in 2017 from January 14 to March 26 and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Susan Morrow Potje, co-owner and director of the show, says, “Over the course of the past 26 years, the legacy of the Celebration of Fine Art has been passed down through generations of artists and art lovers. It has a storied history, and has become a very special place for artists and art lovers to connect, inspire one

another, learn, discover and most importantly build lasting relationships. The Celebration is truly an experience like no other—you simply have to feel it for yourself. Once you come here, it is a place you want to come back to over and over again.” Each year during the three-month run of the event, around 50,000 visitors from around the world pass through the tents. While visiting, they can discuss inspirations and techniques directly with the participating artists, as well as purchase completed art and see works in progress. Collectors who often attend the event will see many familiar faces, as well as new exhibitors. Included in the 2017 show are

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1 Celebration of Fine Art is an interactive art show where collectors can meet with and purchase works from 100 artists. 2 Paul Rhymer, Wake Up America!, bronze on wood and steel, life-size rooster. 3 Beth Zink, Spring Fever, acrylic, 48 x 48"


A R T SH OW P RE VI E W

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4 Paul Rhymer, El Diablo, bronze on onyx, life-size roadrunner. 5 JR Eason, Mornin’ Rush, bronze. 6 Stuart Yankell, Elemental Evening, acrylic and oil on industrial acrylic, 48 x 78" 4

painters such as Beth Zink and Stuart Yankell and sculptors Paul Rhymer and JR Eason, among others. As explained by Celebration of Fine Art, “Styles in the show range from realistic to impressionistic, Western realism, abstract to contemporary. The outdoor sculpture garden will return with nearly 100 pieces of life-sized and monumental sculpture as well as shared work space where visitors can see woodturning, welding and bronze pouring demonstrations weekly.” One artist taking full advantage of the studio experience is Rhymer. He says, “I love being at Celebration of Fine Art as it allows the collector and artist to collaborate. I sculpt, do bronze pours and patina demonstrations every day. It’s a great opportunity to experience the alchemy of clay sculptures becoming bronze.” In addition to the firsthand interaction collectors have by visiting the artists’ working studios, Celebration of Fine Art hosts its Art Discovery Series each Friday from 4 to 5 p.m. The series consists of panel discussions and live demonstrations, where artists can “discover the insights, stories and techniques that all come together 064

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in the artists’ works of art.” Among the highlights will be “As the Wood Turns” on January 27, which focuses on artists creating works of art with wood; “Palette Perfection” on February 10 that discusses color and artists’ palettes; and “Manipulating Metal” on March 24, that

explains the tools and techniques used in metalwork. Tickets to Celebration of Fine Art are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors and military, while children under 12 are admitted free. The tickets are all-event passes, good for the show’s full 10-week run.


Scottsdale in

& VICINIT Y The Art Lover’s Guide to Collecting Fine Art

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Galleries is an ArtWalk favorite, featuring both contemporary ust a short jaunt away from downtown Phoenix, and traditional artwork. With upcoming exhibitions from Scottsdale, Arizona, is paradise for art enthusiasts. Peregrine Heathcote, Holly Wilson and Joseph Lorusso, the Boasting dozens of galleries and containing more gallery is one of the must-visits. than 70 public works of art, 10 of which can be seen Year-round there are events to keep patrons busy. The 27th on a walking tour in the downtown area known as “Old Town Scottsdale,” the city is a feast for serious collectors as well as annual Celebration of Fine Art runs from January 14 to March people just starting their collections. 26 in North Scottsdale. The event, which is one of Arizona’s Old Town Scottsdale is always hopping on Thursday longest running interactive art shows, hosts 100 artists in evenings for its popular weekly Scottsdale ArtWalk, for which working studios and saw over 50,000 visitors at its last event. art galleries open their doors from 7 to 9 p.m. Hosted by the Another show to visit from January 13 to March 26 is Arizona Scottsdale Gallery Association in conjunction with the Fine Art EXPO where guests can explore the booths of city of Scottsdale, the event provides ample opportunity countless artists, walk through a 2-acre sculpture garden for patrons to discover the best in traditional, in the Sonoran Desert and watch artists paint Arabian 1 Over 70 public contemporary and Native American art, as well as horses plein air. artworks can jewelry and artifacts from the West. For those not satisfied with just looking at art, the be seen in Located on Old Town’s Main Street, Bonner David Scottsdale Artists’ School provides instruction with Scottsdale.

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classes taught by top-notch artists, including G. Russell Case and Milt Kobayashi. With winter temperatures in the high 60s, Scottsdale is the perfect escape for snowbirds and visitors from all around the globe who would like to admire art in an idyllic mountain landscape. Named the country’s “Most Livable City� in 1993 by the United States Conference of Mayors, Scottsdale contains not just art galleries but award-winning restaurants and bars to satisfy visitors of all ages and personalities. This destination guide provides insight into the best galleries in the area as well as tips from local art market insiders for the best welcome to the Grand Canyon State. 2 Scottsdale boasts dozens of art galleries. 3 Old Town Scottsdale in the evening.

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BONNER DAVID GALLERIES 7040 E. Main Street, Scottsdale, AZ 85251, (480) 941-8500 art@bonnerdavid.com www.bonnerdavid.com Bonner David Galleries’ dual gallery destination is located on Main Street in

the downtown Scottsdale Arts District. Representing a selection of traditional and contemporary artists, the gallery is known locally as an ArtWalk favorite for its frequent artist exhibits that venture away from the ordinary. Whether visitors have admiration for

traditional works or a flair for contemporary, Bonner David Galleries provides an exquisite art experience. While all the artists represented are admired and highly talented, some fan favorites are Max Hammond, Michael Carson, Ron Burns, and Karen Shapiro, who was just recently added to the

D E STIN ATION / SCOT TSDAL E & V ICI NI T Y

1 The contemporary wing of Bonner David Galleries.

Bonner David family. Upcoming at the gallery are Glorious Survivors, a solo exhibition for Jane Jones, beginning January 19; Holly Wilson’s show A Foot in Two Worlds, A Path On My Own, opening February 2; and Joseph Lorusso’s show beginning February 4.

2 Bonner David Galleries, In Concert, oil on panel, 24 x 24", by John Schieffer. 3 Bonner David Galleries, Birds of a Feather, oil on panel, 34 x 26", by Jane Jones.

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DESTINATION » SCOTTSDALE & VICINITY

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1 A look inside Celebration of Fine Art.

CELEBRATION OF FINE ART Southwest corner of Hayden Road and Loop 101, Exit 35, Scottsdale, AZ 85255 (480) 443-7695, info@celebrateart.com www.celebrateart.com Celebration of Fine Art, one of Arizona’s longest running interactive art shows, opens January 14 in Scottsdale with acclaimed and emerging juryselected artists and working artist studios. The show will be open daily through Sunday, March 26, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Now a linchpin in Arizona’s art, culture and tourism scene, Celebration of Fine Art hosts 100 of the country’s top artists and sees nearly 50,000 visitors from around the globe on average each year. Celebration of Fine Art takes place in north Scottsdale under the signature “big white tents” and features 40,000 square feet of working artist studios and works of art. The juried, invitational show has 068

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2 Celebration of Fine Art, Blooming, oil on panel, 20 x 16", by Leslie Duke. 3 Celebration of Fine Art, 9328 Engine, oil on canvas, 48 x 36", by Santiago Michalek.

