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Isometric 1:100 0

2000

6000 mm

Digital Design - Module 01 Semester 1, 2018 Jee Hong Ng

898 231 Siavash Malek - Studio 20


Week One

Reading: Zeara Polo, A. 2010. Between Ideas and Matters.

According to Zeara-Polo, the diagram does not play a representational role in the design process but provides an organisational and can have a performative quality depending on how it is deployed. Explain how Diagram is different from Signs and Symbols? (100 words Maximum)

A diagram does not play any representative role in defining something. In diagrams, unnecessary information can be filtered out to carry the message of the author. Signs or symbols instead represent the qualities of objects however its materiality does not represent its performance.

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Week One

Precedent Analysis

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1. Image - Overall view 2. Image - Internal view 1 (“Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2001 By Daniel Libeskind With Arup” 2018) 3. Image - Cladding (“Serpentine Gallery Pavilion With Daniel Libeskind” 2018) 4. Image - Internal view 2 (“Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2001 By Daniel Libeskind With Arup”

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Week One

Precedent Analysis

1. Plan - Floor plan of pavilion 2. Section - NS section of pavilion 3. Elevation - North, West and South (Please refer to the appendix at the back for the modelling process)

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Week Two

Reading: Hertzberger H. 2005. The in-between and The Habitable Space Between Things, from Lessons for Students in Architecture. Herzberger discuss how design should not be extreme in its functionality. Use your precedent study to explain how the pavilion allows for an appropriation of use. (100 words Maximum)

In Daniel Libeskind’s pavilion, there were no designated doorways for entry or exit. This encourages people to circulate freely around the space as they wish. Besides that, the architect designed the pavilion with varying roof heights and floor widths. This configuration allows for different activities to occur at different locations depending on the needs of the users.

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Week Two Isometric

Isometric 1:100 0

2000

Eighteen Turns Isometric

6000 mm

As the name suggests, Daniel Libeskind’s Eighteen Turns contains 18 edges of 19 wall/roof panels. The technique that the architect uses mimics the traditional art of folding paper - origami. Paper is a nonelastic material which is limited to folding and bending. It does not have the capability of producing non-developable surfaces. Similarly, the architect chose to use sheet aluminium as the cladding material for his pavilion. The equally-sized flat aluminium sheets can be manufactured at minimal cost and then riveted onto the custom steel frame which makes the skeleton of the structure.

wall and roof panels resulted in a quirky result. Such varying wall and roof planes can contribute to a gradient of spaces that change as one travels through the pavilion. As a result of the varying ceiling heights, one can experience varying degrees of openness as they travel through the space. Where there are major shifts in ceiling height, there is a change of threshold as the user steps into a tighter, smaller space. The same can be said for the varying floor widths as a result of the angled walls. Besides determining the thresholds, the walls of the pavilion affects the circulation. When walls are close to each other, they form a tighter corridor which encourages movement whereas walls that open up into vast spaces do not. Instead, the walls that are further apart allow people to stop and experience the space.

During the modelling process, I realised that none of the wall panels nor roof panels were coplanar with the XY/ZX/ZY axes. The design of these

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Week Two Diagrams

Threshold Diagram

Circulation Diagram

The gradient shows the varying degrees of ceiling heights as one travels through the pavilion (darker = lower ceiling). The change in ceiling heights defines the kind of space which is produced and where the thresholds are present.

The entrances define the start and end points of circulation within the pavilion. The gradient in this diagram displays the floor width of the space. As the gradient gets darker, the space gets tighter and narrower and it is only natural that people tend to not stop in narrow and tight spaces. As the walls move further apart the space starts to feels less like a corridor and more like a room and this gives people the oppurtunity to stop and experience the pavilion.

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Week Two Isometric

Eighteen Turns Unfolded Plan Since the isometric does not reveal a clear representation of how the panels are connected to each other, I chose to unfold the panels into a plan view so that the size of the panels can be perceived normally. Libeskind has a history of using strong geometries to define his architecture and this is not the first time he has based his architecture off origami. In this pavilion, Libeskind uses origami as a technique in developing different thresholds. For the major bulk of the pavilion (in the middle) the panels repeat folds in the same direction which spirals into the shape of a corridor. When the architect chooses to reverse the direction of folding, a different structure seperated from the main body of the pavilion is formed. This creates a sort of archway/gateway at the end of his pavilion.

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Appendix

Process

1)Trace and place the elevations and sections in the right positions.

2) Using the SrfPt command, generate the surfaces in front, back, left and right viewports.

3) Turn on control points for surfaces and move them into the right position using adjacent viewports as reference.

4) Align construction plane to 3 vertices of the surface and SetPt the 4th vertice onto the 0 coordinate in the Z-axis.

5) Successfully planarised the undevelopable surfaces.

6) Completed 2D surfaces of pavilion.

7) Experimenting with various diagramming methods.

8) Generating a Grasshopper script for displaying the approximate floor width.

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Appendix Process

9) Preview of floor area generated with GH.

10) GH script for calculating ceiling height.

11) Preview of ceiling height generated with GH.

12) Replicate staggered aluminium cladding using Pull command to project the curves in the surface normal direction.

13) Unroll pavilion and lay flat on ground plane. Determine the valley folds and mountain folds.

14) Create artifical lighting for shadow generating.

15) ViewCaptureToFile and bring into Adobe Photoshop.

16) Extract shadows using Levels.

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Appendix

Process

16) Make2D of isometrics and export linework as Adobe Illustrator file format.

17) Overlay linework and shadows. Control lineweights.

18) Use LivePaint to colour drawings according to GH preview.

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19) Layout in InDesign.


Appendix Bibliography

1. Serpentine Galleries. “Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2001 By Daniel Libeskind With Arup”. 2001. Accessed March 6, 2018. http://www.serpentinegalleries.org/exhibitionsevents/serpentine-gallery-pavilion-2001-daniel-libeskind-arup 2. Architizer. “Serpentine Gallery Pavilion With Daniel Libeskind”. 2001. Photograph. Accessed March 6, 2018. https://architizer.com/projects/serpentine-gallery-pavilionwith-daniel-libeskind/

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M1 Journal - Jee Hong Ng  
M1 Journal - Jee Hong Ng  
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