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come to be recognized not only for its exceptional art, but also for its welcoming experience and interactive atmosphere. Styles at the show include realism, impressionism, abstract and contemporary, among others. There also is an outdoor sculpture garden with nearly 100 life-size and monumental

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pieces on display, as well as a shared working space where attendees watch sculptors create works. The Art Discovery Series will return in 2017, with panels held each Friday from 4 to 5 p.m. Offering interaction between artists and guests, the series delves into a variety of topics that pull back the curtain to reveal what is

behind the creation of art. The show is open to guests of all ages. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and military, and children under 12 are admitted for free. Tickets are all-event passes, good for the entire 10-week show during which attendees will have the opportunity to see art transform and meet the artists.


1 Roger Wermers sculpting stone at Arizona Fine Art EXPO. 2 Arizona Fine Art EXPO, Sweet Tweets, clay, 16 x 3", by Kathy Parks. 3 Scottsdale Artists’ School offers a variety of painting, drawing and sculpture workshops. 4 Scottsdale Artists’ School maintains small class sizes in each workshop, allowing students to receive oneon-one attention with their instructor. 1

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ARIZONA FINE ART EXPO 26540 N. Scottsdale Road Scottsdale, AZ 85255 (480) 837-7163 judi@thunderbirdartists.com www.arizonafineartexpo.com

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new addition to the 2-acre sculpture garden will be a Hummingbird and Butterfly Garden and a new event that is to be announced. Arizona Fine Art EXPO will be open from January 13 through March 26, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.

SCOTTSDALE ARTISTS’ SCHOOL 3720 N. Marshall Way Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (800) 333-5707 www.scottsdaleartschool.org

remains dedicated to the artistic enrichment of the community and to developing the capabilities of artists and aspiring artists. In 2017, the school will hold workshops taught by a roster of talented artists including Scott Burdick, G. Russell Case, Daniel Keys, Susan Lyon, Rose Frantzen, Jeff Hein, David Kassan, Milt Kobayashi, Lori Putnam, Bryan Mark Taylor and much more. Visit the school’s website to see a full list of visiting instructors and to learn more about its diverse programs. Also in 2017, the school will host its annual Best and Brightest Juried Art Show and Sale from February 9 to March 31.

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Scottsdale Artists’ School has been providing fine art education for artists of all ages and skill levels since 1983. The school maintains

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one of the largest fine art programs in the country by offering over 130 weeklong workshops, 60 weekly classes, and 20 one-day workshops. The school’s weeklong workshops are taught by today’s leading artists and are geared toward those who are passionate about learning the fundamentals of fine art. In addition to workshops and weekly classes, the school also offers destination workshops in a variety of cities across the country, a classical training program in the areas of drawing and painting, open studios sessions, and an engaging youth and teen academy. As a nonprofit organization, Scottsdale Artists’ School

D E STIN ATION / SCOT TSDAL E & V ICI NI T Y

The unique Arizona Fine Art EXPO occurs once a year for 10 weeks, and the show continues to climb the charts in popularity for highly juried award-winning artists, quality fine arts and as an art destination of Arizona. Patrons enjoy the opportunity to meet the artists, watch them work in studios, take in lunch at the Café de EXPO, shop the Artists’ Marketplace, enjoy weekend musical entertainment and much more. Visitors also love wandering outdoors to stroll throughout the 2-acre Sonoran Desert Sculpture Garden, stopping to watch the koi swimming and splashing in the falling waters sponsored by the Gnome Pond. EXPO offers free art classes for veterans. EXPO will host Arabian horses from Gemini Acres equine ranch on January 28, with some artists joining them in the garden for plein air painting of these eloquent horses. This season the


VACATIONS 2017 We have put together a calendar of the best workshops with a group of world-famous artists as your tutors. We’ll paint and sketch, go sightseeing, explore out-of-the-way places as well as the legendary sights of each country we visit. All our tutors will give you helpful and friendly advise on how to improve your painting to make sure you come back with a sketchbook full of memories.

Greg Allen “In the footsteps of Hans Heysen” FLINDERS RANGES, CLARE VALLEY AND HAHNDORF, AUSTRALIA

Sunday 12 March - Friday 24 March, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and adventure in spectacular South Australia. Highlights include the rugged scenery of the Flinders Ranges, one of Australia’s oldest wine regions, the Clare Valley, and historic Hahndorf in the Adelaide Hills.

John Lovett

CENTRAL AUSTRALIA

Sunday 14 May - Friday 26 May, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and adventure in the spectacular Australian Outback. Highlights include exploring Australia’s Red Centre from Alice Springs, the spectacular Uluru and the outback oasis of Glen Helen, situated in the West MacDonnell Ranges. For all the colour and rugged beauty of the Australian Outback laid out before your easel, who better to lead this tour than John Lovett, one of Australia’s most respected painters. If you want to experience adventure and the best of teaching, don’t miss this workshop.

Amanda Hyatt

SICILY & TUSCANY, ITALY

Monday 21 August - Saturday 2 September, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and adventure in the beautiful Tuscan town of Bagno Vignoni and Sicily in Italy. You will paint the beautiful towns in Tuscany as well as the historic towns on the island of Sicily. For all the color and beauty of Italy laid out before your easel, who better to lead this tour than Amanda Hyatt, one of water colourists’ most respected painters. If you want to experience adventure, and the best of teaching, don’t miss this workshop.


Charles Reid

COTSWOLDS & ST IVES, UK

Thursday 24 August - Tuesday 5 September, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and adventure around the beautiful quaint villages of the Cotswold’s and the coastal town of St Ives. Paint some of the very best sights to be found in England and experience the outstanding blend of historic locations, authentic village atmospheres and exemplary teaching from one of the world’s finest watercolor artists.

Greg Allen

CINQUE TERRE & RADDA IN CHIANTI, ITALY

Monday 4 September - Saturday 16 September, 2017 Paint some of the very best sights to be found in Italy. Cinque Terre is an artist’s dream where you will be able to paint the dramatic views of the five villages along the Italian coast. We then travel to Tuscany to experience the stunning scenery of the Chianti region. This 13 day painting workshop with Greg Allen gives members the opportunity to truly experience ‘la dolce vita’, the sweet life.

John Lovett VIETNAM

Thursday 5 October - Tuesday 17 October, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and sightseeing in Vietnam. From bustling cities and charming towns, to the picturesque countryside where you can see the stereotypical image of Vietnam, of a smiling farm worker wearing a coneshaped hat and standing in a rice paddy. This is your opportunity to paint some of the most amazing scenery in Vietnam. This is a wonderful tour for non-painting partners or friends as there is so much to see and do.

USA: 866 552 4278 (Toll Free) AUSTRALIA: 1800 033 436 (Toll Free) ALL OTHER COUNTRIES: +61 3 9729 8722

VACATIONS 2017

Website: www.paintingworkshops.net Email: sales@paintingworkshops.net


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / SCOTTSDALE, AZ

Through December 24, 2016

Bonner David Galleries 7040 E. Main Street | Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 941-8500 | www.bonnerdavid.com

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MICHAEL CARSON

The dangerous warmth M

ichael Carson is known for plucking his figures from bustling parties, quiet household settings, fashion shoots and dressing rooms, and depositing them into empty fields of color that hold them in place, a purgatory of paint where they wait under our watchful eye. They are relaxed, but also slightly concerned, which causes them to gaze out at the viewer, as if to acknowledge our act of voyeurism—and then accept it. In the Phoenix painter’s new exhibition—Not Just a Pretty Face now open at Bonner David Galleries in Scottsdale, Arizona—he again places male and female figures, all of them beautiful, amid hazy one- and two-color backgrounds and allows their evocative expressions to linger within the shadows sweeping

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across their faces and pooling in their eye sockets. In many of the new works, the backgrounds are beige washes, neutral foundations for his characters to build their stories onto. In Cracked Foundation olive paint drips from a hard edge; in Mist the background seems to embrace the nearly nude figure in an enveloping shroud. Then in others he bypasses neutral altogether and brings deep reds to the background and foreground. In all of them, Carson plays with color to achieve the mood he’s searching out. “I feel like I’ve been very muted lately. The more I manipulate the contrast, the less colorful it appears. So I’ve been throwing in hits of bright colors to fill my need for it. I love the red. It already comes with all sorts

1 Michael Carson in his Phoenix studio. 2 Spot On, oil on resin panel, 24 x 18"


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3 Red Dot, oil on resin panel, 48 x 48" 4 The After Party, oil on resin panel, 40 x 30" 5 Mist, oil on resin panel, 30 x 20" 6 Vice, oil on resin panel, 24 x 18" 3

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that day. I mainly work off of photographs and have an extensive collection of images from throughout the years,” he says. “I’ll piecemeal compositions together using all kinds of different reference photos. I may have three pieces of reference for one figure. You can tell when I’m doing this by the multiple light sources that make no sense in reality but work for purposes of creating the pose I wanted.” He continues, “The process only feels effortless when I lose track of time or zone out on a daydream. But I always want my pieces to look like they are effortless. Like there is movement in the paint and it was done quickly and haphazardly but still worked almost by accident. In fact, many times it is. I just keep redoing something until it happens for me.”

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up. His pieces are often large and his colors have a way to swallow viewers whole as they stand in front of them. And as the figures get closer to life-size the more their eyes tend to gently follow guests around the room. It can be profoundly moving to stand in front of one and gaze into the faces Carson has created. They seem to hold their poses just for you. And you half expect them to exhale softly when you walk away. For Carson, he achieves his figures by opening himself up in the studio and to his processes. “More and more lately I’ve been trying to be open for changes and diversions any time during a painting. I will sometimes do a rough composition sketch and usually follow up with a light sketch on the panel. Most of the ‘drawing’ I do is with a brush with whatever dark that I’m using

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of meanings: warning, stop, danger…and it’s so warm that it stands out against my muted palette and gets all the attention,” he says, adding that viewers can interpret what they will from his colors and figures. “Even though I’m probably having conversations with these people as I’m painting them, I’m really trying to not attach a narrative to the paintings. I’d rather that the person viewing it bring whatever mood or bias they have to determine who the subject is and what they are thinking about. It’s really none of my business.” But regardless of Carson’s hands-off approach to dictating narrative, his figures all share several common attributes, among them strength and vulnerability. “I would hope that you could see both. I spend a great deal of time dealing with the subtleties of the face. And even when it could be considered finished, if the expression isn’t there, I have to keep working it,” he says. “I think there is a strength in the singlefigure paintings. Usually with a centrally located, balanced composition the subject can look almost iconic with a very simple background that usually won’t complete and sometimes integrates directly into the figure. It’s all about creating really cool moments within the painting. Many times it’s the face. It’s where our eyes go.” The eyes also tend to go to Carson’s use of patterns, which he uses in a number of new works, including Bring Them to My Heels, which uses a floral print in a dress; The After Party, with its light blue floral pattern on a couch occupied by a stylishly dressed male and female pair; and Spot On, a head-andshoulders portrait of a woman wearing a spotted blouse that is pulled open to reveal her soft skin. “The print transfer that I use has multiple effects in the work. For one it floats. Your eyes want to see the pattern on the sofa but the pattern doesn’t follow the contours or depth and has a ‘floating’ effect,” he says. “You can decide to look into the painting because it has depth and perspective, but the pattern has the effect of bringing you back to the surface. And all my techniques tend to try to do that—in and out. Lately I’ve been painting on top of epoxy resin, which has its own unexpected texture and effects. Just the fact that I’m painting 1/8 of an inch above the surface on a clear ‘bar top’ allows light to get in behind the paint and illuminate the skin tones like I’ve never seen. That’s when I’m most happy. When I’m experimenting on a technique or material and run into something that I didn’t intend and yet it transforms the piece.” It could be said about any artist that their works should be seen in person, as opposed to online or in a magazine, but with Carson that certainly is a relevant point to bring


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / ROCKVILLE, MD

Through December 30, 2016

Artists & Makers Studios 2 12276 & 12280 Wilkins Avenue | Rockville, MD 20852 (240) 437-9573 | www.artistsandmakersstudios.com

JUDITH PECK

The reachable shore

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heoretical physicist Stephen Hawking wrote, “We are all different. There is no such thing as a standard or run-of-the-mill human being, but we share the same human spirit.” In her paintings, Judith Peck examines the creatures who share the same human spirit but who can be separated from one another by labels of race, gender and social bias. Through it all she sees hope. Her exhibition The Reachable Shore draws its title from the Nobel Prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney’s poem Doubletake: 076

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Believe that a further shore is reachable from here. Believe in miracles and cures and healing wells. In this series of paintings, Peck uses the same model. She says, “Lots of times when I’m working on a series my thoughts grow, and change and shift a little. Using the same model binds the series together. I relate to this model and we’ve become friends. I’m able to say things that are personal to me through her.”

1 Urban Dream, oil and plaster on board, 36 x 48" 2 Steeled (diptych), oil and plaster on board, 40 x 60" 3 Ripple Effect, oil and plaster on board, 31 x 33"


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Peck’s depiction of the fragmentation of society extends to the preparation of the boards she paints on. Shards of gessoed sheets emerge from the surface sometimes distinctly and sometimes suggestively. As she applies the shards, sands them down, applies more gesso and sands again, the shards still appear just as the shards of memory and personal history remain throughout our lives. She comments on the beginnings of the shards with a story about her grandparents: “The shards started many years ago. I painted a piece about my grandparents. They were unmarried and in their 20s when they came here from Russia—both as orphans. My grandmother had two brothers who suggested that she and my grandfather get married. They did, and my father was born. They never talked about their past to me—the broken life they left behind. They brought the shards of their life with them as their persona. As I got more into world history I started putting the shards into the paintings.” Peck learns about her paintings while she’s working. “I jump into a painting and I know what I mean in general,” she says. “I’m not illustrating something. The magic


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“Going beyond portraiture, Peck uses the figure to explore urban violence, discrimination, power and politics. Her paintings are strong, bold compositions layered on a ‘broken’ canvas that lure the viewer into the conversation on social issues going on in America today.” —Roxana Martin, collector, Bethesda, Maryland 078

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4 The Divide, oil and plaster on board, 40 x 30" 5 The Seed of Change, oil and plaster on board, 33 x 31"

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Peck acknowledges, “We’re all in the same boat and sometimes it’s difficult to navigate. We all have an effect on one another.” She reflects on the conflicts and points the way from her perspective of what she calls “the charmed life of the artist.” The Reachable Shore is on view at Artists & Makers Studios 2 in Rockville, Maryland, through December 30.

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of painting can change it.” In The Seed of Change the figure walks through a barren early spring landscape with the ice slowly melting in the water—a figure, perhaps, of desolation, walks along the shore. As she finished the painting Peck suddenly realized “Oh my god, she’s planting a seed.” She then painted a seed in the figure’s hand—a subtle, almost imperceptible seed.


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / NEW YORK, NY

Through January 17, 2017

George Billis Gallery 525 W. 26th Street, Ground Floor | New York, NY 10001 (212) 645-2621 | www.georgebillis.com

BENNET T VADNAIS

Unexpected beauty

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lassically trained in the techniques of observation and traditional painting, Bennett Vadnais is truly a contemporary realist. He sees the complex beauty in unexpected places, he experiments with how he applies the paint and he admires the insights of the artists who came after the classical realists. Vadnais spends time in the environment making detailed drawings of a scene as well as color studies with a pared down palette. Back at his studio he follows the traditional method of completing a compositional drawing, transferring it to his panel and making a fully rendered monochromatic underpainting. Occasionally he will come to a bit of information that he doesn’t fully understand and he will go back to the site to look again and to make more studies. He does that not to create paintings of great verisimilitude but because the painting has to work. Vadnais owes part of his point of view to the surrealists. His unoccupied spaces call to mind the vacant, 080

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distorted plazas of De Chirico. Although his scenes are visually accurate, their emptiness of human activity creates a subjective state. “I’m showing something straight forward,” he says, “but because there is no context it has a strange, uneasy or surrealist undertone.” Vadnais breaks with tradition and adopts the modernists’ love of paint itself. The variations in his application of paint can be seen in his exhibition of cityscapes at George Billis Gallery in New York City through January 17. He uses a pointillist technique in his painting Neighbors. “How I apply the paint is an intuitive decision based on what types of shapes or space a scene has,” he explains. “Neighbors is flat, overlapping, graphic shapes. I wanted to break up the spaces by breaking up the color. I was thinking of Seurat at the time, but also the early Renaissance egg tempera painters who rendered flat fields with intricately

1 2nd Ave., acrylic on aluminum, 31 x 40" 2 Neighbors, acrylic on aluminum, 48 x 18" 3 Penn Station, acrylic on aluminum, 33 x 43" 4 Footbridge, acrylic on canvas, 31 x 42¼"


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applied, vibrating color.” In Penn Station he experimented with thick paint. He says, “I knifed on thick color in the sky because it would have been tedious to paint a large area with tiny spots of color. I liked the effect that came about from my just trying it and I kept it going through the whole picture.” The composition is complex. Although the viewer might be more inclined to follow the train tracks and roadways, or the distortions of shadows as they lay across buildings, Vadnais’ use of color leads the eye on a counterclockwise curve from the green railing in the foreground to the green building on the right, back over to the trees in the left center and up to the yellow air conditioning enclosure on the far left. Vadnais’ paintings don’t follow “a traditional concept of beauty or a pleasing aesthetic,” he says. They have their own beauty.


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / SCOTTSDALE, AZ

December 29, 2016-January 17, 2017

Bonner David Galleries 7040 E. Main Street | Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 941-8500 | www.bonnerdavid.com

PEREGRINE HE ATHCOTE

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he paintings of Peregrine Heathcote transport viewers to unique and timeless places filled with figures and backgrounds that harken to past eras but also are contemporary. “Humans change very little, fashion defines the era, fashion is becoming less and less defined, anything goes now,” says Heathcote. “I like a little nod to the era of the cars and planes, but if you really look closely the figures could easily be from today. The colors and palette are perhaps more vintage, hopefully far away from the intense perfection of the blue-lit screens of social media. Escapism through a canvas…” December 29 through January 17, Bonner David Galleries in Scottsdale, Arizona, will host a new

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exhibition of the artist’s work. “I travel often and the shores of Venice, Lake Geneva and the Atlantic have all been powerful triggers for my work this year,” says Heathcote, whose latest paintings will have those places as backdrop. Among the works are Shore Leave and Shore Tango, where figures interact on beaches with waves clipping up along the sand. “The ocean is alive, it has its own translucent beauty, its own deep secrets. We are mere nothings on the shores of eternity…human emotions and forms in all their fragile glory are highlighted by the power of ocean views,” says the artist. Other ocean-themed scenes include Golden Age,

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1 Shared Pleasures, oil on canvas, 24 x 20" 2 Languid Afternoons Long Ago, oil on canvas, 20 x 8" 3 Shore Leave, oil on canvas, 18 x 26" 4 Golden Age, oil on canvas, 24 x 30"


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“No matter where or when you view a Heathcote painting, you are transformed into a timeless sense of wonder. His figures are provocative, his backgrounds stunning and his use of vintage cars, boats, trains or planes transcends our mind and takes us to new places that we left behind.” —Clark David Olson, Bonner David Galleries

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which shows a woman and a group of filmmakers on the deck of a boat, and Shared Pleasures featuring a couple sailing. Of the former work, Heathcote explains, “The Atlantic Ocean provided the backdrop for this cinematic piece. I collect both vintage film and still cameras and love the idea of filming the elegant and bygone age of cruises.” When working on new pieces, Heathcote is often inspired by one particular element and it builds from there. He explains, “[S]ometimes body language of a model will seep into my consciousness and I will know instantly the car to set that emotion off. Often times it is the location…composition is fluid, sometimes it flows quick, sometimes slow and languid.” Heathcote adds that the focus of each composition is important and all his details go to that element. “Sometimes I refer to the very classical palette of the renaissance,” he says, “but my influences are far from being from one era.”


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / ATLANTA, GA

Through January 30, 2017

Salamatina Gallery 876 Joseph E. Lowery Boulevard Northwest | Atlanta, GA 30318 (516) 439-4471 | www.salamatina.com

NABIL MOUSA

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t first glance the artwork of Nabil Mousa may seem to be abstracted fields of color and mixed media collages, but further exploration reveals the artist’s interpretation of culture, society and religion. Born in Syria and having lived in the United States since age 11, Mousa reflects on his firsthand experiences and looks to promote understanding of all people. Through January 30, Salamatina Gallery in Atlanta, where the artist lives, will host an exhibition of his latest series titled Veil of Ignorance. “Initially in the project I was talking about hidden beauty within and the women who wear the burka and go their entire life without people knowing who they are, what they look like, if they smile, are happy, sad or lonely,” he says. “…When we lift the veil we’re going to be introduced to the person who is hiding behind it. They’re a person 084

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full of life, hope and creativity and thought.” Each of these initial works was created using household paint to cover most of the canvas, while around one-third of the canvas was left for the artist to make a geometric design. Included among those pieces is Red on Orange, which was done with gesso, oil paint and charcoal on canvas on board. He explains, “Each painting has a different design on it and it was really to talk about how we’re all individuals and each one of us is so unique.” Later works in the series developed where the artist collaged scared texts together with burlap painted in different colors. “The reason I use the Bible, Quran and Torah is to talk about the oppression of religion where you have to conform to their teaching instead of taking what we’re taught and expressing it in our own views and how it can be meaningful in our lives,” he says.

As a whole, the artist has found that the series has become representative of his own life. “Even though initially I was making work that talks about the oppression of women, I was also talking about me and my personal oppression in being gay and hiding and being afraid of who I am and rejection and being afraid of being made fun of as well,” he says. Color also plays a predominant role in the artist’s work with orange being one of the main hues he uses. It is a base in his artwork, and among the first colors he puts down on the palette. “I talk about orange in a way, if you look it up it’s this color of soothing, comfort and that is what it embodies,” says Mousa, adding that the color has come to symbolize fear or high alert for some, such as in the use of Code Orange in the United States. “I play on that theme; fear creates ignorance.


1 A view of Nabil Mousa’s exhibition Veil of Ignorance. 2 Works from Nabil Mousa’s Veil of Ignorance series. 3 Red on Orange, mixed media, 60 x 48" 4 Veil of Ignorance #19, mixed media, 28 x 22" 2

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scholar John Cauman. Of the book’s title Salamatina says, “[It’s about] you breaking your own chains. He’s breaking out of a burden within him and something he was always very much ashamed of and being someone he’s not. Within himself he became completely free.”

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on the artist titled Nabil Mousa: Breaking the Chains. The event will be held on January 12 at 6 p.m. Oksana Salamatina, owner of the gallery, says the book is divided into three parts: a section on his early life and how he became an artist, a chapter by Charles A. Riley, and an essay on the artist’s use of color by Matisse

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Unless we get rid of fear, ignorance will always be there. Educating people about who we are and being open minded to other people’s lives and allowing them to express themselves without judgment it can change—it can end wars.” Along with the exhibition, the gallery will have a book signing for a new publication

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UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / LOS ANGELES, CA

January 11-15, 2017

Arcadia Contemporary at LA Art Show – Booth #701/800 Los Angeles Convention Center | 1201 S. Figueroa Street, West Hall Los Angeles, CA 90015 | (424) 603-4656 | www.arcadiacontemporary.com

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or the past 13 years, Arcadia Contemporary has participated in the LA Art Show fair that takes place in January at the Los Angeles Convention Center. During that time, the gallery has exhibited works by many of their represented artists, as well as made connections with collectors and the public. This year, the gallery returns to the event, held January 11 to 15, with its largest presentation of works. “It’s terrifying and exciting at the same time. The greater expense of creating such a large display and the introduction of so

many new artists and works is daunting, but hey ‘no guts, no glory,’” says gallery president Steve Diamant. Included in this year’s display at the fair are a number of artists who will be making their United States debuts, as well as artists that the gallery will be exhibiting at LA Art Show for the first time. Among the artists on display will be Annie MurphyRobinson, Alex Russell Flint, James Neil Hollingsworth, John Brosio, Stephen Mackey, Amanda Greive, Miguel Angel Moya, Jeffrey Ripple, Dan Quintana and

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Katie G. Whipple. “We have been very fortunate to have found some new artists who have never shown in the United States before and we are going to present their works for the very first time at the fair. One painter is from the U.K. and while his ‘painting style’ is in keeping with what people come to expect from Arcadia, upon further examination of the works, however, what appear to be ‘ordinary, bucolic scenes,’ reveal a very dark and threatening ‘undercurrent’ that pervades all of the work,” says Diamant. “In addition to U.S. premieres, there are several painters 1 whose works have never Dan been shown at the LA Art Quintana, Shell, oil on Show before and we are wood, 12 x 12" thrilled to be able to do so. One still life painter 2 will astound people with Miguel Angel Moya, Shark, the attention to detail and oil on canvas, a level of execution that 39½ x 24½" is rarely seen in today’s art world, while another painter is creating figurative works in a technique that we have never seen before and we already know that collectors will find the work as fascinating as we do.” Among the pieces that will be on view in the booth is Hollingsworth’s still life painting Big Drill No. 2. “I love painting things that have been designed and built in a pre-digital age. In fact, the more ‘mechanical’ an item is the better. Maybe it’s because I’m a ‘baby boomer,’ or maybe it’s because I was once an aircraft mechanic, I’m not sure, but the more analog something is the more attractive it is to me,” says Hollingsworth. “This drill belonged to a friend and I fell in love with it the first time I saw it. I knew it would become the subject of a painting one day. I have, in fact, painted it three times and hope to paint it again. Simply put, I just think it’s beautiful.” Another more contemporary still life in the show is Moya’s Shark, which confines the predatory animal in a jar of


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water. “During the last years, I have been doing these still lifes about sea creatures,” explains the artist. “When you change their natural environment and translate them to a dark, mysterious atmosphere, inside a scientific jar, our point of view is different. If in addition you increase the size of the subject, its impact grows and then we observe the specimens like a symbol, almost like an archetype.” There also will be Genevieve’s Apples, by Ripple, on view in the exhibition. “These apples come from a local orchard, which grows only antique varieties, some of which have histories that go back hundreds of years,” Ripple says. “I combined them with marigolds from my garden in an effort to show the beauty and variety in these apples and create a balanced composition that captures a particular time of year in the area where I live.” Figurative paintings are also prominent, such as The Feeling of Falling, by Greive, that depicts a woman slumped over above a chair. Of the piece, she explains, “The Feeling of Falling is inspired by my interest in addressing the emotional and

3 Amanda Greive, The Feeling of Falling, oil on wood panel, 48 x 36" 4 James Neil Hollingsworth, Big Drill No. 2, oil on canvas, 36 x 24" 5 Jeffrey Ripple, Genevieve’s Apples, oil on canvas, 12 x 12" 4

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societal pressure to conform to a certain ideal that women face, as well as my interest in the symbolic duality of flowers as fragile, beautiful and sexual but also strong, persistent and adaptable. The figure, with abrasions visible on her elbow, is frozen in a static half-seated/half-prone position, hovering above a chair. Here, the dahlias can either be viewed as a weight or a buoy.” Jerk in a Road by Brosio is another example that will be available from the gallery. “I’d say that is definitely a picture of an American blocking the road,” Brosio explains of the image. “I am not sure whether the tornado is his partner or whether he is protecting us from it. Or both?” In addition to the booth at LA Art Show, Arcadia Contemporary will host a party at its Culver City-based gallery on January 15 in conjunction with the Culver Hotel. “Because of the hotel’s close proximity to the gallery,” says Diamant, “they suggested that the LA Art Show was a perfect time for us to work together to present the food and special drinks the hotel has become known for in an environment like Arcadia Contemporary that celebrated the arts.”


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / CHARLESTON, SC

January 6-February 28, 2017

Robert Lange Studios 2 Queen Street | Charleston, SC 29401 (843) 805-8052 | www.robertlangestudios.com

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n January 6, Robert Lange Studios in Charleston, South Carolina, will open the group exhibition Attention to Detail featuring the work of nearly 30 renowned painters who work in realistic styles such as photorealism and hyperrealism. The paintings in the show span all subjects, providing a cross section of artwork in these meticulously rendered styles. Much of the work evokes classic techniques with contemporary aspects. Included in the show are Matthew Cornell, George Ayers, Mary Ellen 090

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Johnson, Erik Johnson, Robert Lange, Kerry Simmons, Matthew Bober, Adam Vinson, Diane Davich Craig, Katie Miller, Anthony Waichulis, Jesus Navarro, Christopher Stott, Joshua Suda, J.B. Boyd, Matt Story, Harriet White, Adam Normandin, and more. Ayers will be represented in the exhibition by his still life Fruit Tart, which depicts the delectable pastry on the edge of a table or countertop. “I’ve been working on a series of paintings based on a few of my favorite vices,” Ayers says. “Who doesn’t love strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and kiwi? When mixed with a lot of sugar and a crispy tart crust, they become even more delightful. I saw this little gem at the local bakery and knew right away it would be my next still life project.” For his 7-by-5-inch painting Emergence, Waichulis focuses on

1 Christopher Stott, Oliver No. 3 Typewriter, oil on canvas, 30 x 36" 2 Anthony Waichulis, Emergence, oil, 7 x 5"


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3 Brett Scheifflee, When Time Ticked Slowly, oil on panel, 24 x 32" 4 Jesus Navarro, Oranges and Stripes, oil on canvas, 16 x 31" 5 George Ayers, Fruit Tart, oil on panel, 16 x 16"

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masculine hero off fighting some injustice on behalf of that young girl in the picture—the reality is that it was intended to be a symbol of what that young girl aspires to be. A number of specific compositional components and devices were used to promote this idea and I hope that viewers will enjoy an investigation to uncover them.” Other works in the show include figuratives like Miller’s painting of two young girls in yellow outfits titled Twins by the Trees and White’s close-up portrait Glow; still lifes such as Stott’s Oliver No. 3 Typewriter and Oranges and Stripes by Navarro; and Davich Craig’s sign painting Heartbreak Hotel. There will be an evening reception for the exhibition on February 3 from 5 to 8 p.m., while the work will remain on view through February 28.

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a familiar design in his oeuvre, a smallscale shadow box assemblage. “While these compositions often lend themselves to more playful themes, I have enjoyed the opportunity to use the arrangements to explore and communicate complex concepts. Emergence is one such piece,” he explains. “My intention for this work was to celebrate the continuing diminishment of societal norms that aim to dictate specific behavior patterns based on gender. For example, while many may interpret the soldier figurine in the piece as a representation of some


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / SAG HARBOR, NY

January 7-February 7, 2017

RJD Gallery 90 Main Street | Sag Harbor, NY 11963 (631) 725-1161 | www.rjdgallery.com

Earthly delights O

n January 7, RJD Gallery in Sag Harbor, New York, will mount the new exhibition Earthly Delights. “This exhibit is a visual commentary on the juxtaposition of the human need to be surrounded with nature, immersed in beauty and a celebration of the delight of being one with the earth,” says Eve Gianni Corio, director of the gallery. “To fully appreciate this experience one must also explore our man-

made world and acknowledge the confines and self-created challenges. It is only then that we can understand our choices and find balance.” The show will include fresh artwork from the gallery’s roster of artists, including Adrienne Stein, Katie O’Hagan, Pamela Wilson, Margo Selski, Odile Richer, Yana Movchan, and more. Among the works on view will be

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1 Margo Selski, Night Birds, oil and beeswax on panel, 14 x 11" 2 Adrienne Stein, Green Bride, oil on canvas, 48 x 24" 3 Pamela Wilson, The Grievance, oil on canvas, 48 x 48" 4 Yana Movchan, Naturelle Jewellery, oil on canvas, 28 x 22"

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the valley, insanely beautiful and haunting. The family is talking about selling the property, and she is not having it. At such a young age, she seems to know the value of pristine land and how she is being threatened.” Stein’s painting for the show, Green Bride, is from a continuing series of works and features her friend Megan Donley Hewitt. “She is part of an ongoing series of bridal portraits of close friends and family members who are recently married but rather than traditional white, I build the costume and palette around a color that correspondences to the subject’s individual persona and life force,” Stein explains. “Megan is a talented musician, artist and yoga instructor, and I wanted the painting to reflect her earthy, vibrant mystique.” Earthly Delights will remain on view at RJD Gallery through February 7.

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Movchan’s Naturelle Jewellery, which shows a woman surrounded by different birds and butterflies, as well as a monkey. “Nature was always a great inspiration for me,” says Movchan. “If I stop and look at a bird or a butterfly, I realize how complicated and beautiful are their colors, shapes and movements. A combination of outer and inner beauty and the love of living nature can be most complementary for people. My idea of the painting being harmony within nature.” Another work is Wilson’s The Grievance. Of the piece, the artist explains, “This girl stands alone in a cold but sunny aspen forest—with a serious grievance: Her property, her world and her legacy are all being trampled upon by those less concerned than she about the current stage of her family’s 20-actre Colorado aspen forest, which sits still and huge, overlooking


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / NAPLES, FL

January 18-February 12, 2017

Gardner Colby Gallery 386 & 365 Broad Avenue South | Naples, FL 34102 (239) 403-7787 | www.gardnercolbygallery.com

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ANNA KINCAIDE & JUAN CARLOS COLLADA

Nature abstracted

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or Anna Kincaide inspiration struck while flipping through a fashion book. “A photo of Philip Treacy’s hat that he designed for Alexander McQueen stopped me in my tracks,” she says. The image prompted her to push further into a style she was already exploring: creating figurative pieces without a view of the model’s eyes. “I started toying with more portrait-type poses and began disguising faces with huge floral-inspired hats,” Kincaide says. “The hat pieces are a perfect harmony of realism and imagination so the balance is as interesting to create as they are to look at.” Kincaide’s series, which she refined after spending two weeks studying with artist Milt Kobayashi, will be on view at Gardner Colby Gallery during its La Bella Mariposa show from January 18 to February 12. Artist Juan Carlos Collada will also be showcasing his work, which consists of colorful, hand-painted feather butterflies displayed in acrylic cases. Taking inspiration from the objects found in the natural landscape of South Florida, Collada says, “My new works use bright concentrations of color, producing a series born from my love of geometric abstractions reminiscent of favorites like Ellsworth Kelly, Jasper Johns and Piet Mondrian.” Collada’s butterflies are minimalistic while still remaining visually interesting. “The shape of a butterfly is very simple, but the patterns upon their wings are often intricate and complex, no two being identical,” he says. “I love seeing the two meld together into something that is very visually soothing to me.”


1 Juan Carlos Collada, Flight of the Butterflies (heptaptych), mixed media under Plexiglas, 72 x 210" 2 Juan Carlos Collada, Kaleidoscope (quadriptych), mixed media under Plexiglas, 48 x 48" 3 Anna Kincaide, Free Forever, oil, 60 x 60" 4 Anna Kincaide, Hesitating, oil, 60 x 48"

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“Ms. Kincaide’s sophisticated figurative paintings of stylized women disguised by avant-garde floral-inspired hats don’t rely on facial expression to convey emotion. Instead, she uses gesture, color and body language to engage the viewer. In his Butterflies series, Juan Carlos Collada assembles hand-painted feather butterflies, creating a unique artistic statement and a lively engaging story full of movement, color and joy!” — Pamela Campe, gallery director, Gardner Colby Gallery


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / NAPLES, FL

January 18, 2017

Quidley & Company Fine Art 375 Broad Avenue South | Naples, FL 34102 (239) 261-4300 | www.quidleyandco.com

Seasonal celebration Q

uidley & Company Fine Art’s Naples, Florida, gallery will celebrate the new year during Gallery Row’s Season Kickoff Celebration on January 18 along with the four other Naples art galleries that make up the famed art district. There, they will reveal their 2017 winter collection with new

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works from Anne Packard, Gary Ruddell, Stephen Coyle and many others. On display from Coyle are the beach scenes It’s 95 and We’re Out of Ice and Beach Dads and Cell Phones, which serve as an examination of humans as they “walk, crawl, run, crouch and lie upon the earth.”

“The beach paintings evolved slowly,” he says. “It started when my daughter was young and playing around in our backyard in a small inflatable pool. This led to a larger inflatable pool, then to Walden Pond and finally the ocean where she could meet surfer boys.”


1 Stephen Coyle, It’s 95 and We’re Out of Ice, alkyd on panel, 30 x 40" 2 Gary Ruddell, Japanese Lanterns, oil on panel, 52 x 52" 3 Anne Packard, Last Light, oil on canvas, 36 x 60" 2

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In order to paint the large crowds found at the beach, Coyle turned to Breughel, Bellows and Hokusai, with the goal, “to paint a large group and yet express the individuality of each person.” Ruddell uses references to memories of his life and family in order to create his work. His painting Japanese Lanterns, which features a young boy on a small island putting house-shaped lanterns out to sea, has an especially poignant meaning for him. “The Japanese lanterns are put on the water in search of souls lost in tragedy,” Ruddell explains. “For me, this really reflects the family that I’ve lost, my parents and the home that I can’t go back to.” Quidley & Company will be open from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. for the Gallery Row Season Kickoff Celebration, and afterward the paintings in their winter collection will remain on view at the gallery.


INTERNATIONAL ARTIST MAGAZINE AWARD WINNER

MARINA DIEUL Montreal, Canada | marinadieul@yahoo.ca | www.marinadieul.com

Pushing limits Marina Dieul explores new methods of creating three-dimensional illusions in her Trompe l’Oeil paintings.

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ortrayed in the artwork of Frenchborn artist Marina Dieul are critters and cats that seem to be ready to leap out of her canvases. The Trompe l’Oeil style of these works is a method she has dedicated her career to, as well as painting portraiture and some imaginative realism. She explains, “I tend to think that Trompe l’Oeil is the ultimate form of painting, I used to be fascinated as a child by the ability to create the illusion of three dimensions with only two dimensions, and you can’t really push

this concept further than Trompe l’Oeil.” Along with her interest in the artwork style, Dieul had an affinity for drawing and studying pets and it’s something that occupied a lot of her time. “This subject seems totally natural to me; however, I took me many years to discover how I wanted to paint them. I fell in love with Trompe l’Oeil in my 20s, but it was only six or seven years ago that those two main interests merged into one,” she says. “It began with a mice infestation, which led me to my

first little mouse Trompe l’Oeil, quickly followed by many others and cats, rabbits and many other animals appeared. Animal compositions offer a lot of playfulness possibilities.” Her newest works, such as Morphogenese 8 and Morphogenese 10, move beyond the classical techniques of Trompe l’Oeil through the combination of graphic backgrounds and cats emerging from the patterns. “Recently I added an ornamental dimension to my works; I’m very interested in the juxtaposition

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of the abstract flatness of the ornaments and the three-dimensional illusion of realism,” she explains. “Slowly the idea of my new series Morphogenese took life. I played with the idea of creating a kind of Green Man in cat form, leaving the world of more traditional Trompe l’Oeil to experiment something different.” Dieul, who often works in series, says she finds inspiration for the scenes everywhere—browsing artwork in museums, a childhood memory, a friend’s pet and so on. Lately cats have been prominent in her work because she fosters cats for a no-kill shelter. “It’s sometimes a bittersweet experience to meet these little beings, to get them back in shape, to gain their trust and then to let them go with their forever family,” she says. “But I know that this sacrifice is necessary to save more lives. I realized that I needed to portray some of these personalities as a celebration of a beautiful encounter.” Dieul was the Second Prize Winner of International Artist magazine’s Challenge No. 96, Favorite Subjects. 2

IN TE RN ATIO N AL AR TIST MAG AZ IN E AWARD W IN N E R

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2 Morphogenese 8, oil, 10 x 10"

3 Morphogenes 10, oil, 8 x 8"

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4 Souris 27, oil, 6" diameter

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1 Marina Dieul in her studio.


SCOTT B. ROYSTON Baltimore, MD | scottbroyston@yahoo.com | www.scottroyston.com

INTERNATIONAL ARTIST MAGAZINE AWARD WINNER

Detail oriented

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orking in the highly detailed style of Trompe l’Oeil, Scott B. Royston paints a number of different subjects. Depicted on his canvases are traditional still life elements of fruit and flowers to game birds to a new series of flag paintings—all of which tell unique narratives based on the items that he selects for the pieces. “I usually work from life. There are times where I have pictures of my own flowers that I use. I do basically work from life though,” he says, adding that the photo references are because the flowers eventually wilt. Many of the items in Royston’s works are from his own collection of props, but he will search online for any number of items that are needed to complete his work. “One of the major things [that is important in my work] is my faith,” Royston says, who often refers to being a Christian through symbols and metaphors in his compositions. “I always want people to know where my gifts came from. God is my center force in my life and the only reason I have this gift. I use [references to my faith] gently through different ideas in my paintings.” Among Royston’s works is He Got Game, which pays homage to artists John F. Peto and William Harnett.

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“I had the desire to do a duck for a while, but could never find the resource specimen to carry out my project. Thankfully, after going to a few different taxidermist and getting nowhere, two of my students happened to stumble upon a mallard duck that had been lying on the side of the road on the way to their lesson,” says Royston. “They wrapped it up and brought it to me. I thought to myself, ‘Is God great or what?’” Freedom’s Colors, a painting with the American flag, is from the series of flag paintings he has been working on. “This theme was very well received when I had completed another piece very similar several years ago. So I set up a fairly similar composition with a lot of colorful, inspiring, patriotic objects to help bring life into this theatrical and enlightening themed composition,” Royston says. “Playing around with these objects was very enjoyable and fun as it was finding them. Working with the flag was the most entertaining part for me.” Royston is represented by a number of galleries around the United States including Sanders Galleries in Tucson, Arizona. Royston was the Third Prize Winner of International Artist magazine’s Challenge No. 96, Favorite Subjects.

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1 Freedom’s Colors, oil, 36 x 24" 2 Propitiation, oil, 20 x 12" 3 He Got Game, oil, 26 x 22"


A R T I S T

F O C U S

La Crudad Tiene Voz / The City Has No Voice, acrylic, 12 x 12"

Love Potion Number 17, acrylic, 12 x 12"

Canyon At Pilar, NM, acrylic, 12 x 12"

Larry Blissett L

textural and chromatic points of appeal. Blisettt began painting on a more fulltime basis in 2010, and is represented by Sunset Art Gallery of Amarillo in Texas.

Want to See More? Represented by Sunset Art Gallery of Amarillo 3701 Plains Boulevard, Suite 122 Amarillo, TX 79102 | (806) 353-5700 www.sunsetartgalleryofamarillo.com

Sunset Art Gallery of Amarillo

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McElwain, John Axton, Tony Abeyta and Miguel Martinez, among others. He also counts musicians as his inspirations, such as the Rolling Stones, Delbert McClinton, Lou Ann Barton, ZZ Top, Willy DeVille and Doug Sahm. As the gallery explains, “The style Blissett has developed is completely his own, even as it reveals insights from the musical and painterly heroes in his personal pantheon.” From highly abstracted to nonobjective compositions, each painting shows the artist’s attention to design in form and color. This allows his canvases to have

AR TI ST FOC U S

arry Blissett spent many years in the construction industry—working his way from laborer to concrete contractor to general contractor—before finding success as an artist after the age of 50. The Santa Fe, New Mexico-based painter has had a lifelong love of drawing and painting, and it was even reflected in his previous career, as he “gave as much attention to aesthetics as he did to durability, structural integrity and fitness for purpose.” Blissett has been influenced by the paintings of John Nieto, Ed Mell, Henry Asencio, Darren Vigil Gray, Louisa


INDEX

ARTISTS IN THIS ISSUE Ayers, George

93

Blissett, Larry

103

Greive, Amanda

88

Moya, Miguel Angel

87

Selski, Margo

94

Heathcote, Peregrine

82

Navarro, Jesus

92

Stein, Adrienne

94

Carson, Michael

72

Hollingsworth, James Neil

89

Packard, Anne

99

Stott, Christopher

90

Collada, Juan Carlos

96

Kincaide, Anna

97

Peck, Judith

76

Vadnais, Bennett

80

98

Mann, Jeremy

31

Quintana, Dan

86

Waichulis, Anthony

91

Marshall, Kerry James

38

Ripple, Jeffrey

89

Wessmark, Johannes

31

Wilson, Pamela

94

Coyle, Stephen Dieul, Marina

100

Elliott, Josh

31

McIntosh, Ryan

34

Royston, Scott B.

Flint, Alex Russell

31

Mousa, Nabil

84

Ruddell, Gary

102 99

Fox, Stephen

31

Movchan, Yana

95

Scheifflee, Brett

92

ADVERTISERS IN THIS ISSUE American Women Artists / Queensbury, NY

10

Arcadia Contemporary / Culver City, CA

104

Cover 2, 1, 2, 3

Arizona Fine Art Expo / Scottsdale, AZ

25

Aspen Grove Fine Arts / Aspen, CO

24

Astoria Fine Art / Jackson Hole, WY

19

Babb, Gary / Surprise, AZ

16

Bailey, Patrick / Phoenix, AZ

29

Bonner David Galleries / Scottsdale, AZ

9, 11

Celebration of Fine Art / Scottsdale, AZ

12

Faulkner, Gail / Ventura, CA

28

Fracchia, Barbara / Kensington, CA

20

Robert Lange Studios / Charleston, SC

13

Gardner Colby Galleries / Naples, FL

61

Ruddy, Sally / Waterford, CA

27

Scottsdale Artists’ School / Scottsdale, AZ

28

Golden K Studio / Kitscoty, AB John Pence Gallery / San Francisco, CA Kloosterboer, Lorena / Antwerp, Belgium Lotton Gallery / Chicago, IL

18 Cover 4 25 5

Maxwell Alexander Gallery / Culver City, CA

Middlekauff, Chuck / Austin, TX

Cover 3 22

Eason, JR / Cave Creek, AZ

27

Portrait Society of America / Tallahassee, FL 26

Egeli Gallery / Provincetown, MA

27

Rhymer, Paul / Point of Rocks, MD

www.AmericanAr tCollector.com

29

RJD Gallery / Sag Harbor, NY

6-7

Scottsdale Gallery Association / Scottsdale, AZ

26

Southeastern Wildlife Exposition / Charleston, SC

24

Sunset Art Gallery of Amarillo / Amarillo, TX 17 UGallery.com / San Francisco, CA

21

Yankell, Stuart / Bala Cynwyd, PA

28

Zink, Beth / Cave Creek, AZ

26


LA ART SHOW J an u ary 1 1 - 1 5 , 2 0 1 7 | B O O T H # 1 3 6

Featuring new artwork by Sean CHEETHAM, Kim COGAN, Glenn DEAN, Danny GALIEOTE, David GROSSMANN, Logan Maxwell HAGEGE, David KASSAN, Michael KLEIN, Joshua LAROCK, Mark MAGGIORI, Jeremy MANN, Serge MARSHENNIKOV, Cesar SANTOS, Joseph TODOROVITCH, Kim WIGGINS.

Early Preview Available By Request.

MAXWELL ALEXANDER GALLERY

LA ART SHOW Opening Reception Jan 11, 7-11PM Join us in our largest booth to date, BOOTH #136

MaxwellAlexanderGallery.com | 310.839.9242 info@MaxwellAlexanderGallery.com

WE ARE MOVING! CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OUR NEW LOS ANGELES ADDRESS


Gallery Artists Group Show

Greg Gandy, Lake Reflection, Kings Canyon, oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches, 2016

JOHN PENCE GALLERY 750 Post Street • San Francisco • California www.johnpence.com • art@johnpence.com Phone (415) 441 - 1138 Established 1975

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American art collector january 2017  

A book for those who love drawing water-color pictures

American art collector january 2017  

A book for those who love drawing water-color pictures

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